Mahela Jayawardene
Sri Lanka's captain and leading Test run scorer

Sri Lanka in England 2011

Forget day five

A look back at the Cardiff Test and what positives, if any, can be taken from it

Mahela Jayawardene

June 1, 2011

Comments: 117 | Text size: A | A

A delighted Mahela Jayawardene raises his bat on reaching a hundred, England v Sri Lanka, 1st Test, Lord's, May 14, 2006
Jayawardene gets to his hundred at Lord's in 2006; he has centuries in his last two Tests at the ground © Getty Images
Enlarge
Related Links

Right at this moment I can't believe what's just happened, but I'll probably go into my sorrows soon. We played a good four days of cricket in Cardiff, but then threw the entire Test match away in one session. Sadly, that's what can happen in Test cricket if you don't focus and concentrate throughout. We were not up for it, and the English boys showed why they are one of the best Test teams going around these days. They always come back and keep fighting, and we were not up for the challenge

It was always going to be a tricky situation to bat on the last day, when we weren't sure what the weather was doing, but to blame the rain would be nothing more than an excuse. Almost every day of the match had been a 1.30-2pm start, so we knew that whenever it stopped we'd have to focus and get on with it, like we'd done for four days already. Today it just didn't happen. We lost early wickets to pile the pressure on ourselves, but we didn't buckle down and take the fight back to England.

In Test cricket you really have to tough it out in those situations, but we didn't. Our job was just to bat the situation, but there wasn't much incentive because we weren't really going to get anything out of the day other than a bit of time in the middle and maybe a few unbeaten fifties. That would have been the only positive to come out of the day for us, but once we'd been put under pressure by good bowling and poor shot selection, things went out of control. We were not up for the task.

I can't put my finger on the reasons for the defeat, but it wasn't the way we planned it. Any defeat hurts, whether you have a really bad game or whether you lose a tight match in the last over, but to lose a Test like this hurts even more, because we were totally in control and just had to bat 40 overs. The first Test of any series is so important. We have to pick ourselves up and concentrate for the next one.

A lot of people have been saying that England are the best Test team in the world, and they really do look solid at the moment. But, for me, you have to win all over the world if you want to be considered the best, and the subcontinent is the one place they really need to come and dominate if they want that accolade. They have been playing some really good cricket of late - the way they played Australia in Australia, the way they fought well in South Africa as well. But if they are to say they are the No. 1 team in the world, they have to challenge themselves in all conditions, and that includes the subcontinent.

When England toured Sri Lanka three years ago, they seemed to struggle quite a bit with the conditions. That last series was a totally different scenario. We completely dominated the Galle Test before the rain came to save them, and we won the series 1-0. Here in England, the conditions are favourable to the home side and they know exactly what to do with them. We need to stand up for ourselves, which is a great challenge, but we've lost a great opportunity to go to Lord's at 0-0.

 
 
A lot of people have been saying that England are the best Test team in the world, and they really do look solid, but, for me, you have to win all over the world if you want to be considered the best
 

The final day was crazy, but really, this match was dominated by England's batsmen. Both Alastair Cook and Jonathan Trott did really well to build a massive partnership, but in my opinion it was Trott who was the stand-out player. More than Alastair, he was in control of entire situation, and that's what you need when you are batting second with 400 already on the board. You need big partnerships to make sure you get into the game, and beyond, and that's what they did.

Lots of people have commented on the fact that this is Sri Lanka's first Test since Muttiah Muralitharan retired, and it's true our bowlers don't have the same variety now that he's not in the side - which is the main reason why we chose five of them for this match. But we have to move on from Murali, because we're not going to get him back. We have to find other options. Every team has to go through that transition period at some stage, and we need to make sure we get through it too.

I actually thought our bowlers bowled pretty well and were a bit unlucky at times. Cook and Trott did really well to stifle our ambitions. A big partnership is all about how you complement each other, rotate the strike, and attack different bowlers. Those two got through the tough situations, then dominated for a while, and were able to bat through sessions to make big runs.

