Cricinfo XI September 20, 2007

Different era, same brilliance ... Pt 2

Martin Williamson and Siddarth Ravindran
A second batch of XI players from the past who would have excelled at Twenty20
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After their first attempt at picking XI former players suited to the Twenty20 format attracted considerable feedback, Martin Williamson and Siddarth Ravindran offer another XI choices, based on your feedback.



Richard Hadlee: a master at exploiting a batsman's weakness © Getty Images

Richard Hadlee
New Zealand's Atlas for much of the seventies and eighties was a shining example of a player who maximised potential through rigorous practice and a sharp cricketing brain. With a model side-on action that delighted the pundits, he carried New Zealand to their first Test victory over England and helped them (temporarily) gain the upper hand in the bitter trans-Tasman rivalry. A master at exploiting a batsman's weakness, his one-day record is underrated: he finished with 158 wickets at an impeccable 21.58. While his batting was explosive, it lacked the class of his bowling - though he did score 99 in a match where England mustered 82 and 93 in their innings.

Sydney Barnes
Read any contemporary account of Barnes and they all speak of his unerring accuracy, variation of pace, and ability to move the ball off the pitch and in the air. John Arlott wrote that Barnes was "a right-arm fast-medium bowler with the accuracy, spin and resource of a slow bowler, whose high delivery gave him a lift off the pitch that rapped the knuckles of the unwary and forced even the best batsmen to play him at an awkward height". Barnes played little first-class cricket, preferring the lucrative rewards of league cricket, and so his records look sparse. But even in the bat-dominated format of Twenty20, Barnes, one of the greatest bowlers of all time, would have been the scourge of the most bullying batsman.

Lance Klusener
Klusener's astonishing bat speed ensured that a baseball-style back-lift didn't hinder his unmatched ability to dispatch death bowling's most potent weapon - the low, fast full-toss. His tenacious attitude was on display early in his career - after being dismantled by Mohammad Azharuddin in the first innings of his debut Test, he bounced back with eight wickets in the second. A calm temperament coupled with the ability to hit big helped him take South Africa over the line many a time. While his heroics with the bat are legendary, his six five-fors in ODIs (fourth highest of all-time) demonstrate his match-turning skills with the ball.

Graeme Pollock
In the brief period during which he played against the world's best, before South Africa's expulsion from international cricket, Pollock left nobody in any doubt about his right to be regarded as one of the all-time greats. His timing of strokes was exquisite but he could also hit with real power, and his placement was unparalleled. The only fly in the ointment is that he might not have wanted to play. He turned down lucrative offers from three English counties in the late 1960s and early 1970s because he felt the domestic grind was not "my type of game".



Chris Cairns: there have been few better at clobbering the ball © Getty Images

Chris Cairns
The fact that Cairns has hit more Test sixes than Viv Richards - in half the number of matches - speaks volumes of his ability to clobber the ball. Added to this he was a genuine pace bowler and the natural successor to fill the void left in New Zealand cricket by Hadlee's retirement. Unfortunately his career was blighted by injury and he managed only 62 Tests in a 15-year career - though that didn't stop him from taking 200 wickets and 3000 runs in both Tests and ODIs.

Joel Garner
Big Bird was built for Twenty20. He had the pace to trouble the best, and could make the ball rear alarmingly off a length - unsurprising, given that he was 6' 8" - which meant that batsmen found it all but impossible to play forward or back with any certainty. The icing on the cake was his toe-crunching yorker - lethal and unerring - as he showed to devastating effect in the 1979 World Cup final.

Waqar Younis
While helmets protected batsmen from bouncers, there was nothing to protect them from Younis' WMD - the inswinging, screaming yorker. During the death overs in ODIs, when the ball was old, Waqar was at his most lethal. Case in point: Durban 1993, where, with South Africa needing 45 to win, and seven wickets in hand, he sliced through the batting with a 5-for-25 spell to deliver an improbable 10-run victory. His 373 Test wickets came at the second-best strike-rate among all bowlers since the First World War and his 17 Man-of-the-Match awards in ODIs is the most by a specialist bowler. He and his hunting partner Wasim Akram shared more than 1700 international wickets to help Pakistan remain a potent force in the post-Imran Khan era.

