September 11, 2011

Michael Hussey, role model

He's got the shots, and he can grind when needed. Cricket needs more old-school batsmen like him, not the Suresh Rainas, bred on Twenty20
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One of the more intriguing aspects of the drastic changes in cricket in the last five years is the ongoing effect that the Twenty20 explosion has had on batting. There's also no doubt that, and the huge increase in the number of 50-over matches since the beginning of the nineties, has had a flow-on effect of speeding up scoring in Test cricket. This in turn - along with other factors, like making up lost time - has led to a welcome spike in the number of results achieved in Test cricket.

While this makes Test cricket more marketable, an obsession with quicker scoring could obliterate the desire for technical efficiency. Taken to its logical conclusion this imbalance would have a detrimental effect on not only the aesthetics of the longer game but also on the thrill of the contest.

The bowlers have always been the more efficient innovators and boundary-obsessed batsmen play right into their hands. Suicidal strokeplay and the increased instances of lbw, facilitated by the DRS, would put the balance firmly in favour of the ball on all but the flattest of pitches. No one wants to endure the tedium of five-day cricket on flat pitches. Therefore the balance between bat and ball will only remain a reality through even-handed law-making, rational scheduling and common-sense coaching.

While we haven't yet seen a batsman bred on a diet of T20 cricket reach the Test arena, it's interesting to compare the careers of India's Suresh Raina with Australia's Michael Hussey.

Raina is a left-hander of the modern generation, while Hussey is one from the old school. Raina has played a role in India's success in the shorter versions of the game, but was also part of the problem in their recent abject failure in the Test series in England. He can thrash an attack when the field is spread and the bowling restricted, but crowd him and apply the threat of short-pitched bowling and it brings a reaction similar to that of Superman exposed to Kryptonite.

Hussey can survive and then prosper in alien conditions, as he showed on a difficult pitch in Galle. His disciplined innings helped Australia take a series lead. Contrast that knock with his whirlwind strokeplay that helped Australia snatch victory from the jaws of defeat in the World T20 semi-final against Pakistan in 2010.

Hussey is a complete batsman, one who can easily adapt to the game situation; Raina is a talented batsman with a fatal flaw that wasn't addressed in his formative years. Hussey did benefit from starting out in an era where the system provided an opportunity for the vigilant batsman to fully develop; Raina is maturing in a cricket world where the ethos seems to be "more haste, less care".

Now is the time for good cricket minds to invest some thought in the way young batsmen are prepared in the future. The aim should be to produce players with Hussey's assets: the ability to preserve one's wicket when needed and dash a bowler's hopes when the situation demands. That coaching aim, allied with the vision to let batsmen retain their natural tendencies, would be a good starting point.

It's crucial for a batsman with international ambitions to be able to play all the shots. What then separates the successful players from those who fade quickly is the knowledge of when to utilise the different weapons in one's armoury. A wise army general doesn't order machine-gun fire when the situation calls for heavy artillery.

A batsman's duty is to score runs quickly in order to allow the bowlers sufficient time to take the 20 wickets required for victory. There's no doubt the more time you allow batsmen, the longer they'll take to score their runs.

Who knows, with judicious law-making and a sensible advancement of scoring rates, the game could take a step forward by recalling the past. Test cricket started out as a three- and four-day game, and a reduction in the time taken to play the modern game would make it more palatable in a fast-moving world.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is now a cricket commentator and columnist

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:54 GMT

    what about dravid then????

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:39 GMT

    @harshalb Really dude. Then, what do you have to say about Sehwag and Yuvraj Singh? Both seem good pullers but terrible hookers, even Laxman is a great puller but a terrible hooker who even looks awful while ducking, as is bat always stays up when he leans. What do you have to say about these batsmen, aren't they considered world class? What about Ganguly, cricket is a game where you hide your weaknesses from opposition and make use of your strengths, no batsmen can be perfect. Ponting was considered a great puller and hookers of a ball for a better part of his career, and now he seems vulnerable against it. He can't play spin for his life, yet he is a word class batsman(averaging arnd 26 in Ind). For a record, I dont like Sehwag, not because he is pathetic agnst short pitch deliveries, its because he lacks the common sense to differ between a Perth and a Kotla wicket and swings his bat like he is swatting flies. Raina will improve with time. He is a better learner than Yuvi and Sehwag

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:35 GMT

    what about dravid then????

