Australian cricket June 12, 2013

Australia's discipline problem runs deep

The David Warner incident is the latest in a string of discipline issues that have hit Australian cricket recently
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"Drink within your boundaries," said a pre-recorded Michael Clarke on the Edgbaston big screen a few moments before the match against New Zealand. It's possible he said it before the game on Saturday as well. Clarke is currently in London, getting intensive treatment on his back. Had he been in Birmingham, he may have been powerless to stop Warner from getting in trouble.

Despite what David Gower said, Australia does have culture, and at the moment that culture is toxic.

It's easy to overreact to a man punching an opponent a few hours after a game. Or even to take that one problem, and extrapolate it so that the system and all players are to blame. Young people today, eh. Wasn't like this in my day. These kids are running wild.

But Warner's punch isn't a one off for him, and many young Aussie players are doing things that are either blatantly stupid, or amazingly unprofessional way too often over the last couple of years. It's as if Australian cricket has turned into a giant crèche. Some of these things can be explained by Michael Hussey and Ricky Ponting retiring, but it's deeper than that, and was around even before they left.

Brad Haddin's recall to the side, despite his replacement Matthew Wade averaging pretty much the same, shows that CA knows there is a problem. But bringing back one father figure isn't enough, this problem runs deep.

In this team is Mitchell Marsh. Marsh arrived at the cricket academy out of shape, he was almost sent home straight away. Eventually he was kicked out for being unfit to train after a big night out. That was July last year. A few months later, in October, Marsh was left out of a Champions League match for Perth Scorchers because his 21st birthday celebrations meant he wasn't in a fit state to play. His brother Shaun Marsh was also dropped from that game for the same incident.

Their former Western Australian team-mate, Luke Pomersbach, was in trouble during IPL 2012 when he was detained by police for alleged assault. The case was eventually settled out of court. Pomersbach has more than enough batting talent to slip into any of the three Australian sides.

Allrounder Daniel Christian was suspended after damaging not one, or even two, but three separate changerooms during the last Sheffield Shield season. Christian was fined and warned during the first two incidents, but still committed the third act.

Shane Watson, Mitchell Johnson, James Pattinson and Usman Khawaja were suspended from one Test in India after they didn't provide any plans on how they or the team could improve. Watson, the then vice-captain, left the tour straight after the incident, for the birth of his child. That followed on from the World Twenty20, where a player was heard undermining the captain George Bailey to opposition players.

Young Queensland batsman Chris Lynn was fined for attacking the alleged victim in an assault case on Twitter. Saying "She should serve 2 months in jail for her make up! #booyah". Lynn later apologised and noted, "Violence against women is not acceptable and I'm sorry that my words could been seen to condone that." Even Shane Warne was running around the Big Bash League, throwing balls at people and making a fool of himself.

Now there is Warner. Before last weekend, Warner's off-field history was fairly minor. Some bad tweeting with Brett Geeves a few years back, rumours of a personal curfew, perhaps some skinfold issues and being sent home from the academy for untidiness are hardly crimes. And neither is arguing with some press on Twitter. Sure, as a contracted player he was stupid to swear, but I am sure many players and journalists have sworn at each other in bars without us ever having to know about it.

A punishment will not do. A punishment won't stop the cause. These players have been warned, fined and suspended; they are still making mistakes, still being unprofessional and still making it harder for Australia to win matches

This latest incident is not fully known. And in some ways it's barely an incident. It took days to hit the press. Joe Root's jaw is undamaged. Perhaps Warner had a few too many one quid vodka and redbulls at the wrong time of night and did something stupid. But he did try to punch an opposition player. It is far worse than breaking a door in a changeroom or failing to fill in some feedback reports.

In the past, events like this happened all the time. A player gets a bit stroppy when he goes out. A young player enjoys the good life a bit much. A player is involved in a late-night incident that he should've steered clear of. A player bad-mouths his captain.

In the 1970s, it would have been sorted out, and the player would now be doing after-dinner speaking about the good old days. On Sky talking about his days, which were fairly recent, Jason Gillespie said, "If you stepped out of line off the field, you got into strife from the captain and the coach."

So how has Australia regressed since then? How is that a potential captain of the Australian team, in CA's own words, can take a swing at another player? I don't expect James Sutherland to be standing in the bar making sure Warner doesn't do anything stupid.