Alan Knott
With the bulk of bowlers in Twenty20 verging between brisk medium and dead slow, Knott's skill at standing up to the stumps, honed by keeping to the fastish left-arm spin` of Derek Underwood at Kent for almost two decades, would have been invaluable. As a batsman he was an impish, scurrying irritant, and an improviser. Against the pace barrage of Australia and West Indies, the diminutive Knott realised he would be on the receiving end of much chin music. He adapted his grip and style, and emerged with his reputation further enhanced.

Mohammad Azharuddin
While this Hyderabadi artist's ODI strike-rate languishes in the mid-seventies, his Test resume is replete with blazing centuries, with the magical 121 at Lord's in 1990 and the 74-ball hundred against South Africa at Eden Gardens standing out. He retired as one-day cricket's highest run-scorer, and was an excellent runner between the wickets. In addition he was an exceptional fielder, taking more than 100 catches each in both the traditional forms of the game.



Imran Khan: inspirational leader, bowler and batsman © Getty Images

Imran Khan
Genuinely fast and a master of reverse swing, his one-day record as a bowler alone suggests that Imran would have been a real handful in the short format. And his ability to take the attack to the best bowling would have bolstered any middle order. As a tactically astute and inspirational captain - he is the one man to have brought relative tranquility to the Pakistan side in modern times - he would be the perfect man to lead the side.

Michael Bevan
With Bevan at the crease, there was no situation which was unredeemable, no target too large. If your team was at 36 for 4 or 74 for 7, he was the man to call. Unlike most successful ODI batsmen, clubbing sixes or bludgeoning boundaries wasn't his specialty. Rather, he simply refused to get out - concentrating on survival, pinching the singles and resolutely chipping away at the target, remaining unbeaten on 67 occasions. His part-time chinaman bowling once fetched him a ten-wicket haul in Tests. Oddly enough, though he had two World Cup winner's medals, in neither final was he called on to bat or bowl.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY PK246 on | September 23, 2007, 16:32 GMT

    Let's not forget Wasim Raja of Pakistan - A hard hitting fast scoring batsman & useful legbreak spinner.

  • POSTED BY TheFish on | September 23, 2007, 13:32 GMT

    Team isnt Bad, However I would replace Waqar for Wasim Akram and try to find a place for Richards. Richards would have crossed 110 mts mark easily and when he hits, he hits it cleanly.

  • POSTED BY Zahran_F on | September 23, 2007, 10:17 GMT

    Weird Selections!! although it includes several of the games greatest - Selecting players like Azhar, Knott and Bevan ahead of Aravinda De Silva and Sachin Tendulkar makes your selections ludicrous.

  • POSTED BY dodoooooooooooo on | September 23, 2007, 9:55 GMT

    Alan Knott .... a batsman/wicketkeeper with a 20.00 AVG in ODIs ... no great strike rate... yes great pick that one ... heck Jeff Dujon, Ian Healy, even Dave Richardson would be better choices...

  • POSTED BY howizzat on | September 22, 2007, 18:21 GMT

    Its a futile excercise. There are too many to pick up the world XI. A West Indies XI can be, 1.Desmond Haynes 2.Gorden Greenidge 3.Rohan Kanhai 4.Vivian Richards 5.Clive Lloyd 6.Garfield Sobers 7.Jeff Dujon 8.Vanburn Holder 9.Malcom Marshall 10.Micheal Holding and 11.Courtney Walsh.

    1 and 2- are best opening pair during their times. 3- Gavaskar named his son Rohan admiring this batting provess. 4 and 5- Easy picks for any world XI. 6-Pioneer of 36 runs in a over) 8- Naggingly accurate and is the best line and length bowler I ever have seen. 9 and 10-Fire Is The Key. 11- Look at his economy rate.

  • POSTED BY Zubair on | September 22, 2007, 10:14 GMT

    Apropos to the comment made by "cricinfo1" on september 21 about the inclusion of Imran Khan. Well i agree that Imran didnt have the strike rate of above 70 and Kapil Dev has had the better Strike rate in the ODIs but bowling wise Imran was better than Kapil Dev, career strike rate in bowling, average in bowling and the wickets taken throughout their respective careers in every department Imran outclasses Kapil so one would love to have a better bowling all rounder like Imran Khan than Kapil Dev. No doubt Kapil was a hero n a legend but Imran was better than him.

