England news March 17, 2014

'Disappointment' at Vaughan's comments

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The Professional Cricketers' Association (PCA) chief executive, Angus Porter, has expressed "disappointment" at Michael Vaughan's comments regarding Jonathan Trott after the former England captain said he felt "conned" by the explanation given for Trott's early return from the Ashes.

At the time when Trott left immediately after the Brisbane Test it was termed to be for a "stress-related illness". The batsman has this week said - in his first interviews given to Sky Sports, ESPNcricinfo and the Evening Standard - that he was suffering from burnout rather than any form of depression which Vaughan has taken to mean as being "not mental" issues.

"I was so tired, I couldn't think, I couldn't concentrate and I couldn't bat," Trott told ESPNcricinfo. "It was as if my processing speed was slower. My answer has always been to work harder. I can see that was a mistake now."

In a strongly-worded column in the Daily Telegraph, Vaughan wrote that players in the England dressing room and the opposition will now think that Trott did a "runner" from Australia when the going got tough.

"I feel a little bit conned we were told Jonathan Trott's problems in Australia were a stress-related illness he had suffered for years.

"He was obviously not in a great place but he was struggling for cricketing reasons and not mental, and there is a massive difference. There is a danger we are starting to use stress-related illness and depression too quickly as tags for players under pressure."

Vaughan was also critical of Trott's use of words "crazy" and "nutcase" during his interview with Sky Sports.

"He then completely disrespected anybody who has gone through depression and mental illness by using words such as 'nutcase' or 'crazy'. When I hear players talking about burn-out, I suspect it is an excuse. You never see players retiring from sport and talking about burn-out when they are playing well.

"What Trott will have to accept is that players in his own dressing room and in the opposition will look at him and think at the toughest of times he did a runner. He did not fight and got on a plane and went home. It is harsh but that is the reality."

Porter said that the comments were a reminder of the work still needed to be done not only with sport but in the wider society. "I'm disappointed in the comments by Michael Vaughan," he told ESPNcricinfo. "We all need to understand that there is a spectrum of mental illness and every case is different. It's a reminder that there is still much to understand and learn, I think across society as a whole."

Porter did, though, concede that some of the words chosen by Trott could be seen as "clumsy" although believes they were used to describe people's possible view of him rather than his view of how mental illness is perceived.

The ECB's role in how they explained the situation and briefed when Trott flew home has also been questioned, but Porter was sure they "did their very best to explain a difficult situation in a sensitive and sympathetic manner."

Another former England player, Matthew Hoggard, who has spoken openly about suffering from depression towards the end of his international career echoed Vaughan's thoughts.

"Very interesting thoughts from Michael Vaughan on Jonathan Trott," Hoggard posted on Twitter. "As a whole I would have to agree with him. When Trott came back from Australia citing stress-related issues I think we all automatically thought of depression.

"Having first-hand experience of the horrible illness to hear Jonathan use the words nutcase and crazy is so disrespectful and coming from a guy that cited mental health issues as the reason he came home astonishing."

A leading mental-health charity, Mind, emphasised that there are no simple answers when it comes to stress, and its various guises, and that there remains some way to go to create an environment of understanding.

"We all have mental health and, as with physical health, it's essential we are attuned to the signs and symptoms that can be indicative of underlying problems," Paul Farmer, the chief executive, told ESPNcricinfo. "Stress is not a medical diagnosis, but severe stress that continues for a long time may lead to depression, anxiety, or more severe mental health problems.

"Within the world of elite sport, there is undeniable pressure to deliver outstanding performances time after time. There is little room for error and failure to deliver can cost a player their position on a team. In turn there is an atmosphere where asking for help can be perceived as a weakness and speaking out about mental health problems a taboo. Cases like the tragic death of (footballer) Robert Enke show just how serious the effects of this stigma can be.

"It has been encouraging to see governing bodies, including the PCA, start to address problems within their own sports in recent years. However, the confusion and language that has surrounded today's story shows just how far there is to go.

"One in four people experience a mental health problem every year and the sporting world is no exception, however it is clear that we're still a very long way off the point where mental health can be discussed openly, honestly and with understanding."

Andrew McGlashan is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • JG2704 on March 19, 2014, 23:34 GMT

    @AshesErnie on (March 17, 2014, 19:44 GMT) Regardless of what you believe re Vaughan - I don't recall him playing for England again after that SA tour. I think Vaughan is more questioning ECB for leading us to believe it was something different (at least not as severe) from what it was and then Trott's use of the words crazy and nutcase in light of the profile on mental health issues. I wonder how Tres (a regular pundit) feels when Trott uses these terms?

  • JG2704 on March 19, 2014, 23:32 GMT

    @Mikey160 on (March 18, 2014, 21:17 GMT) Swann quit the tour as he felt he had nothing left to give and never let anyone else think anything different. He had his share of folk saying he was a quitter etc. It was kind of a brave decision in not pretending it was anything else but the fact that he felt he had nothing left to offer.

    Trott - for me - was different as we were led to think he could be in a real dark place and he received so much sympathy from fans/players/pundits many of who (maybe Vaughan included) feared for his well being. And a few months later he is talking jovially using the words Crazy and Nutcase - which IMO is at best insensitive. I don't think it was so much the fact he thought Trott did a runner but the fact that he felt he miked the sympathy card whereas Swann was straight down the middle

  • Ian_Greenwood on March 18, 2014, 22:45 GMT

    It is impertinent to make unverified links, I realise, but in the 1970s Geoffrey Boycott absented himself from the test team for reasons that may have been similar to those suggested by Trott.

    That said, for two cricketers to absent themselves unilaterally from the same test tour is surely unprecedented. What are we to make of that?

  • JG2704 on March 18, 2014, 22:28 GMT

    @Jo Salvador on (March 17, 2014, 19:46 GMT) Don't have an issue with Trott. More an issue with Porter for questioning Vaughan over his comms. I think Trott will now become a sitting target for verbals from opposition players

    @Front-Foot_lunge on (March 17, 2014, 19:27 GMT) I'm sure that "As an Australian fan" I can speak for everyone in saying how humbled and delighted we are with your apologies. Well done.

    @smithy.nottingham on (March 18, 2014, 0:05 GMT) I like Trott but I for me him using the the words Crazy and Nutcase affects the sympathy level I have for him. If he was in that dark a place I doubt he'd use those words. Either way it seems insensitive

  • Mikey160 on March 18, 2014, 21:17 GMT

    So Doctor Vaughan is now an expert on medical matters. Can someone explain why he thinks Trott did a runner while when Swann walked away from England in Aus Vaughan says this was a brave decision.

    Where's his consistency.

