England v Australia, 5th Investec Test, The Oval August 22, 2013

Lehmann fined for Broad comments

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The ICC has fined Australia's coach, Darren Lehmann, over his comments that Stuart Broad had blatantly cheated in failing to walk when he edged Ashton Agar during the first Investec Test at Trent Bridge. Lehmann has been fined 20% of his match fee for the final Test over the interview with the Australian radio station Triple M this week, in which he also said he hoped spectators would "give it to" Broad during the upcoming Ashes series in Australia.

Lehmann pleaded guilty to breaching Article 2.1.7 of the ICC Code of Conduct, which relates to "public criticism of, or inappropriate comment in relation to an incident occurring in an international match or any player, player support personnel, match official or team participating in any international match."

The ICC chief executive, David Richardson, laid the charge and on Thursday night, Lehmann admitted the offence and accepted the sanction proposed by the match referee Roshan Mahanama, who is overseeing the ongoing Test at The Oval.

"Whilst noting the context and nature of the comments made, showing mutual respect for one's fellow professionals - including for coaches, players and match officials - is a cornerstone of how we play the game," Richardson said.

During the radio interview, Lehmann was asked about the incident from the first Test in which Broad edged and the catch was taken at first slip after deflecting off the wicketkeeper Brad Haddin. Lehmann said it was a case of cheating on the part of Broad.

"Certainly our players haven't forgotten, they're calling him everything under the sun as they go past," Lehmann said in the interview. "I hope the Australian public are the same because that was just blatant cheating. I don't advocate walking but when you hit it to first slip it's pretty hard."

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 2:18 GMT

    Seems fair enough. Some people are defending Lehmann by saying that the whole interview/conversation was light-hearted but, even if that's the case, an international coach has no business publicly calling an opposition player a cheat unless he has some genuine evidence to back up the allegation. If it was light-hearted then to say that Broad had some gall to stand his ground when everyone on the field but the umpire knew he'd edged it would have been quite acceptable, because it's absolutely the case. To say that it's cheating not to walk if you get an obvious edge but not when you know for a fact that you've got a thin edge is ridiculous and akin to saying that it's OK to drive drunk as long as you don't get caught. Lehmann was clearly stirring the pot because Australia have done poorly but he chose a very inappropriate way to do it. I guess he's not qualified to tell David Warner what he can and can't say publicly. Michael Clarke would be a far better role model for that.

  • banglabangdu on August 25, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    I am surprised the Aussies has these attitudes to not walking towards Broad. Considering if an umpire does not give you out you dont have to leave field of play. Sad situation is Aussies dont walk either only player is Gilchrist. Now its not against the spirit of the game for not walking, batsmen are well within their rights to stand their ground until the umpire raises the finger or crooked finger (Billy Bowden). As to DRS some teams are successful at reviewing and some are not and it just comes down to practice of using DRS. Australians wasted reviews and when it was actually needed, they didnt have any left. I think something new is always open to criticism but the ICC's efforts in making it a fair game and giving justice when its due is good. Some players like Watson wastes reviews which would have been helpful for Rogers in that test. Throughout this summer for some reason the umpires have been making some howlers of decisions. Whether in CPL, FLT20 or Ashes that needs review.

  • Harmony111 on August 23, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    @Samdanh: Lol, you talking about DRS as if it creates no new fuss of its own. If I was a DRS fan the present times would be my quietest times. But here you are, blowing the DRS trumpet yet again even when you know (or perhaps you don't know) how several die hard DRS fans have become either DRS neutral or anti-DRS during the current Ashes.

    A 2nd reading of your comment shows one more flaw there. Why should Indian fans keep quiet even if India had had some lucky ones going their way? Is that +1-1=0 kind of maths according to you? Historically, India has been subjected to a no of umpiring shockers, decisions which won't have been given for anyone else have gone against India. A half-half lbw shout being given not out for an Ind batsman or out for an Ind bowler isn't quite an equalizer to those shockers.

    But why should Ind fans keep quiet? Why can't they demand better umpiring? Btw, the original demand after Sydney08 was that of Improved Umpiring not that of using unreliable tools.

  • swarzi on August 23, 2013, 20:00 GMT

    Darren should appeal this nonsense! Imagine Stuart Broad "late cut" a ball "from the middle of his bat" onto the pads of Wicket Keeper Haddin; Michael Clarke took a legitimate catch, but Broad still stood his ground! The Australians taking his action for a joke appealed, just as a gesture of formality, only to find to their amazement that the umpire did not send Mr Broad! There was a worldwide outcry of dishonesty against Mr Broad - even the Australian PM weighed in regarding the bizarre nature of the incident! Mr Broad knew the sensitiveness of the issue, yet bragged that "he knew he hit it", in a public interview, thus, putting fire to fury! The ICC knowing all this did absolutely nothing to Mr Broad! But now, because Coach Lehman has expressed his feelings on the matter, the ICC see it fit to penalize him! Can't happen! I think we should couple this with what would be an unfair treatment of Danesh Ramdin (if Broad is not penalized) and seek for a inquiry into the conduct of the ICC.