  • on September 14, 2011, 6:28 GMT

    A TOP CLASS a high class hussey started his career @ 31 because of BELOW AVERAGE Damien Martyn

  • on September 14, 2011, 5:41 GMT

    It is a good article from Ian. He is not dragging Raina here, but comparing the current and old player. He also appreciated Raina here saying a dam good ODI player. we have to accept that. Raina is far better player for ODI compare to Test. Even his body language also suggest the same. Just take a look at completed test series and ODI matches. Two different Raina.

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on September 14, 2011, 4:23 GMT

    The irony is that Ind is a pretty poor t-20 team as well, go figure. @jay57870. Ian admitted that Raina is hugely talented. Thats what I believe he means by riches. "Talent" Young Aussies like Phil Hughes seem to be less talented but through hard work and good coaching, I believe he will eventually be much more successful than Raina. As for the "mirror on the wall" thing, let it go, that article was written a hundred yrs ago during a time when SRT was struggling. I don't think IC would write it now.

  • harshalb on September 14, 2011, 4:00 GMT

    Raina...is a joke of a batsman. He cannot play short pitched bowling even in T20s as we saw in the T20 WCs. Any batsman who cannot play short bouncy swingy or spinny balls is NOT a batsman.

  • Markus971 on September 14, 2011, 2:08 GMT

    I agree! A top article. Your last paragraph makes a lot of sense & I'm sure the people that govern the game are listening... We know that Test Cricket, at the moment, is being closely watched & analyzed, for both the short term & longer term. --'Test Cricket' needs to be successful, for the "game of cricket" to be a success!! 4 day Test Matches , perhaps even 100 overs per day, has to be a consideration... For those 'in charge', it is a heavy responsibility.

  • hris on September 13, 2011, 16:26 GMT

    @cricfan and menon. the only reason u didnt know about hussey is bcuz when he was 24 aus had a world dominating team. he had to compete for the openers spot with Taylor, Mark Waugh, Hayden, Langer. raina wouldnt even fit in the aus b team during that time. hussey scored more than 13,000 runs before he got to play in international cricket. the reason raina is in this indian team is only bcuz this is a poor team where a mediocre t20 player can get into this subpar indian test team.

  • on September 13, 2011, 14:52 GMT

    @RandyOZ Dead Rubber Specialist???? Well, and I thought I had seen the most despicable one. You know how much Tendulkar averages in Aus, the place where Hussey was born and brought-up? Do you know how much Tendulkar averages outside sub-continent and how much Hussey averages in Sub-Continent? Go get a life dude. Your comments show your lack of knowledge. The most knowledgeable man alive on Cricket, your very own Ritchie Benaud thinks he is the best, the greatest fast and spin blowers that Aus produced think he is the best, I wouldn't take a Nobody Aussie's opinion over them. Peace.

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:54 GMT

    what about dravid then????

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:39 GMT

    @harshalb Really dude. Then, what do you have to say about Sehwag and Yuvraj Singh? Both seem good pullers but terrible hookers, even Laxman is a great puller but a terrible hooker who even looks awful while ducking, as is bat always stays up when he leans. What do you have to say about these batsmen, aren't they considered world class? What about Ganguly, cricket is a game where you hide your weaknesses from opposition and make use of your strengths, no batsmen can be perfect. Ponting was considered a great puller and hookers of a ball for a better part of his career, and now he seems vulnerable against it. He can't play spin for his life, yet he is a word class batsman(averaging arnd 26 in Ind). For a record, I dont like Sehwag, not because he is pathetic agnst short pitch deliveries, its because he lacks the common sense to differ between a Perth and a Kotla wicket and swings his bat like he is swatting flies. Raina will improve with time. He is a better learner than Yuvi and Sehwag

  • on September 14, 2011, 15:35 GMT

    what about dravid then????

  • on September 14, 2011, 6:28 GMT

    A TOP CLASS a high class hussey started his career @ 31 because of BELOW AVERAGE Damien Martyn

  • on September 14, 2011, 5:41 GMT

    It is a good article from Ian. He is not dragging Raina here, but comparing the current and old player. He also appreciated Raina here saying a dam good ODI player. we have to accept that. Raina is far better player for ODI compare to Test. Even his body language also suggest the same. Just take a look at completed test series and ODI matches. Two different Raina.

