Graham Dilley 1959-2011 October 5, 2011

Ashes hero Dilley dies aged 52

ESPNcricinfo staff
88

The former England fast bowler, Graham Dilley, has died aged 52 after a short illness.

One of the quickest bowlers of his generation, with a memorable surge to the crease, Dilley took 138 Test wickets at 29.78 for his country but his best-remembered contribution to the England cause came with the bat - he made 56 supporting Ian Botham in a 117-run partnership which helped England to a famous Ashes Test win over Australia at Headingley in 1981.

In a ten-year international career, Dilley played in 41 Tests and 36 ODIs. Remarkably, he finished on the winning side in just two of those Test appearances, but in an era of limited success for the England team, those two victories were among the most loudly acclaimed of the decade - in addition to Headingley, he also played a key role in the first Test of the 1986-87 Ashes triumph, at Brisbane, where his first-innings figures of 5 for 68 condemned Australia to the follow-on.

In the entirety of his first-class career, Dilley claimed 648 wickets at 26.84 for Kent, Worcestershire, England and Natal, although his highlight was arguably the role he played in spearheading Worcestershire's back-to-back County Championship title-winning sides in 1987 and 1988.

"I had a lot of great times with him," Botham told Sky Sports News. "He had a good sense of humour and always wanted to be a part of the party. He was quiet and reserved until you got to know him. It's a very sad day. We both joined Worcestershire at the same time together, almost within minutes. We had a great run of about six trophies in five years."

Dilley's international career was curtailed in 1989 by his decision to join Mike Gatting's rebel tour of South Africa, but by that stage his jolting delivery stride had already taken a heavy toil on his knees. In his later years, he was troubled by osteo-arthritis, and he retired in 1992.

In the immediate aftermath of retirement, Dilley suffered financial problems, but found a new lease of life after moving into coaching. He enjoyed spells as an assistant coach with England and then bowling coach to the England women's team, before taking up a position as head cricket coach at Loughborough University. One of his pupils there was Monty Panesar, "So sad to hear my Uni coach passed away," Panesar tweeted. "Great man and top coach. [He] did a lot for me."

ECB chief executive David Collier said: "Graham made a life-long contribution to the game of cricket at all levels and we are deeply saddened by the sad news this morning. He will be fondly remembered for his contributions both as a player and a coach.

"Graham inspired many young cricketers through the University programme and was a highly respected coach to our representative teams. Few will forget his contribution during the historic Ashes win at Headingley in 1981 and the part he played in two Ashes series victories. Graham will be sadly missed by all his friends throughout cricket and ECB sends our deepest condolences to Graham's family. '

Hugh Morris, the managing director of the England team said: "This is very sad news for Graham's many friends and colleagues in cricket both in this country and overseas. As well as being a bowler of the highest class, Graham made an immense contribution to our game as a coach and his ability to impart his knowledge and wisdom to future generations of young cricketers will be sorely missed. "

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • here2rock on October 7, 2011, 11:52 GMT

    I have great memories of Dilley, that beautiful angled approach, then the leap and side on posiiton, the classical out swing bowler. Great loss to cricket, RIP. You are gone but memories will last life time!

  • PrabhuRangarajan on October 6, 2011, 17:36 GMT

    Sunil Kumar Singh: That's a nice recollection :) I remember that too: it was the May 24 1986 ODI against England. We were chasing 162 when Dilley got Srikkanth first ball. However Azhar and Gavaskar too India to victory without further loss.

  • topeleven on October 6, 2011, 16:23 GMT

    No body can and will never forget his delivery stride and also his valuable contributions to England Cricket. RIP

  • on October 6, 2011, 15:41 GMT

    All those of us, of Graham Dilley's generation - whether we played professional or purely village cricket, will savour the memory of meeting, or playing against him. He was a good man, a gentleman as well as a player.

    Requiescat in pace - and the warmest commiserations to all his nearest and dearest.

  • PutMarshyOn on October 6, 2011, 15:17 GMT

    This is sorry news. Wonderful cricketer. One of the really distinctive actions of his era.

  • voyager on October 6, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    His deliveries in 1987 (America's cup?) Perth final against Pakistan made a lasting impression on me... his outswingers/cutters were fast and almost making 45 deg angle after pitching. sure enough very quickly he dismantled pakistan's top order. Whenever I heard his name those deliveries and his clean bowling then in-form Shoaib Mohammad come to my mind.