  • POSTED BY chupchaap on | September 22, 2007, 0:54 GMT

    The list would be endless, there many players and how many more would you include. But how can you not inlcude the man who started it all in the 1992 World Cup,Mark Greatbatch from New Zealand. His heroics almost got his country to finals till they Pakistan who were the eventual winners, so one more to add to the list MARK GREATBATCH

  • POSTED BY Rametlon on | September 22, 2007, 0:51 GMT

    This is THE HEIGHT of Sachin haters.

    Just give me Sachin and Jayasuraya and any other 9 player which are not in your selection. We will beat any of your team ahnds down.

    You forget, probabaly conviniently, that Sachin and Jayasuray are the one who perfected the art of clean hitting as opposed to slog.

    A Very Feeble attempt I must say. Get real frineds. Your hate is not going to afffect the greateness of both htese players when it comes ODI or even 20/20. The bowlers are lucky that Sachin did not play 20/20.

    Cheers

  • POSTED BY daksilva2007 on | September 21, 2007, 19:23 GMT

    Aravinda De Silva would top Chris Caines, Sydney Barnes, Michael Bevan, Alan Knott, and Lance Klusener (and his brief career) any day. Excluding Aravinda and naming any mentioned players above is a suprise.

  • POSTED BY sameed on | September 21, 2007, 18:01 GMT

    well i cant imagine any world 11 without wasim akram, but as is has to go, the team that has been selected is surely a powerhouse of class. and i dont want to change anybody as it is the choice of writer.

  • POSTED BY PK246 on | September 23, 2007, 16:32 GMT

    Let's not forget Wasim Raja of Pakistan - A hard hitting fast scoring batsman & useful legbreak spinner.

  • POSTED BY TheFish on | September 23, 2007, 13:32 GMT

    Team isnt Bad, However I would replace Waqar for Wasim Akram and try to find a place for Richards. Richards would have crossed 110 mts mark easily and when he hits, he hits it cleanly.

  • POSTED BY Zahran_F on | September 23, 2007, 10:17 GMT

    Weird Selections!! although it includes several of the games greatest - Selecting players like Azhar, Knott and Bevan ahead of Aravinda De Silva and Sachin Tendulkar makes your selections ludicrous.

  • POSTED BY dodoooooooooooo on | September 23, 2007, 9:55 GMT

    Alan Knott .... a batsman/wicketkeeper with a 20.00 AVG in ODIs ... no great strike rate... yes great pick that one ... heck Jeff Dujon, Ian Healy, even Dave Richardson would be better choices...

  • POSTED BY howizzat on | September 22, 2007, 18:21 GMT

    Its a futile excercise. There are too many to pick up the world XI. A West Indies XI can be, 1.Desmond Haynes 2.Gorden Greenidge 3.Rohan Kanhai 4.Vivian Richards 5.Clive Lloyd 6.Garfield Sobers 7.Jeff Dujon 8.Vanburn Holder 9.Malcom Marshall 10.Micheal Holding and 11.Courtney Walsh.

    1 and 2- are best opening pair during their times. 3- Gavaskar named his son Rohan admiring this batting provess. 4 and 5- Easy picks for any world XI. 6-Pioneer of 36 runs in a over) 8- Naggingly accurate and is the best line and length bowler I ever have seen. 9 and 10-Fire Is The Key. 11- Look at his economy rate.

  • POSTED BY Zubair on | September 22, 2007, 10:14 GMT

    Apropos to the comment made by "cricinfo1" on september 21 about the inclusion of Imran Khan. Well i agree that Imran didnt have the strike rate of above 70 and Kapil Dev has had the better Strike rate in the ODIs but bowling wise Imran was better than Kapil Dev, career strike rate in bowling, average in bowling and the wickets taken throughout their respective careers in every department Imran outclasses Kapil so one would love to have a better bowling all rounder like Imran Khan than Kapil Dev. No doubt Kapil was a hero n a legend but Imran was better than him.