Culture is not an easy thing to fix. But this has happened under CA's watch. It has happened after their Argus review. It is affecting their marketing off the field. It is affecting their performance on it. They must find the problems and fix them.

A punishment will not do. A punishment won't stop the cause. These players have been warned, fined and suspended; they are still making mistakes, still being unprofessional and still making it harder for Australia to win matches.

Ex-cricketers were quick to abuse Pat Howard and Mickey Arthur for treating players like school kids. But they're acting like them, consistently. It's time for CA to look at the what is wrong with their current crop of cricketers. Or what is wrong with CA itself. This is a team that is losing on the field, and losing off of it.

This is 2013, if you want to be the best team in the world, you can't afford to be anything but professional. South Africa is the best side in the world, they are the best behaved, led, managed and performed in the world. Their players don't get caught in scandals, their team just works as hard as it can to win every match. They even managed to improve while there was a scandal around their board.

This Australian set-up is not behaving, the leadership is not around, the management is not working and the team is not performing.

Point no. 4 on CA's new strategy for cricket to become Australia's leading sport is, "Provide world-class leadership and management and unify Australian Cricket". This is the time when CA proves that is not some lip service that looks good on a plaque in their offices.

Clarke has not attended any of Australia's games in this tournament. The only cricket he has attended was Shane Warne's charity match on Sunday in the Cotswolds, a couple of hours from London. Warner was also there.

After Warner's twitter moment, Clarke said to the press, "Davey has great potential to be a leader of the Australian cricket team, he's a wonderful guy, he's a wonderful player, I know he's learnt from this". That was only a few weeks back.

Whatever Warner did learn, it didn't seem to help him on early Sunday morning.

Jarrod Kimber is 50% of the Two Chucks, and the mind responsible for cricketwithballs.com

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • hhillbumper on June 14, 2013, 14:30 GMT

    they should just let him play.That should be punishment for everyone

  • on June 14, 2013, 12:53 GMT

    Warne, Warner... Hope there's no kid called Warnest out there!

  • Rajeshj on June 14, 2013, 8:31 GMT

    I think Australia can take a leaf out of the WI under Gibson.. they need to invest in a hard working captain like Sammy who has been quite successful in resurrecting the windies cricket.. they need to get rid of the Warner, Watto, Marsh's, Wade etc. and bring in honest (even if less talented) players like Bailey, Voges who strive hard to meet the needs.. Why is Wade or Hughes being persisted in spite of poor results.. Why do these Marsh's appear too often in the playing sheet when they have not played their part even in a single match.. And worst case is that of Watson, who scores in odd matches and then beams like a hulk.. the old Aussie culture is lost.. I think Clarke needs to step down as he is not fit for many matches and having stand-in captain like Bailey does more harm in affecting the discipline and focus of the squad..

  • scarab666 on June 14, 2013, 6:16 GMT

    Problems like Warner are easily solved........just tear up their contracts, its that simple. There are plenty of other cricketers out there who deserve a CA contract more than Warner but get overlooked because their marketability isn't like the Warners etc.....Australia are struggling for a good test opener yet England have a former Aussie in Sam Robson next in line to play for England and he's only 24, he's seen the writing on the wall in Australia and has chosen England....good luck to him.

  • ygkd on June 14, 2013, 6:14 GMT

    I don't understand the apologists' line on this issue. Complaining about the potential harm that enforcing behavioural standards could do to the team's on-field performance in the short-term is just that - short-term thinking. In the long-term, enforcing behavioural standards can only help the team's performance. The message that seems to have been steadily filtering all the way down the system in recent years is one of behavioural standards being largely irrelevant at times. Therefore, a culture sets in that is hard to control or change. We shouldn't have to groom U19 prospects to behave properly. But we do have to when their "good role models" are nothing of the sort. Sure, player behaviour has never been perfect, nor should we expect it to be. However, there must be a point where we say enough is enough and we should have reached that point a long, long time ago. If we had, then the current poor perfomances, & they are indeed sub-standard, might well be better. As they should be.

  • on June 14, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    what CA is doing is not good for Australian cricket....what Warner did was wrong but not to allow him taking part in any cricket up to Ashes is ridiculous.....currently he is the most attacking batsman in your team....the press is blowing everything out of proportions ....why Warner need to explain himself before the press ...warner apologized to Root for his act and Root accepted,end of topic....move ahead.Let him do what he does best that is play cricket ....some former players were making fun of him on Twitter ....this is not the way...you should guide young players not ridicule them on social media...