  • on October 6, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    I only remember him in one of the dayers in 1987 India played against England where he got Srikkanth caught behind the very first ball of the innings and India won the match by nine wickets ... RIP

  • AlanHarrison on October 6, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    @ Abdul Rehman, I also remember the two 1987 series against Pakistan, especially the Oval test where Javed Miandad made nearly 300 and Pakistan racked up an enormous score of more than 700, a rarity in the 1980s (big scores are more common these days). It could have been even worse for England but Dilley came back and showed good determination in the end to get Miandad caught and bowled and five other wickets. You are right that Dilley certainly deserved to play more tests but unfortunately was plagued by bad luck with injuries.

  • AlanHarrison on October 6, 2011, 11:31 GMT

    Very sad news. It is indeed curious that Dilley only played in two test victories for England, a record that does no justice to his quality, and is partly explained by the poor England sides of that era and by the large number of draws he played in. Although troubled by injury, Dilley would have got into many subsequent better England sides. Perhaps a Dilley performance not mentioned above which sticks in my mind came in the 1988 Lords' test against West Indies: England hadn't beaten the mighty West Indies in a test for 14 years, and Dilley took nine wickets in the match (his best figures in a test match), and might have won England a shock victory but for the genius of Malcolm Marshall. (Sad to think that Dilley and Marshall have both now passed away.) On a smaller point, there is a slight error in the above article when it mentions Worcestershire's back-to-back county championship victories in which Dilley played occurring in 1987 and 1988: these were actually in 1988 and 1989.

  • 12kris on October 6, 2011, 11:27 GMT

    Every death lessens me. More so a premature death of a Cricketer. Two tears!

  • here2rock on October 7, 2011, 11:52 GMT

    I have great memories of Dilley, that beautiful angled approach, then the leap and side on posiiton, the classical out swing bowler. Great loss to cricket, RIP. You are gone but memories will last life time!

  • PrabhuRangarajan on October 6, 2011, 17:36 GMT

    Sunil Kumar Singh: That's a nice recollection :) I remember that too: it was the May 24 1986 ODI against England. We were chasing 162 when Dilley got Srikkanth first ball. However Azhar and Gavaskar too India to victory without further loss.

  • topeleven on October 6, 2011, 16:23 GMT

    No body can and will never forget his delivery stride and also his valuable contributions to England Cricket. RIP

  • on October 6, 2011, 15:41 GMT

    All those of us, of Graham Dilley's generation - whether we played professional or purely village cricket, will savour the memory of meeting, or playing against him. He was a good man, a gentleman as well as a player.

    Requiescat in pace - and the warmest commiserations to all his nearest and dearest.

  • PutMarshyOn on October 6, 2011, 15:17 GMT

    This is sorry news. Wonderful cricketer. One of the really distinctive actions of his era.

  • voyager on October 6, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    His deliveries in 1987 (America's cup?) Perth final against Pakistan made a lasting impression on me... his outswingers/cutters were fast and almost making 45 deg angle after pitching. sure enough very quickly he dismantled pakistan's top order. Whenever I heard his name those deliveries and his clean bowling then in-form Shoaib Mohammad come to my mind.

  • on October 6, 2011, 12:14 GMT

    I only remember him in one of the dayers in 1987 India played against England where he got Srikkanth caught behind the very first ball of the innings and India won the match by nine wickets ... RIP

  • AlanHarrison on October 6, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    @ Abdul Rehman, I also remember the two 1987 series against Pakistan, especially the Oval test where Javed Miandad made nearly 300 and Pakistan racked up an enormous score of more than 700, a rarity in the 1980s (big scores are more common these days). It could have been even worse for England but Dilley came back and showed good determination in the end to get Miandad caught and bowled and five other wickets. You are right that Dilley certainly deserved to play more tests but unfortunately was plagued by bad luck with injuries.

  • AlanHarrison on October 6, 2011, 11:31 GMT

    Very sad news. It is indeed curious that Dilley only played in two test victories for England, a record that does no justice to his quality, and is partly explained by the poor England sides of that era and by the large number of draws he played in. Although troubled by injury, Dilley would have got into many subsequent better England sides. Perhaps a Dilley performance not mentioned above which sticks in my mind came in the 1988 Lords' test against West Indies: England hadn't beaten the mighty West Indies in a test for 14 years, and Dilley took nine wickets in the match (his best figures in a test match), and might have won England a shock victory but for the genius of Malcolm Marshall. (Sad to think that Dilley and Marshall have both now passed away.) On a smaller point, there is a slight error in the above article when it mentions Worcestershire's back-to-back county championship victories in which Dilley played occurring in 1987 and 1988: these were actually in 1988 and 1989.

