County news February 13, 2013

Shah could go freelance - Grayson

  shares 31

Owais Shah could become the first English cricketer to be a full-time freelance player as the growing influence of T20 leagues makes itself felt on county cricket.

Shah, who is currently contracted to Essex, has become a regular on the T20 circuit, appearing in the Big Bash League, the IPL and, most recently, the Bangladesh Premier League. With T20 leagues also set-up in Sri Lanka and Zimbabwe and new leagues scheduled for the Caribbean and, in theory at least, the USA and Pakistan, Shah may be among the first to decide his future lies as a travelling freelance with no permanent affiliation to any of the first-class counties.

While several players from other countries - the likes of Scott Styris and Dirk Nannes - have already made the decision to pursue their careers as unattached cricketers, no English player has yet successfully managed it. Andrew Flintoff might have been the first had injury not intervened.

Shah's T20 ambitions are understandable. Aged 34 and with very little chance of regaining an England place, he may consider there is little point in continuing a first-class career if it conflicts with opportunities to secure his family's financial future over the last few years of his career by concentrating on T20 cricket. The lure of helping Essex battle their way out of Division Two of the County Championship may well have paled by comparison.

Counties are also growing increasingly uneasy about the disruption caused by players missing part of the domestic season. Nottinghamshire have already forbidden their contracted players from playing in the IPL this year and other counties may, in time, follow suit.

"We continue to assess our options and opinions over the IPL," Essex's head coach, Paul Grayson, told ESPNcricinfo. "Any coach will tell you about the benefits of having a settled team and you just have to look at the success of Derbyshire last year to see that. They got off to a good start and went on to win promotion, while we missed our IPL players for the first seven Championship games and were always playing catch-up.

"Of course we can understand players wanting to take part in these leagues. It's a short career and who wouldn't want to earn as much as they can? We all understand that and not many of us would turn it down. And, to be fair to Ryan ten Doeschate and Owais, the players we will miss this year, they are absolutely committed to Essex whenever they are here.

"But maybe enough is enough. Maybe the time has come to put our foot down. We want our players to be 100 percent committed to Essex and we do have the option of refusing to issue No Objection Certificates if we feel that is the right route to go down. I suppose there is a worry that players might consider moving to another county if we did that, but these are the issues we are continually discussing."

Grayson has previously indicated that the county could follow Nottinghamshire's example in the future.

"The message sent out by Mick Newell, the director of cricket at Nottinghamshire, was very good," Grayson said. "He was saying, 'We're a big club and we have ambitions.' He has good players and he wants to make use of them to win trophies.

"We knew when we signed Owais that he was keen to play in these T20 leagues and we made a verbal agreement with him then. He is contracted to us from June until the end of the season and it may be that, after that, we decide that agreement doesn't work for us anymore. Who knows: maybe he could end up signing a T20 deal with Essex?

"We are going to see freelance players very, very soon and it could be that Owais is one of the first."

George Dobell is a senior correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Ozcricketwriter on February 14, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    It is good for the game that players can earn their keep without vying for international honours. If you think it isn't - do you honestly think that cricket was better off before World Series Cricket, before professionalism? Back in the days when players had to have a full-time job in order to play cricket for their country. Was it better then? I think not. Twenty/20 cricket, and these domestic leagues, mean that cricket is heading the way of soccer (association football) to become a financial goldmine and a true international game. We will always have test cricket, and I think will always have ODIs too, but this Twenty/20 variation adds so much and freelance players are a big plus for cricket.

  • Nutcutlet on February 13, 2013, 17:02 GMT

    Fine. If some players wish to turn mercenary in order to play substandard abbreviated cricket in some subcontinental dust bowls, let them go. They've learnt their cricket in a better & more demanding school, most certainly have the skills to succeed in these t20 leagues that spring up like mushrooms overnight (& with about as much root system!) & who can blame them for securing their futures financially speaking? Not for them the aspiration of patient development to become the genuine class act; not for them the unquantifiable kudos of playing for loyalty to county or country; not for them the enduring affection of genuine fans of the game. (T20 crowds are a different species, wanting an entertainment package incuding gyrating girls, thumping music, fireworks & vacuous commentary) The price of everything, the value of nothing - it drives men in financial centres round the world & many get so greedy they can never have enough. Ultimately, what are you left with? A handful of gold dust.

