Gary Gilmour 1951-2014 June 10, 2014

Gary Gilmour dies at 62

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Gary Gilmour, the fast bowler who played 15 Tests for Australia and famously demolished England in the 1975 World Cup semi-final, has died at the age of 62.

Gilmour, who had undergone a life-saving liver transplant in 2005, had battled health problems for many years and died at Sydney's Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on Tuesday, after having a hip operation on Monday. Although his international career consisted of only 20 matches across the two formats and was finished by the time he was 25, it featured several remarkable performances.

Perhaps the most memorable was the 6 for 14 he claimed in the World Cup semi-final at Headingley in June 1975, when England's batsmen had no answers for his left-arm swing. The performance was listed by Wisden in 2002 as the greatest bowling effort in ODI history, and the 23-year-old Gilmour followed up with 5 for 48 in the final against West Indies.

His 15 Tests brought 54 wickets at 26.03, but his Test career is remembered as much for his destructive century against New Zealand in Christchurch in 1977 as for his bowling. Against an attack led by Richard Hadlee, Gilmour - known as "Gus" - crunched 20 fours and one six, meaning 86 of his 101 runs in his only Test century had come from boundaries.

"I was next in and the ball was hooping everywhere, Sir Richard Hadlee was bowling and every time Gus picked the bat up I thought 'this is the one, the stumps will go everywhere here'," Kerry O'Keeffe told ESPNcricinfo. "But it kept disappearing all over Christchurch. Then he'd run in and I'd think 'he'll nick this one, first slip will catch this', and long-off was chasing it.

"Honestly, 20 fours and a six, and every one of those fours could have been out! Richard Hadlee on a seaming pitch at Lancaster Park - I though there's no way known you could pick the bat up as high as Gus did, and with serious intent smack it and not nick one. I was doing the sums with the gloves on, next man in.

"I was also in the crowd on that [semi-final] day where he swung that ball against England. It was one of the most exciting spells. He had a day where the inswinger and the outswinger went prodigiously, they didn't go softly, they just boomeranged. You wouldn't think anyone could swing the ball that much but he did that day."

Remarkably, the semi-final was Gilmour's third one-day international, and his first match in the tournament. But Australia's captain Ian Chappell asked Gilmour to share the new ball with Dennis Lillee and his 12 overs brought 6 for 14, which stood as an ODI bowling record until West Indian Winston Davis took 7 for 51 in 1983. It was an Australian record until Glenn McGrath took 7 for 15 in the 2003 World Cup.

"They kept shouldering arms and the ball swung back in and did the rest," Gilmour said of the England batsmen in a 2003 interview. "I wanted to bowl and bowl. I didn't want my overs to run out."

Not only did Gilmour destroy England with the ball, he rescued Australia with the bat. When he joined Doug Walters in the chase of 94, Australia were 39 for 6 and in danger of being bundled out. Gilmour struck five fours in an unbeaten 28 from 28 balls to confirm Australia's place in the final. His efforts also earned him a place in the third Ashes Test at Headingley later the same year, and he claimed his best Test figures of 6 for 85.

"We picked him for the Test match at Headingley in 1975 because he'd got his 6 for 14 there in the World Cup, and we dropped Alan Turner who fielded at bat-pad," Chappell said. "We walked out to bowl first and I thought who's going to field there ... and thought Gus can, he can field anywhere. So I told him 'Gus you're taking Fitteran [Turner's] place so you can field in his spot'.

"Alan had this very recognisable run, really kicked his heels up and almost hit himself in the bum with his run. So Gus turns to chase about the third ball of the Test match and he starts running like Fitteran! So I've told him 'you're taking his place' so he starts running like him! It was only his fourth Test and here he was taking the piss in the first over."

Chappell said Gilmour's talents did not stop at cricket, but extended to almost any sport he tried. However, injuries and illness caused him problems throughout his life.

"I caught him in a baseball match among cricketers in Newcastle around 1980," Chappell said. "He pitched in the main game we played against Newcastle and tied that game 2-2, he was a hell of a good pitcher.