  • 12kris on October 6, 2011, 11:27 GMT

    Every death lessens me. More so a premature death of a Cricketer. Two tears!

  • Puffin on October 6, 2011, 10:54 GMT

    Well, this is a shock, far too young. I remember watching that famous innings headingley 1981, and also the committed fast bowler in 1986-87. what a loss RIP.

  • on October 6, 2011, 10:04 GMT

    One of great cricketer and gentleman he was,, this is end of a great era,, one of my fav. bowler has passed away now,, we will miss him

  • on October 6, 2011, 10:03 GMT

    R.I.P Graham Dilley, I remember you bowling pretty quick late one evening at the Kensington Oval.Rest in peace.

  • akp19 on October 6, 2011, 9:54 GMT

    RIP, i remember I had a poster of Graham Dilley as a kid on my wall along with other greats, like his outswingers, may God bless his soul

  • RiazFarooqui on October 6, 2011, 9:02 GMT

    So Sad news, He was the finest OUT SWING BOWLER, but suddenly he got disappeared from world cricket.

  • gujratwalla on October 6, 2011, 8:34 GMT

    RIP I remember him well when he first appeared for England..he had a beautiful flowin action and considerable pace.Sad at only 52.Well played Graham!

  • on October 6, 2011, 8:23 GMT

    Great loss to international cricket,my deep condolences to sorrowing family.

  • Rahul_78 on October 6, 2011, 7:44 GMT

    Ohh that delivery stride...so unique and in a way so good to watch in those old BBC archives. R.I.P Graham.

  • on October 6, 2011, 7:17 GMT

    Dilley will be remembered by the Indians as the bowler who always took his time to bowl by always retying his shoe laces prompting an AMUL ad which ran as "DILLY DALLY AND THE AMUL BUTTER WILL BE FINISHED" RIP Graham

  • on October 6, 2011, 7:09 GMT

    R.I.P Graham Dilley.But your legendness will bealive.

  • on October 6, 2011, 7:02 GMT

    I am extremely saddened to hear the untimely demise of the great fast bowler. May his soul rest in peace.

  • HMTSRINATH on October 6, 2011, 6:02 GMT

    great loss to the world of cricket, really a teriific fast bowler during his hey days

  • anver777 on October 6, 2011, 5:46 GMT

    A great bowler & a real gentleman cricketer !!!!!!!!! but i guess ECB never took the maximum out of him after his retirement ......

  • on October 6, 2011, 3:25 GMT

    One of my bowling heroes during my cricketing days Graham Dilley was a great bowler.........never seen him on TV as those days you could not have one and the only way you may picture him is in the newspaper.........hear him on the radio.

  • caught_knott_bowled_old on October 6, 2011, 2:55 GMT

    Lillee c Willey b Dilley ...RIP Graham

  • on October 6, 2011, 2:45 GMT

    Aesthetically speaking, for me the loveliest thing in cricket, next to a fluent straight drive, is the right arm fast bowler's late, outswinging delivery to the righthanded batsman. And when Dilley got it to leave the batsman late, there were fewer finer sights!

  • Looch on October 6, 2011, 2:20 GMT

    Very sad news and condolences to his family and friends. Personally I will remember him for his performance on the 86-87 Ashes tour, in particular a 5 for he got in the first test in Brisbane that put England firmly in charge of that series. Well played Graham!

  • wbyeats on October 6, 2011, 1:45 GMT

    Great one @countach; I remember listening to BBC radio commentary of Dilley bowling in the 80s and early 90s; still remember the highlights from that partnership between him and botham. It is a sad loss for cricket; we will miss you Dilley.

  • EdRNZ on October 6, 2011, 1:16 GMT

    While it may be up for debate whether or not White Men Can Jump, Graham Dilley proved that White Men Can Bowl Fast. In an era dominated by Holding, Roberts, Marshall et al I remember, as a skinny white boy, being inspired by Dilley's raw pace. It wasn't pretty, but it sure was entertaining and effective. RIP Graham Dilley - and thanks for the memories.

