England in New Zealand 2012-13

England omit Pietersen for New Zealand series

David Hopps

December 23, 2012

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Kevin Pietersen arrives back at Heathrow Airport after England's series win in India, London, December 18, 2012
Kevin Pietersen can put the airport trolley away for a while after being rested for England's one-day squads in New Zealand © PA Photos
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Kevin Pietersen has been omitted from England's one-day squads for their tour of New Zealand next year as England's selectors have accepted that he needs to rest to survive a heavy international schedule.

Formal rest periods have become ever more prevalent in England cricket, but Pietersen's absence from the New Zealand squads as England look to manage his workload is nevertheless a notable concession to the player so soon after his lengthy dispute with the England hierarchy.

Geoff Miller, England's national selector, said: "There are a number of players who we have decided not to select for parts of the competitive programme this winter as we look to manage their workloads effectively while ensuring we remain competitive across all formats. We feel this is the best way of keeping players as physically and mentally fresh as possible during a demanding 2013 and beyond.

"Kevin Pietersen will miss the limited overs tour of New Zealand with Graeme Swann missing the T20 leg of the tour. This approach also provides an opportunity for talented young players to gain more international experience which will be important for their development and the development of England sides in the future."

Pietersen is expected to play in the Test series in March before heading to India for the IPL ahead of the English season.

Since his much-publicised "reintegration" into the England set-up Pietersen has missed two Twenty20 series despite being one of the world's most outstanding players in this format. He was also rested for the two matches against India, but England still drew the series 1-1 after winning in Mumbai and registered their highest winning total in Twenty20 cricket in the process.

England's introduction of a job share in their coaching set-up, with Andy Flower running the Test squad and Ashley Giles taking charge of the the ODI and Twenty20 sides in the New Year, supervised by Flower as overall team director, is another recognition of cricket's demanding calendar.

England have played 44 matches in all formats this year and the ECB has now accepted that for players and management rest periods are essential if they are to maintain hunger, fitness and a stable family life.

England's T20 squad in New Zealand shows two changes from the original India party with Stuart Broad, recovered from a heel injury, returning to captain the side and Steven Finn also called up after back trouble. Jonny Bairstow, who left the T20 series against India early for personal reasons, is also named. England play two warm-up fixtures against a New Zealand XI in preparation for a three-match series starting on February 9 in Auckland.

For the three match ODI series, which begins on February 17 in Hamilton, Swann, James Anderson and Jonathan Trott return to the side after being rested for the ODI tour of India. As well as announcing squads for all three formats in New Zealand, England's selectors also put Joe Root in charge of the England Lions one-day tour of Australia in February, barely a week after his mentor, the former England captain Michael Vaughan, had identified him as a future England captain.

Root, who made his England Test debut earlier this month against India, will captain a Lions side in five one-day matches against Australia A which includes 12 members of the 2012 England Performance who have recently returned from India.

Reece Topley, Essex's left-arm quick bowler, has an opportunity to win his first England Lions cap alongside Gary Ballance, Varun Chopra, Ben Foakes, Toby Roland-Jones and Chris Wright.

Twenty20 squad: Stuart Broad (capt), Jonny Bairstow, Tim Bresnan, Danny Briggs, Jos Buttler, Jade Dernbach, Steven Finn, Alex Hales, Michael Lumb, Stuart Meaker, Eoin Morgan, Samit Patel, James Tredwell, Luke Wright.

ODI squad: Alastair Cook (capt), James Anderson, Jonny Bairstow, Ian Bell, Tim Bresnan, Stuart Broad, Jos Buttler, Steven Finn, Craig Kieswetter, Eoin Morgan, Samit Patel, Graeme Swann, James Tredwell, Jonathan Trott.

Lions squad: Joe Root, Gary Balance, Scott Borthwick, Danny Briggs, Varun Chopra, Matthew Coles, Ben Foakes, Alex Hales, James Harris, Simon Kerrigan, Toby Roland-Jones, Ben Stokes, James Taylor, Reece Topley, James Vince, Chris Wright.

This article was updated on December 23 at 6.25pm after the ECB advised that James Vince had been omitted from the Lions squad because of an administrative error.

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by   on (December 26, 2012, 18:47 GMT)

why Owais shah is not Being used Especially for T20?