  • POSTED BY chupchaap on | September 22, 2007, 0:54 GMT

    The list would be endless, there many players and how many more would you include. But how can you not inlcude the man who started it all in the 1992 World Cup,Mark Greatbatch from New Zealand. His heroics almost got his country to finals till they Pakistan who were the eventual winners, so one more to add to the list MARK GREATBATCH

  • POSTED BY Rametlon on | September 22, 2007, 0:51 GMT

    This is THE HEIGHT of Sachin haters.

    Just give me Sachin and Jayasuraya and any other 9 player which are not in your selection. We will beat any of your team ahnds down.

    You forget, probabaly conviniently, that Sachin and Jayasuray are the one who perfected the art of clean hitting as opposed to slog.

    A Very Feeble attempt I must say. Get real frineds. Your hate is not going to afffect the greateness of both htese players when it comes ODI or even 20/20. The bowlers are lucky that Sachin did not play 20/20.

    Cheers

  • POSTED BY daksilva2007 on | September 21, 2007, 19:23 GMT

    Aravinda De Silva would top Chris Caines, Sydney Barnes, Michael Bevan, Alan Knott, and Lance Klusener (and his brief career) any day. Excluding Aravinda and naming any mentioned players above is a suprise.

  • POSTED BY sameed on | September 21, 2007, 18:01 GMT

    well i cant imagine any world 11 without wasim akram, but as is has to go, the team that has been selected is surely a powerhouse of class. and i dont want to change anybody as it is the choice of writer.

  • POSTED BY berty on | September 21, 2007, 16:31 GMT

    what about michael john proctor probably one of the hardest hitters of a cricket ball one of the few to have the privilege of hitting 6 consecutive sixes and a very tidy fast bowler unfortunate not to play in the test arena through the majority of his career. and then of course what about barry richards probably one of crickets most destrutive openung batsman.then again another of south africas great allrounders one edgar john barlow.

  • POSTED BY cricinfo1 on | September 21, 2007, 15:59 GMT

    Imran Khan had a strike rate of only 70, compared to almost 100 by Kapil. That is the the reason kapil will always be more suited to this game compared to Imran. Also who can forget his four sixes in an over to save the follow on

  • POSTED BY Divinetouch on | September 21, 2007, 15:47 GMT

    Any cricket team of note deserves to have Rohan Kanhai, Gary Sobers, Lance Gibbs, Michael Holding and Fred Trueman.

  • POSTED BY Jevy on | September 21, 2007, 13:03 GMT

    your team XI is not a bad on but at the same time not the best also. Its a batsmen game players like nick Knight, Roger Twose, Brian Lara is simply one of the greatest batsman ever. U need to select a third XI and add some more balance to it.

  • POSTED BY voyager on | September 21, 2007, 12:51 GMT

    How can you miss Javed Miandad? the inventor of improvisation with steel nerves and master at adjusting to changing situation.

  • POSTED BY Zubair on | September 21, 2007, 12:47 GMT

    Well i m a bit surprised to see M.Azharuddin in the list.. yes ofcourse he was a good batsman but he was not suited for the T20s. This game needs big hittings n he is not renowned for his big hitting he is remembered as a good test batsman with the ability to take singls n doubles n then eventually hit a four. his career strike rate in oneday internationals clearly suggests that he was more of a Test player than a oneday player let alone a T20 player...i think someone like Steve Waugh was better suited in the team than Azharuddin.. both the players were technically the same but Waugh was better at hitting sixes n fours and PLUS his strike rate in ODIs was better and he was a better Slip fielder.

  • POSTED BY faster_slower_ball on | September 21, 2007, 11:36 GMT

    I disagree with Michael Bevan's selection, even though I am a proud Australian supporter. To be a successful batsman in Twenty/20, you have to have a strike rate of over 100. Bevan's career strike rate in ODI's of 74.16 was reflective of his inability to hit boundaries (as mentioned in the article). Even though he guided Australia to quite a few victories, 14 of his not-outs in ODI's were when he played in a losing side, and out of those 14 not-outs, on 11 occasions Bevan's strike rate was less than 100. On these occasions he had to push the pace and wasn't able to do so. He should have hit out.. or got out. When you are coming in late in the order (as he was) and finishing an innings you need to score faster than that. I think this was what the Australian selectors realised, and that is why I propose, the reason he was dropped from the ODI side, with still some years of cricket left in him. His bowling was also erratic and inaccurate. Suited for the newest format? I think not!