  • andrew-schulz on June 14, 2013, 3:27 GMT

    Do you think Wade's wicket-keeping may have just a little bit to do with Haddin being brought back?

  • on June 13, 2013, 21:41 GMT

    I don't really know what purpose the Argus Review is playing, in improving the state of cricket in Australia. I think the issue of discipline was always an old story with Cricket Australia. I think Ian Chappell, Allan Border and Steve Waugh, were great individuals both on and off the field when they played. I think the problem started when Ricky Ponting came on the scene, coz he had drinking problems at the start of his career. Shane Warne was also quite controversial off the field, and did his long-term captaincy chances no good really.

    But, in the late 1990's and in the 2000's, before the Argus Review came about, Australia were winning continuously, and Cricket Australia tolerated the bad and indisciplined behaviour of the players, and overlooked these issues. Then Mr. Andrew Symonds came on the scene, and he started misbehaving too, and then the cracks started to appear. But now these cracks have widened, and Cricket Australia is in a real pickle now, which is a real pity.

  • Big_Maxy_Walker on June 13, 2013, 15:15 GMT

    The questions put to Warner should be, why is he out boozing at 2am? Mitch Marsh was there and hasn't learnt his lesson obviously. The incident took days to hit the headlines and Warner was back there boozing the next day as well. They are there representing their country, not on a holiday. If I go anywhere as a rep of the company I work for, I have to behave myself at all times. Warner is 26 and not a kid anymore. No more Ashes for him

  • PWJohnno on June 13, 2013, 13:57 GMT

    Cricket used to be a game for introverts - five days matches, 8 ball overs, fifty yard runs etc. Plenty of time to think about things - the last ball, the field placement, the next shot, the state of the game etc. In the short forms of the game there is not time to think - just play the next shot. Suddenly it's a game for extroverts - but off the field we want them to suddenly become introverts. The problems talked about here are not character deficiencies, just character traits. When Ian Botham wanted to fight Ian Chappel, it wasn't worth making a fuss over, but now such an event is an indication of something wrong with the culture of the team becuase this sort of thing happens a lot - I would argue its because of the changing nature of the player population. Perhaps they should just leave the kid alone - he's twenty something, he will grow better judgement but he'll always be an extrovert who sometimes reacts immmediately to external events, just like he does to a bad ball.

  • hhillbumper on June 14, 2013, 14:30 GMT

    they should just let him play.That should be punishment for everyone

  • on June 14, 2013, 12:53 GMT

    Warne, Warner... Hope there's no kid called Warnest out there!

  • Rajeshj on June 14, 2013, 8:31 GMT

    I think Australia can take a leaf out of the WI under Gibson.. they need to invest in a hard working captain like Sammy who has been quite successful in resurrecting the windies cricket.. they need to get rid of the Warner, Watto, Marsh's, Wade etc. and bring in honest (even if less talented) players like Bailey, Voges who strive hard to meet the needs.. Why is Wade or Hughes being persisted in spite of poor results.. Why do these Marsh's appear too often in the playing sheet when they have not played their part even in a single match.. And worst case is that of Watson, who scores in odd matches and then beams like a hulk.. the old Aussie culture is lost.. I think Clarke needs to step down as he is not fit for many matches and having stand-in captain like Bailey does more harm in affecting the discipline and focus of the squad..

  • scarab666 on June 14, 2013, 6:16 GMT

    Problems like Warner are easily solved........just tear up their contracts, its that simple. There are plenty of other cricketers out there who deserve a CA contract more than Warner but get overlooked because their marketability isn't like the Warners etc.....Australia are struggling for a good test opener yet England have a former Aussie in Sam Robson next in line to play for England and he's only 24, he's seen the writing on the wall in Australia and has chosen England....good luck to him.

  • ygkd on June 14, 2013, 6:14 GMT

    I don't understand the apologists' line on this issue. Complaining about the potential harm that enforcing behavioural standards could do to the team's on-field performance in the short-term is just that - short-term thinking. In the long-term, enforcing behavioural standards can only help the team's performance. The message that seems to have been steadily filtering all the way down the system in recent years is one of behavioural standards being largely irrelevant at times. Therefore, a culture sets in that is hard to control or change. We shouldn't have to groom U19 prospects to behave properly. But we do have to when their "good role models" are nothing of the sort. Sure, player behaviour has never been perfect, nor should we expect it to be. However, there must be a point where we say enough is enough and we should have reached that point a long, long time ago. If we had, then the current poor perfomances, & they are indeed sub-standard, might well be better. As they should be.

