The Ashes 2013-14 November 7, 2013

England insist on Ashes cookbook

The leaking of England's minutely detailed dining requirements highlights their attention to details. The days of pies, pizza and pints are long gone
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Australia still idly likes to imagine England as a depressing culinary backwater of fish and chips and bacon butties, but if they serve that up for the England cricket team in the forthcoming Test series it could create the greatest Ashes stand-off since Bodyline.

The Bodyline controversy in the 1930s was all about potential damage to the body because of deliberate short-pitched bowling, but Bodyline II is more obsessed with the attainment of physical perfection as England have issued detailed instructions about the health foods they expect to receive during the Ashes series.

England's culinary requirements, which have been leaked to the Sydney Morning Herald, are outlined in a glossy 70-page cookbook plus accompanying instructions and include exact instructions for preparing nearly 200 different types of meals and drinks. Beware, Australia, if your muffins are not wholewheat or if your cranberries are not poached until soft.

Superfoods such as kale, agave nectar and yogurt (probiotic, naturally) are present in abundance and, as for the main courses, expect heavy demand for the mungbean and spinach curry. The Herald classified the cuisine style as "modern pretentious".

Most international sides issue dietary requirements - Australia among them - but it is a safe bet that there has never been anything as detailed as this. If you are reading this while reheating last night's pizza, you may wish to feel ashamed.

England's methodology is based upon micro-planning every aspect of their performance, all supervised by the largest backroom staff in cricket history. This commitment even extended to organising a pre-tour dinner for the team director, Andy Flower, with the players' wives and girlfriends to advise them about their responsibilities (no menus are available, sadly).

They never miss an opportunity to discuss with other elite sports coaches and competitors how to gain minute advantages by perfect preparation. These prescriptive demands for Australia to prepare healthy meals to their requirements will only strengthen their growing reputation for unashamed professionalism.

Chris Rosimus, the ECB's performance nutritionist, has backed up the cookbook with a further 12-page file titled, Test Catering Requirements. Rosimus' secret? Well, England guard such information closely, but after intense research, we can reveal this mantra: "At the end of play, have a good meal that provides one-third carbohydrate, one-third lean protein and one-third vegetables or salad. This will help your body recovery to do it all again the next day."

Rosimus used to work as a nutritionist for Manchester United Soccer Schools in Abu Dhabi before he joined the ECB more than two years ago. He provides guidance to England players, men and women, at all levels and is tasked with identifying potential problem players. Gary Ballance, who some feel carries a little extra poundage, could find Rosimus on his shoulder at any moment.

It is all a world away from England's three-month tour of India in 1993 when the tour manager, Bob Bennett, kept spirits up by occasionally running what became known as Bob's Kitchen, with birthday cakes for the players a speciality.

By the end of the century, England's physiotherapist, Wayne Morton, part of a backroom staff that was tiny by comparison with today, would insist on checking the hygiene of hotel kitchens and was not averse to brandishing bottles of anti-bacterial liquid and suggesting that the staff attended to their cleaning rota.

What Ben Stokes, one of the least experienced members of England's Ashes tour party, makes of it, heaven knows. When Durham won a decisive late-season Championship match against their closest challengers, Yorkshire, at Scarborough, Stokes gleefully tweeted a picture of the boys tucking in with a celebratory Chinese takeaway. Now, as he wonders if he will make his Test debut in the Ashes series, he must learn to love butternut squash and falafel coronation. Be warned, Australia: it must only be made with low-calorie mayonnaise.

Even now, Nancy, the much-loved Middlesex cook during their glory years, who claimed to prepare for a day's work at 8am with "a cup of tea and a fag", must be looking askance from whatever celestial cloud she has alighted upon.

It was Nancy, whose lunchtime apple crumble could famously slow a bowler's approach in the post-lunch session, who once responded to the gentle concern of the former Middlesex and England captain Mike Brearley (and you can insert your own swear words, because there were plenty) by raging: "You take care of the cricket, Michael, and I'll take care of the cooking."

Times have changed, but when England have a captain, Alastair Cook, who goes by the nickname of Chef, what did you expect?

Cook even took part in a fund-raiser for the Chance to Shine cricket charity in September, judged by the TV chef Ainsley Harriott. His own delicacy, a chocolate brownie recipe which he borrowed from his wife, would presumably be on England's banned list.