The challenge now is to get our mindsets right, and our senior players, especially, need to score a lot of runs for Sri Lanka. I love batting at Lord's and I've made hundreds in each of my last two Tests there, although a third one is not really in my immediate planning. Records are great but we're 1-0 down and we have to win the Test match to get back into the series. I just need to start at ball one and get the job done for the team. That's the priority. That would be my personal objective and for the rest of the team as well.

Quite simply, we need to take the fifth day at Cardiff completely out of our minds, and think about what we did right on the first two, three, four days. Our batting was really good in the first innings. Prasanna Jayawardene carried a big responsibility at No. 6 and responded with a hundred, while Paranavitana and Samaraweera fought hard as well. The conditions helped England in the first innings, but we put runs on the board against a quality attack.

There are positives to take into the Lord's Test, but we need to keep working and fighting, and making and creating opportunities. The Cardiff Test is finished now and we need a fresh mindset for the next game, and we need 20 wickets to win a Test match.

Mahela Jayawardene is former captain of Sri Lanka

RSS Feeds: Mahela Jayawardene

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by SMadampege on (June 3, 2011, 8:42 GMT)

That test match was like a hindi film. No way to a win and game was going for a draw. Suddenly, there was an innings defeat. That's a shame. As a Sri Lankan, I am very angry with our bloody players. They always gave priority to IPL rather than country and that's the result of that. All players go home and lul babies. I think if lankan women team played that session, they could have easily drawn the match. Now whole Lankan sports are down like government. Hate to be a Sri Lankan.

Posted by Diyan82 on (June 3, 2011, 8:27 GMT)

No matter how good you are as a team or Individual and no matter how many times you have beaten a team on previous encounters you start on a clean slate in the beginning of every match. It may be 20ovr, 50ovr or a test match, at the end of the day it's all down to preparation and the mentality of the players. The Sri Lankan team must admit to the fact that they were not prepared to the conditions as well as the temperament of test cricket. From 20-20 to 50 over cricket can be easily done but from 20-20 to test match cricket is a whole new ball game. It's sad that the veterans in the Sri Lankan team failed to understand this. It's under preparation and underestimation of the opponents that undid the Sri Lankan line up. Let's hope they have learned from their mistakes and give themselves a better chance in the 2nd test.

Posted by achi82000 on (June 3, 2011, 6:33 GMT)

I think we lost bcz of pathetic team selection.How can we win a match with only 3 genuine bowlers?When we knew that we r not good enough to take wickets, batsmans lost confident.Thats wt happened.Captain and coach should take the responsibility...

Posted by   on (June 3, 2011, 4:24 GMT)

I think potentially England couldl become the number one test side. They seem to be getting better and better, while Sri Lanka through retirements are missing their key wicket taking bowlers. As for India I think they have peaked as the number 1 side and lets see how well they go when a few key players in that Indian side retire.

Posted by jr1972 on (June 3, 2011, 2:25 GMT)

Agree to some extent with the sentiment of this article. Indeed, forget the batting on day 5. What about the bowling on days 3 & 4? This to me should be a far bigger concern for Sri Lanka who now need to win a test and will need 20 wickets to do so.

All this talk about the number 1 test ranking for England is a little premature. Let's see how a much improved and improving team fair against India.

Posted by   on (June 2, 2011, 22:19 GMT)

good luck to both teams...

Posted by   on (June 2, 2011, 21:34 GMT)

What jayawardene says is correct, England still not good enough to be No.1 We have some rankings by ICC and everyone should accept that. Its your consistency over a couple of years that would count. India will play England and we will see how it goes. When ever England does well they create a huge hype. If they start loosing its kept low.

