Bangladesh news June 4, 2013

Dejected Ashraful apologises to fans

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The regret of missing out on cricket was what finally broke Mohammad Ashraful. In his first appearance in front of the media, after he met with the ICC Anti-Corruption and Security Unit (ACSU) last month, the cricketer broke down when asked if he regretted his actions at this phase of his career.

"Obviously, I am feeling very bad... Please pray for me," was all he could tell mediapersons, before being taken inside by his friends, who were standing near his house in Dhaka. Ashraful was sobbing, and was quickly taken upstairs to his apartment.

The 2012-13 season saw Ashraful make his highest Test score, in a bid to come back into the Bangladesh team. His 190 against Sri Lanka was hailed by even his critics who quietly praised his patience. Though the subsequent Zimbabwe tour wasn't as good, Ashraful still looked to be in good form. But his admission of guilt to the ACSU has now ensured that he stands in breach of several codes and awaits punishment from the BCB.

A few minutes before the press interaction began, he was trying to force a smile. He even let out a giggle when asked if he would talk off-camera after he repeatedly said he wasn't prepared to talk until the ACSU's report is submitted to the BCB.

"Not talking in front of the camera got me into trouble in the first place," he blurted out, and laughed. This was an attempt at seeking normalcy but, given what he has admitted to, normalcy will elude him even though the ACSU verdict is still a few weeks away.

"I made a mistake. This was the first time in my career that the ICC anti-corruption unit called on me. I did some bad things and I admitted to doing them. I am trying to help them for the sake of cricket," he said. "After coming back from Zimbabwe, when they asked me, I told them what I had done. I didn't want to keep feeling guilty, so I told them whatever I did wrong. I made a couple of mistakes, but otherwise I was honest to the cause of playing for Bangladesh."

One of Bangladesh's most admired cricketers, Ashraful also apologised to his fans. "I apologise to the entire nation, to all my fans and friends. I am guilty about everything. I have disappointed my fans," he said.

Mohammad Isam is ESPNcricinfo's Bangladesh correspondent. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on June 4, 2013, 23:50 GMT

    He was named by Wisden some six years ago as one of the top 10 future cricketers in the world. Very sad to see his career going down this way. He didn't apply himself first of all and then just when he's making a good comeback into the team, this happened. Very sad. Ashraful, you did a mistake and I hope you've learnt from it. God bless you and never again do such things in life.

  • canterbury1990 on June 4, 2013, 23:42 GMT

    It's not a person's mistakes that define a person, but how he/she responds to past mistakes. I am certainly disappointed by the corruption, but in this case I am glad to hear that Ashraful has willingly confessed and admitted his guilt. I feel sorry that Ashraful has found himself in this position, but he has done the right thing by confessing. I don't imagine that any punishment will be easy, nor do I think that the road to redemption will be short, but he has taken the first step. I hope he finds the strength to deal with and move on from this and I hope this episode makes him a better person, and teaches us all to be wary of corruption. Clearly corruption is still way too widespread in cricket. The ICC need to sit down and seriously consider whether the measures it has in place are at all effective, especially with the advent of the IPL and silimar leagues around the sub-continent and the world!

  • on June 6, 2013, 17:52 GMT

    It is safe to say Ashraful was financially in very good state compared to 95% of the population. He may be supporting five famillies as Jimmy was suggesting, the fact of the matter is there are people who make do with much less with greter demand on their earning capability. It is was not the pressure of property that forced him to indulge him into immoral activities. It was greed and chance to live in a bit more confortably tempted him to the wrong path. I do not have sympathy for him as a person but to for those who dependentd on his income. There are things one does that affect so many people directly or indirectly. I feel like victim also as our collective image was turnished by him. It is just not the image. It has real financial impact too.