  • Scrop on August 23, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    Good that ICC has taken the right step in letting the game be more respectful.

    But why is ICC selective in punishing ?? ICC be more proactive!! If you want to not have such incidents in future ban the coach for the rest of the series or ban him for the next series/tour, let the assistants take the charge.

  • LeeHallam on August 23, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    Jason83: Australia probably would have won if it had not rained at Old Trafford, but it is too much to say that they would have ,for sure. England were only 3 wickets down! If Broad had walked or be given out, then perhaps they would have won at Trent Bridge, but if Agar had been given out stumped as he should have, then Australia would have been nowhere near England. As for Durham, Australia got into a good position, but in the end were not good enough to finish it off. England won by 74 runs which is quite comfortable, and Lords was a disaster for the Aussies. It is fair to say that the sides have been much closer than in 2010/11, and that Australia have got better. The problem is that they are building on their older players; Rogers, Haddin, Clarke and Harris. Will any of them still be there for the next tour of England?

  • Jason83 on August 23, 2013, 15:48 GMT

    i really to feel that england have been luck this series. If there had been no rain Australia would have one def one test. Also if Broad have had walked they would have won the first test. That automatically two tests to Australia. And if Australia had have shown at least 10% fight in the last test that could have been different too. I just hope English supporters have the courage to admit that they have far from dominated this series.

  • Jason83 on August 23, 2013, 15:09 GMT

    i really to feel that england have been luck this series. If there had been no rain Australia would have one def one test. Also if Broad have had walked they would have won the first test. That automatically two tests to Australia. And if Australia had have shown at least 10% fight in the last test that could have been different too. I just hope English supporters have the courage to admit that they have far from dominated this series.

  • InnocentGuy on August 23, 2013, 14:07 GMT

    @Samdanh, India has been at the receiving side of incidents like Broad's many times. And India is not wrong in opposing DRS, which now even the other teams that are using are beginning to grow sick of. By the way, no one's cribbing about those howlers, just reminding Lehmann to stop using double standards.

  • CustomKid on August 23, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    jmcilhinney on (August 23, 2013, 6:00 GMT) - nasty is perhaps the wrong term. I want a team that doesn't give an inch, who are aggressive, have a win at all costs mentality and are in your face and never back down.

    Tell me the windies circa 1970-80-90 didn't try and knock players heads off. Plenty of broken jaws during that era. Despite their gentle nature they got nasty. The Aussies from 93-2005 were tough sobs who gave nothing, we don't have anyone like that anymore in the current Aus team. I'm hoping Lehmann installs some of that back into this current side.

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 2:18 GMT

    Seems fair enough. Some people are defending Lehmann by saying that the whole interview/conversation was light-hearted but, even if that's the case, an international coach has no business publicly calling an opposition player a cheat unless he has some genuine evidence to back up the allegation. If it was light-hearted then to say that Broad had some gall to stand his ground when everyone on the field but the umpire knew he'd edged it would have been quite acceptable, because it's absolutely the case. To say that it's cheating not to walk if you get an obvious edge but not when you know for a fact that you've got a thin edge is ridiculous and akin to saying that it's OK to drive drunk as long as you don't get caught. Lehmann was clearly stirring the pot because Australia have done poorly but he chose a very inappropriate way to do it. I guess he's not qualified to tell David Warner what he can and can't say publicly. Michael Clarke would be a far better role model for that.

  • banglabangdu on August 25, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    I am surprised the Aussies has these attitudes to not walking towards Broad. Considering if an umpire does not give you out you dont have to leave field of play. Sad situation is Aussies dont walk either only player is Gilchrist. Now its not against the spirit of the game for not walking, batsmen are well within their rights to stand their ground until the umpire raises the finger or crooked finger (Billy Bowden). As to DRS some teams are successful at reviewing and some are not and it just comes down to practice of using DRS. Australians wasted reviews and when it was actually needed, they didnt have any left. I think something new is always open to criticism but the ICC's efforts in making it a fair game and giving justice when its due is good. Some players like Watson wastes reviews which would have been helpful for Rogers in that test. Throughout this summer for some reason the umpires have been making some howlers of decisions. Whether in CPL, FLT20 or Ashes that needs review.