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on September 14, 2011, 4:23 GMT

    The irony is that Ind is a pretty poor t-20 team as well, go figure. @jay57870. Ian admitted that Raina is hugely talented. Thats what I believe he means by riches. "Talent" Young Aussies like Phil Hughes seem to be less talented but through hard work and good coaching, I believe he will eventually be much more successful than Raina. As for the "mirror on the wall" thing, let it go, that article was written a hundred yrs ago during a time when SRT was struggling. I don't think IC would write it now.

  • harshalb on September 14, 2011, 4:00 GMT

    Raina...is a joke of a batsman. He cannot play short pitched bowling even in T20s as we saw in the T20 WCs. Any batsman who cannot play short bouncy swingy or spinny balls is NOT a batsman.

  • Markus971 on September 14, 2011, 2:08 GMT

    I agree! A top article. Your last paragraph makes a lot of sense & I'm sure the people that govern the game are listening... We know that Test Cricket, at the moment, is being closely watched & analyzed, for both the short term & longer term. --'Test Cricket' needs to be successful, for the "game of cricket" to be a success!! 4 day Test Matches , perhaps even 100 overs per day, has to be a consideration... For those 'in charge', it is a heavy responsibility.

  • hris on September 13, 2011, 16:26 GMT

    @cricfan and menon. the only reason u didnt know about hussey is bcuz when he was 24 aus had a world dominating team. he had to compete for the openers spot with Taylor, Mark Waugh, Hayden, Langer. raina wouldnt even fit in the aus b team during that time. hussey scored more than 13,000 runs before he got to play in international cricket. the reason raina is in this indian team is only bcuz this is a poor team where a mediocre t20 player can get into this subpar indian test team.

  • on September 13, 2011, 14:52 GMT

    @RandyOZ Dead Rubber Specialist???? Well, and I thought I had seen the most despicable one. You know how much Tendulkar averages in Aus, the place where Hussey was born and brought-up? Do you know how much Tendulkar averages outside sub-continent and how much Hussey averages in Sub-Continent? Go get a life dude. Your comments show your lack of knowledge. The most knowledgeable man alive on Cricket, your very own Ritchie Benaud thinks he is the best, the greatest fast and spin blowers that Aus produced think he is the best, I wouldn't take a Nobody Aussie's opinion over them. Peace.

  • jay57870 on September 13, 2011, 14:01 GMT

    Yes, Hussey is a fine role model. An about face by Ian? Maybe it's the permanent egg on his face - after the infamous "retire" dictum to Sachin, possibly the finest role model of them all! Ask Katich: He points out how an "inspiration" like Sachin was "written off ... ironically by one of our (CA) selectors, and the fact is he has proved him wrong." That's Greg Chappell, who was fired in 2007, after a disastrous 2-year stint as India's coach. No wonder CA (Argus panel?) also axed him. Another irony: Hussey made the Test side at the "overripe" age of 30. Would Greg or Ian, with their age hangups, have allowed him in as selectors? Cricket surely needs these "old-school" role models. But not for reasons Ian's obsessed with: Speed, slogging, strike-rates. Cricket is not baseball: It takes 30 hours for a game, not 3. It's about building an innings, not a home-run derby. About partnerships, not individualism. So, this notion of a 3- & 4-day game is utterly ridiculous. Old-school? Go figure!

  • jay57870 on September 13, 2011, 13:44 GMT

    Ian Chappell is flip-flopping! Recently, in "India's riches, Australia's need," he declared: "The Australian selection panel would be delighted ... to choose between talented young batsmen like Sharma, Kohli, Raina, Vijay and Pujara." From "Australia may lust over" these youngsters, he now proclaims cricket has no need for the Rainas bred on T20. What a Switcheroo! Further, he's now singing the praises of Michael Hussey (I fully agree), Amen! But this same Chap has always played the Age-card, preaching his "ageing/fading stars" logic to prematurely write off elite players like Dravid, Tendulkar, Katich, etc. To which Ponting recently proclaimed: "I told Dravid not to retire"! Ricky also pointed to Tendulkar & Kallis as being an "inspiration" to not only older guys like himself, but also for "younger blokes to see it as well; to know that if you keep doing the right things and working hard, and if you've got the talent, then age is not a barrier in our game"! Well said Ricky! (TBC)

  • luisbrunel on September 13, 2011, 12:28 GMT

    Hussey is a damn good player but what is wrong in a player being good in ODIs and T20.

    just to compare, I would probably put Raina and Laxman on the same level as they are good in their own forms of cricket.