  • Nutcutlet on June 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    I would hope that the contrite Ashraf can turn state's (in UK we'd call it Queen's) evidence. If he, a senior internat. player, could provide the prosecution with a list of names (cricketers & non-cricketers) whose affairs should be examined with a view to prosecution, then genuine good may come from his held-up hand. I am sorry that he has had his head turned & do accept that should it be possible for him to assist the prosecuting authorities in the manner outlined with resultant convictions, then his penalty should be reduced. That is the principle & his confession & humiliation should then prove a silver-lined cloud - for himself & for the good of the game. Cricket is mired in corruption & whilst it is not exclusively sub-continental in origin, the overwhelming number of cases, historical & currently sub judice, come from that area of the world. BTW, I wd ask readers to consult Transparency International for them to gain a world perspective on corruption. We are not all the same!

  • RG2008 on June 6, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    Such a shame, although it is at least refreshing to see some candour and contrition. A stark contrast to recent events in the IPL

  • on June 6, 2013, 3:01 GMT

    You are disgusting Ashraful. Disgrace to the sport.

  • bad_boy on June 6, 2013, 1:58 GMT

    I like Ashraful even more now... for lack of better words I will quote Russell Peters'... "Be a Man" ... and my friends right now Ashraful is the Man....

    Don't get me wrong he should be punished as per current standards... but still he is the Man...

  • on June 5, 2013, 17:06 GMT

    In life u have to do what u do , as best as u can. The money will then follow. Money is not secondary. It just flows to those who are great at what they do. All Ash had to do was score tons in every outing and he would have all the money in the world. There are no shortcuts to fame, wealth and glory.

  • on June 5, 2013, 12:59 GMT

    Its sad to see what's happening to the "Gentleman's Game".

  • on June 5, 2013, 10:55 GMT

    the kind of love people around the world have for you is amazing....in most of the places in BD you are the talking point and still people wants that some how the punishment comes in small package and they can see you again playing for BD....ashraful you did all wrong...the first mega star of BD cricket has shown how to disappoint his followers.....but we are thank full that you have confessed everything....you still have a chance...keep alive...!!

  • on June 4, 2013, 23:50 GMT

    He was named by Wisden some six years ago as one of the top 10 future cricketers in the world. Very sad to see his career going down this way. He didn't apply himself first of all and then just when he's making a good comeback into the team, this happened. Very sad. Ashraful, you did a mistake and I hope you've learnt from it. God bless you and never again do such things in life.

  • canterbury1990 on June 4, 2013, 23:42 GMT

    It's not a person's mistakes that define a person, but how he/she responds to past mistakes. I am certainly disappointed by the corruption, but in this case I am glad to hear that Ashraful has willingly confessed and admitted his guilt. I feel sorry that Ashraful has found himself in this position, but he has done the right thing by confessing. I don't imagine that any punishment will be easy, nor do I think that the road to redemption will be short, but he has taken the first step. I hope he finds the strength to deal with and move on from this and I hope this episode makes him a better person, and teaches us all to be wary of corruption. Clearly corruption is still way too widespread in cricket. The ICC need to sit down and seriously consider whether the measures it has in place are at all effective, especially with the advent of the IPL and silimar leagues around the sub-continent and the world!

  • on June 6, 2013, 17:52 GMT

    It is safe to say Ashraful was financially in very good state compared to 95% of the population. He may be supporting five famillies as Jimmy was suggesting, the fact of the matter is there are people who make do with much less with greter demand on their earning capability. It is was not the pressure of property that forced him to indulge him into immoral activities. It was greed and chance to live in a bit more confortably tempted him to the wrong path. I do not have sympathy for him as a person but to for those who dependentd on his income. There are things one does that affect so many people directly or indirectly. I feel like victim also as our collective image was turnished by him. It is just not the image. It has real financial impact too.

  • Nutcutlet on June 6, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    I would hope that the contrite Ashraf can turn state's (in UK we'd call it Queen's) evidence. If he, a senior internat. player, could provide the prosecution with a list of names (cricketers & non-cricketers) whose affairs should be examined with a view to prosecution, then genuine good may come from his held-up hand. I am sorry that he has had his head turned & do accept that should it be possible for him to assist the prosecuting authorities in the manner outlined with resultant convictions, then his penalty should be reduced. That is the principle & his confession & humiliation should then prove a silver-lined cloud - for himself & for the good of the game. Cricket is mired in corruption & whilst it is not exclusively sub-continental in origin, the overwhelming number of cases, historical & currently sub judice, come from that area of the world. BTW, I wd ask readers to consult Transparency International for them to gain a world perspective on corruption. We are not all the same!