  • sonu.g on March 18, 2014, 17:56 GMT

    now i wonder how the indian players lyk sachin performed under such high mental pressures....1 of the reasons y he is the greayest of them all ever

  • YorkshirePudding on March 18, 2014, 14:10 GMT

    @cloudmess, I saw the program you mention, it was very enlightening, especially in regards to Depression, however Vaughan isnt doing himself any favours by stating that being mentally exhausted/burnt out is not a stress related illness.

    I myself have suffered mental exhaustion on a couple of cases, usually because I pushed myself too hard, on a couple of occasions it led to stress and very nearly to clinical depression, and the only way to reduce it was to walk away from the job I had.

    In the End Trott did the right thing for himself, and thats all that matters, it doesnt matter what vaughan or anyone else thinks.

  • on March 18, 2014, 13:36 GMT

    I had a go at Warner for his comments, maybe he was right.

  • cloudmess on March 18, 2014, 13:25 GMT

    Given the savagery of some of the comments being made about Trott, I'm assuming these are being made by people who, in their own various lines of work, have had the hard work and guts to become one of the best and most successful in their country at what they do?

  • cloudmess on March 18, 2014, 12:43 GMT

    I don't agree with those who say Vaughan is trying to grab the headlines. He once did a programme on mental illness in sportsmen, it's a subject he knows something about. I think he was concerned with sportsmen confusing clinical depression with being tired and out of form. The danger is in future no distinction is made between a player who is burnt out and needs a break, and a player who is genuinely ill and needs treatment. However I think every player has the right to ask to be left out if they don't feel they are 100% fit for the job in hand, which is all that Trott did. Forget all this machismo rubbish about not being enough of a man. It benefits no-one if a team fields half-fit players.

  • JG2704 on March 19, 2014, 23:34 GMT

    @AshesErnie on (March 17, 2014, 19:44 GMT) Regardless of what you believe re Vaughan - I don't recall him playing for England again after that SA tour. I think Vaughan is more questioning ECB for leading us to believe it was something different (at least not as severe) from what it was and then Trott's use of the words crazy and nutcase in light of the profile on mental health issues. I wonder how Tres (a regular pundit) feels when Trott uses these terms?

  • JG2704 on March 19, 2014, 23:32 GMT

    @Mikey160 on (March 18, 2014, 21:17 GMT) Swann quit the tour as he felt he had nothing left to give and never let anyone else think anything different. He had his share of folk saying he was a quitter etc. It was kind of a brave decision in not pretending it was anything else but the fact that he felt he had nothing left to offer.

    Trott - for me - was different as we were led to think he could be in a real dark place and he received so much sympathy from fans/players/pundits many of who (maybe Vaughan included) feared for his well being. And a few months later he is talking jovially using the words Crazy and Nutcase - which IMO is at best insensitive. I don't think it was so much the fact he thought Trott did a runner but the fact that he felt he miked the sympathy card whereas Swann was straight down the middle

  • Ian_Greenwood on March 18, 2014, 22:45 GMT

    It is impertinent to make unverified links, I realise, but in the 1970s Geoffrey Boycott absented himself from the test team for reasons that may have been similar to those suggested by Trott.

    That said, for two cricketers to absent themselves unilaterally from the same test tour is surely unprecedented. What are we to make of that?

  • JG2704 on March 18, 2014, 22:28 GMT

    @Jo Salvador on (March 17, 2014, 19:46 GMT) Don't have an issue with Trott. More an issue with Porter for questioning Vaughan over his comms. I think Trott will now become a sitting target for verbals from opposition players

    @Front-Foot_lunge on (March 17, 2014, 19:27 GMT) I'm sure that "As an Australian fan" I can speak for everyone in saying how humbled and delighted we are with your apologies. Well done.

    @smithy.nottingham on (March 18, 2014, 0:05 GMT) I like Trott but I for me him using the the words Crazy and Nutcase affects the sympathy level I have for him. If he was in that dark a place I doubt he'd use those words. Either way it seems insensitive

  • Mikey160 on March 18, 2014, 21:17 GMT

    So Doctor Vaughan is now an expert on medical matters. Can someone explain why he thinks Trott did a runner while when Swann walked away from England in Aus Vaughan says this was a brave decision.

    Where's his consistency.

  • sonu.g on March 18, 2014, 17:56 GMT

    now i wonder how the indian players lyk sachin performed under such high mental pressures....1 of the reasons y he is the greayest of them all ever

  • YorkshirePudding on March 18, 2014, 14:10 GMT

    @cloudmess, I saw the program you mention, it was very enlightening, especially in regards to Depression, however Vaughan isnt doing himself any favours by stating that being mentally exhausted/burnt out is not a stress related illness.

    I myself have suffered mental exhaustion on a couple of cases, usually because I pushed myself too hard, on a couple of occasions it led to stress and very nearly to clinical depression, and the only way to reduce it was to walk away from the job I had.

    In the End Trott did the right thing for himself, and thats all that matters, it doesnt matter what vaughan or anyone else thinks.

  • on March 18, 2014, 13:36 GMT

    I had a go at Warner for his comments, maybe he was right.

  • cloudmess on March 18, 2014, 13:25 GMT

    Given the savagery of some of the comments being made about Trott, I'm assuming these are being made by people who, in their own various lines of work, have had the hard work and guts to become one of the best and most successful in their country at what they do?

  • cloudmess on March 18, 2014, 12:43 GMT

    I don't agree with those who say Vaughan is trying to grab the headlines. He once did a programme on mental illness in sportsmen, it's a subject he knows something about. I think he was concerned with sportsmen confusing clinical depression with being tired and out of form. The danger is in future no distinction is made between a player who is burnt out and needs a break, and a player who is genuinely ill and needs treatment. However I think every player has the right to ask to be left out if they don't feel they are 100% fit for the job in hand, which is all that Trott did. Forget all this machismo rubbish about not being enough of a man. It benefits no-one if a team fields half-fit players.

  • milepost on March 18, 2014, 12:23 GMT

    @CM1000, well said. Cricket is a tough sport, Clarke made 160 getting pumped by Morkel (who applauded his ton). Trott gets pumped by Mitch and goes home. Vaughn is right to question the ECB spin on it.

  • mordechai_sprint on March 18, 2014, 11:43 GMT

    I am disappointed by Vaughan's comments. Forget labels like burned out/depressed/mentally ill and look at the symptoms Trott was experiencing. He was unable to perform and contribute to the team. He took the only option available. I respect him for his desire to return despite this episode. Ex-players should moderate their comments, especially in fields they know little about.

  • UsmanMuhammad on March 18, 2014, 10:53 GMT

    Trott is confused and confusing others as well. Truth is he fled back home citing reasons he refuses to hold upon now will leave others been conned. If it was burnout he should have said same in Australia before leaving team in crisis.