  • RandyOZ on September 12, 2011, 23:11 GMT

    @Sreejith Menon, ok lets compare Hussey and Tendulkar....oh that's right you can't because Hussey is a game winner where as Tendulkar is just a dead rubber specialist.

  • Aniruddha_K on September 12, 2011, 10:51 GMT

    Suresh Raina can't play the short ball....that's the technical flaw everyone is talking about.... accepted....but i really dont think you can put it down to t20..May be we can blame it on not being coached well in his early years to play the bouncer...But then Even Sehwag isn't good against the bouncer... but he adjusts well....Sanjay Manjrekar once wrote a really good article about playing short pitched bowing...He wrote playing the short ball well doesn't always mean playing the pulls and the hooks....look at Sachin. He rarely plays the hook in tests because he doesn't need to...he either ducks , glides the ball behind square or plays the upper cut. Raina also needs to sort himself out mentally... Having said that one can't help thinking he's had his chance and it's now time for Rahane and Pujara.

  • Nuxxy on September 12, 2011, 8:05 GMT

    "Raina is a left-hander of the modern generation, while Hussey is one from the old school." He's comparing them for a reason. Stop reacting defensively whenever anyone points out valid flaws in an Indian batsman. The first step to fixing a problem is admitting it exists.

  • on September 12, 2011, 5:39 GMT

    A good article from Ian Chappel on Mike Hussey but still feel it was unnecessary to drag in Suresh Raina.Agreed he has a weakness facing the short ball in test cricket which has been worsened by t20 but with just 15 tests it is too early to make a judgement on him.All Aussie Fans and Ian himself would remember Damien Martyn or Matt Hayden at the start of their careers struggled against quality fast bowling but became great players.It takes time and more importantly commitment from players

  • Impactzone on September 11, 2011, 23:49 GMT

    I get my kids to watch Hussey play in all forms of the game. They understand that its a goal to be able to do it with class like that man. Same with Tendulkar. Work ethics which built skill levels so deep that each ball presents its own opportunity in a given circumstance. And both it seems still love playing the game.

    More than a few have been Hussey bashers on many cricket forums in the last 2 years. Most are choking on eating their own words.

  • montys_muse on September 11, 2011, 20:47 GMT

    @ultrasnow: i would pay to watch hussey bat in all forms but raina in limited overs only :)

  • zico123 on September 11, 2011, 19:14 GMT

    no doubt IPL, CL too much of T20 and huge money on offer from them has ruined younger generation in India, if this continues India will never produce any more great Test batsman, all it will produce is T20 dasher, cut down pay scale in IPL and reduce it to 2 week event. make pay scale for Test cricket the highest, then ODI, then T20.

  • zico123 on September 11, 2011, 19:10 GMT

    if Raina has any desire to be a good test player, he needs to play Ranji/ County (not IPL, CL) and score big hundreds. until then he should not be picked in Test side again, time to give longer run to Ajanka rahane and Pujara in Test side.

  • screamingeagle on September 11, 2011, 18:02 GMT

    @Mervo. You, sir, seems to have nothing better to do. Why would you start a discussion on India being No.1 on an article like this? :) Anyway, Aus is still living in the past, and their fall has been rapid. Maybe Ind is following the Aussie way, huh? On topic, there is no point in comparing Raina to Hussey. There are enough capable Indian bats whom you can compare Raina to. If Ian is so interested, he should compare some of the Aussie wannabes to Hussey. Flame me, if you like, but that my opinion, I believe Ian never misses a chance to poke a finger in India's eye.

  • sixnout on September 11, 2011, 16:27 GMT

    @ultrasnow...Yes, I would pay to watch Hussey bat. Damn I would pay to watch Dravid bat...

    Might be a romantic notion, but there is something to admire about people who knuckle down in the face of adversity and come out victorious.

    Raina is awesome in the onedayers, but tends to get caught out in the rigours of the longer version

  • manisacumen on September 11, 2011, 14:49 GMT

    I agree with Srikkanth and steve in their comments. IC has needlessly lobbied for a reduction in duration from 5 days to 4 or 3. I think 5 days is ideal. In earlier days say upto the early 90s, I thought 5 days were not enough. Six were required to get results. But now (yes the influence of ODIs and T20s cannot be denied) with modern batsmen like viru, dilshan scoring fast, there is enough time to produce results within 5 days. Batsmen may have been spoilt by the limited overs version; but still they are not so bad as not to play copybook cricket. The pioneers of scoring fast have been australians who won because their openers scored fast. And the man who started it all was Michael Slater and copied by Langer and Hayden. Then by Viru and now Dilshan.