  • RG2008 on June 6, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    Such a shame, although it is at least refreshing to see some candour and contrition. A stark contrast to recent events in the IPL

  • on June 6, 2013, 3:01 GMT

    You are disgusting Ashraful. Disgrace to the sport.

  • bad_boy on June 6, 2013, 1:58 GMT

    I like Ashraful even more now... for lack of better words I will quote Russell Peters'... "Be a Man" ... and my friends right now Ashraful is the Man....

    Don't get me wrong he should be punished as per current standards... but still he is the Man...

  • on June 5, 2013, 17:06 GMT

    In life u have to do what u do , as best as u can. The money will then follow. Money is not secondary. It just flows to those who are great at what they do. All Ash had to do was score tons in every outing and he would have all the money in the world. There are no shortcuts to fame, wealth and glory.

  • on June 5, 2013, 12:59 GMT

    Its sad to see what's happening to the "Gentleman's Game".

  • on June 5, 2013, 10:55 GMT

    the kind of love people around the world have for you is amazing....in most of the places in BD you are the talking point and still people wants that some how the punishment comes in small package and they can see you again playing for BD....ashraful you did all wrong...the first mega star of BD cricket has shown how to disappoint his followers.....but we are thank full that you have confessed everything....you still have a chance...keep alive...!!

  • on June 5, 2013, 10:50 GMT

    It's a sad situation for the game .My advise to every up coming young players. You should follow the legends of the game who put the game first before money.End of the day crickert should not be a race course.It's a gentlemans game.

  • on June 5, 2013, 10:03 GMT

    I don't trust cricket anymore. Every results seems fabricated to me now.

  • Pathiyal on June 5, 2013, 9:18 GMT

    Disappointed. As a matured sportsman and as a player who can stand at par with the greatest of cricketers, it is hard to believe he had done it. his absence from cricket will be a huge loss not even for his country but to the world of cricket. Hope his apologies will be accepted.

  • DaisonGarvasis on June 5, 2013, 9:03 GMT

    When his name is taken the picture coming to mind is "play a rash shot, get out as a result and on the way to pavilion do all sort of grandstanding to imply that he knew that was a bad shot to play and it was a moment of madness". And come to bat the next game and "play a rash shot, get out and more grandstanding". That has been the pattern for a long time in his career. Now that he has played the "rash shot" of getting in to corruption and now he has "got out" of cricket. So the "grandstanding" of crying and weeping has followed as usual. There is no reason to believe that given another chance, he will not play the "rash shot" again!!!

  • rashivkd on June 5, 2013, 8:36 GMT

    Once Asharaful started his career, I honestly believed he can do a lot to Bangladesh Cricket like What was done by A. Disilva to Srilanka. But it was not happened by his consistent failures and now it is.. It is really sad to hear such a huge talent wasted in this manner. why this cricketers are not realizing their talents?? Its sad :(

  • on June 5, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    we all people of our country fell very bad.why you doing this? why? why?.Ashraful this is you fall.we miss you.we didn.t through that you do that.we pray for you

  • Haleos on June 5, 2013, 7:18 GMT

    @Ashraful - You knew very well what you were doing. You can not be so naive.

  • Hillsidemoon on June 5, 2013, 6:48 GMT

    He did mistake as a human being. He confessed as a true cricketer. Hats off to you Ashraf. We miss you.

  • ADV.SAIKAT on June 5, 2013, 6:27 GMT

    i am a lawyer and practicing here in bangladesh last 5 years.in accoradnce of law, though mr ashraful confess himself as a guilty so there is no other option to say that he is in a serious trap or he is an innocent. BANGLADESH had rich historical backround, so this type of unethical work cant tolerable. BCB board president mr papon is a fair and honorable person, we all the general people believed him and wait for his fair decision about ashraful and spot fixing and the spot fixer.finally ashraful is a matured guy and he has enough matured to face such situation, he involve these types of unethical job willingly. its a big shame for us and for our history. so we want a fair investigation..........