  • Harmony111 on August 23, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    @Samdanh: Lol, you talking about DRS as if it creates no new fuss of its own. If I was a DRS fan the present times would be my quietest times. But here you are, blowing the DRS trumpet yet again even when you know (or perhaps you don't know) how several die hard DRS fans have become either DRS neutral or anti-DRS during the current Ashes.

    A 2nd reading of your comment shows one more flaw there. Why should Indian fans keep quiet even if India had had some lucky ones going their way? Is that +1-1=0 kind of maths according to you? Historically, India has been subjected to a no of umpiring shockers, decisions which won't have been given for anyone else have gone against India. A half-half lbw shout being given not out for an Ind batsman or out for an Ind bowler isn't quite an equalizer to those shockers.

    But why should Ind fans keep quiet? Why can't they demand better umpiring? Btw, the original demand after Sydney08 was that of Improved Umpiring not that of using unreliable tools.

  • swarzi on August 23, 2013, 20:00 GMT

    Darren should appeal this nonsense! Imagine Stuart Broad "late cut" a ball "from the middle of his bat" onto the pads of Wicket Keeper Haddin; Michael Clarke took a legitimate catch, but Broad still stood his ground! The Australians taking his action for a joke appealed, just as a gesture of formality, only to find to their amazement that the umpire did not send Mr Broad! There was a worldwide outcry of dishonesty against Mr Broad - even the Australian PM weighed in regarding the bizarre nature of the incident! Mr Broad knew the sensitiveness of the issue, yet bragged that "he knew he hit it", in a public interview, thus, putting fire to fury! The ICC knowing all this did absolutely nothing to Mr Broad! But now, because Coach Lehman has expressed his feelings on the matter, the ICC see it fit to penalize him! Can't happen! I think we should couple this with what would be an unfair treatment of Danesh Ramdin (if Broad is not penalized) and seek for a inquiry into the conduct of the ICC.

  • Scrop on August 23, 2013, 18:54 GMT

    Good that ICC has taken the right step in letting the game be more respectful.

    But why is ICC selective in punishing ?? ICC be more proactive!! If you want to not have such incidents in future ban the coach for the rest of the series or ban him for the next series/tour, let the assistants take the charge.

  • LeeHallam on August 23, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    Jason83: Australia probably would have won if it had not rained at Old Trafford, but it is too much to say that they would have ,for sure. England were only 3 wickets down! If Broad had walked or be given out, then perhaps they would have won at Trent Bridge, but if Agar had been given out stumped as he should have, then Australia would have been nowhere near England. As for Durham, Australia got into a good position, but in the end were not good enough to finish it off. England won by 74 runs which is quite comfortable, and Lords was a disaster for the Aussies. It is fair to say that the sides have been much closer than in 2010/11, and that Australia have got better. The problem is that they are building on their older players; Rogers, Haddin, Clarke and Harris. Will any of them still be there for the next tour of England?

  • Jason83 on August 23, 2013, 15:48 GMT

    i really to feel that england have been luck this series. If there had been no rain Australia would have one def one test. Also if Broad have had walked they would have won the first test. That automatically two tests to Australia. And if Australia had have shown at least 10% fight in the last test that could have been different too. I just hope English supporters have the courage to admit that they have far from dominated this series.

  • Jason83 on August 23, 2013, 15:09 GMT

    i really to feel that england have been luck this series. If there had been no rain Australia would have one def one test. Also if Broad have had walked they would have won the first test. That automatically two tests to Australia. And if Australia had have shown at least 10% fight in the last test that could have been different too. I just hope English supporters have the courage to admit that they have far from dominated this series.

  • InnocentGuy on August 23, 2013, 14:07 GMT

    @Samdanh, India has been at the receiving side of incidents like Broad's many times. And India is not wrong in opposing DRS, which now even the other teams that are using are beginning to grow sick of. By the way, no one's cribbing about those howlers, just reminding Lehmann to stop using double standards.

  • CustomKid on August 23, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    jmcilhinney on (August 23, 2013, 6:00 GMT) - nasty is perhaps the wrong term. I want a team that doesn't give an inch, who are aggressive, have a win at all costs mentality and are in your face and never back down.

    Tell me the windies circa 1970-80-90 didn't try and knock players heads off. Plenty of broken jaws during that era. Despite their gentle nature they got nasty. The Aussies from 93-2005 were tough sobs who gave nothing, we don't have anyone like that anymore in the current Aus team. I'm hoping Lehmann installs some of that back into this current side.