    If Raina plays a season in County, surely he will be a capable test batsman. Hope he decides to play in county at the next earliest opportunity.

  • Praxis on September 11, 2011, 14:13 GMT

    Like a few others I'm a little confused with the last bit of this article too. I think Ian Chappell was trying to point out Raina's technical deficiencies with batting, he fears that a talented batsman like Raina may never be able to get to Husseys's level in tests. Hussey is truly a good batsman with a fighting spirit & solid technique for all three formats.

  • on September 11, 2011, 14:09 GMT

    you can convert a player who has excelled in the long form to 20-20 and NOT vice versa. Raina needs to play Ranji/County and score lots more runs. IPL and 20-20 has sadly ruined the Test side of India

  • whoster on September 11, 2011, 13:04 GMT

    Michael Hussey is indeed a great role model. Sound technique, discipline, a good range of strokes, and a great work ethic. He'll take some replacing for the Aussies when he goes, but could still have a few years left in him.

  • Kaze on September 11, 2011, 11:50 GMT

    Raina is rubbish that's the bottom line and when he is 36 he will still be rubbish, if you can't get the basics right you will always fail in the long run.

  • SPotnis on September 11, 2011, 11:42 GMT

    This is where people like Hussey, Dravid, VVS Laksham come out of top because of great technique. Raina's, Kohli's of this world will never get the importance of technique because of the type of cricket and the system they are used to. That is why Hussey is a world class player like Dravid where are Kohli's, Raina's are just another cricketers more geared for T20 than longer versions.

  • rats_rule on September 11, 2011, 11:32 GMT

    @ultrasnow, yes i would definitely pay to watch hussey bat. the guy's cover drives and pull shots are so amazing to watch, would much rather watch these classical shots that some flat track bully clearing the front hip and aiming for cow. and @ Tendia... Bradman may have only played 52 tests but he did so over a career spanning 18years. isnt this similar to the length of tendulkar's career? its not his fault that the amount of tests back then was much less, but remember he played on uncovered pitches as well. current indian team struggled excessively on covered english pitches, so imagine if they were uncovered now. no batsman would get it off the square!

  • Winsome on September 11, 2011, 11:09 GMT

    I love Hussey but I can't see what is to be gained from comparing Raina with him. Hussey's record at the Waca when he was in his twenties wasn't really anything to write home about, it took him years of cricket to turn himself into a really fine player. Raina has talent and needs time to learn more.

  • Mervo on September 11, 2011, 10:59 GMT

    India has survived on the past and their fall will be rapid. They should never have been number 1. Their bowling is just so weak. Hussy was out of the Australian team for so long because of the greats there. Ponting, Gilchrist, Hayden and so on. He is a quality player and his average shows that. What is Raina's average?

  • ultrasnow on September 11, 2011, 8:38 GMT

    Would you pay to watch Hussey bat?.....Nooo

  • on September 11, 2011, 8:13 GMT

    @Mark00. You seriously have limited knowledge of Indian cricket. Gavaskar, Vishwanath, Sachin, Dravid, Laxman and co. have all been good pullers. Yes, it's true that most surfaces in India don't help you play the short ball well, especially overseas, but the above mentioned players were good enough to adapt and play the shot well. Why can't Raina then? Not because of India's batting heritage, which have unarguably produced some of the best batsmen in world cricket over the last 3 decades, but the fact that T20 cricket doesn't help you learn to control the pull shot and get over the ball and pull it down.

  • Charindra on September 11, 2011, 8:05 GMT

    @Stephen Miller - Exactly my thoughts. The last 2 paragraphs were so random. I thought this was an article on Hussey!

  • on September 11, 2011, 7:36 GMT

    silly silly comparison.....Ian seems to forget hussey was on the verge of being left out of aussies team during ashes 2009 when he scored a face- saving hundred in a lost cause during the last test match of that series.....raina is only 24,,,give him time to develop and he will be surely be one of the best,,,not every good batsman in test history just came and dazzled.....not everyone is Mohd. azharuddin or Sourav Ganguly,,,Some are Marvan Attapattu as well....

