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Dalmiya and Zia to meet

Jagmohan Dalmiya, the chief of the Indian cricket board, and Tauqir Zia, his Pakistani counterpart, will meet in Dubai early next month in an attempt to resolve the impasse arising out of the Indian government's refusal to sanction cricket matches

Wisden CricInfo staff
22-Jul-2005
Jagmohan Dalmiya, the chief of the Indian cricket board, and Tauqir Zia, his Pakistani counterpart, will meet in Dubai early next month in an attempt to resolve the impasse arising out of the Indian government's refusal to sanction cricket matches between the two countries. Both will be in Dubai to attend the Asian Cricket Foundation session on May 3. In keeping with their policy of not allowing bilateral series, the Indian government had declined permission for the team to tour Pakistan for a Test series. Pakistan responded by pulling out of the six-nation Asia Cup, which is due to be held in Sri Lanka from August 10 to 28.
Zia admitted to The Telegraph, a Kolkata-based newspaper, that India's refusal to play in Pakistan was a primary reason in Pakistan pulling out of the Asia Cup. "Look, that's been the top, but not the sole, consideration. There have been a series of events."
Zia was clearly irked by India's decision to play a three-nation tournament in Bangladesh when they should have been touring Pakistan.
"Even though India should have visited us after the World Cup, the Board of Control for Cricket in India made the Bangladesh commitment well over a year ago. How do you expect us to react? What do I tell people in Pakistan?
"It was on the understanding that India would play Pakistan in a Test series, even if that be on neutral territory, that we agreed to forego our chance of hosting the Asia Cup. But, when even that is not materialising, why should Pakistan play at all? After all, it's known that India's no to a bilateral series is hurting the Pakistan Cricket Board.
"The ACC [Asian Cricket Council] has no future. It can't unless India and Pakistan join hands."
A source from the Indian board indicated that a compromise could still be worked out, but with the Indian government maintaining its tough stand, it's difficult to see how.