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • RednWhiteArmy on November 10, 2013, 4:26 GMT

    @Tony Pitzicada Hey, forget about it, paisan.

  • on November 9, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    Don't forget Limes. Plenty of Limes.

  • jmcilhinney on November 9, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    I guess one needs to consider the law of diminishing returns in this regard. I don't think that there's any doubt that nutrition is important and all else being equal, could be the difference between winning and losing. It's a matter of whether the money it costs to implement this level of control is worth it. For many teams in international cricket, who may even be having trouble paying their players, it just would not be feasible. The ECB is fairly flush though, so I guess any improvement in results is worth the investment. As many are fond of telling us, this England team is not going to go down in history as one of the greats. The key for them is getting the absolute most out of the talent they have available. If this level of attention to detail can eke out an extra 1% then that might be the difference in this series. England won 3-0 in England without vastly out-playing Australia so that little edge could be crucial.

  • on November 8, 2013, 22:37 GMT

    the greatest team in the history of the game (west indies of the 70s and 80s) did it all without this kind of 'unashamed professionalism'. You can micromanage all you want, but you can't micromanage theu hunger and desire to win, tenacity or team spirit. The english team is very good, but let not a 70-page cookbook be attributed to their success. It doesnt have any relation to a team winning on the field.

  • on November 8, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    I am not sure if any picture perfect diet is related to success or not, take example of the great west indies team who will drink every night but still ruled the world. its all in attitude.

  • SCC08 on November 8, 2013, 22:02 GMT

    Also remembering that with the vast foriegn community in the England setup, they probably do need a 87 page menu.. Lol

  • shot274 on November 8, 2013, 21:05 GMT

    For God sake give Jo Root something proper to eat even if the others are into Tofu!!Just as you thought the England cricket team couldnt get more boring......!

  • R_U_4_REAL_NICK on November 8, 2013, 19:09 GMT

    @RandyOZ (post on November 8, 2013, 18:29 GMT): how are you finding the cuisine in U.K? Sounds like you should pre-order a copy of the cook book.

  • RandyOZ on November 8, 2013, 18:29 GMT

    Probably one of the most embarrassing things to come out of world sport in recent years. Won't help you retain the Ashes so enjoy the tofu!

  • sachin_vvsfan on November 8, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    "Chris Rosimus, the ECB's performance nutritionist" Lol! i did not know ECB has these kind of staff. May be it is good to have some people like this. I wish BCCI the richest cricket body could do something about the well being of our fast bowlers.

  • RednWhiteArmy on November 10, 2013, 4:26 GMT

    @Tony Pitzicada Hey, forget about it, paisan.

  • on November 9, 2013, 21:10 GMT

    Don't forget Limes. Plenty of Limes.

  • jmcilhinney on November 9, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    I guess one needs to consider the law of diminishing returns in this regard. I don't think that there's any doubt that nutrition is important and all else being equal, could be the difference between winning and losing. It's a matter of whether the money it costs to implement this level of control is worth it. For many teams in international cricket, who may even be having trouble paying their players, it just would not be feasible. The ECB is fairly flush though, so I guess any improvement in results is worth the investment. As many are fond of telling us, this England team is not going to go down in history as one of the greats. The key for them is getting the absolute most out of the talent they have available. If this level of attention to detail can eke out an extra 1% then that might be the difference in this series. England won 3-0 in England without vastly out-playing Australia so that little edge could be crucial.

  • on November 8, 2013, 22:37 GMT

    the greatest team in the history of the game (west indies of the 70s and 80s) did it all without this kind of 'unashamed professionalism'. You can micromanage all you want, but you can't micromanage theu hunger and desire to win, tenacity or team spirit. The english team is very good, but let not a 70-page cookbook be attributed to their success. It doesnt have any relation to a team winning on the field.

  • on November 8, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    I am not sure if any picture perfect diet is related to success or not, take example of the great west indies team who will drink every night but still ruled the world. its all in attitude.

  • SCC08 on November 8, 2013, 22:02 GMT

    Also remembering that with the vast foriegn community in the England setup, they probably do need a 87 page menu.. Lol

  • shot274 on November 8, 2013, 21:05 GMT

    For God sake give Jo Root something proper to eat even if the others are into Tofu!!Just as you thought the England cricket team couldnt get more boring......!