  • sparth on August 23, 2013, 12:14 GMT

    Im surprised the ICC actually fined him for this when there have been many other situations where players have "publicly criticised". One is reminded of Broad's incident against VVS Laxman when India came to tour in 2011

  • on August 23, 2013, 10:46 GMT

    Don't really see the issue myself -sounded very tongue-in-cheek and was having some fun . The Aussie crowd will pillar Broad just as the Barmy Army pillared Mitchell Johnson ........ id rather the ICC was more concerned with ridiculous over rates and sorting out the DRS, making all test playing nations use it and make it more effective ....

  • 5wombats on August 23, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    Good. He's had his knuckles rapped. Perhaps he'll stop mouthing off now, although I doubt it.

  • mcheckley on August 23, 2013, 9:03 GMT

    I am surprised that so reputable a person as Lehmann has used this vocabulary. He is entitled to disapprove of Broad's conduct. Others also might; I daresay the late Christopher Martin-Jenkins would disapprove most strongly. But "cheating" is a very strong and very specific word. Surely it is not "cheating" to stand one's ground and seek to take advantage of a potential umpiring error? "Cheating", as I understand the term, implies active deception - examples would be to apply a covering to one's bat to seek to deceive hotspot from picking up an ebge, or interfering with the condition of the ball to an extent beyond that permitted by the Laws, in the hope that it will swing more or spin more or otherwise misbehave to the bowler's advantage - that's "cheating". Accepting the benefit of umpiring / DRS mistakes benefiting the batsman is surely not "cheating", and particularly as one has no choice when the error goes the other way

  • shirl on August 23, 2013, 8:07 GMT

    Humm Boof fined...Richardson states "showing mutual respect for one's fellow professionals - including for coaches, players and match officials ", correct if I'm wrong, but why was no one fined when all players walked off the field before the umpire had declared batsman out & ended play?? Isn't that disrepectful? Seems like yet another inconsistency in this Ashes series.......

  • disco_bob on August 23, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    @CustomKid, it's true I don't know Boof's character, but seriously the Broad incident is simply not worth mentioning at all because it was in fact Broad having a laugh at the ridiculous wasted DRS appeals. Being tough is not about whinging at bad DRS calls, especially when we had plenty of opportunities to win a couple of these matches. Also Hughes has been handled abominably by Lehmann not to mention not playing Lyon after two years planning just compounded the their error in India.

  • Samdanh on August 23, 2013, 7:39 GMT

    To all India fans: Do not keep whinging about umpiring decisions when some of those decisions went in favour to your team too in cricket history. You cannot keep cribbing on umpiring when you get a fair share of benefits through wrong decisions; and more importantly when you, your team and your board continues to be against DRS while most playing countries are playing using DRS. One should wait and see how you people react when your team is at the receiving end of such howlers by umpires, and such incidents like the one involving Broad. Looking forward to be reading through this site when your country team happens to tour SA, Eng and Aus in the near future!!

  • venkatesh018 on August 23, 2013, 6:40 GMT

    The ICC certainly gets its act right in these major cricketing matters. The minor ones like the UDRS and imbalance in FTP tours between nations, they leave it for the member boards to decide.

  • disco_bob on August 23, 2013, 6:25 GMT

    Lehmann's comments disguise the real issue. You could look at Broad's actions in the light of the fact that he KNEW that Australia did not have any reviews left, therefore he legitimately used that against them, and as far as I am concerned the Australian way would be 'fair cop guv', because the reviews were frivolous and they cost Australia dearly. Far better to focus on that because that is something that is within Australia's control.

    All Broad did was highlight Australia's inability to use DRS correctly.

  • arunsahu on August 23, 2013, 6:16 GMT

    Mr. Lehman must be reminded by someone about Sydney 2008 Ind Vs Aus

  • on August 23, 2013, 6:09 GMT

    20% - flogged with a limp leaf of lettuce.

    It's the most lenient tariff applied to minor infringements made by players in the heat of the moment. Lehmann's comments were made a month after the event and shows such poor judgement that he is very lucky indeed not to be stripped of his entire match fee and banned for a test or two. Unfortunately from the comments made here, it appears there are many who see nothing wrong in Lehamann's action, a state of affairs which extends into the general cricket-watching public. This is the the reasons the maximum penalty should have been applied in order to clearly show how inappropriate Lehmann's conduct was.

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 6:03 GMT

    @Vikneshwar Elango on (August 23, 2013, 1:28 GMT), the ICC is the International Cricket Council, the body responsible for the administration of international cricket. How could the coach of an international cricket team not be answerable to the ICC?

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 6:00 GMT

    @CustomKid on (August 23, 2013, 4:53 GMT), I think that it's really quite sad that people believe that you have to be "nasty" to succeed. Being aggressive in your play and not giving quarter is one thing but being nasty is quite another.