  • on June 14, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    what CA is doing is not good for Australian cricket....what Warner did was wrong but not to allow him taking part in any cricket up to Ashes is ridiculous.....currently he is the most attacking batsman in your team....the press is blowing everything out of proportions ....why Warner need to explain himself before the press ...warner apologized to Root for his act and Root accepted,end of topic....move ahead.Let him do what he does best that is play cricket ....some former players were making fun of him on Twitter ....this is not the way...you should guide young players not ridicule them on social media...

  • andrew-schulz on June 14, 2013, 3:27 GMT

    Do you think Wade's wicket-keeping may have just a little bit to do with Haddin being brought back?

  • on June 13, 2013, 21:41 GMT

    I don't really know what purpose the Argus Review is playing, in improving the state of cricket in Australia. I think the issue of discipline was always an old story with Cricket Australia. I think Ian Chappell, Allan Border and Steve Waugh, were great individuals both on and off the field when they played. I think the problem started when Ricky Ponting came on the scene, coz he had drinking problems at the start of his career. Shane Warne was also quite controversial off the field, and did his long-term captaincy chances no good really.

    But, in the late 1990's and in the 2000's, before the Argus Review came about, Australia were winning continuously, and Cricket Australia tolerated the bad and indisciplined behaviour of the players, and overlooked these issues. Then Mr. Andrew Symonds came on the scene, and he started misbehaving too, and then the cracks started to appear. But now these cracks have widened, and Cricket Australia is in a real pickle now, which is a real pity.

  • Big_Maxy_Walker on June 13, 2013, 15:15 GMT

    The questions put to Warner should be, why is he out boozing at 2am? Mitch Marsh was there and hasn't learnt his lesson obviously. The incident took days to hit the headlines and Warner was back there boozing the next day as well. They are there representing their country, not on a holiday. If I go anywhere as a rep of the company I work for, I have to behave myself at all times. Warner is 26 and not a kid anymore. No more Ashes for him

  • PWJohnno on June 13, 2013, 13:57 GMT

    Cricket used to be a game for introverts - five days matches, 8 ball overs, fifty yard runs etc. Plenty of time to think about things - the last ball, the field placement, the next shot, the state of the game etc. In the short forms of the game there is not time to think - just play the next shot. Suddenly it's a game for extroverts - but off the field we want them to suddenly become introverts. The problems talked about here are not character deficiencies, just character traits. When Ian Botham wanted to fight Ian Chappel, it wasn't worth making a fuss over, but now such an event is an indication of something wrong with the culture of the team becuase this sort of thing happens a lot - I would argue its because of the changing nature of the player population. Perhaps they should just leave the kid alone - he's twenty something, he will grow better judgement but he'll always be an extrovert who sometimes reacts immmediately to external events, just like he does to a bad ball.

  • hmmmmm... on June 13, 2013, 13:45 GMT

    Blessing in disguise - how can you not pick rogers to open when he has scored over 700 runs in the last two months in county cricket and warner has scored....not much in anything for as long as I can remember.

    Holding your own when a few words are exchanged on the field is one thing but to take your aggression to the next level is a sign of a frustrated player who thinks that bullying is a better avenue than his batting to express himself - that is a big issue for a 'test opener'!

  • on June 13, 2013, 10:42 GMT

    The article clearly tells why the australian cricket is losing its position. The boozing and partying habits of aussie players is leting them down. there have been such problems before but the players involved have come up strongly showing the responsibility and talent. Punter and Roy are good examples. there captains also backed them knowing the kind of talent and addition they can be for the team. the new breed must learn quickly from these incidents and also from the past else the australian cricket will be in danger.

  • GeorgeGM on June 13, 2013, 10:36 GMT

    "Giant Creche' is a phrase that resonates with me. Cricket is a team game, but is also highly individualistic as it requires being able to think on your feet and work thinks out for yourself. You're on your own when you open the batting or bowling with a hostile crowd and opposition in attendance. But now there are team hangers on for just about anything. Surely there is therefore a danger of players, even if only subconsciously, starting to rely on other people and not themselves. Plus being part of such a large elaborate (unnecessary??) set up can swell their own sense of importance. We don't want angels - we want players who are ready to perform when it counts- and most of that comes from the inner self.