"From all reports he was a hell of a good rugby union fullback, terrific kicker of the ball, saw him play a bit of tennis on tour and he had a serve like Neale Fraser. He'd just turn up, toss the ball and bang the arm would come down, we'd all look and think 'who is this bloke?' But he could just do anything.

"When you look back now it's pretty obvious that his body was breaking down. At Centenary Test time his ankles were shot and he had a lot of trouble with his liver from a fairly young age. You didn't know that at the time, but it's fairly obvious now that his body was starting to give out even at that age."

An old-school cricketer with immense all-round talent, Gilmour said in the 2003 interview that he would not have enjoyed playing in the modern era. "I couldn't play under today's conditions, what with the travelling and training and scientific aspects," he said. "It's not a sport any more, it's like going to work. You know how some mornings you get up and don't want to go to work - that's how I'd feel playing cricket these days. I'd clock on for a sickie."

One of the few players to score a century on first-class debut for New South Wales - he made 122 against South Australia in his first match in 1971-72 - he finished his career with 233 wickets at 31.52 and 3126 runs at 30.64 from 75 first-class games. Steve Bernard, the team-mate who often shared the new ball with Gilmour at New South Wales, described him as extraordinarily talented.

"As a cricketer he was the most talented player of my time, a guy who had extraordinary talents in every facet of cricket," Bernard said. "In hindsight he probably didn't reach the heights that he should have, based on his cricket ability, but the guys who played with him and against him will recognise he was a fantastic player, who was dynamic in anything he did in cricket.

"When he was on he was unplayable. He bowled a swinging ball, he could hit the ball a mile, throw it like a bullet and he was a fantastic catcher either close to the wicket or in the outfield - a supreme cricketer. He was a very popular person, Gus, a bit of a larrikin and very much liked by everyone. He didn't take life all that seriously, played for the enjoyment of it."

Chappell said as well as enjoying the game, Gilmour provided plenty of enjoyment for those who saw him and played with him. "The last couple of weeks when he's been crook it's amazing the number of people who've asked about him, called about him, sent messages asking," Chappell said. "He was a very, very popular team-mate."

Gilmour is survived by his wife Helen, daughter Brooke and sons Ben and Sam. The family was also mourning a third son, Clint, who recently died aged 33 after a long battle with brain cancer.

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. @brydoncoverdale

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Baddabing on June 10, 2014, 9:13 GMT

    I will never forget that 6-14, he bowled his 12 overs straight out and the batsmen barely got middle of the bat on anything,not a loose ball to be seen. England were 6-36 when he finished his spell and even then they nearly won. Back in the days of televised Sheffield Shield matches Gilmour came in to bat the last ball of an over and hit a boundary, over the next 25 minutes he barely got to face more than 1 ball per over. When his score reached 32 the TV commentator did something very unusual for those days and asked the scorer how many boundaries Gilmour had hit, after a few seconds pause the answer came back 8, then he asked how many balls he had faced, about 30 seconds passed before the answer came back 8, spectators really got their moneys worth when he was batting

  • vsroc on June 10, 2014, 7:16 GMT

    Posted by Venkatsraman on (June 10,2014) It was really disheartening to know about the sudden demise of Australian legend fast bowler.His remarkable bowling performance of 6 for 14 in the first world cup semi-final is still etched in our memory.This performance is regarded as one of the greatest fast bowling performance in ODI history.It is true that Australia has lost one of the outstanding pace bowler.

  • Rowayton on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    I once had the pleasure of bowling to Gus in Sydney. The first ball, pitched up, came back at about the speed of sound and hit the fence a nanosecond later. The umpire, non striker and me all looked at each other nervously, and the non striker said, "Do you think you could bowl short so that somebody else can get hit?" I did. I wonder what he would have been like with a modern bat! A nice bloke, too sad about his health problems over the years.