  • R_U_4_REAL_NICK on November 8, 2013, 19:09 GMT

    @RandyOZ (post on November 8, 2013, 18:29 GMT): how are you finding the cuisine in U.K? Sounds like you should pre-order a copy of the cook book.

  • RandyOZ on November 8, 2013, 18:29 GMT

    Probably one of the most embarrassing things to come out of world sport in recent years. Won't help you retain the Ashes so enjoy the tofu!

  • sachin_vvsfan on November 8, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    "Chris Rosimus, the ECB's performance nutritionist" Lol! i did not know ECB has these kind of staff. May be it is good to have some people like this. I wish BCCI the richest cricket body could do something about the well being of our fast bowlers.

  • davidhopps1 on November 8, 2013, 16:34 GMT

    @ Greatest_Game re your junked complaint about your comments being junked, it probably didn't help that you sent them about 80 times!

    This story is obviously just part of the pre-Ashes malarkey and although some take a high-minded view and regard these stories as worthless, their popularity is undeniable, and there is lots of serious stuff elsewhere on the site. Behind the triviality of the tale, though, is a serious debate - and thanks to those of you who have touched upon it: just how far professionalism and planning can go for it still to bring benefits, and when that maximum point is reached? Different sides achieve in different ways. That, I think, is interesting.

  • on November 8, 2013, 16:06 GMT

    Peter Siddle, who has enormous stamina, and his captain can rely on to bowl fiery overs when the other Aussie quicks are drooping, is a vegan. Diet or nutrition is important. Garbage in, garbage out!

  • milepost on November 8, 2013, 15:32 GMT

    Lunge, how can I put this, your dreary comments are certainly inevitable. I hope the cookbook is released in time for Christmas, I want it under the tree!

  • jrw39 on November 8, 2013, 15:15 GMT

    As others have said, this is professional sport. It is precisely this attention to detail that has made the British cycling team so successful over the last few years. It might seem over the top but if it produces even a tiny improvement then it could be the difference between winning and losing. Like it or not, the England cricket team has a huge amount of money to spend on backroom staff and it is things like this that contribute to the success of the team.

  • Greatest_Game on November 8, 2013, 14:02 GMT

    "England's methodology is based upon micro-planning every aspect of their performance, all supervised by **the largest backroom staff in cricket history."

    How galling for **the largest backroom staff in cricket history, that, despite their micro-planning & a meticulously prepared diet of poached saffa, every 4 years a bunch of biltong chomping Castle guzzling blokes from Africa comes and whips them in their backyard, retires their skipper, & waltzes off their silverware.

  • Greatest_Game on November 8, 2013, 14:02 GMT

    Incisive, illuminating, informative and just the type of in depth analysis of the critically important issues that dominate modern cricket that is so lacking in today's ubiquitous tabloid cricket journalism.

  • Front-Foot-Sponge on November 8, 2013, 12:58 GMT

    Seriously as professional sportspeople I see nothing wrong with paying attention to nutrition, not to mention it is a long tour for the guys. It is all a bit too much with the largest back room staff of any team but hey their win record is pretty sweet lately.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge on November 8, 2013, 12:56 GMT

    Australia were certainly 'Cooked' last time down under, no doubt those memories are still fresh in the eyes of certain fans. These days, no one can even be bothered to state the bleedin obvious- That England are far better than Australia at cricket - because its old news as well as being so apprent in the present day. Australia are acting like they have so much to fear. They certainly do have much to fear - If Cook scores just half the runs he scored last time (766) then England will win. Seeing how strong England are on paper compared to Australia should be enough for any fan or commentator. I'm just waiting for the series to begin and England to chalk up their first win. Australia must be hoping there's some way the inevitabe can be avoided. We all know it can't.

  • YorkshirePudding on November 8, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    @millsy24, you would be unlikely to see Agave on a market stall as its not edible, however the article mentions Agave nectar which should be available from most health food shops.

  • DingDong420 on November 8, 2013, 11:43 GMT

    The Ashes has to be one of the most boring series around

  • Greatest_Game on November 8, 2013, 11:08 GMT

    Agave is a cactus. Tequila is made from it!