  • ashqarmahi on June 5, 2013, 6:22 GMT

    Being a bangladesh cricket fan....We will miss some ashraful classic...surely...but mistake is mistake....you should be punished...should be punished in that way so nobody will try to think in future....BCB did right...banned him from all type of cricket...sorry ashraful....we are really sorry for you....but I personally don't want to see you in the cricket again anymore....!!

  • vrn59 on June 5, 2013, 6:10 GMT

    Ashraful must be banned for life from all forms of competitive cricket, no question about it. If he is given a short ban and then returns to the game, it will set a bad precedent for other fixers. He has knowingly committed a crime, and must be punished. Yes, his fans may well point out that he has apologised, but that doesn't mean anything. He has been on the international circuit for long enough... His apologies are hollow...

  • bharath74 on June 5, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    Cricketers are falling into traps of betting mafia: i dont want to see the best BD cricketer punished. Punish those who lure these innocent cricketers.

  • on June 5, 2013, 5:46 GMT

    Asharaful has done something wrong and there cannot be any excuses. There is some mention of honesty in some comments here but it was dishonest in the first place to do the "bad" things he has admitted to. However, his not giving excuses, admitting that he was completely wrong and apologizing to the fans and his nation are to be admired. He was a cricketer with great potential but something seemed to have stood in his way in realising same. It is so sad to see everything ending like this. May God give him strength to become a good man and make progress in life.

  • on June 5, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    Feeling ashamed to world cricket and hope it will never happened in BD cricket again.

  • on June 5, 2013, 5:28 GMT

    Cricket is soon going to become like WWE.. Everything is fixed and practiced, and fans would still see it for entertainment.

  • on June 5, 2013, 4:59 GMT

    i think we make a big mistake to take mr Asraful to BD cricket team. In Many match he played like unusual have no responsibility ....

  • BDforever on June 5, 2013, 4:55 GMT

    Ash, we still love you. Human beings make mistakes, but the most important thing is admitting them and help game to go forward without mistakes. You are one of the most talented cricketers country has ever produce. We don't want to miss you.

  • Rafelgibt on June 5, 2013, 4:53 GMT

    Sorry but i simply cant forgive you.As a BAN cricketer you have cheated with the whole nation so you need to be punished severely.

  • on June 5, 2013, 4:46 GMT

    I admire Ash's honesty in his admission. But lets not get carried away here. It was no bare mistake. It was a crime done very consciously. Put him to the sword I say. Let everyone witness the heavy price you must pay for this offense against cricket.

  • on June 5, 2013, 4:14 GMT

    I am so shocked.... We have lost a good talent........

  • screamingeagle on June 5, 2013, 4:11 GMT

    kthxbai, another one bites the dust.

  • ajithabey on June 5, 2013, 4:04 GMT

    Disgraceful and shameful.Another cricketer of repute bites the dust for his greediness and falling prey to bookies and gamblers.What is happening to this noble game??????????

  • fr600 on June 5, 2013, 3:54 GMT

    I loved seeing how he is the first cricketer to admit to corruption willingly. I haven't seen any other doing to.

  • Narbavi on June 5, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    oh, BD fans how sweet of you to still support him and pat him on the back, we would never do that with Sreesanth or the others, corrupt cricketers have no place in the game, either they are punished or not is secondary but they simply don't have a place in the sport anymore

  • on June 5, 2013, 3:03 GMT

    Many a time I commented/meant - it is Ashraful who has taught us how to dream to be a major cricket playing nation. But we simply can't forgive him, under no consideration!! No way!!

  • on June 5, 2013, 2:57 GMT

    He is in serious trap now. ACSU must think about the big fishes behind the scene. DG franchise partners are now out of our eyes. Why? And one more thing, a fixing can't made by 'a man'.