  • on June 11, 2014, 16:39 GMT

    I never read his past performance before, i did not know his career was so short lived due to injuries, all i knew was that he was a great player and achiever.i was a kid in his hey days but still remember him in my sub-conciseness. My condolences to his family and people of a great cricketing nation Australia.

  • AltafPatel on June 11, 2014, 8:09 GMT

    He was not only great cricketer but having good hands in other sports too that makes him more interesting. He was having potential to be second Lilly. Sad, due to injury, could not play more cricket.

  • anver777 on June 11, 2014, 5:17 GMT

    6/14 is amazing bowling figures !!! a good sets of B/W images along with this nice article... a great idea by the Editor !!!

  • anver777 on June 11, 2014, 5:07 GMT

    A great all round cricketer with some outstanding talent... RIP !!!!

  • TATTUs on June 11, 2014, 3:55 GMT

    Hard to say whether he was better as a cricketer or a human being. Outstanding cricket talent. Outstanding human being.

  • on June 11, 2014, 3:48 GMT

    I remember playing cricket against Gus the first time when we were 11 in Newcastle. He had a reputation already by then! The first ball I received I reckon came straight out of Headingly 1975, just 13 years earlier! I was shell shocked with his pace as a kid and his ability to bend the red pill! Later we were team mates for a number of years and his sheer ability, coupled with his laid back approach was mind blowing! At high school he played for Newcastle Boys High and I Newcastle Tech High! In one game we batted first and amazingly finished at 3 for 270+! Everybody thought we had the game in the bag! Come the following Wednesday afternoon we copped a hiding! We didn't do much chasing, as we leisurely strolled to the boundary fence to retrieve the ball! Yes Gus decimated us with 130 something not out with the majority of his shots going to the boundary! RIP Gus

  • on June 11, 2014, 3:07 GMT

    Kallicharan ,Kanhai , Richards , Lloyd and Murray for good measure his scalps in 1975 World Cup Final ( complete middle order ).No mean feat .

  • Baddabing on June 10, 2014, 9:13 GMT

    I will never forget that 6-14, he bowled his 12 overs straight out and the batsmen barely got middle of the bat on anything,not a loose ball to be seen. England were 6-36 when he finished his spell and even then they nearly won. Back in the days of televised Sheffield Shield matches Gilmour came in to bat the last ball of an over and hit a boundary, over the next 25 minutes he barely got to face more than 1 ball per over. When his score reached 32 the TV commentator did something very unusual for those days and asked the scorer how many boundaries Gilmour had hit, after a few seconds pause the answer came back 8, then he asked how many balls he had faced, about 30 seconds passed before the answer came back 8, spectators really got their moneys worth when he was batting

  • vsroc on June 10, 2014, 7:16 GMT

    Posted by Venkatsraman on (June 10,2014) It was really disheartening to know about the sudden demise of Australian legend fast bowler.His remarkable bowling performance of 6 for 14 in the first world cup semi-final is still etched in our memory.This performance is regarded as one of the greatest fast bowling performance in ODI history.It is true that Australia has lost one of the outstanding pace bowler.

  • Rowayton on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    I once had the pleasure of bowling to Gus in Sydney. The first ball, pitched up, came back at about the speed of sound and hit the fence a nanosecond later. The umpire, non striker and me all looked at each other nervously, and the non striker said, "Do you think you could bowl short so that somebody else can get hit?" I did. I wonder what he would have been like with a modern bat! A nice bloke, too sad about his health problems over the years.

  • on June 11, 2014, 16:39 GMT

    I never read his past performance before, i did not know his career was so short lived due to injuries, all i knew was that he was a great player and achiever.i was a kid in his hey days but still remember him in my sub-conciseness. My condolences to his family and people of a great cricketing nation Australia.

  • AltafPatel on June 11, 2014, 8:09 GMT

    He was not only great cricketer but having good hands in other sports too that makes him more interesting. He was having potential to be second Lilly. Sad, due to injury, could not play more cricket.

  • anver777 on June 11, 2014, 5:17 GMT

    6/14 is amazing bowling figures !!! a good sets of B/W images along with this nice article... a great idea by the Editor !!!