  • on August 23, 2013, 5:57 GMT

    I cant understand why Australians complain about not walking. Remember the ghost of Sydney 2008 and many other tests, when they used to justify that they are playing for fine and they leave the decision to umpires. What goes around, comes around mate. Australia is in debris and now they are feeling the heat which only their opponents used to face in the past decade.

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 5:57 GMT

    @CustomKid on (August 23, 2013, 4:53 GMT), that's rubbish. I have listened to it and Lehmann's words were not tongue-in-cheek at all. It was certainly not a vicious attack and Lehmann was speaking rather casually because of the context but he said that Broad's actions constituted "blatant cheating" and he meant it. There was no hint of a joke.

  • TestsbeforeTwenty20 on August 23, 2013, 5:53 GMT

    Ha Ha, maybe Australia should call back Mickey Arthur - even if it is only to give Boof a few lessons in professional conduct....

  • on August 23, 2013, 5:45 GMT

    mmm at least Micky was civil...

  • Cricket_Man on August 23, 2013, 5:36 GMT

    Was he fined by Chris Broad? So many controversial things have happened in this Ashes but it seems like Darren Lehmann had to bear the brunt. Please post.

  • Amarjitmadan on August 23, 2013, 5:24 GMT

    Well rewarded for irresponsible outburst. I am not sure if a Coach has ever been punished like that,but any way a good precedent set.

  • orangtan on August 23, 2013, 5:16 GMT

    @PrasPunter , Lehmann was fined for bad-mouthing and rabble-rousing. Comments about umpiring made by Haddin have not been censured, so why drag in the Indian captain ?

  • Rufus_Fuddleduck on August 23, 2013, 5:03 GMT

    @humdrum - what was wrong? I was pleading for leniency. Lehmann would have grown up in an era when Australians and Englishmen bestrode the earth like colossuses (except that tiny bit of earth called West Indies) and generally said what they felt. While playing too it was the same - they made the rules. Now the rules have suddenly changed, even for the Caesars. And the Caesars have to be notified gently - not with fines. It takes time for civilisation and sanitisation to sink in. Please refer my message to PrasPunter, which shows that at least the English know how to do it. And lastly nothing can substitute for winning

  • nair_ottappalam on August 23, 2013, 5:02 GMT

    A very immature reaction from Lehmann. In the midst of a series he shouldn't have made such a senseless comment. Whether Broad is right or not on the field is something to be decided by the ICC officials. Being the coach of the opposition, Lehmann had no need to make such a public statement. He thoroughly deserves the punishement. So does Watson for backing his coach publicly on such an offensive issue. Memory goes back to "Monkey-Gate" when the Aussies were so much vociferous.

  • CustomKid on August 23, 2013, 4:53 GMT

    @disco-bob, get off your high horse mate. Do a google search and podcast the interview and then start commenting on the type of character Lehmann is. It was purely tongue in cheek and then the beloved media caught wind and turned it in to this let's burn Stuart Broad at the stake mentality. It's so far from the truth it's not funny. The sad thing is society has become so politically correct you can't have a laugh without offending someone somewhere.

    Lehmann is exactly the right person to be leading this team. He has the track record as a player and as a coach. He doesn't hold back when it's required. What he needs to instill in to this Australian team is nastiness, just like Allan Border did, unfortunately that evaporated after the Sydney Test 2008 when the AUS media slaughtered the AU team for the way they conducted themselves.

    Once they become more consistent at the top level I expect them to show a nasty side that backs up the performance and boof will bring that.

  • on August 23, 2013, 4:50 GMT

    Wonder why it took so long for the ICC to act. Darren Lehman's choice of words is unbecoming of an international cricket team's coach. @ Pras Punter, the Indian captain never asked crowds to " to give to the " umpires. The choice of words is the key here. May be Darren Lehmann had acted at the spur of the moment or may be it was just jovial banter. As far as the current Indian captain is concerned, he is perhaps the most well mannered one going around. For a wicketkeeper he never sledges- never ever. That is one reason why no bowler ever gives him the glare or the chirp. Even he treats a fast bowlers like the likes of Brett Lee like an offspinner and carts them out of the ground, they still don't sledge him.It is out of sheer respect. He airs his views to the media and uses as diplomatic language as possible.

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 4:45 GMT

    @cricket_ahan on (August 22, 2013, 23:48 GMT), to be honest, I get a bit sick of people referring to cricket as a "gentleman's game". Cricket today is certainly not a gentleman's game; it is a professional sport. Cricket used to be played by actual gentlemen, i.e. men of wealth and high standing, who never had to actually work a day in their lives and required diversion to prevent their dying of boredom. Cricket was one such diversion. In those days they played it purely for fun and the outcome was of no consequence. Cricket is a very different game nowadays and, while we would hope that it remains more civilised than most contact sports or semi-contact sports like football, it's ridiculous to expect modern cricketers to be gentlemen beyond being superficially polite.