  • millsy24 on November 8, 2013, 10:41 GMT

    I think you will find that the majority of elite sportsmen have a similar diet. But, in saying that, Australia has some of the best fresh produce in the world according to extremely highly regarded European chefs. Not sure about agave though. Never seen that one in a fruit and veg market. No doubt it will have to be imported, whatever it is.

  • YorkshirePudding on November 8, 2013, 10:27 GMT

    @m0se, I would imagine most of the ingredients are all able to be sourced locally anyway. You mention Salsa, which are are are tomato, onion, chillies and lime. curries, 90% of the ingredients will be in any decent hotel kitchen, and as England stay in 5* hotels, they will have all the ingredients or be able to source them locally.

  • Orsoncarte on November 8, 2013, 10:20 GMT

    The end of play diet of 1/3 carbs, 1/3 lean protein, and 1/3 salad or vegetables sounds suspiciously like a good square meal. That's hardly eye brow raising. The fact that they've added some variety to the traditional meat and veg with bread is reason for congratulations more than anything else.

  • brusselslion on November 8, 2013, 10:19 GMT

    @Partyman on (November 7, 2013, 21:43 GMT): The name's ironic, right?

  • YorkshirePudding on November 8, 2013, 10:11 GMT

    So whats the news hear, a team of sportsmen have specific dietary requirements.

    As for the meal the SMH are making out of this its laughable, digging up relics like Jones and Merv Hughes.

    The point people have missed is that theres are around 40 people on the tour, add on the Wives and Girlfriends, who rpobably arrive mid december, and there will be a lot of diversity in terms of dietary requirements, from those that are Vegan, to people who have particular allergies or personal dislikes.

  • guycollier118 on November 8, 2013, 10:08 GMT

    Maybe Australia should take a leaf out of England's book and embrace professionalism rather than continue to snigger.

    England have won three Ashes series in a row, he who laughs last, laughs the longest.

  • dunger.bob on November 8, 2013, 8:44 GMT

    @ Stumay : lol , that's pretty funny.

  • on November 8, 2013, 8:40 GMT

    @MaruthuDelft NBot sure what you mean here. This story was in an Australian newspaper leaked by an Australian to be read by Australian readers. How did England contrive to make this the "topic of the hour"?

  • on November 8, 2013, 8:21 GMT

    Nothing can compare with cartons of Baked Beans being sent to Shane Warne from Australia when on tour of India in 2002

  • m0se on November 8, 2013, 7:56 GMT

    I looked at the cookbook on the Sydney Morning herald. The cookbook has curries, tostadas, salsa and dishes from around the world. The kitchen would have to be well stocked to prepare the dishes for the team. I would think eating fresh local produce and meat by chefs experienced in preparing them would be better than asking for ingredients sourced from all over the world and hamstringing them with strict recipes. But, they are professionals and not on holiday and so perhaps it is a good idea to have familiar food.

  • on November 8, 2013, 7:47 GMT

    Professional sportsmen in strict diet shocker! Amazed the coverage given to this non-story. Let's get the Ashes underway and stop all this guff.

  • Stumay on November 8, 2013, 7:45 GMT

    Shane Warne thinks that the menu is too dull and that Michael Clarke would have prepared a much more exciting selection.

  • Optic on November 8, 2013, 7:37 GMT

    My brother's a sports nutritionist who's worked with England RU, England RL, as well as a few sides in the Premier League. This has been common practice for a number of years and cricket are only relatively recently catching up with. i'm not sure why the Aussie media need to issue with it and make fun, it probably speaks volumes about themselves tbh. If they asked their own national side, they'd be surprise to know that they will have had a similar set up in England and India, maybe not as detailed but similar. If they didn't it's pretty amateur.

  • on November 8, 2013, 7:35 GMT

    leave Gary Balance the way he is! His game might suffer if you remove the ballast.

  • MaruthuDelft on November 8, 2013, 7:13 GMT

    English always make relatively insignificant things look the topic of the hour. This time around its food. What is food compared to Ashes?

  • Front-Foot-Sponge on November 8, 2013, 6:37 GMT

    @Lunge, I..... I like your comment! I wonder if they might release the cookbook, I like the sounds of it! I just don't think I will be able to stomach the DVD if England win the Ashes again (nor the Aussie's for that matter) but the cookbook, that I could stomach!