  • anver777 on June 11, 2014, 5:07 GMT

    A great all round cricketer with some outstanding talent... RIP !!!!

  • TATTUs on June 11, 2014, 3:55 GMT

    Hard to say whether he was better as a cricketer or a human being. Outstanding cricket talent. Outstanding human being.

  • on June 11, 2014, 3:48 GMT

    I remember playing cricket against Gus the first time when we were 11 in Newcastle. He had a reputation already by then! The first ball I received I reckon came straight out of Headingly 1975, just 13 years earlier! I was shell shocked with his pace as a kid and his ability to bend the red pill! Later we were team mates for a number of years and his sheer ability, coupled with his laid back approach was mind blowing! At high school he played for Newcastle Boys High and I Newcastle Tech High! In one game we batted first and amazingly finished at 3 for 270+! Everybody thought we had the game in the bag! Come the following Wednesday afternoon we copped a hiding! We didn't do much chasing, as we leisurely strolled to the boundary fence to retrieve the ball! Yes Gus decimated us with 130 something not out with the majority of his shots going to the boundary! RIP Gus

  • on June 11, 2014, 3:07 GMT

    Kallicharan ,Kanhai , Richards , Lloyd and Murray for good measure his scalps in 1975 World Cup Final ( complete middle order ).No mean feat .

  • on June 11, 2014, 3:01 GMT

    Watched him play many times and in either 80 or 81 he got me out caught at cover I'll probably remember the moment more than he will especially now Too young to give up the fight I hope he finds green wickets and conditions perfect for swing ..........

  • billbassoz on June 11, 2014, 2:45 GMT

    Very sad to read of Gary Gilmour's passing. I saw him make 95 batting at 8 for Aus against WI at Adelaide Oval in 75/76. He came off the field last man out, opened the bowling and got Roy Fredericks' wicket in his first over. Had he not been hampered by injuries and ill health, with a bit of luck he could have been the fifth great all-rounder in the 80s alongsige Imran Khan, Kapil Dev, Richard Hadlee and Ian Botham.

  • dunger.bob on June 11, 2014, 0:07 GMT

    Very sad. I can't remember his actual playing days but I certainly know who Gus Gilmore is and the special place he has in our cricket history. RIP old mate.

    @latecut04: Gilmore was supremely talented but cursed with a frail body. He started to get sick in his early 20's and by the time he retired he was falling apart and in for a life time of illness. Apparently Victor Trumper was similar. .. Anyway, Gus is a good example of just how cruel and ironic mother nature can be I guess. Packing an outrageous amount of talent into a fundamentally flawed vessel seems like a very sick joke to me.

  • Chris_P on June 10, 2014, 23:26 GMT

    You have been taken away too soon. RIP Gus.

  • on June 10, 2014, 22:40 GMT

    A super talent and one of the last of his kind, playing hard but for sport. Really sad his last years have been so tough, especially the loss of his son. Coulda been anything, and in my head he still could be.

  • Arif_Khan_Bangladeshi on June 10, 2014, 22:17 GMT

    Condolences to the grieving family.

  • on June 10, 2014, 21:59 GMT

    I remember Tony Cozier writing after Australia beat WI in 1976 how Gary Gilmour is like a stick of Dynamite: scratch a match and he is ready to explode. How true was Cozier's description of Gilmour. His and his son's passing is of Shakespearean sadness.

  • on June 10, 2014, 17:23 GMT

    Sad day for cricket. I remember Gary Gilmour very clearly. I was inches away from him when he was net practising at Lord's in 1975. Gilmour's heroics at Headingley in 1975 are still fresh in my mind. Although I only read in the newspaper about his infamous 101 at Christchurch, I do remember listening to Alan McGilvray commentating during his fabulous 95 v WI at Adelaide in the 1975-76 series. By an odd coincidence, his rival on the other side was Keith Boyce who also scored 95 in the same test match; and extending the coincidence further both were members of the epic 1975 World Cup final, and both are no longer with us. At times, Gilmour outshone Lillee and Tommo. RIP Gary Gilmour.