  • CricketMaan on June 13, 2013, 10:25 GMT

    Like Symonds, a lot these players will end up chosing adhoc T20 leagues rather than playing for thier board, nation and face all this too much scrutiny!!

  • Harlequin. on June 13, 2013, 8:40 GMT

    I dunno about this issue - on the one hand, these incidents sound like almost every club team I have played for so they are not really that shocking or disappointing. I also think that these incidents have been going on fairly regularly throughout the years in international cricket and the current Aus team is no worse than many teams in the past.

    On the other hand, yes this is a professional age with massive media (conventional and social) coverage and the players should act more responsibly than they have in the past, especially considering the money they are paid now. This is easy to do when you are winning, but when you are losing then you need to be able to step back and think about the situation a little more, and this is where the problem lies. Cricketers now are trained to be machines, on the park and particularly in the press conferences where thinking for yourself is discouraged, so brainless incidents like this from Warner are sort of to be expected.

  • Tom_Bowler on June 13, 2013, 7:29 GMT

    "Warner is the most awesome talent that Australia have produced since Watson"

    Everyone knows Australian cricket is a sick old dog, the statement above proves it's time to put that dog down.

  • YorkshirePudding on June 13, 2013, 7:29 GMT

    @Un_Citoyen_Indien, I think you might dfind that Symonds was reprimanded in 2005, and sent home in 2009 after disobeying team regulations. Warne always managed to stay on the 'right' side of the line.

    The others you mention, Lillee, Hughes, were all from a different era, where the game was different, who else remembers players like Gooch, Gower trundling up doing impersonations of bowlers in the last overs of a final day where the game was dead, and heading to a draw, can anyone see that happening in modern cricket?

  • _Australian_ on June 13, 2013, 7:16 GMT

    These minor altercations have in the past and are currently happening throughout all cricketing nations. It is the press that makes a bigger issue of these things, demanding conduct befitting a pope and in turn acting like they never do anything wrong and have a right to interrupt private lives. In this instance Warner apologised to Root and Root accepted that apology, case closed. To me both Warner's recent indiscretions are hardly even newsworthy let alone having any affect on his cricket. He was not underprepared for a game or miss training so why CA needs to punish him is beyond me. The only positive of this is perhaps he will be sent home from a coupe of series he really should not have been picked for due to form.

  • Clyde on June 13, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    Cricket has such pretensions, with its Lords and Long Rooms. I don't see how tennis is so wrong in its apparent decency. The difference is that tennis players express themselves, taking it out, but just out, not on others. Their characters are shown in close-up. Perhaps it is time for Australian cricket to pay attention to grace in a player. In the end, we, the spectators, may just not like many of the people we are presented with. What is the cause of all the misery, when it is a game?

  • tests_the_best on June 13, 2013, 5:41 GMT

    Australian cricket needs to get its act together, off field and on it. Degradation in cricket standards in any country is bad for the game as a whole. A year or so earlier after India's twin whitewashes, there were a lot of comments from non-Indian fans as well saying that a strong India is important for world cricket. Same goes for Australia, last thing you want is another mighty cricketing nation going the way of West Indies cricket.

  • OneEyedAussie on June 13, 2013, 4:22 GMT

    There is a discipline issue - there is no denying that. However, the problems with discipline are really secondary to team performance. If you think about it, few ever complained about the woeful off-field actions of guys like Warne and Boon because they always performed on the field. The causal link between tightening discipline and improved performance is unestablished as a universal. Works in some cases, not in others - it is not a magic bullet to fix the problems of Australia cricket.

  • sid.cmu on June 13, 2013, 3:35 GMT

    There is hope. If he can only learn from Ponting. The similarities are there. Young, oodles of talent, hot headed. This is a link to an incident when punter got into a brawl. http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/story/80026.html . To think that he came from that to being such a fantastic leader embodying those much vaunted qualities of humility, taking responsibility and leading by example. It's perhaps already time that punter is back in the CA setup in some capacity. They have such a fine mentor in their own backyard.

  • Sanj747 on June 13, 2013, 3:12 GMT

    Bang on Kimber. Problem runs deep into the fact that no one in CA acknowledges the problem.

  • JoeStinger on June 13, 2013, 2:27 GMT

    Good we have identified the symptoms, so what is really behind this culture in the Australian team which is leading to loss on and off the field? What are the reasons for Australia not demonstrating professionalism?

