September 22, 2011

'The most charismatic cricketer of his generation'

ESPNcricinfo staff
A selection of tributes to former India captain MAK Pataudi
  shares 47

"It is a terrible news for me, he brought me up and guided me. I can't even express myself, it is one of my saddest days. He was a great human being, a great cricketer, a great fielder, shrewd captain, it is really sad. He always guided the youngsters. I was very close to him, so I can't really forget the way he brought me up. He was my first captain under whom I played. Whatever career I had, it stands on him."
Former India batsman Gundappa Viswanath is crestfallen at the passing of Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi

"It is an extremely painful loss for me. Unbearable and shocking loss. He was one of the greatest captains to lead India. He gave a new face to Indian cricket and emphasised on the role of quality fielding. He was primarily responsible for developing India's spin quartet in an aggressive role similar to what the West Indians had later in form of the pace quartet. He always believed that teams have to bowl at least 80 to 85 attacking overs out of 100 overs."
Erapalli Prasanna, the former India spinner, lauds Pataudi's captaincy skills

"It is a great personal loss, he was a very dear personal friend, he was my first captain, I learnt a lot from him. He was by far the best Indian captain to my mind of thinking. He was the first leader of Indian cricket who told everybody in the dressing room, 'look you are not playing for Delhi, Punjab, Madras, Calcutta or Bombay, you are playing for India. You are Indian.' That left a very very good mark on the minds of youngsters who played under him.

"His faith in the spinners was absolute and we all prospered under his captaincy, he guided us so comfortably and serenely, the spin quartet had the highest regard for him... We won't find the likes of him in a long, long time. His voice cannot be filled. A great, great chapter of Indian cricket has come to a close."
Former India captain Bishen Bedi says we won't see another Pataudi

"It is a big shock for me. It is too early for him to depart.. just 70 years. A great captain, always attacking and aggressive.. never defensive at any stage. He always focused on trying to win the match and would go all out to win. We had four spinners then, and I, especially, was extremely lucky to have had him as a captain."
Former India legspinner Bhagwat Chandrasekar is grateful to have had Pataudi as a captain

"Tiger Pataudi was my first captain. When I played my first Test in 1969, he was not just a nawab, royalty, but also already a superstar. When I walked out one morning to have breakfast at the CCI (Cricket Club of India) where the Indians players lived during a Mumbai Test, he invited me over to share a table with him and I'll never forget that. He was captain of India, a nawab and I was a debutant. He taught the Indian team how to win, he brought about its transformation convinced us that we could beat strong sides, even with limited resources, even by having basically three bowlers. He was aggressive but didn't shout on the field, nothing of the sort, his thinking about the game was that if you were playing for the country, you didn't have to be treated like children; you didn't need motivation or baby talk.

"He treated us all as equals, as a captain he was totally professional on the field, aggressive, attacking. It didn't strike me then, but when I played against other captains, I realised just how attacking he was, I realised he was the best captain I had every played under. Off the field he was an extrovert, he loved going out, socialising, late night partying and often he said to me, 'you take cricket too seriously, you're young, enjoy your life. If you are too emotional about it and take it too seriously, you will be an unhappy man'."
Former India opening batsman, Chetan Chauhan, remembers Pataudi's zest for life

"Tiger Pataudi was the most charismatic cricketer of his generation. To bat with almost zero vision in one eye and still to score nearly 3000 runs and half a dozen centuries in Test cricket tells you what a genius he was. He will be terribly missed and it's a huge loss to the game of cricket."
Former India captain Sunil Gavaskar puts Pataudi's achievements in context

"I recently watched him on television and he looked great, but the sudden news of his death is a shock to me. When Pataudi started his career, we didn't have India-Pakistan ties but we got a chance to play together in a World XI and I found him a great human being, a charismatic character and a genuine cricket buff."
Former Pakistan captain Hanif Mohammad reminisces about meeting Pataudi

"Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi was a man of exceptional talent who turned out to be an inspiration to millions of cricketers, not only in India but across the globe. It was an honour and privilege to have known him. He became a true darling of India cricket due to his on the field heroics and off the field easy manners. After retirement, he maintained his close association with the game in different capacities, including as a commentator. Whenever he shared his views on the game, they were taken seriously as they were considered to be coming right from the bottom of the heart of one of India's greatest servants of the game. He will be sorely missed."
ICC president Sharad Pawar remembers Pataudi's contribution to the game