  • on June 10, 2014, 16:31 GMT

    really the hero in wc 1975

  • on June 10, 2014, 16:04 GMT

    He was one of the surprise package in 1975 cricket World Cup in England took 11 wickets in two matches . It is sad - such a Telant player had very short span.

  • paapam on June 10, 2014, 15:57 GMT

    Quit the game too early now time runs out too early. These larger than life blokes leave a big void. RiP Gary. Have a good one up there.

  • Biggus on June 10, 2014, 14:53 GMT

    @Matt.au:- Mate as a fourteen year old kid at the time of the Centenary Test I nearly cried seeing Gus reduced to hobbling around and myself wondering what had happened to the player who'd topped the bowling averages in 75/76 Vs the Windies and smashed a brutal 95 at Adelaide. I've been watching cricket now since about 1972 and of all the players I've watched, and there have been quite some, the player I'd most love to have seen more of was Gus Gilmour but we were not to be so lucky. P.S.- He and Doug Walters seem to go together, both mercurial/magical players with that everyman touch.

  • on June 10, 2014, 14:16 GMT

    ooohh so sad of this news

  • Matt.au on June 10, 2014, 14:12 GMT

    @latecut_04 As Ian Chappell pointed out it was his ankles that gave out on him. I remember watching the Centenary Test and seeing him hobble around before needing to leave the field. He only bowled 4 of 115 overs in the second innings and didn't bowl all that many in the first innings.

    @Biggus Both he and Dougie Walters were my boyhood heroes too. It was really sad watching him struggle through his last test and then knowing he wouldn't be playing again was a real bummer.

  • on June 10, 2014, 13:44 GMT

    RIP Gary Gilmour!!! Yep seem great just sad that you were forgotten and a man who contributed so much in a World Cup!!!

  • on June 10, 2014, 13:35 GMT

    Oh very sad,the whole cricketing world will miss u,may his soul rip

  • on June 10, 2014, 12:42 GMT

    buckets of talent.....inspired me as a kid....RIP

  • Philip_Gnana on June 10, 2014, 11:26 GMT

    A loss to cricket for sure. I do remember the 6-14 against England a kid at that time. What a game that was to listen to on BBC World Service whilst in Sri Lanka at that time.

    The wickets were that of batsmen and the tail enders by any chance. Much remembered.

    Philip Gnana, Surrey

  • latecut_04 on June 10, 2014, 11:22 GMT

    RIP Gus.I am 35 and an avid cricket follower from India.Hadn't heard about Gary Gilmer before today and reading about his exploits with the bat and ball really makes me wonder what really happened to him. He should have been as familiar to me as RodneyMarsh, Dennis Lille,Ian Chappel or Thomson.What really ended his career at 27 years of age.was it the Kerry packer series or did he suffer from injuries .but career ending injury at 27????could any one help me regarding this..thanks

  • MaxB on June 10, 2014, 10:47 GMT

    What a spectacular player he was. It isn't the thing most people remember about him, but he had perhaps the best throwing arm of his day - he could return the ball hard and flat from the deep at a time when no-one else did.

  • on June 10, 2014, 10:36 GMT

    I met Gary a number of times in Newcastle. He was a great bloke and his sons are just as talented as he is. Rest in peace, Gary.

  • Biggus on June 10, 2014, 10:28 GMT

    Sad to hear of his passing. He, along with Doug Walters were my childhood heroes. So much talent.......

  • on June 10, 2014, 10:25 GMT

    His talent was as good as Sir Garfield Sobers but could not sustain the pressure to perform in international cricket.One can not forget his unforgettable performance in the world cup.May his soul rest in peace

  • on June 10, 2014, 10:25 GMT

    Well, I remember listening to his exploits on radio because then we did not have any TV. May he rest in peace. The WC 1975 semi-final i can recollect and hoe the likes of Brian Johnstan and Arlott described the progress of the match.