  • CustomKid on March 18, 2014, 10:49 GMT

    @foozball on (March 17, 2014, 22:05 GMT) My word will he cop it next time he plays a team of any substance. If Davey Warner is in the side turn up the stump mike please! Vaughn has a job and that is to grab headlines and sell papers for his employers. He does it well, like or dislike him but I'm backing him on this one.

    Trott has technical difficulties and has been exposed, whether he can overcome it remains to be seen against the like of Steyn, Johnson and co. Listening to what he said I think he's shot himself in the foot as did the ECB with their description of his description post the Gabba.

    Personally I'd not pick him again or at best make him score runs in county then put him back in for the Ashes, then its sink or swim. Ironic how his two burn out experiences have come against some of the best bowlers on the planet at present.

    Something doesn't add up in all of this. At 32 I'd clip him for good and move along. They've dumped KP @ 33 time get rid of Trott as well.

  • WarVdm on March 18, 2014, 10:44 GMT

    Only those inside the England dressing room (trainers and players) would know if Trott was exhausted, if he bolted, if he needed a break, if he was selfish, etc. Be it as it may, Vaughan has never seemed to like Trott anyway, he has made comments (even accusations) against Trott over the years, so whether Vaughan has a point or not, he won't be impartial towards Trott.

  • keptalittlelow on March 18, 2014, 10:39 GMT

    Vaughan's comments against a fellow cricketer might look appalling but I am afraid Trott who has served English cricket so admirably was a bit confusing in his recent comments about his problems in Australia. Most people would still have sympathy with Trott.

  • on March 18, 2014, 10:32 GMT

    Vaughan seems to be attacking a straw man. Neither Trott nor the ECB ever used the term 'depressed' or 'depression' - they were very careful to use 'stress-related', which is *not* the same thing. To attack them because, in Vaughan's view, Trott turns out not to be depressed,'just' stressed is simply ridiculous.

    My memory is that Warner's comments were made before Trott left the tour, and were also condemned before he left. They were nasty and personal, and not the way international sportsmen typically describe each other. He deserved all the condemnation he got, not because he 'caused' Trott's condition (He didn't), but because it was an uncivilized way to attack a sporting opponent (As is thumping them in a bar).

  • drdickdixon on March 18, 2014, 9:28 GMT

    A lot's been said of Trott bottling it because of Johnson. He's already said his problems we resurfacing at home to Aus when we were coasting. Vaughan is fast becoming an attention-seeking rent-a-quote. Tactically great, tactfully inept - he doesn't know the full story. Trott, however has done himself no favours by trying to deny he had mental problems and that it was "burnout". All the behaviour he described in his various interviews was of someone with anxiety/stress problems (as has been said above, part of the broad spectrum of mental health problems). Trott seems to be denying this maybe to minimalise any sledging which he'll inevitably receive should he make it back to Test level.

  • on March 18, 2014, 9:07 GMT

    Really interesting interview on Sunday night. A new insight into the pressures of international sport. Not sure why Flower said that they were aware of this condition for some time and were managing it. Clearly he should have had a break before the Ashes series.

  • on March 18, 2014, 9:03 GMT

    I think the fact he was on the verge of tears during his interview on Sky, more than once his eyes reddened and he looked about to crack. Whether he has a problem admitting he has a minor (probably fatigue related) mental issue or not, it seems pretty clear he does. Several mental issues have fatigue as a major causal factor - and often it's not as simple as "getting a few days of rest" to cure them as the fatigue triggers some reactions to the bodies ability to cope with events that can fundamentally change a person until they are corrected - if they can be corrected. I never heard Trott himself say he had mental issues - and those that did say it on his behalf may still be right despite Trott's assertion that he is fine. Physician heal thyself? Trott isn't a physician.

  • Nutcutlet on March 18, 2014, 8:24 GMT

    Like just about everything that relates to the human condition, it's extremely complex. Trott hasn't done himself many favours by opening up, because there's now a genuine perception that we were misguided about his departure after the Gabba. He wasn't suffering the (purely) stress-related condition; it was rather, Vaughan asserts, a matter of ticker for the scrap. But this discounts Trott's psychological make up which is, IMO, obsessive, with the tunnel-vision that has made him a man who is never more himself than when in his tunnel. Unable to find his comfort zone & its ritual mother-hen scratching of his guard - Mitch saw to that - Trott lost himself. His compass spinning, his batting disintegrated. Trott was of no further use to himself or the team. He needed rehab. Off he went. Hanging on in Aus. almost certainly not an option. He was the embodiment of a destroyed cricketer. Bad for morale. Every wo/man has an Achilles' Heel. Some never discover theirs, unlike JT.

  • Thegimp on March 18, 2014, 8:22 GMT

    English cricket needs to apologise to Warner. They were quick to jump on him when he called Trott soft when in actual fact he was right!!!

  • dunger.bob on March 18, 2014, 8:06 GMT

    I think Trott's a bit of a perfectionist and came across something he couldn't handle. It spun him out fiercely, so he took off. .. This is how I look at it. If he's sick, get well soon. If he's bailed out - well, that's something isn't it.

  • on March 18, 2014, 7:48 GMT

    I honestly think what Trott did was right. In fact I view what he did as being extremely courageous of him rather than cowardly, which his act has been condemned as by the majority.it takes guts to come forward when you are suffering from such problem and admit it. Hats off to ECB, Alastair Cook and the rest of the team for being supportive of Trott. Every ex-cricketer can't be an expert on Trott's condition. People vary from each other, their abilities to adapt to circumstances vary too. Yes, most are able to take pressure and criticism in their stride, but what if there is one who breaks down in the face of such pressure? Is he to be condemned for reacting differently for the rest of his life? Vaughan and that scumbag Piers Morgan have been extremely vocal about how people need to be respected for being different in the Pietersen saga. How is it any different in this case then? I say that notion is more applicable here than in KP's case.

  • xl2020 on March 18, 2014, 7:22 GMT

    this makes Warner being chastised over his comments about Trott ridiculous, the England team were very soft during the aussie summer only Ben Stokes showed any class and toughness (both of which he has plenty).

  • Beertjie on March 18, 2014, 6:28 GMT

    @cloudmess on (March 17, 2014, 18:45 GMT) Excellent remarks. Clearly he wants to play test cricket again. Should he be recalled and if so will it set a dangerous precedent?

  • xtrafalgarx on March 18, 2014, 6:03 GMT

    Vaughan's point is that the 'burnout' that Trott talks about happens to everyone. If it was depression, he could be excused because those are strenuous circumstances. However, he isn't and therefore just isn't up to the riguours and pressures that come with being an International cricketer.