  • on June 5, 2013, 2:50 GMT

    ashraful is a good player.I know he make mistake and he beg pardon.I think he need a second Chance to prove himself

  • Sabiaah_Naz_BD on June 5, 2013, 2:47 GMT

    You are still our hero...its you, who made us love cricket...

  • mk49_van on June 5, 2013, 2:38 GMT

    The thing about fixing is this - even total failures like Ashraful (avg 24 in 61 tests! - in any other country he would have dumped well before he played that many) can hope to make things happen, or so the bookies think.

    Good riddance.

  • on June 5, 2013, 2:38 GMT

    It takes courage to make an admission like that. The saddest part of all is that one mistake often outweighs all your career achievements. All I can say to Ashraful is that you did what you did son, and you cannot change the past. Just remember in the end you did the right thing, so held your head high and keep serving the game however you can. Rest what may come is your destiny.

  • on June 5, 2013, 1:20 GMT

    you brave man Ashraful , accepting the mistake is great. thats fine man as a human anybody can mistake , but correcting it is great its not only your fault , players falling to the bookies methods , they hitting the weaker points.

  • on June 5, 2013, 1:13 GMT

    Easy money especially for those in developing countries is a reality one should not rule out. Thprone to fall prey to this greed.e comforts money can get you in such countries should not be ruled out. Cricketers in particular and all sportsmen in general are prone to fall for this greed. It will take great character and upbringing to stay out of it. Why blame poor Ashraful. At least he has been sincere and truthful in owning up. Wonder how many more in this racket.

  • Dhutugemunu on June 5, 2013, 0:42 GMT

    Average player when you consider Whole Cricket World. But he was one of the Legends in BD Cricket (According to BD fans). Finally he has added a nice "Black Mark" to his legendary image.

  • mar2000 on June 5, 2013, 0:30 GMT

    More and more we see the "GREED" of some players that finally get them into trouble . When will we the cricket loving public sit and watch a match without outside flaws . ICC must continue to weed out all these players who continue to taint the waters of the beautiful game of cricket .

  • Ajronald on June 5, 2013, 0:30 GMT

    Chase the money - you will find truth

  • on June 4, 2013, 23:54 GMT

    Still remember those sixes hit from Yorker length balls..You were such a talent Ash. Your greed for BPL occasion led you down. May God be with you and you get a third chance...

  • on June 4, 2013, 23:23 GMT

    Why Ashraful !!! why ??? I forgive u; everyone deserves a 2 ND chance. Be strong.....and thanks for your honest opinion.

  • ARad on June 4, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    This is sad and shocking. It is time for ICC and all the boards to put their collective brains together and come up with something. Even after the well-published affairs of Cronje and the Pakistani trio, cheating seems to exist everywhere in Cricket. If the boards are serious, before they allow anyone to represent the country, county, club or franchise, they must make them sign a strongly worded agreement that tells them that they will not only be sacked but sued to recover additional assets. In other words, they will not only be able to make any profits but should lose other assets so that cheating may not be worth the risk. Also, accepting your mistake _after_ getting a call from the investigators is hardly a matter of HONESTY and should not be a reason to RESPECT anyone. Let's not devalue those two words please.

  • Monjur_Elahi on June 4, 2013, 22:48 GMT

    This confession, just a few days after the ICL scandal, seems very incidental to me... Somewhat linked??? A plotted drama? Who doesn't know the tragedy of Hansie Cronje, the hailed South African?

  • on June 4, 2013, 22:07 GMT

    stop these T20 and Cricket leagues which have contaminated this great game. IPL BPL SCL etc. corruption was never part of this great game and people would watch it from the first ball until the end. Now they don't trust the Asian teams at all.

  • on June 4, 2013, 22:01 GMT

    Comments weren't allowed on Sreesanth issue but it is allowed for Ashraful issue. You gotta love Cricinfo.