  • fguy on February 15, 2013, 23:12 GMT

    @voice_of_reason.. No IPL team in the so called "Champions League" final.. really thats your "evidence"? well maybe not this year but IPL teams've won the title twice. not bad considering its only had 4 editions wouldnt you say?

  • on February 15, 2013, 0:49 GMT

    You can see why Shah would do this as his test career is near enough over as he has been unable to produce the high scores and disciplined inings in first class cricket to test matches. Temperament has been the reason why Shah has be unable to cement a place in the England test team. He has the shots but unfortunately now he is past his best in the test format. I still think Shah may have a role to play in the batting line up of the T20 team and possibly the ODI team as he brings experience to the squad. Ive always felt the shorter formats have always suited Shah because of his natural agressive stroke play.

  • TrueFactors on February 14, 2013, 18:08 GMT

    So, this is good for all cricketers. If you are not selected for your local country level clubs (Please do not mind, but all boards are not country representatives, they are just private companies), but good enough to get a place in such other local clubs and making career from it, then what is wrong in that? In fact, that is how it supposed to be from start. Jobs are created and people are willing to pay. Case of Shah proves that Country level clubs are not interested in talent, they want power. Talented players can be bought and sold any part of world, so they got career. I see it as a good sign.

  • JulianDawson on February 14, 2013, 12:52 GMT

    Soon players will have to decide on whether to be freelance or have the stability of a county contract. However, only T20 players of the quality of Shah will have that luxury.

  • voice_of_reason on February 14, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    @Rahul_78 Not sure what your point is about football clubs. They have always been city based entities and never have and never will be franchises, unlike the US professional sports system which is totally franchised. First class cricket around the world has always been based on regional clubs e.g. counties, states or even islands.

    In football, players are restricted to one club throughout a long season, with only a limited transfer period. When the "Champions League" or equivalent comes around, he plays for the club he is currently contracted to, not the one he played for last year but which wants to retain the rights to his services in the biggest tournaments.

    Too many people try to compare football to the "new order" of cricket. The comparisons don't stack up.

  • voice_of_reason on February 14, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    Ashley, I don't think there was much of a clamour for Shah to be called up into England's T20 squad. The IPL may have glitz and glamour and thousands of screaming fans when a ball gets smashed over the boundary but it lacks quality. There are far too many mediocre home grown players, over the hill former internationals and over rated overseas players. Runs scored/wickets taken in this environment have to be seen for what they are. Evidence? No IPL team in the so called "Champions League" final.

  • mahjut on February 14, 2013, 11:20 GMT

    yadayadayada ... cricket is still going strong. On the whole you have the likes of Tait, Nannes, Shah, (the tatooed English bloke who's a pretty decent allrounder), Hall ... - all ending careers that promised but never took off! or a few youngsters who have some ability but probably no great future...lastly you have players at odds with their boards (this is a little more complex - but one can understand, eg Bravo and Gayle, if not go as far as to condone it). While you may complain that it destroys the game - i think that it was a godsend to Zim cricket last year. It was great to watch our kids playing with the above named lads - facing some serious pace and bowling to some big hitters, just getting some higher standard cricket. It was the only form of cricket in Zim coming close to breaking even financially (i hear) and players were playing for reasonable amounts of money (of course, that may not continue and it may go south ... but I loved every minute of last years Zim T20 tourny

  • anver777 on February 14, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    Like mentioned here.... Shah's Eng career is almost over, so this is not a better move to be financially stable for future !!!!

  • Ozcricketwriter on February 14, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    It is good for the game that players can earn their keep without vying for international honours. If you think it isn't - do you honestly think that cricket was better off before World Series Cricket, before professionalism? Back in the days when players had to have a full-time job in order to play cricket for their country. Was it better then? I think not. Twenty/20 cricket, and these domestic leagues, mean that cricket is heading the way of soccer (association football) to become a financial goldmine and a true international game. We will always have test cricket, and I think will always have ODIs too, but this Twenty/20 variation adds so much and freelance players are a big plus for cricket.