  • on September 11, 2011, 7:30 GMT

    @CricFan78, @Sreejith Menon: The point of the article is not to compare players of the same age. This article compares a real good ol' style batsman with the modern lads learning through T20. And if you ask why Hussey was not known when he was 24, that's probably because very few Indians follow cricket worldwide. That said, it is generally Australian culture for a player to be given a chance in intl cricket in his late 20's. In those days, you had to earn the baggy green with sheer truckloads of runs at the Shield - and still guys like Hodge missed out. That's the point of this article - nowadays you have some hacks playing the IPL and the crowd immediately wants that player to be thrust into intl cricket. Good on ya Ian (as usual)!

  • Tendia on September 11, 2011, 7:21 GMT

    Hi Ian nice article but pls don't compare Raina to michel hussey if you can then compare him to tendulkar you will find after playing more than 185 or so test matches he still averages more tha 56 and hussey avg over 65 for first 50 test matches but now more he plays he is averaging 51 does this tell something about sor don bradman

  • on September 11, 2011, 7:00 GMT

    This is more or less saying what Gavaskar has pointed out repeatedly in the last few months. If your technique has been honed in first class cricket then it is relatively easy to adapt to the requirements of the short form games. If however you have basic flaws in your technique you will inevitably be found out in tests.

  • on September 11, 2011, 4:36 GMT

    Mike Hussey.A mirror image if ever of Rahul Dravid..a man after his heart!Technical excellence combined with a scoring ability all over the Dial!such phenomenal application in all forms of the game..a hardcore fighter,who has excelled in pacey pitches of Australia and the dustbowls that the subcontinent can create(r can pitches ever b prepared like these r should we say un prepared?!)his blinding quick savagely annhilation of Pakistan in T20 in the caribbean was simply breathtaking and one ofa kind!

  • on September 11, 2011, 4:35 GMT

    Raina is 24 Years and Hussey is 36 Years...why dont you compare Hussey to Tendulkar???

  • CricFan78 on September 11, 2011, 3:42 GMT

    Raina is only 24 compared to Hussey who is 36. Did anyone know Hussey when he was 24?

  • Governor on September 11, 2011, 3:28 GMT

    An excellent article Chappelli. The problem with the youth of today is they want to earn $1 million in 3 weeks by playing 20-20 cricket. The only way for Australian cricket to move forward by educating young batsmen on how to build a long innings in the 4 day game is to introduce a ruling where young cricketers are eligble for 20-20 cricket when they have 4 full first class Shield seasons under their belts. They must play every shield game over a 3 to 4 year period before they are allowed to play 20-20 cricket. Once the solid foundations of their game are 2nd nature, they are in a position to improvise with their techniques to play 20-20 cricket.

  • shrikanthk on September 11, 2011, 3:27 GMT

    The beneficial impact of ODIs on Test run rates is largely exaggerated. Check out the Run rates in the recent Ind-WI series or the ongoing Aus-SL series. They're no different from the run rates of the 70s/80s or even the 60s.

    The remarkable scoring rates among Aussie teams of the early 2000s is more a commentary on the extraordinary skill of those batsmen than on any purported benefits of ODI cricket.

    And who says a test match with a net RR of 4 runs an over is more entertaining than a game played at a tempo of 3.5 runs an over! What matters is the quality of the contest between bat and ball. The 1960-61 series was one of the most entertaining rubbers of all time. Yet, the scoring rates in that series were anything but high.

    Also, I don't know why IC is talking about reducing the duration of tests. Fans who cannot fathom a 5 day game will struggle to fathom a 4day/3day game as well. Cricket must guard itself against this tendency to stoop to the lowest denomination.

  • on September 11, 2011, 3:27 GMT

    Suresh Raina is just a slogger, forget about his weakness against the short pitch stuff he can't even play spin as we have seen in the test matches against England. Young Indian batsmen have been exposed to T 20 cricket in very early of their careers and now these Raina, Kohli etc.. are struggling in situations when batsmen have to respect bowlers and negotiate good balls.

  • Mark00 on September 11, 2011, 3:13 GMT

    Silly comparison. Raina's problems with short-pitched bowling isnt due to t20 but because of his indian batting heritage. Indians have always had problems with the short ball. Of the current crop, only Dravid and Laxman can comfortably play the pull against quick bouncers. The rest either duck, flail, or get hit.