  • Baundele on August 23, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    ICC is interesting. Most often they are into deep sleep; but suddenly wakes up and makes a correct decision.

  • humdrum on August 23, 2013, 4:41 GMT

    @Rufus_Fuddleduck:you got it wrong mate.Players and captains have been at the receiving end of generosities from the match referees to the point of perversity. So if a coach gets a bit of it,no harm done.By the way,wonder what shane warne has to say about this--he has always said that a coach is a vehicle for going to the ground and back.Over to you shane.

  • landl47 on August 23, 2013, 4:41 GMT

    One thing that not many people seem to be thinking about is that Lehmann is, by necessary implication, criticizing the umpire as well as Broad. While it's clear the umpire got it wrong, it's not for Lehmann to make a joke of it to the media- in fact, the 'light-hearted' nature of the conversation actually makes it more offensive.

    Anyway, it's over with now. Move on.

  • Rufus_Fuddleduck on August 23, 2013, 4:40 GMT

    @PrasPunter - that is so true. Slow over rates, going over now and then to the umpires to discuss the ball, substitutions in the manner of a diarrhoeaic team - all these are under the radar. Anything is fine as long as one is on the right end of it, and has the wherewithal to get away with it. The Australians are also no strangers to the rule and Indians are learning fast. Broad may broadly have defined his position and label in history, but the Aussie team must understand that they will need to start winning before any complaints are accepted.

  • I-Like-Cricket on August 23, 2013, 4:38 GMT

    20% of his match fee? That's a hell of a lot cheaper than TV advertising and since the media keep making a big deal out of it I'd say every Test here will be sold out. Worth it if you ask me, I'd say CA will probably just reimburse him anyway.

  • jmcilhinney on August 23, 2013, 4:31 GMT

    @Mitty2 on (August 22, 2013, 21:45 GMT), a lot of people complain about the fact that so many cricketers and coaches provide such canned answers during press conferences and interviews. When they are just "having a bit of fun" then they are likely to be less guarded and give more honest, heart-felt answers. I think that what you seem to consider a throw-away line is more likely to be what Lehmann really thinks than anything he might say on the matter in a more formal setting. He has every right to hold the view that Broad is a cheat if he wants to, even though it's clearly not true, but to say so in so public a forum is very poor and deserving of sanction. Did you notice any England players or officials calling David Warner names after his altercation with Joe Root? No, because they have a bit more class than to say it publicly even if they think it personally. How would Australia have reacted if Andy Flower had been quoted as calling Warner a thug or the like?

  • on August 23, 2013, 4:26 GMT

    Seems a small price to pay for Boof and indeed the Australian set up to have their say - and get the message across to the Poms. Certainly a case of double standards by the Aussies in this case.

  • PrasPunter on August 23, 2013, 4:20 GMT

    When the indian captain was making all kinds of statements about umpiring, was the icc sleeping ? And what about the appalling over-rate of england yesterday ? 36 overs in 3 hours !!!

  • Biggus on August 23, 2013, 4:12 GMT

    I guess it's got to end this way. It's obvious to anyone who's heard the interview that they were clowning around. It wasn't all that funny as far as my tastes go, but that's what it was, nevertheless some people plainly have taken it as a serious threat and CA has done the politically correct thing and told Darren that he's a very naughty boy and to go and sit on the naughty stool and think about what he's done. Another victory for the nanny society. I miss cricket in the '70s, when players used to be able to give an opinion instead of regurgitating PR spin that means nothing. People will use examples like this one to justify stringent controls on what players and officials can say but the end result is the sterile, information free, media friendly interviews we get now like, "We're all united moving forward and looking to play to the best of our abilities". Those who get all flustered about what Lehmann said are responsible for modern sporting media nothingspeak. Thanks a lot........

  • vswami on August 23, 2013, 3:52 GMT

    Lehman is an employee of Cricket Australia. By refusing to fine him, do they endorse his comments ?

  • Chris_P on August 23, 2013, 3:39 GMT

    Well, he may be fined, but 2MMM is paying it as it was all said in a lighthearted manner, there was no malice as what Lehmann said was tongue in cheek, if in doubt, listen to the pod of it. I can't believe how this has blown up over a joke. Talk about a knee jerk reaction to a light piece of banter between a comedy duo & a laid back Boof. Have we all gone so politically correct we can't enjoy a joke.

  • MelbourneMiracle on August 23, 2013, 3:36 GMT

    Boof has gone from Hero to zero in a span of 5 matches. What a sad story!