  • anilkp on June 4, 2013, 21:53 GMT

    Since the confession came from Ashraful himself, in front of camera, there is no denying the fact that this news is not true. So, I get it, that this is a ntue news. However, what is unbelievable is three international matches are under scrutiny now. Seriously? Are there people on Earth who bribe Bangladesh player(s) to lose? Is there a need to bribe them? Do they ever win? It is baffling, really! And, of all the players, it has to be Ashraful? I thought the bookies were smart who invest smartly. Din't realize that dumbs are everywhere.

  • The_bowlers_Holding on June 4, 2013, 21:40 GMT

    How come all this match fixing comes from the 'sub-continent'? Any such conviction should automatically mean a life time ban, cheating the fans and setting a truly terrible example as well as fraudulently conning book makers.

  • on June 4, 2013, 21:31 GMT

    Ashraful ___"I apologise to the entire nation, to all my fans and friends. I am guilty about everything. I have disappointed my fans,"

    Why shouldn't I accept. In the vast sea of corruption of Bangladesh you have done a little......

  • Kumail_Asadi on June 4, 2013, 21:26 GMT

    Now what will ICC do? Can we see some soft heart from ICC for Ashraful? Or he will also disappear from international cricket like young Amir?

    Why these cricketer disgrace their countries for just money? Why they don't care about their fans , fame and respect.

  • on June 4, 2013, 20:27 GMT

    WAAO every one was blasting Pakistanies for being involved in match fixed and how immoral and corrupt they were.

    But all of these Indians and Bangladeshi players were just "tempted"

  • tommyhawk on June 4, 2013, 20:14 GMT

    this means you can't swear or stick your neck out for any cricketer now - from any country! This whole thing is sickening. I stopped watching wrestling many years ago because of match fixing. Only a matter of time now for me to stop following sports altogether. It is downright cheating! Call it for what it is.

  • on June 4, 2013, 20:14 GMT

    buddhikapm. That never ending desire is called "greed".

  • AnanthX on June 4, 2013, 20:10 GMT

    Is this related to the BCB, or to international matches? Must be the BCB, I don't see why anyone would pay Bangladeshi cricketers to play badly, when they do it for free.

  • harrdstone on June 4, 2013, 20:03 GMT

    At least he has been honest. Compare him with Salman Butt who still says i am innocent.But overall the issue seems very deep. Better stop T20 for at least two years to clear the mess.

  • on June 4, 2013, 19:31 GMT

    Mohammad Ashraful taught me to sit in front of the television and to feel that something amazing is going to happen today!! That little boy taught me to be audacious and tell all the powerful people that I have something to tell and show, just give me a chance!! That boy taught me so many things over the year when I become so much good at so many things!! I am not ashamed of speaking in favor of a person who is involved in 'match fixing'!! Mohammad Ashraful, take care and find a good way to make yourself happy again. Hats off to the 'first big player' of this cricket crazy nation. And if I am not wrong, Ashraful has been the biggest craze of this craziness in this country.

  • aby__prasad on June 4, 2013, 19:18 GMT

    I dont think this would give many fans any consolation but pleaseeee try to think..these are club/league matches and 'not' national matches. Please dont go the media way and blow this into your minds as well. National games are not fixed or spot fixed to a large extent. Ashraful wouldnt do it, in fact it is almost impossible to do that in national matches with the kind of security and precautions taken. The last known national fixing was done years back by very very few naive cricketers (yes i agree its wrong yet) and its over! So dont discount ourselves from the fantastic innings this man has played and get our perspectives right. League/gully/street cricket isnt test cricket or national cricket!...yea yea its still wrong but not to the same degree as cheating a ntional side

  • Sadequl on June 4, 2013, 19:15 GMT

    apology accepted Ash & the way you stand for the truth to accept all your guilt, hope this will be a real solid example for any other cricketers in the whole world.

  • Naz1991 on June 4, 2013, 19:10 GMT

    Absolutely distraught by what has occurred. Have been a fan and will still be a fan. Yes the incident is shocking, however he has come clean before the situation escalates. Will like to see the outcome but yes, another Hansie cronje incident. Another fan favourite guilty of corruption. Let's just hope Ashraful doesn't have the same ending...