"I had grown up as a young cricketer hearing about his achievements and had only met him for the first time during The Oval Test on 22 August where he had come to present the Pataudi Trophy to the England team, while I presented Andrew Strauss with the Reliance ICC Test Championship mace. During the Test, I had the privilege of discussing with him the past, present and future of Test and 50-over cricket. It was absolutely fascinating to hear his views and confidence in these formats."
ICC chief Haroon Lorgat recollects his recent discussions with Pataudi in England

"I am shocked to hear the news of Tiger Pataudi's demise. He was an exemplary individual, who guided Indian cricket to unprecedented heights, as batsman, fielder and captain. He revolutionised fielding standards in the Indian team, and across the country. In an age wherein a draw was considered as good as a win, Tiger Pataudi encouraged his players to go flat out for victory. He was an aggressive batsman who excelled in crisis situations, and showed the nation how to combat adversity. I join my colleagues in the BCCI to express my condolences at his passing away. His services to Indian cricket will never be forgotten."
BCCI president N Srinivasan pays tribute to Pataudi

"We are very sad to hear of Tiger Pataudi's untimely death. He was a legendary figure for his country, and is fondly remembered for all he contributed to Sussex Cricket. I met him at the recent Test match at The Oval when he was very much looking forward to visiting us at Hove later this year. It has come as a great shock to us all and our condolences from everyone associated with Sussex Cricket go to his family."
Sussex Chairman Jim May offers his commiserations on the death of Pataudi, who played 88 first-class matches for Sussex between 1957 and 1970

"He was a legend for us and we have never seen him play. He was a romantic figure, an absolute legend. I have always heard stories of Tiger, how he changed Indian cricket. He had a huge impact beyond his sheer performance in the cricket field. He was a huge inspirational figure. Even after so many years whenever you talk to legends of cricket, they always talk about him with awe and respect. He will definitely go down as an all time great, who had influenced not only on the cricket field but beyond it as well. He made the game popular in India with his sheer personality and performances. He led the team in the different way. He was a leader for us and he always stood with the current lot of players. In 2002, when we had problem with ICC with the central contract system, Mr. Pataudi backed us along with Madan Lal. I met him briefly in England at the Oval, after the Test series. We spoke briefly and now when I think about it, I regret that I couldn't spend more time talking to him."
Rahul Dravid wishes he could have spent more time with Pataudi

"I am extremely saddened hearing the news about Pataudi passing away. My heartfelt condolence to his family and may his soul rest in peace. I had known him personally and even met him a few times. There was lot of class and dignity about the man. Due to an accident he lost one eye and was yet successful at the international level, just goes on to show how good a player he was. The most positive thing about him was that he was very honest and always had the good of Indian cricket at heart."
Sourav Ganguly remembers Pataudi for his class and dignity

"It's a terrible loss to the cricketing world. I had the privilege of meeting him on a few occasions. World cricket will miss a hero like him. I really respected him."
Sachin Tendulkar mourns the loss of a cricketing hero

"I am devastated, I had no idea he was in hospital ... he was a contemporary of my cousin Javed Burki, and what I heard from my cousins, and from his contemporaries, was that had he not lost his eye apparently, he was a genius of great proportions. Anyone who knows batting, knows that it's difficult to play with one eye, specially [to play] fast bowling. What he achieved with one eye, the sort of ability he had, what sort of a player he could have become... In Pakistan, to us he was also a cricketer who was a crowd puller."
Imran Khan, the former Pakistan captain, says Pataudi was a crowd favourite across the border as well

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY deepakdr on | September 25, 2011, 9:32 GMT

    Easily the most charismatic player to have played for India,outbeats even today's star players hands down.His ads were also in a class of its own where saif used to look like a novice and HE stood tall and ROYAL.None of the cricketers of present generation have such domineering screen presence.We miss Prince and the void is not going to be filled.thanks for all the pleasure you gave us.