  • PFEL on August 23, 2013, 3:04 GMT

    Also I had no idea until now that Coaches got match fees lol

  • PFEL on August 23, 2013, 2:35 GMT

    Ridiculous. Lehmann has been fined because of the way the media reported his comments. Not the comments themselves.

  • popcorn on August 23, 2013, 2:15 GMT

    Mr.Dave Richardson, CEO of ICC, how about fining Aleem Dar 100% of his match fee for poor umpring?

  • Rufus_Fuddleduck on August 23, 2013, 2:12 GMT

    It's a bit unfair on the part of the ICC - fining Lehmann for what is basically a cultural deficiency. Other types of people would understand that pointing out faults in the opposition doesn't enhance your biodata. Secondly, there is something esoteric called the decencies of debate. These things are not to be appreciated by his ilk. And of course, lastly, a hard look at what Australians have done in the matter of helping out the umpire (and roundly castigating Adam Gilchrist in the bargain) over the years. The brilliant tweet yesterday - Pot.Kettle.Lehmann - pretty much summed up the matter. The ICC should not be harsh on Lehmann. They need to recognise this for what it is - a malaise which is not of Lehmann's origination. Rather it is due to his origination. And all these years, the English and Aussie players and team members have got away with much more.

  • Sarthik on August 23, 2013, 1:40 GMT

    I had respect for Lehmann until his recent remarks about another team's player. Now when was the last time a COACH got fined for a public outburst... What example does he set for the team to follow?

    PATHETIC....

  • Vasi-Koosi on August 23, 2013, 1:35 GMT

    We now have a full confession that everyone in the Australian team is calling Broad "every thing under the sun". We have a case to charge the entire team in a level 1 breach. Will the ICC look into this.

  • CoverDrive88 on August 23, 2013, 1:31 GMT

    I've never been a believer in walking after doing it in a junior game, being recalled by the umpire and then getting run out on the way back!! However, there's a big difference between a fine edge and steering it to first slip. I think it was certainly getting pretty close to cheating, but as a minimum I think Broad showed a serious lack of respect for the game and the umpire. I expect that others will now follow his example and his actions have changed the situation from a grey area that was accepted to anything goes - not really a proud moment. Further, I find the way England's bowlers keep harassing the umpires when they don't like the ball similarly unprofessional. It's simply them gaming the system to try to get an advantage. It may be my imagination, but Broad always seems to be prominent in that as well, and often the ring-leader.

  • on August 23, 2013, 1:28 GMT

    How do coaches come under ICC ? How can ICC punish them ? Sorry if this qn is silly .

  • on August 23, 2013, 1:14 GMT

    TripleM (the radio station) has agreed to pay the fine!

  • GrindAR on August 23, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    Good one from ICC. Discipline start from Coach. All inclusive mind, body and mouth.

  • cricket_ahan on August 22, 2013, 23:59 GMT

    Also, why has Cricket Australia not come down harder on Darren Lehmann? The ICC has levied a charge and a fine. Given CA's recent focus on discipline, why should this incident, officially recognised by the ICC, go without reprimand on their part? Shows a lack of consistency in maintaining control over a group that is not really winning any popularity contests at the moment.

  • cricket_ahan on August 22, 2013, 23:48 GMT

    The latest in a series of stupid and reckless episodes involving people from the Australian camp. Seriously, GROW UP! Watson, Warner, and now Lehmann. Personally I don't advocate Stuart Broad's stay at the crease - it was blatantly out, and respecting the (perceived) gentleman's nature of our sport, I advocate walking every time. However, it's clear that there are two sides to this, and not walking is a choice somewhat validated by the fact that as a batsman you will get some decisions that go against you. And that is it, there's no half way in-between! If you know you have hit it as a batsman and you don't walk, how does it matter if it was a faint edge or off the middle of the bat ?? It's painful and disappointing to consistently see senior members of the Australian outfit setting such bad examples for the younger, developing members of the team.

  • stickboy on August 22, 2013, 23:47 GMT

    I love Boof, but I think this is a fair result. It was unnecessary and I think he just let it happen out of frustration...it didn't do anything to help the side in the end...

  • Stuart_Lord on August 22, 2013, 23:40 GMT

    The Ozzies can hardly claim to be squeaky clean in this respect - how about Trott's dismissal in the second innings at Trent Bridge when he nicked a ball and was given out LBW regardless? That was, admittedly, when the video evidence wasn't available, because the camera hadn't been reset after Root's dismissal a ball earlier. The point is that the Ozzies got a wicket which shouldn't have been given.. So Broad not walking simply put the record straight - perhaps..? No-one can say definitively that Trott would have contributed to the score or not, or that Broad's wicket, if given, would have doomed the English to defeat. That would be conjecture. Either way the Ozzies were pleased to get the wicket of Trott and didn't complain about the very obvious umpiring blunder. They only appear to so do when it may have worked in their favour - thats hardly in the spirit of cricket is it?