    Furthermore, Trott, who had received an outpouring of sympathy after his exit has now turned around and spat on the faces of the people who supported him as well as those who know and understand just how debilitating the disease can be. People are criticising Vaughan now, but are forgetting that he was one of the first people to offer his sympathy towards Trott when he left Australia.

    But now that the truth has come out that he actually wasn't depressed and that he has now offended people with the disease, and that he wants to waltz back into the team straight away is unforgivable. Ask yourselves this, if Johnson was playing for Scotland or SL, or IND, would he be so keen to get back then?

    Nope.

  • simon_w on March 18, 2014, 5:00 GMT

    Vaughan is grandstanding and playing to the gallery. His comments are more about his own self-publicism than anything else.

  • MaruthuDelft on March 18, 2014, 4:43 GMT

    Who does Vaughan blame? Was it Trott that said he was returning because of depression? It was Flower and co. But it happens all the time. Institutions do forward non specific reasons for events. The intention is to stop people interpret things wrong and disturbances. And I am fed up with this runner theory. Did he run away from his wife? There are so many cricketers waiting for the opportunity. If you don't feel great at the moment what is wrong in making way? Michael Vaughan is a respectable cricketer but on this issue he is off the mark. And remember his tweet '..the worst number 3..' could also have played a part in Trott's departure.

  • sa13375 on March 18, 2014, 4:17 GMT

    honesty, if truth be told it was clear after the first test that england would struggle in the series. it was clear from the way trott got out that his technique had been exposed. he would have gained more respect if he had continued on and tried to overcome his techincal problems the way root did. he took the easy way out and if england are questioning pieterson and have taken the courage of dropping him for bringing disharmony in dressing room then in the interest of english cricket ECB seriously needs to think if it is in the interest of english cricket to bring back a player who chickened out by giving excuse of mental stress. trott has been a very good player but there is no shame in accepting the fact that his time is up and england would only gain by looking ahead than looking back

  • chechong0114 on March 18, 2014, 3:41 GMT

    I guarantee u dat if the English were playing any other team even if dey were 4-0 down in the series none of the players would have returned home. These men were manipulated by a ruthless Australian team and returned home through fear. Australia has always played cricket that way, they do not just beat u on playing skill, they use any tactics necessary. If it were just playing skill they would not be reigning world champions for as long as they were. Having said that I will also say this, for the upcoming 2015 Ashes series in England the English team need to quickly find a coach with the same ruthless attitude of Lehmann if they are to win back the Urn, if not dey may just end up losing that series 5-0 at home as well and even more players will retire from international test cricket citing mental and physical burn out too. Mark my words.

  • on March 18, 2014, 3:29 GMT

    If Trott spent sleepless nights if he could have got sleep he would have had nightmares of Johnson - so he bolted. England does not need a coward at "one drop". The selectors should be looking for young British born top order batsmen and see that they stand up like Brian Close or Ian Botham to whatever is delivered at them. Learning to avoid the short fast stuff is something that must come instinctively. Take Michael Clark or Jacques Kallis - both had problems with the short ball after being hit but the stood up and came back. Trott did a bolt.

  • VivGilchrist on March 18, 2014, 2:58 GMT

    Sounds like a stooge of a guy to have in your team ... pretty much the opposite to the lionhearted Ryan Harris. This basically reads - Please play me for home series or soft away tours to Zimbabwe or Bangladesh to maintain my average.

  • vswami on March 18, 2014, 2:25 GMT

    It takes guts for Vaughan to write what he did. Well done .. he just confirmed what lots of people around the world think of what Trott did. PCA simply has to spin the story to defend one of their members which isnt surprising.

  • OneEyedAussie on March 18, 2014, 1:43 GMT

    The great thing about a phrase as suitably vague as "stress related illness" is that it can mean just about anything. At the time everyone thought depression, now it turns out Trott had trouble coping with the rigors of international cricket and the English schedule. I guess you could say both are "stress related illnesses". Nevertheless, if I was an English selector I would be VERY hesitant in picking Trott again.

  • morgan_gibson87 on March 18, 2014, 1:36 GMT

    The exhaustion and burnout experienced by Trott should be seen as we see a physical injury; someone is in no position to play in those circumstances, just as if they'd had a hand broken or some other injury caused one to withdraw.

  • dalboy12 on March 18, 2014, 1:30 GMT

    There seems to be two issues here. Firstly, should Trott have left the tour, did he flee when he shouldn't have? Secondly, the excuse given for him leaving, was it accurate? On the first one, that really seems up to Trott, his form in the first tests I think showed he was in no place to perform well in test cricket - as I heard questioned -- do players have the right to "drop" themselves, when they know they are not up to it? Trott knew he wasn't coping, so he left - it's a hard one as some would say guts it out, but would he really have offered much to the team in the state it seems he was in? On the second issue, let's not lessen the impact of burnout, it seems like Trott just drove himself too hard and over the edge. Everyone has that edge, it's just in different places for all of us. I think this shows the importance of quality time away from the game, in an age when cricketers can be asked to play all year round. Quality down time leads to better cricketers.

  • on March 18, 2014, 0:34 GMT

    I totally agree with Porter when he said:

    "We all need to understand that there is a spectrum of mental illness and every case is different. It's a reminder that there is still much to understand and learn, I think across society as a whole."

    Let me also add, from personal experience. A member of my family have a similar condition. He goes through ups and downs. When he is up and about, he acts and talks that he is alright, and unfortunately refers to others with similar problems as " crazy", "mental" , "nuts" or on similar terms. When he talks like that, we all ignore those "comments" (not him) : nether support or oppose those views. We gently shift the topic.

    His younger brother use to respond: "Look who is talking!". That used to make him very angry and agitated; and things use to become worse. I thought, I may share. May be of some value to someone somewhere.

  • CricketLifer on March 18, 2014, 0:17 GMT

    I think Trott continues to confirm that Australian tactics of "mental disintegration" works. After reading this I completely agree with Vaughan. You either fight or stop making excuses. Now your teammates and competitors know that you will cave in when it gets really difficult. Trott is also very wrong in choosing his words to describe others as "crazy" and "nutcase" especially after hiding behind so called "depression". Lost respect for him after reading this story.

  • on March 18, 2014, 0:05 GMT

    I think that saying Trott had mental problems was meant to make the aussies look bad..Warner was cast as the baddie thank goodness it didn't work!

  • smithy.nottingham on March 18, 2014, 0:05 GMT

    Vaughan is becoming rent-a-quote - if we hang on for a few weeks, he will say the exact opposite of what he recently said about Trott.

    Trott deserves our sympathy, not the rabid, desperate headline grabbing of a former decent player desperate to retain the limelight, regardless of the cost.