  • POSTED BY Pablomin on | September 21, 2007, 6:48 GMT

    Great side, but you forgot to mention the best crunch-time player ever.

    JONTY RHODES !!!! - HE WOULD HAVE BEEN SUPERB !

    He was one of the most overlooked batsmen, often fetching more than a quick fifty time and time again.

    His fielding speaks for itself.

  • POSTED BY WhoNWhy on | September 21, 2007, 2:10 GMT

    Wonderful teams . How about Martin Crowe, Aravinda De Silva ( With his slow spinners ), Dean Jones, Jonty Rhodes ( in 20-20 with batsman looking for a single every ball, he is d best fielder not only to save runs but pick up a few runouts as well ), Hansie Cronje, Nathan Astle, Shane Warne

  • POSTED BY vincing on | September 21, 2007, 2:00 GMT

    If there would be a match between the previous team in this column and this one, the former would be the favourites. But the match would be very close. Both had world beaters. Though, there is only one problem in this team, there are seven bowlers. Twenty20 tournament has shown one thing very clearly: Definition of allrounder. There is only one genuine allrounder right now in world cricket ad thats is Andrew Flintoff.The other huge list are either better batsmen or better bowler, like Pollock, Afridi, Oram, Colingwood, Symonds, Jayasuriya. Players like Symonds, Colingwood who are so handy in ODI find no place as bowlers in twenty20. There are four allrounders in the team and three of them would be in all time great: Hadlee, Imran, Cairns. Lane would go for runs, sure. Instead of one of them , we can go for some handy batsman. Sachin Tendulkar, Javed Miandad, Saeed Anwar,Mark Waugh, Boon. Strangely in both the list no mention of good fielders, Jonty Rhodes was allrounder in his own righ

  • POSTED BY amerch786 on | September 20, 2007, 18:46 GMT

    I would add Saeed Anwar, Aaqib Jawaid, Ajay Jadeja, Malcolm Marshall, Carl Hooper (If Wasim Akarm is there, why hom Hooper?), Moin Khan.

    To be consider next year :) Sachin Tendulkar Rahul Dravid Saruv Ganguly

  • POSTED BY daksilva2007 on | September 20, 2007, 16:43 GMT

    What is sad is that the Sri Lankans introduced the pinch/bower hitting (now Twenty20 Style Cricket) in mid 90s and none of the SL greats are even mentioned. Aravinda? Kaluwitharana?

  • POSTED BY arvin on | September 20, 2007, 15:44 GMT

    jadeja should be there... and with ganguly/tendulkar looking certain not to play 20/20 they will make part of any 20/20 looking at players of past...

  • POSTED BY anandr91 on | September 20, 2007, 15:20 GMT

    Krish. Srikanth would have had a hay day in this form of cricket. he was doing the kinda hitting u see in this form and the 50 ov. ODI format before the fielding restricitions came into place. this is tailor made for him.

  • POSTED BY CricketPissek on | September 20, 2007, 15:10 GMT

    i think a 3rd XI will have to be published soon :) I agree with xen3ct (YK :P), Aravinda would have been simply AWESOME at this. An amazing improvisor who didn't need to "slog" to get massive hits.

    The 1996 WC Semi-final and Final innings', mentioned by xcen3ct were worth their weight in gold.

  • POSTED BY Shahzadhussan on | September 20, 2007, 12:03 GMT

    This is your second list of eleven in this catagory. But one player you terribly missed, is Zaheer Abbass. Can you please see his batting record in limited-over match. His average is more than 47, nearly equal to that of Richards, with seven centuries in around 60 matches with strike rate of over 80. I hope you will feel that you missed this player if you make this list really on some merit.