  • entryholedia on June 10, 2014, 10:06 GMT

    Oh what a tragic loss !!!! I still remember the 1975 match he was simply out of the world and a tragedy that he only figured in 15 tests . I still remember that vicious attack that Ian Chappel & Later Greg Chappel had as dangerous arsenal !!!- DENNIS LILLEE, JEFF THOMSON, MAX (TANGLES!!!) WALKER, GARY GILMOUR Thank god India never played against them then !!

  • talgeri on June 10, 2014, 9:58 GMT

    It is just like it was few days back. The swing bowling as described in TMS which I had been hearing from almost the first ball as a college going boy, here in India.

    The fight back by Snow & Co. We do not get to see such bowling these days. Though Steyn is an exception. But those days we had Massie,Arnold,Old.

  • on June 10, 2014, 8:49 GMT

    More ability in his little finger than some of the overpaid "would be's" today. Saw his whole career and just wondered if he was committed to the more professional approach of today what he could have been...but then again we wouldn't have seen the true Gus. R.I.P. Gary.

  • gt_doss on June 10, 2014, 8:47 GMT

    Gary Gilmour had a lot of talent. He was the surprise weapon for Aussies in 1975 WC Semi-final and he destroyed England and thus dashed Pommies' hopes of winning the first World cup, which they were considered as favourites. And his century against Kiwis..really great innings...RIP Gary....

  • Markdal on June 10, 2014, 8:40 GMT

    Really sorry to hear it. I remember watching his World Cup performances on TV, and I couldn't work out why he only played one Test in the series that followed. In the next Australian summer, he managed to keep Max Walker out of the Test XI, a testament to his ability right there. At least there is a lasting tribute to him in the song "C'mon Aussie C'mon" - "Gilmour's weilding willow like an axe". RIP big Gus.

  • Drew2 on June 10, 2014, 7:46 GMT

    I was at Adelaide oval in January 1975 when Gus carted the powerful West Indies attack all over the ground (including Roberts and Holding). He scored 95, mostly in the morning session, then Ian Chappell brought him on for a over before lunch where he snared the wicket of Roy Fredericks. Great memories.

  • P.B.Mohan on June 10, 2014, 7:39 GMT

    Apart from his well documented feats in the WOrld Cup and his test century against New Zealand, Gus also also scored 95 off 94 balls at Adelaide in 1975-76 against the Windies. In the first test of this series at risbane, he had taken an incredible catch at gully to dismiss Viv Richards for a duck off Dennis Lillee. In his "One for the road", Doug Walters humoprously describes an occassion during the WSC days, when he (Walters), no real fan of training himself, had to judge Gus' fitness and pass him as fit to play.

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:51 GMT

    I was fortunate to have witnessed the demolition of England in 1975 and a awe of a lifetime, whenever I compile an One day All Time X1 , Gilmour is penciled in as automatic choice...RIP Gary Gilmour , you always be a legend in my book.

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    Gus was one of my favourites and I still remember a century in a session he scored against Victoria at the SCG. It was one of the best innings I have seen and I still remember it vividly today. His century against NZ over the ditch in a massive partnership with my favourite, Doug Walters, is also memorable. Vale Gus and thanks for the memories!

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    Its sad to know that he is no more with us. I had seen the lethal spell he bowled against England in 1975 World Cup specially with the likes of Lillee, Thompson & Max Walker in the bowling line-up and he followed it up with a superb innings of 28 not out when he came out to bat at No. 8. He eventually won the semi-final for Australia and deservedly got the man of the match award. He had a short career but this performance has been etched in the memory of many for all times to come.RIP

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:27 GMT

    Gilmour could do anything. He had an incredible eye and it didn't matter that his front foot was nowhere near the pitch of the ball - the ball swung through and it scorched through the covers or behind point at great speed. On first-class debut in 1972, he came in first ball after lunch on the third day with NSW at 6-48. By tea he was out for 122, made out of 166. He could swing the ball either way and rather late. He just never had it in his head to be a professional cricketer and as such was one of the greatest wasted talents in my 47 years of watching top-class cricketers.