  • Pilot777 on March 17, 2014, 23:47 GMT

    Amazing a few days ago I stated the same as Michael Vaughan under the article about Trott bleating about his problems. My comment was never published but low and behold Michael states the same. Trotts explanations are a load of hogwash. The reality is he threw in the towel whilst the other lads soldiered on. Does this mean each time there is a tough series he will cry "Stress" and run back home? Credit goes to the guys who were also away from home for a long time and stayed till the bitter end on a disastrous tour. I totally agree with Michael Vaughan's assessment and his feeble excuses are nothing short of a joke and he abandoned his team mates in their hour of need.

  • attilathecricketer on March 17, 2014, 23:45 GMT

    Trott did return with a stress related illness - that much is clear from program. It is also clear from it that it was different from Trescothick's problem. I suspect some people can tough out Trott situ whereas no one can a Tresco situ. To me it is clear that he was not right to play the tests and therefore right he came home (and he should be allowed to make that choice). Equally he should play again if he proves worthy of his place at the start of the county season. Trott was describing how some people view him (and how he and most of society views people mentally worse off than him). Vaughan is wrong - we should not force people to continue with that level of stress

  • jb633 on March 17, 2014, 23:45 GMT

    @Dr Johar, what happened with Ghambir? I have not heard anything about him for ages but always thought he was a decent player.

  • jb633 on March 17, 2014, 23:43 GMT

    @cloudness, I agree that if Trott was not mentally fit he should not have played. However, the way the ECB managed the situation seems wrong. Could we not have just dropped Trott and sent him home with a fabricated injury? As Engllshmen whether we like to admit it or not, Trott went home directly after Johnson bounced him out and Warner abused him in the press. IMO this handed great impetus to Aus as it made us look weak and it made it look like we were crumbling under the pressure. You can't tell me this had no influence on what was to follow. We should have dropped Trott and he should have been brave enough to say he was struggling with his confidence. We did not need to say any more than that if you ask me. We had beaten Aus with relative ease in the 3 series before and the minute they made a comeback we had no answer. It really does not look good for our game. I am not sure Trott should play for England again.

  • SoyQuearns on March 17, 2014, 23:38 GMT

    Onya Vaughan - call it like it is.

    Trott will only ever now be remembered as 'that guy who couldn't stand the heat' when the going got tough in Australia.

    As Vaughan said - no player ever retires or takes time off when they are doing well.

    Pleased to see that most opinion on here supports Vaughan. Get Trott to go work 10-hour shifts in a factory, 5-days a week for 50 years and then get him to comment on 'exhaustion'.

    He's a millionaire who plays a game of sport for an extremely high-paid living. There are pressures and expectation in every job, for those who try to say 'yeah but he's under pressure'.

    All too convenient, and Trott's efforts to show (what is now obviously mock) sincerity and self-awareness have fallen flat, especially since he insulted those that actually do suffer such an illness.

    I always suspected Trott had no ticker and that has been objectively proven. He should stick to jamming the bat into Windies and Bangladesh, Aus will only improve.

  • jb633 on March 17, 2014, 23:28 GMT

    I must confess I have come full circle with this issue and I agree with Vaughan entirely on this one. Initially I was very defensive over anyone that wanted to disrespect Trott as having a family member suffering with depression, I understood how damaging it can be, especially in a sporting environment. To hear him talk in his interview about crazy and nutty, demonstrated how far from the illness he actually was. Not only did I actually find the words offensive but I also felt let down that we, as loyal fans through thick and thin, were misled by the coaching staff. At the end of the day I, along with millions of others across the world, have to get up and go to work on a daily basis and we have periods in our lives in which we really struggle to get things done the way they should be or the way we want to. However, we do not have the chance to simply go home and claim a stress related illness. Stress related illness is very different from a burnout. Vaughan is correct, we were conned.

  • MasterBlaster100 on March 17, 2014, 23:11 GMT

    Trott has technical problems. He doesnt cut hook or pull and he lunges on the front foot to all comers. He says he has experienced similar feelings at the end of the SA tour (where Steyn and Morkel sorted him out on a quick deck in the 5th test) and again at Lords in 2013 (where Ryan Harris picked on his technique mercilessly with a succession of bouncers) Having to face Mitchell Johnson targetting you on one of the world's bounciest pitches when you dont have a technique to cope probably is very stressful. Knowing you have Perth to come and dont have an answer is textbook conditions for stress. He may have relapses every time a good quick gets after him unless he can learn a backfoot game.

    The interesting question is why does Trott play forward to everything. Why does he walk down the track towards these nasty fasties. Is he trying to control the uncontrollables. A batsman reveals an awful lot about themselves through their technique.

  • Ms.Cricket on March 17, 2014, 23:03 GMT

    The ECB is full of shameless bureaucrats like Angus Porter who are like the Emperor in the fairy tale. Time the ECB and the selectors were dumped.

  • Marcio on March 17, 2014, 22:44 GMT

    Well if Trott wasn't depressed he will be now. What a drama!

  • on March 17, 2014, 22:37 GMT

    Micheal Vaughan should be ashamed. I don't usually comment on here but what on earth makes him think he had a right to judge Trott here. It's pretty clear from what trott Had said he was in a very dark place and in no fit state to pay cricket. You could tell that just by watching him bat. That wasn't just bad form, that was a man not thinking straight. He was absolutely right to make the choice (the only choice) he did and take time out. I can relate to how Trott felt. He his a bit of an obsessive and it was spiraling or of control. No rest, practice practice practice, anxiety no sleep, no escape.

    Why should he stay and suffer and risk even worse mental health consequences.

    my opinion of Vaughan has been tainted for good.

  • CM1000 on March 17, 2014, 22:36 GMT

    I bet Flower and co decided to suggest it was a mental illness because they thought that would stop the Australians using it as sledging ammunition against England for the rest of the series. In the meantime, Michael Clarke refuses to try to hit himself out of trouble against a frightening short ball attack from Morkel in Capetown, takes hits to the body repeatedly, has his shoulder fractured, and still toughs it out and makes 160 not out. Cricket is a tough sport, both mentally and physically, and some are clearly tougher than others.

  • foozball on March 17, 2014, 22:05 GMT

    I'm looking forward to the next time this pillock Trotts onto the pitch again. Sure the fielding team will make him feel well at home.

    ECB management to blame here. Shouldn't have picked him for the tour if there was any problem. Using the catch-all generic "stress-related illness" to cover a multitude of mental issues causes confusion - who could have possibly foreseen that?

    At least everyone knows that Trott is a big softie now though. Get under his skin, he'll wah wah all the way home...

  • ShutTheGate on March 17, 2014, 22:02 GMT

    I think there is no doubt that Trott will be sledged quiet a bit if he comes back to international cricket.