  • Nutcutlet on February 13, 2013, 17:02 GMT

    Fine. If some players wish to turn mercenary in order to play substandard abbreviated cricket in some subcontinental dust bowls, let them go. They've learnt their cricket in a better & more demanding school, most certainly have the skills to succeed in these t20 leagues that spring up like mushrooms overnight (& with about as much root system!) & who can blame them for securing their futures financially speaking? Not for them the aspiration of patient development to become the genuine class act; not for them the unquantifiable kudos of playing for loyalty to county or country; not for them the enduring affection of genuine fans of the game. (T20 crowds are a different species, wanting an entertainment package incuding gyrating girls, thumping music, fireworks & vacuous commentary) The price of everything, the value of nothing - it drives men in financial centres round the world & many get so greedy they can never have enough. Ultimately, what are you left with? A handful of gold dust.

  • fguy on February 15, 2013, 23:12 GMT

    @voice_of_reason.. No IPL team in the so called "Champions League" final.. really thats your "evidence"? well maybe not this year but IPL teams've won the title twice. not bad considering its only had 4 editions wouldnt you say?

  • on February 15, 2013, 0:49 GMT

    You can see why Shah would do this as his test career is near enough over as he has been unable to produce the high scores and disciplined inings in first class cricket to test matches. Temperament has been the reason why Shah has be unable to cement a place in the England test team. He has the shots but unfortunately now he is past his best in the test format. I still think Shah may have a role to play in the batting line up of the T20 team and possibly the ODI team as he brings experience to the squad. Ive always felt the shorter formats have always suited Shah because of his natural agressive stroke play.

  • TrueFactors on February 14, 2013, 18:08 GMT

    So, this is good for all cricketers. If you are not selected for your local country level clubs (Please do not mind, but all boards are not country representatives, they are just private companies), but good enough to get a place in such other local clubs and making career from it, then what is wrong in that? In fact, that is how it supposed to be from start. Jobs are created and people are willing to pay. Case of Shah proves that Country level clubs are not interested in talent, they want power. Talented players can be bought and sold any part of world, so they got career. I see it as a good sign.

  • JulianDawson on February 14, 2013, 12:52 GMT

    Soon players will have to decide on whether to be freelance or have the stability of a county contract. However, only T20 players of the quality of Shah will have that luxury.

  • voice_of_reason on February 14, 2013, 11:53 GMT

    @Rahul_78 Not sure what your point is about football clubs. They have always been city based entities and never have and never will be franchises, unlike the US professional sports system which is totally franchised. First class cricket around the world has always been based on regional clubs e.g. counties, states or even islands.

    In football, players are restricted to one club throughout a long season, with only a limited transfer period. When the "Champions League" or equivalent comes around, he plays for the club he is currently contracted to, not the one he played for last year but which wants to retain the rights to his services in the biggest tournaments.

    Too many people try to compare football to the "new order" of cricket. The comparisons don't stack up.

  • voice_of_reason on February 14, 2013, 11:33 GMT

    Ashley, I don't think there was much of a clamour for Shah to be called up into England's T20 squad. The IPL may have glitz and glamour and thousands of screaming fans when a ball gets smashed over the boundary but it lacks quality. There are far too many mediocre home grown players, over the hill former internationals and over rated overseas players. Runs scored/wickets taken in this environment have to be seen for what they are. Evidence? No IPL team in the so called "Champions League" final.

  • mahjut on February 14, 2013, 11:20 GMT

    yadayadayada ... cricket is still going strong. On the whole you have the likes of Tait, Nannes, Shah, (the tatooed English bloke who's a pretty decent allrounder), Hall ... - all ending careers that promised but never took off! or a few youngsters who have some ability but probably no great future...lastly you have players at odds with their boards (this is a little more complex - but one can understand, eg Bravo and Gayle, if not go as far as to condone it). While you may complain that it destroys the game - i think that it was a godsend to Zim cricket last year. It was great to watch our kids playing with the above named lads - facing some serious pace and bowling to some big hitters, just getting some higher standard cricket. It was the only form of cricket in Zim coming close to breaking even financially (i hear) and players were playing for reasonable amounts of money (of course, that may not continue and it may go south ... but I loved every minute of last years Zim T20 tourny

  • anver777 on February 14, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    Like mentioned here.... Shah's Eng career is almost over, so this is not a better move to be financially stable for future !!!!

  • on February 14, 2013, 8:45 GMT

    Good for T20 cricket and Owais. While most of the fan followers of english T20 cricket thought a call up was around the corner following IPL 2012, the english management had different plans going ahead with the build up, which to some extent surely dissapointed the man, as at the time other than KP there didn't seem to be anyone striking it rich with runs in the format. Purely on the fact that contributions were collective and Colly made it happen for the 2010 T20 cup. Go for it Owais, this could be twilight; make the best of it. In a couple of years we would probably be having 6 top notch T20 tournaments in the year, so bring it on!!!