  • Countach on October 5, 2011, 23:30 GMT

    According to an urban myth, it was during a Test match between the West Indies and England when Michael Holding was about to bowl to Willey, that the radio commentator Brian Johnston said: "The bowler's Holding, the batsman's Willey". While Wisden stated that there is no record of Johnston or anyone else actually saying this,[3] Johnston's co-commentator, Henry Blofeld, recalled the incident as having taken place at The Oval in 1976.[4]

    In 1979, Willey caught Dennis Lillee off the bowling of Graham Dilley, resulting in a scorecard entry of: "Lillee c Willey b Dilley".[

    RIP Mate...you will be missed...

  • offcutter on October 5, 2011, 23:14 GMT

    Not the very best, but a big-hearted competitor. He bought a house in the village where my father and I played cricket when I was a teenager. Always happy to present prizes at the annual awards. I remember his playing for Kent and Worcestershire, not to mention England. I remember screaming at him for bowling a stupid wide that lost Kent (an already lost) one day game. BUT he had heart and strength, pace and commitment. Not a great cricketer perhaps, but a fine man and a very, very good cricketer. It is so sad that he has died so young.

  • cricsavvy on October 5, 2011, 23:01 GMT

    Graham, may your soul rest in peace.

  • on October 5, 2011, 22:47 GMT

    What a terrible, terrible shame. Who can ever forget Lillee caught Willey bowled Dilley?

  • Meety on October 5, 2011, 22:39 GMT

    Must say the pic used for the article is a great one, you can tell alot about a person when they smile. Have no idea what he was like as a person, but I'm guessing a top bloke. Terrible news.

  • whoster on October 5, 2011, 21:06 GMT

    So shocked and saddened to hear about Graham's passing at such a ridiculously young age. If it wasn't for injuries, he could've been one of England's great bowlers, and he had real pace before his body let him down. I'll always remember his contribution at Headingley in '81. It'll always be Botham's match, but without fantastic efforts from him and Bob Willis, would've been a losing cause. He was obviously a really well liked guy reading the tributes from former players. Very nice to see so many warm comments on here from non-English people, and it's heartening to see so much respect paid to such an exciting player. He played a massive part in the 86/87 Ashes triumph, and that was probably when he was at his peak as a bowler. He'd lost a bit of pace by then, but he developed great control along with seam and swing. So sad, and the thoughts of people from all over the cricketing world are with Graham's family at this terrible time. RIP G.R. Dilley

  • Somerset-Richard on October 5, 2011, 20:26 GMT

    We are only here for a finite length of time but we would all hope to have longer than 52 years. My mate and I were having a pint in The Bat and Ball Canterbury after a Kent v Somerset B&H game in May 1980, which our team Somerset had won comfortably. Graham Dilley walked in wearing his England blazer and tie looking, quite frankly, like a star. He was happy to chat with us and congratulate us on our teams success, very generous with his time. Lovely bloke, a fine bowler and, I suspect one of the very quickest England pacemen of his generation.

  • RohanMarkJay on October 5, 2011, 19:50 GMT

    He was the quintessential 1980s England cricketer. Modest, very good cricketer who who competed well especially in the Ashes in an era when their were so many brilliant cricket teams such as West Indies, Pakistan,NZ and India.While England in those days lost quite a bit because they were up against very good cricket teams from other countries. Individually the England cricketers put in very good performances like Gatting, Gooch, Botham and Gower Dilley was one such cricketer. Very good bowler, who had to bowl against very good opposition in those days. He will be remembered for two 1980s ashes performances. 1981 and 1987 in Australia.He was one important reason why they won he made sure England got the 20 wickets against Australia. RIP Graham Dilley.A very good cricketer and coach for the todays training programs a reason why England is doing well. Oh how Andrew Stauss and Alistaire Cooke must be thanking their lucky stars they weren't captaining England in the 1980s.

  • CricketingStargazer on October 5, 2011, 19:38 GMT

    Dilley was very young when he started to play for England. He'd already toured twice by the time Headingley came round and, for a time, it appeared that he and Bob Willis might form a potent partneship but, fate had it that they played few Tests together. After a long period injued or out of favour he came back better than ever but, sadly, never fulfilled his batting potential. It was a pity that the England regime at the time was far less supportive than now. I always get the impression that he was underrated and that his contributions were rarely appreciated as they should have been.