  • Mastervillain on March 17, 2014, 21:34 GMT

    I take a contrary view to many regarding Vaughan, who I find rather distasteful with his petty nips at individuals when he thinks he has the backing of the majority behind him. Of course, he can also snatch the headlines with his over the top comments to boost own image.

    Whether Trott had depression, fatigue (look at the schedule leading into the Ashes) or whatever, the guy has put his test career on the line in withdrawing from the Test arena the way he did. That is not done lightly. The inference from the ex England skipper suggests is was rather spineless, yet I find his own antics fit that billing more appropriately.

    Drop the sensationalism Vaughnie and get a grip or move on.

  • MarinManiac on March 17, 2014, 21:26 GMT

    Depression or burnout -- does it really matter? Trott left the tour for "stress-related reasons" -- and that can logically include either. Anyone who has suffered burnout knows that they cannot perform their job properly, will be incapable of sleeping, have physical symptoms, etc. Under the conditions of Ashes tours then it's quite conceivable that Trott could simply not do his job. Was it fair to the team for him to continue? Probably not. But is it fair for him to label others who suffer different mental illnesses as crazy? No. But did he REALLY say that, or did he just simply say he himself was not crazy? This series of interviews and articles is so ripe for overinterpretation and speculation that it dilutes the point somewhat. There is simply too much international cricket on the schedule, and overwork can mess anyone up, whatever their job. Some cope better than others, but sooner or later it will have an effect.

  • TEST_CRICKET_ONLY on March 17, 2014, 21:25 GMT

    Face it, "depression", "stress", "anxiety" all mean the same thing. Character weakness and lack of courage to deal with what life throws at you. Trott is just soft, and his recent comments prove that. Suddenly, now that Joihnson is not in his radar, he is well again ?

  • Insightful2013 on March 17, 2014, 21:09 GMT

    Significant point, when one is recovering or has recovered from depression or a stress related episode, either through meds or CBT( Cognitive Behavior Therapy). One experiences increased energy, a change from a despairing perception to a brighter future etc. This has to be explained internally, especially to a competitive international sportsman. The depression or stress maybe construed as weakness by the previously afflicted. Shame or anger maybe experienced. Defense mechanisms such as repression, rationalization,reaction formation or Intellectualization may kick in. This could explain his word choices, modifying the weakness of stress or depression into something more palatable such as exhaustion. His words can also be an ignorant response to his feelings. Either way, people should be happy he feels better and be supportive. Michael is a Northerner, no offense intended and they generally speak their minds. I'm sure he means no harm as well. Love Northern birds! Ayup, duckies!

  • Puffin on March 17, 2014, 20:57 GMT

    Perhaps it is not a good idea to pass judgment without knowing the full facts of the case. Considering the pressures of the modern game, shouldn't we be looking into the mental health of players a little more? A timely intervention might have forestalled whatever happened to Trott.

  • Westmorlandia on March 17, 2014, 20:52 GMT

    I think Vaughan and so on are reacting too quickly to what Trott said. He didn't say he was fine - he clearly was in a bad way. Hiding at breakfast, not wanting to speak to anyone - it isn't just "cricketing reasons", though obviously it has its roots in cricket. Fear of being considered "crazy" is something that many people with stress, depression or anything similar experience when they are thinking about speaking to someone about it.

    As the PCA said, there is a whole spectrum of mental health issues here, and they blur into one another. It isn't so simple as to say that on one side of a line is depression, and on another is simply stress, and they're completely different. It doesn't work like that.

  • tiswaldo on March 17, 2014, 20:38 GMT

    Having watched the Trott interview on Sky and then reading Vsughan's article he has got it spot on. Trott does not come across well in these interviews, by his own admission he only got 'burnt out' on 2 tours - funnily enough away in SA and Oz where he was dire. And he says he's targeting an England comeback vs Scotland ! I bet he is, there's some nice easy runs on offer to boost the average !

  • PFEL on March 17, 2014, 20:28 GMT

    Agree with @Burnham. Vaughan is 100% in the right.

  • ThePieChucker on March 17, 2014, 20:14 GMT

    @Dr.Navdeep Johar: While I am a fan of Gautam Gambhir, what on earth does he have to do with an article about Jonathan Trott? There are appropriate places to discuss Gambhir and whether he should be back in the Indian side. This is not one of them.

  • Harlequin. on March 17, 2014, 20:10 GMT

    I am not going to be critical of Trott, because I don't know what it was like to be in his situation, but I was watching his interview last night with the general feeling that something was being hidden.

    There was too much that didn't make sense, if it was burnout then how did Flower realise Trott had a problem very soon after they met. If it was burnout because Trott was working too hard then why was he so keen to throw himself back into the deep end and 'start working hard again'.

    Mental illnesses are very difficult to explain to other people, and I don't believe that Trott was required to explain himself, which is why I would have preferred him to keep quiet rather than come up with what seemed to be a very woolly explanation.

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:46 GMT

    It seems that people are incapable of understanding plain English. Trott has carefully explained that he couldn't think straight, his co-ordination was shot, his confidence was shot, his life-perspective was completely lost. There is nothing to be done at that point but take a break for as long as needed - had he continued he would have been a liability to the team. This condition is definitely stress-related - it might not be depression but unless one acts quickly it can lead to very severe depression. I would have thought this would be obvious even the limited intellects of Vaughan and Hoggard.

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:45 GMT

    Surely the entire point is that the ECB gave the explanation of 'depression'. If blame is to be laid over confusion, it is them, not Trotty.

  • Diaz54 on March 17, 2014, 19:45 GMT

    I fully concur with Vaughan on this. Trott at the time of leaving the tour was declared suffering from depression...in fact it was suggested that he had previous incidences and was being managed through these episodes by his county. Which was obviously not true, and no body including Trott denied this fact. Now what is the difference of being under extreme pressure and burnout? We all,go through all,sorts of pressure in life when we do. to want to get up and go to work! How does one distinguish burnout from just losing the stomach to fight! I feel very sorry for the guys who had to step in.....likes of Carbberry who made a good fist of it and finds himself kicked out from the team. No doubt Trott wants to play in the summer against India and Sri Lanka who will not exert same pressure and he will go on to score lots of runs. I feel,he should not be selected, Players like,Carberry should,be given a chance at homer

  • AshesErnie on March 17, 2014, 19:44 GMT

    Attention seeking tosh from Vaughan. Is this the same Michael Vaughan that blubbed his way out of the England captaincy mid-series when getting beaten by South Africa? Trott knew in Brisbane he was mentally incapable of continuing the tour and, regardless of what label is given to his condition, his staying on tour would not have helped anyone.