  • BOND_OO7 on June 4, 2013, 19:08 GMT

    Listen Ashraful ! We , 160 million fans , are behind you. We know you did not do it for money. A player who refused 10+ crore -taka ICL contract cannot sell himself for 10+ lac taka. There are some behind the scene people who made him do this. Ash you are still as beloved as you used to be among us. We know you for years. You cannot do this for your own interest. Big guns are behind this. To err is human and to confess error is great human character. Love you

  • on June 4, 2013, 19:03 GMT

    nothing to say about Ashraful .very sad

  • buddhikapm on June 4, 2013, 18:21 GMT

    never ending desires of human beings....

  • on June 4, 2013, 18:21 GMT

    asraful you are a hero & always remain hero. we keep loving you

  • dinesh9278 on June 4, 2013, 18:14 GMT

    another sad day for cricket. first Pakistani, than India nw Bangladesh.

  • on June 4, 2013, 18:14 GMT

    I was undoubtedly his fan...and still...but I am speechless too...dont know what to think and say ....accept or reject... Personally I was thinking how his profile description will end in espncricinfo profile page when officially he will announce his retirement ...but never thought some thing like this will be mentioned....really never thought like that...but now I can see it coming....

  • Surajdon9 on June 4, 2013, 18:05 GMT

    sad day for cricket..Now i can't trust every cricket Match..

  • on June 4, 2013, 17:44 GMT

    Many are commenting that Ashraful is no more the player he was; so good riddance. And some youngster can fill that vacuum far better. They are missing the point altogether. It is not a question of a fading cricketer overstaying. It is a grave issue of a role model indulging in illegal activities and setting a wrong example to millions of young boys and girls interested in cricket. So, it has to be dealt with seriously and severely.

  • Surajdon9 on June 4, 2013, 17:30 GMT

    Feeling sad................

  • on June 4, 2013, 17:20 GMT

    You did the right thing by being honest about your mistake Ashraful, God will open other doors for you, be strong.

    Cornelius Henry.

  • fifer on June 4, 2013, 17:16 GMT

    no hate but never thought that you would do something like this, you disappointed me Ashraful! from an Indian!

  • on June 4, 2013, 17:11 GMT

    first time since hansie cronje i feel bad today for asharful...totally agree with jamal to err is human and he should not be hated instead i have just began to respect him more...may god be with you

  • sweetspot on June 4, 2013, 17:02 GMT

    No need to take our anger out on Ashraful and/or call him names. Temptation seems to hound a lot of cricketers. He is still young but this sort of thing should not become a route map for other youngsters - make a "mistake" and apologize later.

  • ZsZs on June 4, 2013, 17:00 GMT

    A few weeks is a long time to wait for BD cricket fans - and more so for Ashraful. I hope BCB will do the right things and investigations - despite the consequences their actions may have for Bangladesh Cricket.

  • on June 4, 2013, 16:38 GMT

    @Jamal Hossain: So you have the same to say about Indian and Pakistani cricketers?

  • indiasucksgobd on June 4, 2013, 16:25 GMT

    Ashraful don't be too hard on yourself.as Jamal has mentioned making mistakes is a part of life.all 17 million bd people will be praying for u.

  • PanGlupek on June 4, 2013, 16:20 GMT

    @Jamal Hossain Shuvo, I totally agree: It's refreshing for someone to come forward & admit to what they've done so early on. It makes follow-up investigation easier, and makes it far more forgivable than repeatedly lying & wasting everyone's time (and money, people have to be paid for carrying out these investigations).

    I know others like Amir & Westfield also admitted guilt, but that was only after it became obvious they would be found guilty in the courts anyway.

    Although it is still a very serious offence, I hope some leniancy is given, based on the early confession.

  • on June 4, 2013, 16:16 GMT

    To be very honest I just feel very sad for him right now, not that it justifies anything, but........

  • on June 4, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    I apologise this guy. he atleast realised it when many cricketers are yet to do that

  • on June 4, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    Ashraful we still love you and we believe you.Though you are not my favorite cricketer but I love you.