  • Ram-i on February 14, 2013, 7:08 GMT

    I can understand the situation the likes of Shah/Nannes find themselves in. During their early ages, they weren't considered for their national teams and when they are on wrong side of 30's they cant hope to be considered as most selectors group are talking about grooming youth so the only viable option to secure themselves financially is by playing these T20 leagues, and to be fair these guys are very good in that format. If it weren't for these leagues, they would have to end up doing a 9 to 5 job for the next 20 years to live comfortably. Guys - please stop blaming IPL and BCCI for all that's happening in cricket world. Probably BCCI is to be blamed for the asteroid passing by the earth as well!!

  • TripleCenturian on February 14, 2013, 6:58 GMT

    But all these T20 leagues are unsustainable and franchises paying top dollar for below average players will eventually come to their senses when the novelty wears off. T20 mercenaries will be able to pick and choose which ones they play in and some will fall by the wayside. Plus the rewards from some T20 leagues will be negligible as the BCCI won't give them any places in the Champions League as of right and therefore these leagues will be much lower down the pecking order.

    And surely the ICC will realise the threat and have to respond differently one way or another?

  • vedichitesh on February 14, 2013, 6:11 GMT

    Cricket has survived the test of time..... When the ODI's came people made a hue and cry about Cricket losing its sheen..... but ODIs made better Cricketers. Everything that is new will have good and bad effects........ if the bad is more than the good soon it will die its own death. Mushrooming of the T20 leagues is nothing but business proposition at this moment. Many will invest but only the right ones or the well managed ones will survive. T20 will stay and will add some spice, it will burn very high and then all will mellow down. All players will become normal and will mature with the system eventually.

  • Rahul_78 on February 14, 2013, 5:13 GMT

    Have a look at the football. The Manchesters Uniteds and Real Madrids of the world are where the loyalty and fan following lies today. Messi as much belongs to Argentina as he belongs to Barcelona. The cricketing world is evolving. We all have to accept that. Though it is sad for the purists but time will soon come when cricketing world will comprise of massive franchisees and international cricket being reduced to events like world cup and Champions trophies played at the duration of 4 years in between. All things in life do evolve..for good or for worse is debatable.

  • on February 14, 2013, 3:59 GMT

    I am one of the first and one who maintained all along damn IPL and all the PL's that have mushroomed will kill off international cricket. You cannot blame the individual cricketers. They have a limited career too. Thank you INDIA and the ICC for destroying our teams that once took pride representing their mother country. Just look at England set up. Most of the players are SA? Are we not producing enough home bred cricketers to represent the country? Money has got the better of the sport.

  • bennybow on February 14, 2013, 2:57 GMT

    Can't help feeling sympathetic towards Owais Shah and others looking towards T20. If England Test sides were selected on ability rather than how much the management likes the player, I'd expect these guys to battle their way to the top. However, you only have to look at players like Onions, Foster, Read and Monty to see that it doesn't matter how skilful and committed you are, you ain't gonna get the top dollar available in England.

  • jmcilhinney on February 14, 2013, 2:50 GMT

    It's perfectly understandable that counties don't want to allow their contracted players to miss games that could cost them Championship points and affect their standing. The IPL is obviously the big draw because of the big money available but it would be hard to justify allowing players to go to the IPL but not other competitions and the IPL is one that clashes where some others don't. It's understandable that someone like Owais Shah might choose to do this given his age but it's far less likely that younger players will do so. It would be a shame to lose some of the experienced heads though.

  • StarHawk on February 13, 2013, 22:37 GMT

    @Paul Rone-Clarke, in what universe are you living in? I love test cricket and I watch them. But you are saying only 1 in 5 t20 matches are thrillers and they're boring? So what about test matches? Every other test match is either a dull draw or a one-sided contest. Once in a blue moon, you'll see a thriller in ODIs nowadays.