  • FredJ000 on March 17, 2014, 19:44 GMT

    I think a player should be dropped if he is unfit - that goes either mentally or physically. The trouble is, even with all the team psychologists they employ, it is harder to tell when a player is not match fit mentally. Well done to Trott for having the courage to say he wasn't mentally fit to play, but well done Vaughan for his criticisms.

    Steve Finn is a good example of a player shot of his confidence and going through a bad patch. He has been dropped and needs a break to rethink things. Is he suffering from mental illness? No, he just isn't mentally fit. Trott's situation is no different from Finn's.He has also demonstrated through his own wording that he has little understanding of any of these problems and how to differentiate a serious illness from a mere blip in form or fatigue. His only defense might be that when you are in the midst of stress and problems you can misjudge how bad they are at the time they are happening. Could this be Trott's way of saying it wasn't that bad?

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:43 GMT

    Shouldit really matter if whatever he was suffering from was mental illness or not. Whether or not he it was mental issue the point is he WAS NOT able to be in a state to play. What condition caused it is just a trivial matter. Why does he need to have depression to not be able to play!! Isn't the end result more important here!!

  • JG2704 on March 17, 2014, 19:41 GMT

    Vaughan is absolutely spot on in all his comments.

    But as is so often the case with the way England handles things - nothing adds up.

    We were getting stories saying that Trott felt his England career was over - which we all did - and now you get Trott using the words "Crazy" and "Nutcase" and Porter criticises Vaughan for lacking understanding? Maybe there was a degree of stress like there would be with anyone who was doing too much but it is a different kettle to what happened to Tres

  • FieryFerg on March 17, 2014, 19:37 GMT

    Spot on Vaughan! Trott should never play for England again, as much for the arrogance of his assumption that he can just walk straight back in against Scotland. I'm sure that would suit him fine as we've no real pace bowlers. Another flat track bully who can't handle true pace. Time to move on beyond limited thirty-plus year olds with over-inflated egos. KPs gone, time for Trott to follow.

  • shot274 on March 17, 2014, 19:36 GMT

    Vaughn is absolutely spot on . If its cricket related stress which member of the touring team was not suffering from it.Its entirely different from mental health issues. I bet Trott would not have felt 'burnt out' if the series was against Bangladesh!

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:36 GMT

    Well said Michael Vaughan, sounds to me that Trott is an obsessive netter and when Johnson found his technique wanting against the short ball he couldn't deal with it, had something akin to a panic attack, and left the tour. Poor form and even worse for him to then say 'I'm not crazy' etc. Long way back for him to sort out his technique and his mental attitude, and no way he should be chosen for England's home tests this summer.

  • Greatest_Game on March 17, 2014, 19:28 GMT

    "Burnout' is a generic, non-specific word meaning physical & mental exhaustion, a condition that causes severe stress. Trott's described reaction was to work harder, to practice more, inducing further stress. Such a response is viewed as anxiety based.

    If the physical & mental stresses bearing upon him caused anxiety, that is a definable, stress related condition. Depression is only one of a number of stress related conditions or disorders.

    Trott's injudicious self-description does not change the nature of his condition, nor that the ECB should have enforced rest before stress & anxiety resulted in mid-tour intervention.

    How many people did Michael Vaughan disappoint when, in tears, he resigned the captaincy & abandoned his team mid-series? He clearly has a limited understanding of stress related conditions, despite evidencing behavior that suggests he suffered the same. He should know better than to criticize Trott. Vaughan caused far greater damage to Eng cricket. Pot … kettle.

  • Front-Foot_lunge on March 17, 2014, 19:27 GMT

    As an England fan, you know things are at their worst when members and former members of the team start rounding upon each other. Not less than a year ago, we were crowing about how good we were having defeated Australia at home. A few warned against this hubris, but many disregarded it. Perhaps the mighty fall that's befallen the England team will help remind a few fans and the media to pull their head in, if things (And that's a big IF) turn around for team England.

    I must also apologise for the way the English media and fans hounded Australian players for comments they made about Trott's departure. Especially Warner, who played a straight bat at a press conference and was forced to apologise. The reality is that he was spot on, Trott was 'scared' and was 'weak' to go home.

    Vaughan here, has effectively said the same thing.

  • jackiethepen on March 17, 2014, 19:22 GMT

    It's a bit of a Catch 22 situation. If Trott wasn't suffering from a stress related illness then going home immediately after the first Ashes Test might seem a bit excessive when he could have been rested from playing and stayed around to help the team. But if he was suffering from a stress related illness which warranted his immediate return home then it is highly unlikely that he would be contemplating playing for England again so soon. The severity of the condition is the issue. It sounds very much as though Trott was suffering from very high levels of anxiety which had got out of control. If that's the case then he needs to be very careful how he manages his return to cricket. To target a return to England so soon sounds like a symptom of the same illness. Trott would be putting himself under pressure to perform after a long lay off. He and England would be wise to take it step by step. The next time the breakdown could be even more serious.

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:21 GMT

    Just because someone is gets a bigger wage packet at the end of the month does not mean that they can't burnout from stress. If anything it could make it worse. I think Trott has clearly described how he was feeling on the pitch when playing and off it when not playing. Stress and Depression can be linked in some cases but are also separate mental issues. Stress is not depression. This is one of the problems when people discuss mental illness as it is so hard to understand and every case is different. Of course you don't feel burnt out when you are playing well as everything is easier when you are playing well. I think Vaughans comments aren't great as Trott has made it clear that he wasn't going to be able to play his way out of the stress and that it would just make it worse.

  • Jaffa79 on March 17, 2014, 19:11 GMT

    I have no doubts that Eng players play too much. I know others do too but Eng players play throughout the English summer and then tour all winter. With these ODI series latched onto the end of series and the endless bout of T20 stuff, it must be exhausting. Players should be managed better and nobody should play all 3 formats in my book. That being said, he should have gotten through it and gritted out the tour. Swann too really. I know Swann says his elbow wasn't up to it but couldn't he have taken painkillers and played until the end of the tour? Trott and Swann both took the easy option when their team needed it. Sure, the Aussies came at Eng hard but as we thrashed them in the summer 3-0 (and 15 minutes away from 4-0), Eng should have been able to come back hard. Disappointingly soft really. Shame that Carberry, who fronted up and faced MJ and invariably took the shine off the new ball without really going on, will probably be cast aside for Trott who took off when it got tough.

  • the_blue_android on March 17, 2014, 19:02 GMT

    That's what happens when you hype an average player into thinking he's a great player.

  • Winsome on March 17, 2014, 18:55 GMT

    Well, it's a tight line Vaughan is walking, he's talking about the perspective of the other guys in the changerooms and what he's saying is understandable. Quite frankly, the ECB have been culpable as Trott around the blurring of the issues from the beginning.