  • 5wombats on October 5, 2011, 19:34 GMT

    This is shocking news. All of us here on cricinfo are joined in sending our deepest condolences to his family. Hero of Headingley 1981 - Thank You Graham Dilley. God bless you.

  • R00ster on October 5, 2011, 19:30 GMT

    AH Graham dilley. his name brings up so many memories. i remember trying to copy his action and his lifting outswinging deliveries as i was growing up back in Karachi. not the greatest fast bowler ever but a good cricketer who left a impression on me. and more importantly , for me, he reminds me of a time when cricket was a great sport.

  • on October 5, 2011, 18:33 GMT

    Graham Dilley Dies at 52...He was Great Fast Baller for ENGLAND sor 9-10 yrs.... I remeber he is bowlling to AZHAR-GAVASKAR IN 1986 TEXACO TROPHY 1 DAY MATCH ..INDIA WON THAT 1 DAY SERIES AND TEST SERIES ALSO ..HE had a Big stride forward while delivering the ball... and that costed him his knee ... and had to rtire due to same injury...Grt Baller Grt Human being as said by IAN BOTHAM

  • on October 5, 2011, 18:22 GMT

    I loved his Long strided action and was my favourite bowler. I am deeply saddened by his untimely demise

  • on October 5, 2011, 17:56 GMT

    May your soul rest in peace ! Graham

    Since the day i started to watch cricket , you are one of the few names i remember and i will always remember u .

  • voma on October 5, 2011, 17:30 GMT

    A very fine fast bowler for England , that was a pretty good bowling line up in those days . Big shame that he didnt play more often , and thats the reason these days Englands management handle our fast bowlers better .

  • on October 5, 2011, 17:18 GMT

    He appeared to put no effort in his delivery but still generated more pace than many fast bowlers of his time.

  • pussatina on October 5, 2011, 17:13 GMT

    kancnaic it was cancer he sadly died in a Leicester Hospice according to some newspaper reports. RIP.

  • Nasir55 on October 5, 2011, 17:11 GMT

    I can remember my childhood when I used to copy his bowling action, such a great player and what a loss .... ah.

  • on October 5, 2011, 17:08 GMT

    Dilley was one of my heroes. He exemplified the spirit of endurance and was always gave his very best when asked to bowl. His run up and the high stride to the wicket was unique. Very sad to here the untimely loss of such a wonderful fast bowler who was certainly under utilized. May his soul rest in pleace

  • JG2704 on October 5, 2011, 16:56 GMT

    Obviously very very sad news . STEVEMARKS - enjoyed your story about him. I didn't realise he was only 21 when he was involved in that stand with Botham and I suppose that not only was Dilley to be praised by England for hanging with Botham in what looked like a lost cause , but also Botham must have alot to thank him for personally as he was going threough a rough run of form.

  • ansram on October 5, 2011, 16:52 GMT

    @kancnaic - He had a short battle with cancer.

  • sonicattack on October 5, 2011, 16:40 GMT

    So sad.....as the article suggests he will always be remembered for his partnership with Botham in THAT test, seem to recall in an earlier interview that Sir Ian has said that it was Dilley who really got the partnership going...I recall the almost sheepish expression on his face when he reached 50. Amazing that he only finished on the winning side twice. Far too young....

  • on October 5, 2011, 16:30 GMT

    @kancnaic I don't think we should be dwelling on such things. Plenty of people find they have aggressive cancers too late, die within months and nothing can still be done for them anywhere in the world - for example.

  • harshalb on October 5, 2011, 16:18 GMT

    I saw his debut over - took wicket of Vengy

  • brittop on October 5, 2011, 16:06 GMT

    So sad - far too young. He was one of my first cricketing heroes. Remember not only his batting at Headingley, but also his catch of Rod Marsh on the long leg boundary when it looked liked the Aussies might do it. Condolences to his family.

  • on October 5, 2011, 15:48 GMT

    i always remember him as a guy who tied his laces under his boot. very strange than and now. always remember early in my cricket fanatism when he toured india with Fletcher as captain.

  • stevieboy74 on October 5, 2011, 15:45 GMT

    RIP Graham Dilley. I'll always remember him from the 86-86 Ashes win. I don't think he ever got the full credit for his part in that series. Such a shame that injury blighted his career so much.