  • POSTED BY deepakdr on | September 25, 2011, 9:26 GMT

    TIGER was the first super star player of Indian cricket,whatever he did was followed by others.He was held in awe by his team mates and followers alike.He made the face of Indian cricket,which was in shambles earlier and mostly ruled by Bombay.Many felt jealous of him,his lineage and his exploits,but he cared for none of these and brought about gems like Vishy,and spin quartet.He did not look at the category of the person what he was interested was quality of play.His memorable innings like the 148 at headingly where we were following on ,he told his team mates to play positive cricket and not bore the crowd,and that set the tone for that match,which we lost but won the hearts of millions.He was the man of the series for the series against Tony Lewis team in India in 1972-73, the first time TIGER played under Wadekar and scored a couple of fifties and the English skipper commented they were looking for the most prized wicket of Pataudi- you shall live in our hearts forever TIGER

  • POSTED BY on | September 25, 2011, 6:16 GMT

    one of the finest batsman and certainly the best captain india ever had and what a personality u just have to see him walk and u could feel his greatness . his comments were flawless world of cricket has lost a real gem

  • POSTED BY RasheedS on | September 24, 2011, 15:31 GMT

    Good Bye Pataudi. I was a great fan of him,but sorry to say at this moment that he was not the best Ind.Capt. in the first place. He was a good bat, but with lesser average. He came from elite and those days Ind.cricket was strongly influenced by Rajas and Nowabs and industrialists.

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 11:02 GMT

    Sad loss for cricket, a great captain and cricket and also gave back to the game in form of administration. I can recall I was only 9 years old and he came to play cricket in Nakuru, Kenya with an Indian Cricket was accompanied by his wife Sharmila in 1971 and that inspired into the game. Though little knowledge of the game at that time but surely got me hooked. May his soul rest in peace.

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 7:45 GMT

    Tiger Pataudi... and that name says it all, may his soul rest in peace

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 6:43 GMT

    I firmly subscribe to the belief that cricket matches are played in heaven. The next match will feature a new star, a great cover fielder and super strokeplayer. That grace, charm and elegance from a bye gone era will be missed. Good bye Tiger.

  • POSTED BY zico123 on | September 23, 2011, 21:06 GMT

    i didn't have the priviledge to watch Tiger Pataudi's batting or captaincy, but what i heard was he was a fantastic and extremely attacking captain and had a great great personality! i wish at Oval on 22 August 2011 he could hand over the trophy to Dhoni had India not performed so terribly

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 15:57 GMT

    Nawab of Patudi was a true inspiration to all of us youngesters in 60s & 70s. I still remember the unofficial test against Sri Lanka in Bangalore in 1967. It was the first time he was playing in Bangalore. Wow what a sight it was to see him in action. He was an idol to thousands who saw him in that match. I was lucky to see him play every match he played in Bangalore and I along with many of my friends were never satisfied. We wanted to seem him play more. I know hundreds of people who just wanted to see him, the result, the runs scored and wkts taken were all secondary. I doubt if there will be any one like him for years to come. It is one of the greatest loss to Indian cricket. Heart felt condolences to his family. Tiger rest in peace, you will not be forgotten by your fans.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 15:37 GMT

    GREAT CRICKETER & CAPTAIN

  • POSTED BY deepakdr on | September 25, 2011, 9:32 GMT

    Easily the most charismatic player to have played for India,outbeats even today's star players hands down.His ads were also in a class of its own where saif used to look like a novice and HE stood tall and ROYAL.None of the cricketers of present generation have such domineering screen presence.We miss Prince and the void is not going to be filled.thanks for all the pleasure you gave us.

  • POSTED BY deepakdr on | September 25, 2011, 9:26 GMT

    TIGER was the first super star player of Indian cricket,whatever he did was followed by others.He was held in awe by his team mates and followers alike.He made the face of Indian cricket,which was in shambles earlier and mostly ruled by Bombay.Many felt jealous of him,his lineage and his exploits,but he cared for none of these and brought about gems like Vishy,and spin quartet.He did not look at the category of the person what he was interested was quality of play.His memorable innings like the 148 at headingly where we were following on ,he told his team mates to play positive cricket and not bore the crowd,and that set the tone for that match,which we lost but won the hearts of millions.He was the man of the series for the series against Tony Lewis team in India in 1972-73, the first time TIGER played under Wadekar and scored a couple of fifties and the English skipper commented they were looking for the most prized wicket of Pataudi- you shall live in our hearts forever TIGER

  • POSTED BY on | September 25, 2011, 6:16 GMT

    one of the finest batsman and certainly the best captain india ever had and what a personality u just have to see him walk and u could feel his greatness . his comments were flawless world of cricket has lost a real gem

  • POSTED BY RasheedS on | September 24, 2011, 15:31 GMT

    Good Bye Pataudi. I was a great fan of him,but sorry to say at this moment that he was not the best Ind.Capt. in the first place. He was a good bat, but with lesser average. He came from elite and those days Ind.cricket was strongly influenced by Rajas and Nowabs and industrialists.