  • POSTED BY Richvii on | September 20, 2007, 11:59 GMT

    Hi Guys, I am surprised to see the talent being displayed by the cricinfo panelist. I am very surprised to see that Kapil Dev and Ian Botham 'name do not gigure. Kapil has a fantastic ODI record and it is very superior to Chris Cairns in every aspect of the game. Also Ian botham deserves a second look. Including Michael Bevan just amuses me as he was a very poor player of SPIN and also of swing bowling.It seems your knowledge of game desperatley needs a revision at your end or you guys just do not have good cricketing experience. I apologized but your assesment of all the players is very mediocre.

  • POSTED BY mikeindex on | September 20, 2007, 11:54 GMT

    What emerges most strongly from all 22 selections is the (perfectly reasonable) view that all-time gretas would have been great in any form of the game!

    One or two slightly more offbeat selections from my early years of watching: Kanhai d'Oliveira Mushtaq Mohammed (inventor of the reverse sweep) Underwood Not Milburn, but only because of his fielding

    And a few old-timers: McCabe O'Reilly 'Big Jim' Smith and of course Grace - all-time great batsman, brilliant fielder in his youth and possibly the game's most notable tactical innovator.

  • POSTED BY SwatiKulkarni on | September 20, 2007, 11:38 GMT

    So you agree that your first list was crap?

    and when are you coming up with third list???

    And you cannot keep Kapil out of ANY XI...

  • POSTED BY junaidafzal on | September 20, 2007, 10:37 GMT

    who would be the captain of this ex-TWENTY20 game? i think IMRAN KHAN.but i will also like to add Saeed Anwar, for his highest one day record and then Saqlain Mushtaq,the man to take away the match from opposition silently,just by his off-spin blowing. what about the Vavian Richard?

  • POSTED BY George_in_Israel on | September 20, 2007, 9:32 GMT

    No room for Clive Lloyd in either XI? He was one of the hardest hitters of a ball, and his cover fielding was at times lethal.

  • POSTED BY cricketschmicket on | September 20, 2007, 8:24 GMT

    Outstanding - I would have picked the same team. I twould thrash your so called first xi. Chappell should play ahead of Bevan. Lillee should have bowled. Cairns, Lance could swing both bat and ball.

  • POSTED BY suhaibj on | September 20, 2007, 6:30 GMT

    How about Saeed Anwar... there hasnt been a better opener in ODIs. Or how about the streetfighter Javed Miandad... apart from his improvisation skills, he could be a real entertainer !

  • POSTED BY Harold.I on | September 20, 2007, 6:16 GMT

    The list has players who batted well or bowled well in traditional forms, but it doesn't look at the single most important aspect of 20/20 cricket that we can point out so far - adaptability. That's why players like Ian Harvey are masters of it (as far as I know, the only player with 3 20/20 centuries and also useful wickets. Look at the players who have really stood out so far - ul-Haq, who isn't even a prospect for the ODI or test teams, McMillan, who was considering dumping cricket when he wasn't even signed by a provincial side several months back, Afridi - who's a hit and miss player with the bat, but always has another string to his bow. Not great in anything but can also do pretty much anything. 30 or 40 runs, some wickets, good fielding. Bevan would never fit in this setup, he was top-notch at what he did - but he had only one style of play. I doubt the Pakistani bowling greats would either. However, players like Tony Greig would probably love it.

  • POSTED BY xcen3ct on | September 20, 2007, 6:15 GMT

    And what about Sri Lanka's Aravinda de Silva? Remember his 60 odd in the '96 semi final? Or his magical innings against Australia in the 2003 world cup, in the same innings where he flicked a Brett Lee yorker for Six over square leg? With Batting like that De Silva would've made a superb twenty 20 player and lets not be forgetting his wily offspin which helped Sri Lanka in many occasions.

  • POSTED BY mansoorafzal on | September 20, 2007, 6:14 GMT

    I agree with the above list but I think that there are many players who can also be the best players in T-20 matches like Saeed Anwar, Saqlain Mushtaq, etc. Moreover, its nice to see the balanced team of the best XI.