  • 11_Warrior on June 10, 2014, 6:08 GMT

    Perhaps one of the finest cricketers in short formats. RIP

  • warnerbasher on June 10, 2014, 5:59 GMT

    How sad!!!. If it wasn't for some excess weight and weak ankles Gus was destined to become one of Australia great allrounders. I remember as a kid wishing I was left handed like my idol. Respects to all his family and friends

  • warnerbasher on June 10, 2014, 5:59 GMT

    How sad!!!. If it wasn't for some excess weight and weak ankles Gus was destined to become one of Australia great allrounders. I remember as a kid wishing I was left handed like my idol. Respects to all his family and friends

  • 11_Warrior on June 10, 2014, 6:08 GMT

    Perhaps one of the finest cricketers in short formats. RIP

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:27 GMT

    Gilmour could do anything. He had an incredible eye and it didn't matter that his front foot was nowhere near the pitch of the ball - the ball swung through and it scorched through the covers or behind point at great speed. On first-class debut in 1972, he came in first ball after lunch on the third day with NSW at 6-48. By tea he was out for 122, made out of 166. He could swing the ball either way and rather late. He just never had it in his head to be a professional cricketer and as such was one of the greatest wasted talents in my 47 years of watching top-class cricketers.

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    Its sad to know that he is no more with us. I had seen the lethal spell he bowled against England in 1975 World Cup specially with the likes of Lillee, Thompson & Max Walker in the bowling line-up and he followed it up with a superb innings of 28 not out when he came out to bat at No. 8. He eventually won the semi-final for Australia and deservedly got the man of the match award. He had a short career but this performance has been etched in the memory of many for all times to come.RIP

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:38 GMT

    Gus was one of my favourites and I still remember a century in a session he scored against Victoria at the SCG. It was one of the best innings I have seen and I still remember it vividly today. His century against NZ over the ditch in a massive partnership with my favourite, Doug Walters, is also memorable. Vale Gus and thanks for the memories!

  • on June 10, 2014, 6:51 GMT

    I was fortunate to have witnessed the demolition of England in 1975 and a awe of a lifetime, whenever I compile an One day All Time X1 , Gilmour is penciled in as automatic choice...RIP Gary Gilmour , you always be a legend in my book.

  • P.B.Mohan on June 10, 2014, 7:39 GMT

    Apart from his well documented feats in the WOrld Cup and his test century against New Zealand, Gus also also scored 95 off 94 balls at Adelaide in 1975-76 against the Windies. In the first test of this series at risbane, he had taken an incredible catch at gully to dismiss Viv Richards for a duck off Dennis Lillee. In his "One for the road", Doug Walters humoprously describes an occassion during the WSC days, when he (Walters), no real fan of training himself, had to judge Gus' fitness and pass him as fit to play.

  • Drew2 on June 10, 2014, 7:46 GMT

    I was at Adelaide oval in January 1975 when Gus carted the powerful West Indies attack all over the ground (including Roberts and Holding). He scored 95, mostly in the morning session, then Ian Chappell brought him on for a over before lunch where he snared the wicket of Roy Fredericks. Great memories.

  • Markdal on June 10, 2014, 8:40 GMT

    Really sorry to hear it. I remember watching his World Cup performances on TV, and I couldn't work out why he only played one Test in the series that followed. In the next Australian summer, he managed to keep Max Walker out of the Test XI, a testament to his ability right there. At least there is a lasting tribute to him in the song "C'mon Aussie C'mon" - "Gilmour's weilding willow like an axe". RIP big Gus.

  • gt_doss on June 10, 2014, 8:47 GMT

    Gary Gilmour had a lot of talent. He was the surprise weapon for Aussies in 1975 WC Semi-final and he destroyed England and thus dashed Pommies' hopes of winning the first World cup, which they were considered as favourites. And his century against Kiwis..really great innings...RIP Gary....