  • BuggleBoy on June 13, 2013, 1:58 GMT

    Fantastic article. Time for CA to wake up and make some tough calls including amending their own behaviour else what David Gower said the other day stands true.. Shame on Australia- on field and off field

  • Un_Citoyen_Indien on June 13, 2013, 1:52 GMT

    Oh come now, suspending Warner is hardly the solution to a testosterone fuelled bar brawl in which both parties were probably guilty of verbo-physical provocation. Warner is the most awesome talent that Australia have produced since Watson, bar none. I fear that this punishment coupled with the other one he received recently for his twitter outburst will only serve to demoralise a young man who wears his heart on his sleeve. Sad and potentially such a waste of brilliant, raw talent. It does truly seem as if the Aussie cricketing establishment doesn't really care for it's future champions.

    Ask yourselves this question: "Were Ponting, Symonds, Warne, Lillee and M. Hughes all that different"? How can anyone forget that infamous episode on live TV involving Lillee and Javed Miandad? Surely that incident was far, far worse than what Warner's involved in now.

    It's upto the Oz fans to stand behind Davey Warner during times such as these.....

  • cvam on June 13, 2013, 1:14 GMT

    Point 1,2 and 3 are that they make most of their money thru IPL, they (non ECB players) don't consider any cricket board as their 'bread providers' hence they do not care about bringing disrepute to their nation's cricket board. IPL is now on shaky grounds, hopefully it fades away starting next year and cricket returns to what it was. And I say this as an Indian who used to enjoy parts of the IPL and who was ceaselessly amused by the poms getting their drawers in a bunch over the IPL.

  • Maxifan on June 13, 2013, 1:12 GMT

    And George Bailey is a good honest captain.

  • Maxifan on June 13, 2013, 0:56 GMT

    Don't tar all Australian cricketers with the same brush. The majority are behaving themselves and doing the best they can. It's leadership that's lacking.

  • on June 12, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    When a team is winning this type of thing is usually dismissed, if it gets noted at all. 'Take the mongrel out of him and he wouldn't be the same player' is the phrase that gets trotted out in defence of errant stars, and not just in cricket.

    Australia's problem is that, at the moment, they're a poor side. Which means offences like Warner's are treated seriously. The press look for ways to link off-field problems to on-field ones so they can dig out the 'crisis' headlines. Coaches and management come down hard on offenders because they're desperate to show that there is no such link and that they do have some semblance of control.

    The question has to be asked though: are Australia poor on the field partly because there is no discipline behind the scenes? And if so, is that because some players don't respect the captain and / or coach? Knowing what we do about the 'homework' fiasco and the bringing back of Haddin as VC, the answer to both of those appears to be yes.

  • on June 12, 2013, 22:56 GMT

    Whenever -mostly during India's infamous losses in 2011/12 at Eng/Aus- the Eng and Aus players sledged the Indian players invariably in a real ugly manner, they said "This is the new generation. This is part and parcel of cricket. Deal with it". For a change, I guess it is time now for them to deal with their own ways. Looks like their cannon misfired back at them. On contrary, Indian cricketers don't fare well either. Perhaps the most indisciplined was Sreesanth. It is good that he is out of proportions now. Others like Harbhajan and Kohli have to change too. Someone like Kohli may 1 day evolve into a great player. If he continues with his current attitude though, he will not only be debasing himself, but also his country's honor in the International arena. The best way is to look at examples. There is a certain individual who is part of this same Indian Team for nearly 24 years now. There is still a debate if he is the greatest or not. But, has his discipline ever come into question?

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on June 12, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    This is a good article. Despicably bad behavior crops up yet again for Oz, they're so terrified of losing the B2B Ashes that the wheels are definitely coming off. Send Warner the Walking Anderson Wicket home.

  • correctcall on June 12, 2013, 21:35 GMT

    An Aussie coach would be the place to start.

  • on June 12, 2013, 20:11 GMT

    Point 4? Why not Point 1? Maybe it will be now ...

  • on June 12, 2013, 18:51 GMT

    All teams have their discipline problems. This is not limited to Australia, and not just restricted to on-the-field "heat of the moment" things either.

    Things like this are a fact of life. Punishments are necessary to keep people in line as much as possible, but sport is not separate from life in general, and as such, it is not free of life's problems. Indignant rage and bafflement are all well and good, but so would be a little realism. Yours, an England fan.