  • on February 13, 2013, 19:56 GMT

    Counties may sign an agreement that let's players come and go, but that is part of the contract. And if you have a contract you stick with it or face the possibility of being sacked or legal action. Say... If you work for "Acme Co" and for 4 weeks a year "Smith & Son" offer you 4x the pay to work for them and you just go - then Acme have the right to sack you - AND SUE YOU FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT. Cricket is no different. Besides, T20 is a very dull form of cricket. 1 in 5 games is a close run thriller but the rest follow a very predictable and very small set of preset patterns that get vey samey after watching a few dozen games. The currency of the game is devalued "6! Wow - who cares! another one will be along in a moment" They bring the ropes in 10 yards on grounds that are tiny to begin with, my 8 year old daughter could hit sixes on some of these T20 grounds. T20 = Cricket without skill. The terrible standard of IPL cricket is testament to that

  • on February 13, 2013, 19:24 GMT

    There is one thing for sure the scenario suggested by GeoffreysMother is a non-starter... Age discrimination regulations will scotch that. Who knows what the answer is... The only way out of it as far as I can see is to treat T20 in a similar way that rugby treats the 7-a-side game... which at face value interferes neither with the 15-a-side national or club sides.. That way a player can make up his own mind.. Does he want to play the long form of the game or in the more lucrative T20 circus.. Either way, it appears that with the proliferation of the shorter format, he won't be able to satisfy both on a full-time basis.

  • on February 13, 2013, 19:13 GMT

    gsingh 20/20 is the most boring form of cricket. It limits the skills required to play with artificially induced run rates. You say "when there are run feasts for 3 hours", yes well cricket is not just about batting my friend. It appeals for the moment to people whi know nothing about the game, perhaps why you like it. Its being flogged to death and the majority of the games are as boring as hell, especially when the side batting first bashes a large score. I dont blame the player for goingg for it though, good luck to them, counties will ddrop them like a stone if it suits them and desrere no loyalty. Players can only fet a years contract from the counties and never know from one year to the next if they will have a job.

  • 200ondebut on February 13, 2013, 18:45 GMT

    This is exactly what will happen if counties pursue their bigoted policy of not releasing players for IPL etc. They will just say thanks, but no thanks to a county contract. ECB need to stop playing Canute and relent to the inevitable IPL tide.

  • on February 13, 2013, 18:03 GMT

    Oh dear! 20/20 is so boring but if Shah can secure his families future this way then good luck to him but these players don't get to the big stage without playing for a County/State team first,so hopefully loyalty will rear its head as first class/Test cricket is where the real cricket happens.

  • on February 13, 2013, 17:20 GMT

    Counties may talk about putting their foot down, but at the end of the day, they may be in no position to do so, as they aren't able to match the pay of the twenty twenty game. Counties probably need to look at the broad picture around the world and decide on a realistic strategy rather than grandstanding over contracts.

  • skilebow on February 13, 2013, 16:41 GMT

    Don't worry i don't think the county game will miss him that much. Personally whilst i like T20 there is no substance to it. I can't remember a single T20 game clearly and i've watched many. However, I can still remember Allan Donald's spell to Mike Atherton at Trent Bridge in about 1998 like it was yesterday. I think many people are like me. We enjoy the entertainment of T20 but don't really care what the result is.

  • philvic on February 13, 2013, 16:30 GMT

    I dont know, those middle overs in T20 are a bit dull you know. The future is T10 or maybe even F5. Or maybe we can just dispense with the cricket altogether and go directly to the Pub?

  • GeoffreysMother on February 13, 2013, 16:26 GMT

    I think the balance for counties may be to agree to let players over the age of 30, say, play in other leagues. They will have served their time for the county and deserve to earn a bit of money from circus cricket if they want to. That is very different to allowing younger players with international aspirations such as Hales, Morgan and Wright to dip in and out of the county season. If they choose to go freelance then good luck to them - but they can't really have it both ways.

  • KDLarsen on February 13, 2013, 15:50 GMT

    It'll definantly be interesting to see how many of those T20 leagues are still going. BBL were damn close to losing a lot of their foreign players due to non-payments, SLC can't even pay their own players, and the less said about USA cricket the better. BBL & IPL - and then what for the other 8-9 months of the year?

  • gsingh7 on February 13, 2013, 14:49 GMT

    good player owais shaw, one of my favourite. he knows career is short and so comes flying to ipl money. t20 is future and it will devour tests quicker than most people think, who wants boring tests when there is run fest for 3 hours at night? @inside edge--- bcci just playing power game to show ecb who is boss by their dodgy schedule , thats logic my friend, to play the game hard and fair.

  • InsideHedge on February 13, 2013, 13:44 GMT

    Good luck to Owais, I say. It works both ways, what kind of loyalty did Middlesex show him when they refused to offer him a new contract despite being an important player?