Posted by pankajkumarsingh on (June 2, 2011, 21:20 GMT)

Ranking is really an inter-raking of how teams have faired against each other. Aus cannot retain #1 spot just because Waugh/Punter won a series in every country. Or WI cannot retain #1 spot because Clive Lloyd won test series in every part of the world. Questioning India's #1 spot on ground of their inability to win series in Aus and SA is simply silly. Also, to brand India's victory against NZ and SL as marginal is also silly. Fact of the matter is - statistically, India is ahead of any other team if you look at will/loss/draw ratio. Now, someone rightly said, age of total dominence is over. We dont have WI of 80s and Aus of 90s anymore. Having said that, if you HAVE to pick one #1 side, it'd be India.

Posted by Ups1 on (June 2, 2011, 19:04 GMT)

Mahela, thanks for the article. It's a good read. I truly hope you guys can do better so that we can square the series at Lord's. You say that you can't "put your finger" on the reason(s) for the loss. I think you've actually spotted it with your last sentence - we need the bowling firepower to get 20 wickets. You won't get through the Eng batting twice by bowling just line and length. We need Fernando, Welagedara, Perera, Herath and Mendis (give him another chance). That's the best we can do with the current options if we have taking wickets and winning a Test (not negatively just hanging on) in mind. It's precisely because the bowling put such a strain on the team that the batters lost their concentration and energy, which eventually cost us the match. Good luck. Our thoughts are with you guys.

Posted by Valavan on (June 2, 2011, 18:04 GMT)

@Jim1207, You are spamming about OZ here. Where did India won OZ in past 15 years, only in India except the one in2004. When did India won a series in OZ, no records for that, India yet to win a series in OZ in their 60 yr old career. Btw OZ won in SL, the 3 test series, in SL in 2004, when warne took the MOS. check cricinfo archive, is it Aus fear of SL in Sl (or) SL do not want to invite the invincible OZ then.Also a fact is that Aussies whitewashed SL in SL in 2004 March/April. And just accept the fact it is not that easy for SL to win a test in England this time.

Comments have now been closed for this article

FeedbackTop
Email Feedback Print
Share
E-mail
Feedback
Print
Mahela JayawardeneClose
Mahela Jayawardene Elegant and prolific, Mahela Jayawardene is easily one of the best batsmen around. By a fair margin he is the highest run-getter for Sri Lanka, and on his way to becoming an all-time great. His excellent slip catching, and sharp captaincy - until early in 2009 - made him a big contributor to Sri Lanka's cause. He and Kumar Sangakkara hold the world record for the highest partnership in Tests, 624 for the third wicket, against South Africa in Colombo. Jayawardene is one of cricket's gentlemen: well-mannered, humble, intelligent and articulate.

    'My kind of bowling style is gone now'

Gavin Larsen talks about wobbly seam-up, the 1992 World Cup, and his role in the next tournament

    Busy keepers, and Waqar's bowleds

Ask Steven: Also, high scores and low averages in ODIs, most ducks in international cricket, and the 12-year-old Test player

    When Lillee bowled offspin

Dickie Bird on what happened when he declined a request for a change of ball once

'The man who had a winning impact'

Modern Masters: Rahul Dravid and Sanjay Manjrekar discuss VVS Laxman's match-winning skills

The underutilised, and the ergonomically unpleasing

Beige Brigade: Odd bowling actions, the Onehunga Cricket Association, commentary doyens, and Mystery Morrison's Test wickets

News | Features Last 7 days

Youngest double-centurions, and the oldest living Test players

Also, the closest ODI team match-ups, most catches in a T20, and expensive Test debut five-fors

From Constantine to Chanderpaul

As West Indies play their 500th Test, here's an interactive journey through their Test history

Soaring in the 1980s, slumping in the 2000s

In their pomp, West Indies had a 53-13 win-loss record; in their last 99, it is 16-53. That, in a nutshell, shows how steep the decline has been

The contenders to replace Ajmal

Following the bowling ban on Saeed Ajmal, ESPNcricinfo picks five bowlers Pakistan may replace him with for the time being

I got more than I expected - Shastri

ESPNcricinfo spoke to Ravi Shastri, India's new team director, after the conclusion of the tour of England, where MS Dhoni's team lost the Tests, won the ODIs and then lost the only Twenty20 international

News | Features Last 7 days