  • TSJ07 on June 4, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Well done Ashraf you have admitted your mistake.Hope more players follow you.

  • Abrar_10 on June 4, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Still I can't believe a personality like Ashraful did this sin. May Allah forgive him. We the cricket fans are behind you. Whatever happened we never want to see such incidents in any form cricket by any cricketer.

  • aashrit on June 4, 2013, 15:39 GMT

    Could anyone tell me What has he done Maan????????????

  • sandeepkrao on June 4, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    First of all, it require big heart to admit your mistakes. Its a human nature to do mistakes. Admit them and being honest to yourself and people who care about it is different thing. Only good souls can do it. I do admire Ashraful as a cricketer but more as a human being. People should learn from Ashraful.

  • srikanths on June 4, 2013, 15:23 GMT

    Another one of those talented people lost to cricket. He was the most talented Bangladesh cricketer before Shakib and Tamim came along. Lost form, lost his way, one though he made it back, obviously he is lost forever

    So sad.

  • on June 4, 2013, 15:13 GMT

    It's easier to make judgement when a sports star commits a crime. Yes, he has committed a crime but rather than just punishing him, the root cause for the ill happening should be discovered. Was it for the money or some regret within or a particular pressure from outside. Until the reason is known, stopping and curbing such activities is impossible. Cricket is on a downhill road and such activities are just speeding the process. Hope the people at highest level can ensure purity of cricket along with quality(t20's are just spoiling the art)

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:32 GMT

    To err is human. Every person makes mistakes throughout in his life. However, the important things are admit that mistakes and learn lesson from that.

    Ashraful admits his mistake, this is the important point. We should not hate him.

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:26 GMT

    what can i say......feeling too bad man...don't know weather i will see u on the field again or not..but definitely will w8 for that..u master,u genious .....u made us proud so many times...we will never forget u. :|

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:14 GMT

    ashraful...............an unfulfilled talent in every sense.................

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:14 GMT

    ashraful...............an unfulfilled talent in every sense.................

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:26 GMT

    what can i say......feeling too bad man...don't know weather i will see u on the field again or not..but definitely will w8 for that..u master,u genious .....u made us proud so many times...we will never forget u. :|

  • on June 4, 2013, 14:32 GMT

    To err is human. Every person makes mistakes throughout in his life. However, the important things are admit that mistakes and learn lesson from that.

    Ashraful admits his mistake, this is the important point. We should not hate him.

  • on June 4, 2013, 15:13 GMT

    It's easier to make judgement when a sports star commits a crime. Yes, he has committed a crime but rather than just punishing him, the root cause for the ill happening should be discovered. Was it for the money or some regret within or a particular pressure from outside. Until the reason is known, stopping and curbing such activities is impossible. Cricket is on a downhill road and such activities are just speeding the process. Hope the people at highest level can ensure purity of cricket along with quality(t20's are just spoiling the art)

  • srikanths on June 4, 2013, 15:23 GMT

    Another one of those talented people lost to cricket. He was the most talented Bangladesh cricketer before Shakib and Tamim came along. Lost form, lost his way, one though he made it back, obviously he is lost forever

    So sad.

  • sandeepkrao on June 4, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    First of all, it require big heart to admit your mistakes. Its a human nature to do mistakes. Admit them and being honest to yourself and people who care about it is different thing. Only good souls can do it. I do admire Ashraful as a cricketer but more as a human being. People should learn from Ashraful.

  • aashrit on June 4, 2013, 15:39 GMT

    Could anyone tell me What has he done Maan????????????

  • Abrar_10 on June 4, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Still I can't believe a personality like Ashraful did this sin. May Allah forgive him. We the cricket fans are behind you. Whatever happened we never want to see such incidents in any form cricket by any cricketer.

  • TSJ07 on June 4, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Well done Ashraf you have admitted your mistake.Hope more players follow you.

  • on June 4, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    Ashraful we still love you and we believe you.Though you are not my favorite cricketer but I love you.