    George hits the nail on the head, there's yet more leagues that will spring up. There's the Pakistani league which eventually will start up, and if the buffoons at USA Cricket get their act together, we should see opportunities Stateside. The Zimbabwe league is already popular, the Kiwis know how to put on a show.

    IPl is way too long and requires trimming, the season starts too late, they could easily finish it off before the English county season starts and avoid the current conflict. But the BCCI doesn't place too much emphasis on logic.

  • InsideHedge on February 13, 2013, 13:44 GMT

    Good luck to Owais, I say. It works both ways, what kind of loyalty did Middlesex show him when they refused to offer him a new contract despite being an important player?

    George hits the nail on the head, there's yet more leagues that will spring up. There's the Pakistani league which eventually will start up, and if the buffoons at USA Cricket get their act together, we should see opportunities Stateside. The Zimbabwe league is already popular, the Kiwis know how to put on a show.

    IPl is way too long and requires trimming, the season starts too late, they could easily finish it off before the English county season starts and avoid the current conflict. But the BCCI doesn't place too much emphasis on logic.

  • gsingh7 on February 13, 2013, 14:49 GMT

    good player owais shaw, one of my favourite. he knows career is short and so comes flying to ipl money. t20 is future and it will devour tests quicker than most people think, who wants boring tests when there is run fest for 3 hours at night? @inside edge--- bcci just playing power game to show ecb who is boss by their dodgy schedule , thats logic my friend, to play the game hard and fair.

  • KDLarsen on February 13, 2013, 15:50 GMT

    It'll definantly be interesting to see how many of those T20 leagues are still going. BBL were damn close to losing a lot of their foreign players due to non-payments, SLC can't even pay their own players, and the less said about USA cricket the better. BBL & IPL - and then what for the other 8-9 months of the year?

  • GeoffreysMother on February 13, 2013, 16:26 GMT

    I think the balance for counties may be to agree to let players over the age of 30, say, play in other leagues. They will have served their time for the county and deserve to earn a bit of money from circus cricket if they want to. That is very different to allowing younger players with international aspirations such as Hales, Morgan and Wright to dip in and out of the county season. If they choose to go freelance then good luck to them - but they can't really have it both ways.

  • philvic on February 13, 2013, 16:30 GMT

    I dont know, those middle overs in T20 are a bit dull you know. The future is T10 or maybe even F5. Or maybe we can just dispense with the cricket altogether and go directly to the Pub?

  • skilebow on February 13, 2013, 16:41 GMT

    Don't worry i don't think the county game will miss him that much. Personally whilst i like T20 there is no substance to it. I can't remember a single T20 game clearly and i've watched many. However, I can still remember Allan Donald's spell to Mike Atherton at Trent Bridge in about 1998 like it was yesterday. I think many people are like me. We enjoy the entertainment of T20 but don't really care what the result is.

  • on February 13, 2013, 17:20 GMT

    Counties may talk about putting their foot down, but at the end of the day, they may be in no position to do so, as they aren't able to match the pay of the twenty twenty game. Counties probably need to look at the broad picture around the world and decide on a realistic strategy rather than grandstanding over contracts.

  • on February 13, 2013, 18:03 GMT

    Oh dear! 20/20 is so boring but if Shah can secure his families future this way then good luck to him but these players don't get to the big stage without playing for a County/State team first,so hopefully loyalty will rear its head as first class/Test cricket is where the real cricket happens.

  • 200ondebut on February 13, 2013, 18:45 GMT

    This is exactly what will happen if counties pursue their bigoted policy of not releasing players for IPL etc. They will just say thanks, but no thanks to a county contract. ECB need to stop playing Canute and relent to the inevitable IPL tide.

  • on February 13, 2013, 19:13 GMT

    gsingh 20/20 is the most boring form of cricket. It limits the skills required to play with artificially induced run rates. You say "when there are run feasts for 3 hours", yes well cricket is not just about batting my friend. It appeals for the moment to people whi know nothing about the game, perhaps why you like it. Its being flogged to death and the majority of the games are as boring as hell, especially when the side batting first bashes a large score. I dont blame the player for goingg for it though, good luck to them, counties will ddrop them like a stone if it suits them and desrere no loyalty. Players can only fet a years contract from the counties and never know from one year to the next if they will have a job.