  • on March 17, 2014, 18:52 GMT

    100% in agreement with Vaughn, Angus Porter views are absolutely absurd. Trotts situation is like saying I am not going to work tomorrow coz I am afraid of my boss or I have to do a lot of work under pressure. If everyone in the office has the same excuse who is going to work? These sportsmen are payed extra ordinary amount of money to cop up with this pressure, if you can't do that sorry mate you should go out and earn your money from some other profession, and this applies to every field of work.

  • cloudmess on March 17, 2014, 18:45 GMT

    There are different degrees of depression/anxiety as Angus Porter suggests, but I still think Vaughan has picked up an important distinction between the mental illness which, for example, Marcus Trescothick suffered, and the exhaustion and general burn-out which afflicted Jonathan Trott. As someone who once suffered the same thing as Tres, I can tell you they are not at all the same thing. Having said that, 2 facts should be kept in mind about Trott: the first was that he was clearly in no position to play test cricket in December. Is it right for a player to play if they are not completely fit, either physically or mentally? Who does that benefit? Furthermore, if he feels better now, he surely wants to play test cricket again, so will be looking to play his condition down.

  • Burnham on March 17, 2014, 18:05 GMT

    Brilliant article by Vaughan. Absolutely support his views on all counts.

  • on March 17, 2014, 17:21 GMT

    Trott is critical to England like gambhir is critical to India. Both these guys need to back in their national teams . That will be a good for India team fortunes too. Gambhir out not on performance but due to non cricketing reasons

  • malepas on March 17, 2014, 17:11 GMT

    I totally agree with Vaughn here, the statement came through first told us that Trot has got mantel related illness/stress, that's why he came back, now he is saying that it was a burnout,, what the hell that means?? Burnout from what?? he never complaint when he was scoring tons of runs, as soon as things got tough,, he declared himself unfit,, this is a dangerous slope,, anybody who is under bit of pressure in international cricket, would say the same thing,, these guys are highly paid, well looked after sportsmen, and they suppose to perform under pressure as this is their job, how can you burnout?

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  • malepas on March 17, 2014, 17:11 GMT

    I totally agree with Vaughn here, the statement came through first told us that Trot has got mantel related illness/stress, that's why he came back, now he is saying that it was a burnout,, what the hell that means?? Burnout from what?? he never complaint when he was scoring tons of runs, as soon as things got tough,, he declared himself unfit,, this is a dangerous slope,, anybody who is under bit of pressure in international cricket, would say the same thing,, these guys are highly paid, well looked after sportsmen, and they suppose to perform under pressure as this is their job, how can you burnout?

  • on March 17, 2014, 17:21 GMT

    Trott is critical to England like gambhir is critical to India. Both these guys need to back in their national teams . That will be a good for India team fortunes too. Gambhir out not on performance but due to non cricketing reasons

  • Burnham on March 17, 2014, 18:05 GMT

    Brilliant article by Vaughan. Absolutely support his views on all counts.

  • cloudmess on March 17, 2014, 18:45 GMT

    There are different degrees of depression/anxiety as Angus Porter suggests, but I still think Vaughan has picked up an important distinction between the mental illness which, for example, Marcus Trescothick suffered, and the exhaustion and general burn-out which afflicted Jonathan Trott. As someone who once suffered the same thing as Tres, I can tell you they are not at all the same thing. Having said that, 2 facts should be kept in mind about Trott: the first was that he was clearly in no position to play test cricket in December. Is it right for a player to play if they are not completely fit, either physically or mentally? Who does that benefit? Furthermore, if he feels better now, he surely wants to play test cricket again, so will be looking to play his condition down.

  • on March 17, 2014, 18:52 GMT

    100% in agreement with Vaughn, Angus Porter views are absolutely absurd. Trotts situation is like saying I am not going to work tomorrow coz I am afraid of my boss or I have to do a lot of work under pressure. If everyone in the office has the same excuse who is going to work? These sportsmen are payed extra ordinary amount of money to cop up with this pressure, if you can't do that sorry mate you should go out and earn your money from some other profession, and this applies to every field of work.

  • Winsome on March 17, 2014, 18:55 GMT

    Well, it's a tight line Vaughan is walking, he's talking about the perspective of the other guys in the changerooms and what he's saying is understandable. Quite frankly, the ECB have been culpable as Trott around the blurring of the issues from the beginning.

  • the_blue_android on March 17, 2014, 19:02 GMT

    That's what happens when you hype an average player into thinking he's a great player.

  • Jaffa79 on March 17, 2014, 19:11 GMT

    I have no doubts that Eng players play too much. I know others do too but Eng players play throughout the English summer and then tour all winter. With these ODI series latched onto the end of series and the endless bout of T20 stuff, it must be exhausting. Players should be managed better and nobody should play all 3 formats in my book. That being said, he should have gotten through it and gritted out the tour. Swann too really. I know Swann says his elbow wasn't up to it but couldn't he have taken painkillers and played until the end of the tour? Trott and Swann both took the easy option when their team needed it. Sure, the Aussies came at Eng hard but as we thrashed them in the summer 3-0 (and 15 minutes away from 4-0), Eng should have been able to come back hard. Disappointingly soft really. Shame that Carberry, who fronted up and faced MJ and invariably took the shine off the new ball without really going on, will probably be cast aside for Trott who took off when it got tough.

  • on March 17, 2014, 19:21 GMT

    Just because someone is gets a bigger wage packet at the end of the month does not mean that they can't burnout from stress. If anything it could make it worse. I think Trott has clearly described how he was feeling on the pitch when playing and off it when not playing. Stress and Depression can be linked in some cases but are also separate mental issues. Stress is not depression. This is one of the problems when people discuss mental illness as it is so hard to understand and every case is different. Of course you don't feel burnt out when you are playing well as everything is easier when you are playing well. I think Vaughans comments aren't great as Trott has made it clear that he wasn't going to be able to play his way out of the stress and that it would just make it worse.

  • jackiethepen on March 17, 2014, 19:22 GMT

    It's a bit of a Catch 22 situation. If Trott wasn't suffering from a stress related illness then going home immediately after the first Ashes Test might seem a bit excessive when he could have been rested from playing and stayed around to help the team. But if he was suffering from a stress related illness which warranted his immediate return home then it is highly unlikely that he would be contemplating playing for England again so soon. The severity of the condition is the issue. It sounds very much as though Trott was suffering from very high levels of anxiety which had got out of control. If that's the case then he needs to be very careful how he manages his return to cricket. To target a return to England so soon sounds like a symptom of the same illness. Trott would be putting himself under pressure to perform after a long lay off. He and England would be wise to take it step by step. The next time the breakdown could be even more serious.