  • POSTED BY kamranwasti on | September 20, 2007, 5:46 GMT

    Why in the world is Greg Chappell's name not included? These are not "coaching" trials for the Indian team. He was a pretty OK batsman (an average of 40 and a strike rate of 76 in 70s and early 80s), a not-that-bad a fielder and could bowl a bit too (good enough to take two five-fors in 70 odd matches including 5 for 15 against India and take a wicket a match). What do you think?

  • POSTED BY SudhyNair on | September 20, 2007, 4:35 GMT

    Where is Ajay Jadeja? Remember the Jadeja - Waqar battle!!! Other misses: Nathan Astle, Chris Harris, Rajesh Chauhan, Sandip Patil, Aamir Sohail, David Boon

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  • POSTED BY SudhyNair on | September 20, 2007, 4:35 GMT

    Where is Ajay Jadeja? Remember the Jadeja - Waqar battle!!! Other misses: Nathan Astle, Chris Harris, Rajesh Chauhan, Sandip Patil, Aamir Sohail, David Boon

  • POSTED BY kamranwasti on | September 20, 2007, 5:46 GMT

    Why in the world is Greg Chappell's name not included? These are not "coaching" trials for the Indian team. He was a pretty OK batsman (an average of 40 and a strike rate of 76 in 70s and early 80s), a not-that-bad a fielder and could bowl a bit too (good enough to take two five-fors in 70 odd matches including 5 for 15 against India and take a wicket a match). What do you think?

  • POSTED BY mansoorafzal on | September 20, 2007, 6:14 GMT

    I agree with the above list but I think that there are many players who can also be the best players in T-20 matches like Saeed Anwar, Saqlain Mushtaq, etc. Moreover, its nice to see the balanced team of the best XI.

  • POSTED BY xcen3ct on | September 20, 2007, 6:15 GMT

    And what about Sri Lanka's Aravinda de Silva? Remember his 60 odd in the '96 semi final? Or his magical innings against Australia in the 2003 world cup, in the same innings where he flicked a Brett Lee yorker for Six over square leg? With Batting like that De Silva would've made a superb twenty 20 player and lets not be forgetting his wily offspin which helped Sri Lanka in many occasions.

  • POSTED BY Harold.I on | September 20, 2007, 6:16 GMT

    The list has players who batted well or bowled well in traditional forms, but it doesn't look at the single most important aspect of 20/20 cricket that we can point out so far - adaptability. That's why players like Ian Harvey are masters of it (as far as I know, the only player with 3 20/20 centuries and also useful wickets. Look at the players who have really stood out so far - ul-Haq, who isn't even a prospect for the ODI or test teams, McMillan, who was considering dumping cricket when he wasn't even signed by a provincial side several months back, Afridi - who's a hit and miss player with the bat, but always has another string to his bow. Not great in anything but can also do pretty much anything. 30 or 40 runs, some wickets, good fielding. Bevan would never fit in this setup, he was top-notch at what he did - but he had only one style of play. I doubt the Pakistani bowling greats would either. However, players like Tony Greig would probably love it.

  • POSTED BY suhaibj on | September 20, 2007, 6:30 GMT

    How about Saeed Anwar... there hasnt been a better opener in ODIs. Or how about the streetfighter Javed Miandad... apart from his improvisation skills, he could be a real entertainer !

  • POSTED BY cricketschmicket on | September 20, 2007, 8:24 GMT

    Outstanding - I would have picked the same team. I twould thrash your so called first xi. Chappell should play ahead of Bevan. Lillee should have bowled. Cairns, Lance could swing both bat and ball.

  • POSTED BY George_in_Israel on | September 20, 2007, 9:32 GMT

    No room for Clive Lloyd in either XI? He was one of the hardest hitters of a ball, and his cover fielding was at times lethal.

  • POSTED BY junaidafzal on | September 20, 2007, 10:37 GMT

    who would be the captain of this ex-TWENTY20 game? i think IMRAN KHAN.but i will also like to add Saeed Anwar, for his highest one day record and then Saqlain Mushtaq,the man to take away the match from opposition silently,just by his off-spin blowing. what about the Vavian Richard?

  • POSTED BY SwatiKulkarni on | September 20, 2007, 11:38 GMT

    So you agree that your first list was crap?

    and when are you coming up with third list???

    And you cannot keep Kapil out of ANY XI...