  • on September 11, 2011, 3:11 GMT

    I like reading Ian Chappell's postings, but am frustrated by the urge he seems to have to muddle ideas together. This article was about the need to develop batters with the technical skills and the ability to adapt to different conditions (a la Hussey), but then he suddenly throws in a paragraph at the end about reducing test cricket to three or four days. Please, please, Ian, listen to the voice of your inner English teacher, and try to focus on one or two key themes!

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  • on September 11, 2011, 3:11 GMT

    I like reading Ian Chappell's postings, but am frustrated by the urge he seems to have to muddle ideas together. This article was about the need to develop batters with the technical skills and the ability to adapt to different conditions (a la Hussey), but then he suddenly throws in a paragraph at the end about reducing test cricket to three or four days. Please, please, Ian, listen to the voice of your inner English teacher, and try to focus on one or two key themes!

  • Mark00 on September 11, 2011, 3:13 GMT

    Silly comparison. Raina's problems with short-pitched bowling isnt due to t20 but because of his indian batting heritage. Indians have always had problems with the short ball. Of the current crop, only Dravid and Laxman can comfortably play the pull against quick bouncers. The rest either duck, flail, or get hit.

  • on September 11, 2011, 3:27 GMT

    Suresh Raina is just a slogger, forget about his weakness against the short pitch stuff he can't even play spin as we have seen in the test matches against England. Young Indian batsmen have been exposed to T 20 cricket in very early of their careers and now these Raina, Kohli etc.. are struggling in situations when batsmen have to respect bowlers and negotiate good balls.

  • shrikanthk on September 11, 2011, 3:27 GMT

    The beneficial impact of ODIs on Test run rates is largely exaggerated. Check out the Run rates in the recent Ind-WI series or the ongoing Aus-SL series. They're no different from the run rates of the 70s/80s or even the 60s.

    The remarkable scoring rates among Aussie teams of the early 2000s is more a commentary on the extraordinary skill of those batsmen than on any purported benefits of ODI cricket.

    And who says a test match with a net RR of 4 runs an over is more entertaining than a game played at a tempo of 3.5 runs an over! What matters is the quality of the contest between bat and ball. The 1960-61 series was one of the most entertaining rubbers of all time. Yet, the scoring rates in that series were anything but high.

    Also, I don't know why IC is talking about reducing the duration of tests. Fans who cannot fathom a 5 day game will struggle to fathom a 4day/3day game as well. Cricket must guard itself against this tendency to stoop to the lowest denomination.

  • Governor on September 11, 2011, 3:28 GMT

    An excellent article Chappelli. The problem with the youth of today is they want to earn $1 million in 3 weeks by playing 20-20 cricket. The only way for Australian cricket to move forward by educating young batsmen on how to build a long innings in the 4 day game is to introduce a ruling where young cricketers are eligble for 20-20 cricket when they have 4 full first class Shield seasons under their belts. They must play every shield game over a 3 to 4 year period before they are allowed to play 20-20 cricket. Once the solid foundations of their game are 2nd nature, they are in a position to improvise with their techniques to play 20-20 cricket.

  • CricFan78 on September 11, 2011, 3:42 GMT

    Raina is only 24 compared to Hussey who is 36. Did anyone know Hussey when he was 24?

  • on September 11, 2011, 4:35 GMT

    Raina is 24 Years and Hussey is 36 Years...why dont you compare Hussey to Tendulkar???

  • on September 11, 2011, 4:36 GMT

    Mike Hussey.A mirror image if ever of Rahul Dravid..a man after his heart!Technical excellence combined with a scoring ability all over the Dial!such phenomenal application in all forms of the game..a hardcore fighter,who has excelled in pacey pitches of Australia and the dustbowls that the subcontinent can create(r can pitches ever b prepared like these r should we say un prepared?!)his blinding quick savagely annhilation of Pakistan in T20 in the caribbean was simply breathtaking and one ofa kind!

  • on September 11, 2011, 7:00 GMT

    This is more or less saying what Gavaskar has pointed out repeatedly in the last few months. If your technique has been honed in first class cricket then it is relatively easy to adapt to the requirements of the short form games. If however you have basic flaws in your technique you will inevitably be found out in tests.

  • Tendia on September 11, 2011, 7:21 GMT

    Hi Ian nice article but pls don't compare Raina to michel hussey if you can then compare him to tendulkar you will find after playing more than 185 or so test matches he still averages more tha 56 and hussey avg over 65 for first 50 test matches but now more he plays he is averaging 51 does this tell something about sor don bradman