  • Chris_Howard on June 12, 2013, 18:41 GMT

    I think we forget one R. Ponting got suspended from the Australian team for some fisticuffs during a night out in Kings Cross, Sydney, when he was young. And he went on to captain Australia. Michael Clarke got into a serious altercation with his own team mate (Katich). He also went on to captain Australia.

    And just like CA didn't crucify the young Ponting (though a fair bit of the media did) or Clarke, CA shouldn't be crucifying Warner.

    However, standards and expectations are even higher now and he has had a few incidents lately where he's snapped. This in itself suggests he's under a lot of stress about something and maybe it's time the team psychologist sat him down and asked him what the heck is eating away at him at the moment.

  • Hillaire on June 12, 2013, 18:38 GMT

    Excellent article I agree with every word. However as an England fan I hope they don't get their house in order any time soon!

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  • Hillaire on June 12, 2013, 18:38 GMT

    Excellent article I agree with every word. However as an England fan I hope they don't get their house in order any time soon!

  • Chris_Howard on June 12, 2013, 18:41 GMT

    I think we forget one R. Ponting got suspended from the Australian team for some fisticuffs during a night out in Kings Cross, Sydney, when he was young. And he went on to captain Australia. Michael Clarke got into a serious altercation with his own team mate (Katich). He also went on to captain Australia.

    And just like CA didn't crucify the young Ponting (though a fair bit of the media did) or Clarke, CA shouldn't be crucifying Warner.

    However, standards and expectations are even higher now and he has had a few incidents lately where he's snapped. This in itself suggests he's under a lot of stress about something and maybe it's time the team psychologist sat him down and asked him what the heck is eating away at him at the moment.

  • on June 12, 2013, 18:51 GMT

    All teams have their discipline problems. This is not limited to Australia, and not just restricted to on-the-field "heat of the moment" things either.

    Things like this are a fact of life. Punishments are necessary to keep people in line as much as possible, but sport is not separate from life in general, and as such, it is not free of life's problems. Indignant rage and bafflement are all well and good, but so would be a little realism. Yours, an England fan.

  • on June 12, 2013, 20:11 GMT

    Point 4? Why not Point 1? Maybe it will be now ...

  • correctcall on June 12, 2013, 21:35 GMT

    An Aussie coach would be the place to start.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on June 12, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    This is a good article. Despicably bad behavior crops up yet again for Oz, they're so terrified of losing the B2B Ashes that the wheels are definitely coming off. Send Warner the Walking Anderson Wicket home.

  • on June 12, 2013, 22:56 GMT

    Whenever -mostly during India's infamous losses in 2011/12 at Eng/Aus- the Eng and Aus players sledged the Indian players invariably in a real ugly manner, they said "This is the new generation. This is part and parcel of cricket. Deal with it". For a change, I guess it is time now for them to deal with their own ways. Looks like their cannon misfired back at them. On contrary, Indian cricketers don't fare well either. Perhaps the most indisciplined was Sreesanth. It is good that he is out of proportions now. Others like Harbhajan and Kohli have to change too. Someone like Kohli may 1 day evolve into a great player. If he continues with his current attitude though, he will not only be debasing himself, but also his country's honor in the International arena. The best way is to look at examples. There is a certain individual who is part of this same Indian Team for nearly 24 years now. There is still a debate if he is the greatest or not. But, has his discipline ever come into question?

  • on June 12, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    When a team is winning this type of thing is usually dismissed, if it gets noted at all. 'Take the mongrel out of him and he wouldn't be the same player' is the phrase that gets trotted out in defence of errant stars, and not just in cricket.

    Australia's problem is that, at the moment, they're a poor side. Which means offences like Warner's are treated seriously. The press look for ways to link off-field problems to on-field ones so they can dig out the 'crisis' headlines. Coaches and management come down hard on offenders because they're desperate to show that there is no such link and that they do have some semblance of control.

    The question has to be asked though: are Australia poor on the field partly because there is no discipline behind the scenes? And if so, is that because some players don't respect the captain and / or coach? Knowing what we do about the 'homework' fiasco and the bringing back of Haddin as VC, the answer to both of those appears to be yes.

  • Maxifan on June 13, 2013, 0:56 GMT

    Don't tar all Australian cricketers with the same brush. The majority are behaving themselves and doing the best they can. It's leadership that's lacking.

  • Maxifan on June 13, 2013, 1:12 GMT

    And George Bailey is a good honest captain.