  • Simoc on November 8, 2013, 6:34 GMT

    That is the problem with abundant money and professionalism. They are all trying to promote themselves as being 'what it takes'. But only the players on the field count. The rest are hanging onto their shoestrings for employment.

  • jimbond on November 8, 2013, 6:13 GMT

    I am waiting for England to come against a team that plays exactly like England- the waiting game, and grind them out. Of course SA did that also, but they did much more. It is then that English character (or lack of it) will come out an England will be forced to play a less bland form of cricket. Even interesting guys like Pieterson, Anderson, Swann and Panesar are given defensive roles in this team. Hope it changes soon.

  • Agnihothra on November 8, 2013, 5:46 GMT

    In 1993 england caprtain Graham Gooch missed a TEST(yes and entire test) due to prawn curry they ahd in the dinner before the test... so thay have come a looong way there.........

  • FredBoycott on November 8, 2013, 5:01 GMT

    World's Gone Mad. Can't see any of the Yorkshire lads eating that stuff.

  • Masking_Tape on November 8, 2013, 4:57 GMT

    That's how it works in most athletes. It's about damn time cricketers started acting like athletes not fat stocky slow guys who can only hit and field at slip.

  • heathrf1974 on November 8, 2013, 3:18 GMT

    I am impressed by it. These people are well paid professional sportsman representing their country and any advantage can make a difference. I think a good diet is especially important for the quicks.

  • on November 8, 2013, 3:17 GMT

    If they want to go to these lengths, wouldn't it be easier to bring their own chef with the team? This is what pro cycling teams do after all. That said, McNuggets didn't stop Usain Bolt!

  • TengaZool on November 8, 2013, 2:45 GMT

    All's well and good till the next defeat. And suddenly, "micro-planning every aspect of their performance" becomes "fussing over cuisine rather than delivering a good performance on the field."

  • trav29 on November 8, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    if you look at the success dave brailsford has had in british cycling its through exactly this type of process. looking to make lots of little gains in every aspect of a player's performance and fitness which all add up to make a cumulative difference to the end results

  • Thegimp on November 8, 2013, 2:19 GMT

    What has got England into a position where they can compete with the best teams going around is a good grass roots structure, academy (thanks a lot Rod Marsh) and good County structure which has produced good cricketers. I guess a good immegration structure could also take some of the credit. These guys, as the story confirms, didn't need kale, agave nectar and yogurt to get to test level and hardly need it to stay and perform there. It's the typical example of phycology games England play with and against themselves. Too many people pumping their own importance, similar to the Esendon Football Club Suppliments scandle. What will they do if they lose the Ashes?

  • landl47 on November 8, 2013, 2:18 GMT

    I have to say that when articles like this are 'news', it's time for the tests to start.

  • srriaj317 on November 8, 2013, 2:16 GMT

    This English team works so hard at becoming a well-oiled machine with cogs running at computerised frequencies...that they are so utterly boring. Looks like cricket is not at all a sport to be enjoyed anymore - more of a business with patriotism thrown in to capture spectators (read $$$).

  • disco_bob on November 8, 2013, 2:15 GMT

    Posted by popcorn on (November 8, 2013, 0:28 GMT), do you mean kidney stones or gall stones?

  • on November 8, 2013, 2:12 GMT

    I wish I toured the world eating elite health foods and played cricket, Swann is right, they're living the dream.

  • on November 8, 2013, 1:54 GMT

    Most people here didn't understand what England is trying to achieve by doing this. They are fine tuning every aspect of their game professionally and personally. So its sensible to look at diet as what you put in is what you get out. Paying attention to all details even the small nutritional ones could be the difference between a good side and a great one.

  • Front-Foot-Lunge. on November 8, 2013, 1:51 GMT

    We Englishmen have a fine knack for reducing everything to the boring nth degree.

    But hey, it has been working so fair play to it.

    With 'leaks' like this I tell you we'd better win. If we kick on about pretentious stuff like this then we are setting ourselves up for an almighty and negative reception if we don't win the Ashes.

  • Patchmaster on November 8, 2013, 1:48 GMT

    As a die hard England supporter, I am utterly ashamed. The POINT of going on tour is to test yourself in different environments and cultures - not to just magically transport YOUR whole culture to another country. Pathetic.