Posted by landl47 on (December 25, 2012, 22:37 GMT)

@brusselslion: you can add James Harris and Matt Coles to the list of prospects. Harris, for a young player, has a long and impressive resume and Coles is not only a useful bowler but a good lower order batsman, too. Chris Wright had an excellent season for Warwickshire, but at 27 he might be just an ordinary bowler who had a good season. It's great to see, though, that his achievement has been rewarded with at least a look at Performance Squad level.

I agree that Topley looks the pick of the young bowlers and being left-handed doesn't hurt either. He was easily the best bowler on show in the under-19 world cup this year.

Posted by phoenixsteve on (December 25, 2012, 18:09 GMT)

It seems that common sense is at last prevailing in the England selection camp? Everybody concerned must have had quite a shock at the recent 'Pietersengate' saga & it seems that concessions have been made. It's important for KP & others to keep their powder dry for the Aussies. Back to back Ashes could see a remarkable turnaround in the long term status of English cricket. Like India, the Aussies are ripe for picking, Alastair Cook's captaincy and form have been sensational and it seems that if at least one batter has a sensational series that the Aussies will suffer. Examples that spring to mind are Chris Broad in Oz, Trott+Bell+KP also in Oz recently. Add the class and maturity of Matt Prior to the spin twins (Monty and Swann) and it's just a question of who accompanies Jimmy with the new ball attack? But I'm jumping the gun a little; as we have NZ first and then the main course (twice)..... it going to be a great 12 months and some real opposition to come! COME ON ENGLAND!!!

Posted by dabhand on (December 25, 2012, 17:42 GMT)

@hira1 - you may, others may but 'we all' don't want to see him in T20s - T20s are for fun, testing young up and coming players, spectators have no need to concentrate or even understand it, but test cricket is what is important to the English management and it requires a total different skill set (as dose 50 over) which should not be undermined by bish bash boff cricket.

Posted by JG2704 on (December 25, 2012, 11:15 GMT)

@Hira1 on (December 24 2012, 18:48 PM GMT) OK - and I've said myself that I'd prefer to see him in the ODI/T20 fmts and rested from the tests , but as I said before , the example of Wright totally disproves your theory about KP not playing in the Big Bash

Posted by brusselslion on (December 24, 2012, 21:22 GMT)

Like others, the Woakes omission puzzles me.

The Aussies go on - with some justification in fairness - about their young fast men, however, we are not too badly placed ourselves. Finn's pretty much established; Meaker's on the fringes. If Broad can return to something approaching form and one - or more - of Topley, Roland Jones, Woakes or Stokes can come through then we'll be laughing. I think Topley could the pick of the bunch if he fills out and adds a yard of pace - tall, quick, accurate and left-handed. Let's hope he "trains on" as the racing boys might say.

Posted by brusselslion on (December 24, 2012, 20:49 GMT)

Like others, the Woakes omission puzzles me.

The Aussies go on - with some justification in fairness - about their young fast men, however, we are not too badly placed ourselves. Finn's pretty much established; Meaker's on the fringes. If Broad can return to something approaching form and one - or more - of Topley, Roland Jones, Woakes or Stokes can come through then we'll be laughing. I think Topley could the pick of the bunch if he fills out and adds a yard of pace - tall, quick, accurate and left-handed. Let's hope he "trains on" as the racing boys might say.

Posted by ZsZs on (December 24, 2012, 18:50 GMT)

That is a nice problem to have for a country where there are young players waiting in the wings. It is a win-win solution. I love Pietersen - and want to see him for a long time.

Posted by Hira1 on (December 24, 2012, 18:48 GMT)

@JG2704 there is some cricketers who are beyond the game and KP is one of those specially for his fans like us and that is why he is getting more media attention than any other players, right now my point only is that KP is at his prime in T20 and we all wants to see him in that format and England has not done very well in T20 without him so why keep him out in that format?

Posted by S-Matrix on (December 24, 2012, 18:14 GMT)

@anuajm: the whole point of having separate teams is to cultivate players with different skills. England would rather have Cook the Test batsman than risk losing him for T20 exploits.

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David Hopps David Hopps joined ESPNcricinfo as UK editor early in 2012. For the previous 20 years he was a senior cricket writer for the Guardian and covered England extensively during that time in all Test-playing nations. He also covered four Olympic Games and has written several cricket books, including collections of cricket quotations. He has been an avid amateur cricketer since he was 12, and so knows the pain of repeated failure only too well. The pile of untouched novels he plans to read, but rarely gets around to, is now almost touching the ceiling. He divides his time between the ESPNcricinfo office in Hammersmith and his beloved Yorkshire.
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