  • dagger64 on October 5, 2011, 15:27 GMT

    Great man and bowler. Never forget about him when I was a teenager watching him bowl at Viv Richards of Somerset at Taunton. Viv was struggling a bit agianst Dilley. I think Dilley has a good record against Viv. RIP Dilley.

  • on October 5, 2011, 15:18 GMT

    My earliest cricketing memories are of the great bowling run up of Graham Dilley. I saw him bowling in the 1987 series against Pakistan and fell in love with his bowling. He was probably under utilized, he should have played more tests as his test average was good enough for him to spearhead England's attack through the 80s.Very sad news. RIP Graham Dilley

  • aamerahmad on October 5, 2011, 15:15 GMT

    one of the best english fast bowler with most beautiful bowling action may his soul rest in peace!!!!

  • kancnaic on October 5, 2011, 15:15 GMT

    In a developed country like England,a famous cricketer has died because of short illness.May anyone clarify what type of illness it is ?

  • on October 5, 2011, 15:11 GMT

    Still remember that catch off Marsh, Headingley 1981, I was about 10 yards behind him and thought it was going for six.

  • on October 5, 2011, 15:08 GMT

    Bye Picca - I'll remember you as you were in the 80's at New Road - my first cricketing hero.

  • Sir_Geoffrey on October 5, 2011, 14:50 GMT

    Can hardly believe it. Shocked and saddened. Always grateful for Headingley 1981 and other memories. Thanks Graham.

  • aamerahmad on October 5, 2011, 14:46 GMT

    will be sadly missed he had one of the most beautifully smooth bowling action!!!!

  • CricketChat on October 5, 2011, 14:42 GMT

    May his soul RIP. Too young to leave this world. I remember him as an effective fast bowler for Eng.

  • Marcio on October 5, 2011, 14:30 GMT

    This is rather a shock. I recall him playing around the time I first started getting interested in cricket. 52 is far too young to die, and I can't imagine what the short illness might have been. I remember him as a strapping young fast bowler, the epitome if physical health. That final giant stride where he seemed to scape his back foot must have scuffed up a lot of wickets! RIP Graham Dilley.

  • on October 5, 2011, 14:27 GMT

    very very sad news. A great fast bowler with a typical bowling action. England has lost a great cricketer. May his family members muster enough courage and strength to bear this irrepairable loss.

  • on October 5, 2011, 14:27 GMT

    all one can say great bowler, great heart, and great person. will be missed by all

  • Truemans_Ghost on October 5, 2011, 14:19 GMT

    Really sad. As a member of the England team when I was first getting into cricket in the early 80s I always have remembered him as a bigger star than he perhaps was, but always seemed a genuine guy.

  • on October 5, 2011, 14:18 GMT

    Very sad. One of my childhood cricketing heroes. Rest in peace Graham.

  • ShashidharHundi on October 5, 2011, 14:18 GMT

    As a school kid, I remember watching his bowling & amazed at this bowling action and the stride at the bowling crease. Very eye catchy bowler of those days. RIP Dilley.

  • siriherath on October 5, 2011, 14:16 GMT

    Very sad and shocked to hear the loss of a great fast bowler and a true gentleman of cricket at just 52. For me, he had the most rhythmic run up and a graceful delivery of all the English bowlers I've seen in the last 50 years. Only Truman and Gough came close. Only a few weeks ago I was checking the whereabouts of Dilley in cricinfo archives. May he attain Nirvana!

  • ibbani on October 5, 2011, 14:14 GMT

    1 famous scorecard between Aus and Eng - Dennis Lillee - c Willey - b Dilley

  • on October 5, 2011, 13:49 GMT

    i remember dilley bowling against kapil dev's indian team in 1986 tour of england..was a good bowler and very effective..will always be remembered...a good man...may his soul rest in peace

  • Rakim on October 5, 2011, 13:40 GMT

    Rest in Peace, condolence to his family!

  • on October 5, 2011, 13:27 GMT

    Very sad, one of my early cricket watching memories is staying up to watch the 86-87 Ashes from Australia and the sight of Graeme Dilley steaming in and bowling with pace and movement using that huge delivery stride is almost embedded in my subconscious. Top man!

  • Rajdhaniexpress on October 5, 2011, 13:26 GMT

    Will be sadly missed.