  • disco_bob on November 8, 2013, 0:41 GMT

    Please cricinfo, serve up a helping of traditional Ashes trash talk rather than this.

  • 2.14istherunrate on November 8, 2013, 0:39 GMT

    Diet is very important and sportsmen especially so. Modern man is quite tuned to different diets if he is interested in his body. I applaud England for being so switched on. Spinach and mungbean curry would down a treat with me too. With brown rice!

  • RJHB on November 8, 2013, 0:31 GMT

    Yes I know Warnie was an Aussie, don't write in!

  • on November 8, 2013, 0:30 GMT

    :O proffesional sportsteam wants players to watch what they eat! Shock horror!

  • RJHB on November 8, 2013, 0:29 GMT

    Jeez, what would Warnie have eaten?!! Mungbean curry? Sorry to those who like to eat this but pooh-weeeeee, that's a stinker!!

  • popcorn on November 8, 2013, 0:28 GMT

    This is hilaroous! I think England are preparing their excuses for losing this Ashes series.Remember Kris Kristoferson's song,"Blame it on the Stones"? This is the next big challenge for Masterchef Australia!

  • Lmaotsetung on November 8, 2013, 0:14 GMT

    Say what you will but at the end of day Aussie bowlers are falling like ten pins save Siddle while the poms are still standing strong. Jimmy's been injury free for god knows how long (touch wood).

  • on November 8, 2013, 0:08 GMT

    A previous poster asked what Fred Trueman would have thought about this diet. Well, the legend is that his basic nutrition was pork pies followed by lots of pints.

    Trueman would have been a culinary outlaw if he played for England today.

  • nareshgb1 on November 8, 2013, 0:03 GMT

    Gotta sympathize with Punjab da Puttar Monty here.

  • InsideHedge on November 7, 2013, 23:58 GMT

    What's wrong with butternut squash? Makes for a fantastic soup.

  • Whatsgoinoffoutthere on November 7, 2013, 23:48 GMT

    Would Colin Milburn have asked for more, or just phoned out for a sneaky takeaway.

    This is one instance where a late night call for pizza could actually be for pizza, and preferably not a mungbean and cranberry pizza with made live yak cheese.

  • on November 7, 2013, 23:40 GMT

    Hey blue_android they have more silverware than Australia have. It's very sad that the media here has to stoop this low and can't find something sensible to write about. It's even sadder that we are reading this garbage.

  • smudgeon on November 7, 2013, 23:39 GMT

    ...and this is why apart from Swann and Pietersen, they're a pretty dry bunch of people! Only half-kidding there. I would have thought a happy, healthy cricketer who isn't being micro-managed would be better than an unhappy, healthy cricketer who has his pee-breaks mapped out. Still, if they win the Ashes, then I guess they can eat what they like, and pee when they like. When did we stop trusting people to take responsibility for themselves? I can see the next generation of cricketers who will need to log in for advice between each delivery, who probably dare not pass wind for fear of upsetting their rhythm. Still, if it works out, it works out. Success is all that matters...

  • browners76 on November 7, 2013, 23:38 GMT

    Makes you chuckle to think back to the bodyline tour where Harold Larwood would have a pint of bitter brought out at the drinks interval to keep him going. It's just as well Mike Gatting isn't the tour manager, he'd be sneaking fish and chips into his hotel room at night!

  • 2MikeGattings on November 7, 2013, 23:11 GMT

    It must have been all those acai and wheatgrass smoothies that made them wazz on the Oval pitch.

  • Mitty2 on November 7, 2013, 22:55 GMT

    @Partyman, that comment is a joke and I hope you're ashamed. You're proud over the diet of your cricketers... And a ridiculous one at that.... Wow

    Read Gilly's article on this site about Lehman and see his record with Qld and then make the same comment again.

  • on November 7, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    The insistence on low fat high carbohydrate is not actually demonstrated to be good for people.

  • on November 7, 2013, 22:39 GMT

    Hilarious! England will easily win the diet war, but whether they will win the cricket war? Who knows.... :-)

  • Truemans_Ghost on November 7, 2013, 22:38 GMT

    No Nando's? Alex Bowden will be devastated.