  • disco_bob on August 22, 2013, 23:31 GMT

    This incident reveals a disturbing character flaw in Lehmann and I wonder if he is the right person to take Australia forward.

  • Cricket_theBestGame on August 22, 2013, 22:43 GMT

    while its good to punish such behaviour, it was dissapointing that ICC only fined him 20% match fee. he should've been docked 100% match fee ! this wasn't a veiled or light hearted comment. it was full on labelling a player cheat while his own team did exactly the same. its worth reminding lehman few years ago clarke edged one to slip and stood around for umpire to raise his finger....in the same match symonds edged clearly to keeper and didn't walk.he made 100 and cost india the match. so mr lehman with this comment you've lost respect with lot of your supporters.

  • on August 22, 2013, 21:46 GMT

    The Comments by Mr. Lehmann are uncalled for and childish. Is he trying to instigate the aussies against Broad? How about Haddin not walking when he admitted that he edged it in the same match. The question is what is Ausralian cricket assoc going to do about this?

  • Mitty2 on August 22, 2013, 21:45 GMT

    I thought the interview was hilarious, but I guess having a bit of fun is just not acceptable nowadays.

    But oh well, Broad's going to cop it hard!

  • TomPrice on August 22, 2013, 21:44 GMT

    No apology from Lehmann then?

  • TheScot on August 22, 2013, 21:38 GMT

    Just became a fan of Mr. Lehmann. Lets see if Aussie fans can make him prouder than his team has. It feels ages when it was Warner vs Rooty.

  • on August 22, 2013, 21:36 GMT

    he shouldve had a one match ban effective next test match really

  • M.Usman-Sharif on August 22, 2013, 20:56 GMT

    very good... good step from icc

  • M.Usman-Sharif on August 22, 2013, 20:56 GMT

    very good... good step from icc

  • on August 22, 2013, 21:36 GMT

    he shouldve had a one match ban effective next test match really

  • TheScot on August 22, 2013, 21:38 GMT

    Just became a fan of Mr. Lehmann. Lets see if Aussie fans can make him prouder than his team has. It feels ages when it was Warner vs Rooty.

  • TomPrice on August 22, 2013, 21:44 GMT

    No apology from Lehmann then?

  • Mitty2 on August 22, 2013, 21:45 GMT

    I thought the interview was hilarious, but I guess having a bit of fun is just not acceptable nowadays.

    But oh well, Broad's going to cop it hard!

  • on August 22, 2013, 21:46 GMT

    The Comments by Mr. Lehmann are uncalled for and childish. Is he trying to instigate the aussies against Broad? How about Haddin not walking when he admitted that he edged it in the same match. The question is what is Ausralian cricket assoc going to do about this?

  • Cricket_theBestGame on August 22, 2013, 22:43 GMT

    while its good to punish such behaviour, it was dissapointing that ICC only fined him 20% match fee. he should've been docked 100% match fee ! this wasn't a veiled or light hearted comment. it was full on labelling a player cheat while his own team did exactly the same. its worth reminding lehman few years ago clarke edged one to slip and stood around for umpire to raise his finger....in the same match symonds edged clearly to keeper and didn't walk.he made 100 and cost india the match. so mr lehman with this comment you've lost respect with lot of your supporters.

  • disco_bob on August 22, 2013, 23:31 GMT

    This incident reveals a disturbing character flaw in Lehmann and I wonder if he is the right person to take Australia forward.

  • Stuart_Lord on August 22, 2013, 23:40 GMT

    The Ozzies can hardly claim to be squeaky clean in this respect - how about Trott's dismissal in the second innings at Trent Bridge when he nicked a ball and was given out LBW regardless? That was, admittedly, when the video evidence wasn't available, because the camera hadn't been reset after Root's dismissal a ball earlier. The point is that the Ozzies got a wicket which shouldn't have been given.. So Broad not walking simply put the record straight - perhaps..? No-one can say definitively that Trott would have contributed to the score or not, or that Broad's wicket, if given, would have doomed the English to defeat. That would be conjecture. Either way the Ozzies were pleased to get the wicket of Trott and didn't complain about the very obvious umpiring blunder. They only appear to so do when it may have worked in their favour - thats hardly in the spirit of cricket is it?

  • stickboy on August 22, 2013, 23:47 GMT

    I love Boof, but I think this is a fair result. It was unnecessary and I think he just let it happen out of frustration...it didn't do anything to help the side in the end...