    I will always remember his poetic contribution to the game. The famous bit of commentry during Australia Vs England test match:-

    Lilley caught Willey bowled Dilley for 9 (?).

    Dennis Lilley is walking back and the commentator says, " ... but Lilley is not amused!".

  • Bilal_Choudry on October 5, 2011, 13:15 GMT

    very very sad news indeed :(. I still remember him running of that angular run he was very quick. Rest in peace Graham

  • bumsonseats on October 5, 2011, 12:55 GMT

    i went on holiday to australia on 1986/1987 ashes tour, the guy did very well on that tour getting wickets very early in most tests an 1 dayers and the perth challenge. always had a funny action seeming to stop on delivery. a good bowler both for his county kent and england. dpk

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    So sad. A great man, and a year younger than myself. My abiding memory is not of his exploits, but of his visit to my cricket club many years ago, and the impromptu coaching session he gave us, out on the square. His first ball to me I nudged for a single, his second ball I drove straight past him for four. At this point I was thinking "This isn't so bad". The next ball I never saw, but the stumps certainly felt the impact! When I had the opportunity to bowl to him, he repayed the honour by smacking my first delivery over the clubhouse and onto the bowling green next door. He was all smiles, and so generous with his time, patience and skills. Sorely, sorely missed.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:50 GMT

    R.I.P. so sad news for english cricket

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    Very sad news, and so young.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    I remember his tireless bowling during the Oval test of '87 when Pakistan racked up 708. His angular run up -- starting almost at long off -- and loose-limbed action were unmistakeable. RIP, Graham Dilley.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    I remember hearing that 1981 Ashes Epic on BBC , and i have seen Graham Dilley bowl many times , he was a great bowler and good person , May GOD bless him and he will be missed , too young to die , but that's destiny.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:43 GMT

    So sad. I'll never forget his contribution to the Headingly test of 81. A true cricket man. RIP

  • InsideHedge on October 5, 2011, 12:42 GMT

    Shocking news. Only 52 yrs old, far too young. RIP Graham. Thoughts with his family and friends.

  • chefrahul on October 5, 2011, 12:37 GMT

    That is so sad. RIP He will be always remembered.

  • TouseefAhmad on October 5, 2011, 12:30 GMT

    Very sad news. Two great cricketers Nawab of Pataudi and Diley have died in space of a month. Surely we belong to God and to Him shall we return.

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  • TouseefAhmad on October 5, 2011, 12:30 GMT

    Very sad news. Two great cricketers Nawab of Pataudi and Diley have died in space of a month. Surely we belong to God and to Him shall we return.

  • chefrahul on October 5, 2011, 12:37 GMT

    That is so sad. RIP He will be always remembered.

  • InsideHedge on October 5, 2011, 12:42 GMT

    Shocking news. Only 52 yrs old, far too young. RIP Graham. Thoughts with his family and friends.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:43 GMT

    So sad. I'll never forget his contribution to the Headingly test of 81. A true cricket man. RIP

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    I remember hearing that 1981 Ashes Epic on BBC , and i have seen Graham Dilley bowl many times , he was a great bowler and good person , May GOD bless him and he will be missed , too young to die , but that's destiny.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    I remember his tireless bowling during the Oval test of '87 when Pakistan racked up 708. His angular run up -- starting almost at long off -- and loose-limbed action were unmistakeable. RIP, Graham Dilley.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:48 GMT

    Very sad news, and so young.

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:50 GMT

    R.I.P. so sad news for english cricket

  • on October 5, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    So sad. A great man, and a year younger than myself. My abiding memory is not of his exploits, but of his visit to my cricket club many years ago, and the impromptu coaching session he gave us, out on the square. His first ball to me I nudged for a single, his second ball I drove straight past him for four. At this point I was thinking "This isn't so bad". The next ball I never saw, but the stumps certainly felt the impact! When I had the opportunity to bowl to him, he repayed the honour by smacking my first delivery over the clubhouse and onto the bowling green next door. He was all smiles, and so generous with his time, patience and skills. Sorely, sorely missed.

  • bumsonseats on October 5, 2011, 12:55 GMT

    i went on holiday to australia on 1986/1987 ashes tour, the guy did very well on that tour getting wickets very early in most tests an 1 dayers and the perth challenge. always had a funny action seeming to stop on delivery. a good bowler both for his county kent and england. dpk