  • neo-galactico on November 7, 2013, 22:30 GMT

    ECB is somewhere between awesome and preposterous!!!

  • the_blue_android on November 7, 2013, 22:18 GMT

    It's great that they go that far and it's expected in elite sport these days. Wouldn't it just be a little nice to show some silverware for it!

  • Kolpak1989 on November 7, 2013, 22:15 GMT

    What a bunch of prima-donnas... I hope they get cold pies.

  • whoster on November 7, 2013, 22:11 GMT

    I wonder what dear old Freddie Trueman would've made of this. Or dear old Freddie Flintoff for that matter!

  • jb633 on November 7, 2013, 22:10 GMT

    Gone are the days when sport had characters the "average man" could associate with.

  • HOMEBREW on November 7, 2013, 22:04 GMT

    Somehow i'd rather the West Indies menu of KFC.

  • blink182alex on November 7, 2013, 22:00 GMT

    Little over the top from England i think.

    Yeah eating right is all good and well as international sportsmen but i don't think having a blueberry yoghurt is going to make Trott or KP score any more runs against a guy like Harris. Which ever team plays the best cricket will win the series, not who has the best diet.

  • northumbriannomad on November 7, 2013, 21:45 GMT

    I reckon I'm about two stories like this away from switching allegiance to Australia.

  • Partyman on November 7, 2013, 21:43 GMT

    As an avid England supporter I am very proud of this. Compare this to Darren Lehmann (yes, who incites violence against opposition players) who was stood in the balcony at The Oval this year, drinking beer during a passage of play during the test. Enough said.

  • regofpicton on November 7, 2013, 21:21 GMT

    I seem to remember a radio play on 19th century English social conditions having the line "Kale, Mr Engels, is a cross between cabbage and grass". So is this new "unashamed professionalism" with a side serving of the old English "suffering for its own sake"? Then again, with Mr Rosimus on the team, Captain Scott might have been alive today . . . .

  • ProdigyA on November 7, 2013, 21:17 GMT

    In pursuit of perfection, cricketers become chefs.

  • ze_wolf on November 7, 2013, 20:46 GMT

    Based on the tweets of many of their first class players I expect the Nandos menu to make up some of the 82 pages.

  • Bucky77 on November 7, 2013, 20:45 GMT

    Too many column inches to be filled after a wet day, I'd say...

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Bucky77 on November 7, 2013, 20:45 GMT

    Too many column inches to be filled after a wet day, I'd say...

  • ze_wolf on November 7, 2013, 20:46 GMT

    Based on the tweets of many of their first class players I expect the Nandos menu to make up some of the 82 pages.

  • ProdigyA on November 7, 2013, 21:17 GMT

    In pursuit of perfection, cricketers become chefs.

  • regofpicton on November 7, 2013, 21:21 GMT

    I seem to remember a radio play on 19th century English social conditions having the line "Kale, Mr Engels, is a cross between cabbage and grass". So is this new "unashamed professionalism" with a side serving of the old English "suffering for its own sake"? Then again, with Mr Rosimus on the team, Captain Scott might have been alive today . . . .

  • Partyman on November 7, 2013, 21:43 GMT

    As an avid England supporter I am very proud of this. Compare this to Darren Lehmann (yes, who incites violence against opposition players) who was stood in the balcony at The Oval this year, drinking beer during a passage of play during the test. Enough said.

  • northumbriannomad on November 7, 2013, 21:45 GMT

    I reckon I'm about two stories like this away from switching allegiance to Australia.

  • blink182alex on November 7, 2013, 22:00 GMT

    Little over the top from England i think.

    Yeah eating right is all good and well as international sportsmen but i don't think having a blueberry yoghurt is going to make Trott or KP score any more runs against a guy like Harris. Which ever team plays the best cricket will win the series, not who has the best diet.

  • HOMEBREW on November 7, 2013, 22:04 GMT

    Somehow i'd rather the West Indies menu of KFC.

  • jb633 on November 7, 2013, 22:10 GMT

    Gone are the days when sport had characters the "average man" could associate with.

  • whoster on November 7, 2013, 22:11 GMT

    I wonder what dear old Freddie Trueman would've made of this. Or dear old Freddie Flintoff for that matter!