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 11:02 GMT

    Sad loss for cricket, a great captain and cricket and also gave back to the game in form of administration. I can recall I was only 9 years old and he came to play cricket in Nakuru, Kenya with an Indian Cricket was accompanied by his wife Sharmila in 1971 and that inspired into the game. Though little knowledge of the game at that time but surely got me hooked. May his soul rest in peace.

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 7:45 GMT

    Tiger Pataudi... and that name says it all, may his soul rest in peace

  • POSTED BY on | September 24, 2011, 6:43 GMT

    I firmly subscribe to the belief that cricket matches are played in heaven. The next match will feature a new star, a great cover fielder and super strokeplayer. That grace, charm and elegance from a bye gone era will be missed. Good bye Tiger.

  • POSTED BY zico123 on | September 23, 2011, 21:06 GMT

    i didn't have the priviledge to watch Tiger Pataudi's batting or captaincy, but what i heard was he was a fantastic and extremely attacking captain and had a great great personality! i wish at Oval on 22 August 2011 he could hand over the trophy to Dhoni had India not performed so terribly

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 15:57 GMT

    Nawab of Patudi was a true inspiration to all of us youngesters in 60s & 70s. I still remember the unofficial test against Sri Lanka in Bangalore in 1967. It was the first time he was playing in Bangalore. Wow what a sight it was to see him in action. He was an idol to thousands who saw him in that match. I was lucky to see him play every match he played in Bangalore and I along with many of my friends were never satisfied. We wanted to seem him play more. I know hundreds of people who just wanted to see him, the result, the runs scored and wkts taken were all secondary. I doubt if there will be any one like him for years to come. It is one of the greatest loss to Indian cricket. Heart felt condolences to his family. Tiger rest in peace, you will not be forgotten by your fans.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 15:37 GMT

    GREAT CRICKETER & CAPTAIN

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 13:43 GMT

    I still remember his brief innings of 19 and his fielding in the covers against West Indies in Calcutta 194-75. He had four glorious boundaries in that short innings.

  • POSTED BY krnataraj on | September 23, 2011, 12:57 GMT

    I am told by those who watched him that he was a sheer genius when it comes to his own fielding and positioning fielders. one such incident happened in during the windes series in india in 1974-75. tiger who was the captain standing and cover motioned with his hands behind his back to the fielder at mid-off to start moving backwards when the bowler came into bowl. the batsman(probably richards or lloyd) hit the spinner(probably prasanna) only to find that the fielder in mid-off instead of moving forward had moved back to some kind of long-off position and waited for the ball to land in his palms. how many such acts of cricketing genius can one get to see today?? it gives goose bumps even today when you hear of such an exceptional indian captain who read his opposition so well.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 12:36 GMT

    Sad loss for cricket, certainly one of the most gifted captains to have played the game.

  • POSTED BY NavalPatel on | September 23, 2011, 12:15 GMT

    The Nawab losing an eye in a car accident was the greatest tragedy ever to afflict Indian cricket. I saw him bat as an Oxford undergraduate against the truly strong English County attacks of the 1950s, particularly that of Yorkshire - he devastated them all with panache. If his sight had remained, he would have become the greatest ever Indian Test batsman bar none. As it is, Pataudi Sahib has left us splendid memories of grace and leadership. Rest you in bliss.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    We as a nation will miss dis great servant of the nation as far Indian cricket goes......

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 10:24 GMT

    What an inspiring "never-say-die" leader of men, what a gentleman off it, the world has lost an irreplaceable superstar of style and substance.

    We will never forget the Nawab of Indian Cricket!

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 10:20 GMT

    I can't imagine a similar raft of heartfelt tributes on the untimely death of some current players!

  • POSTED BY BoonBoom on | September 23, 2011, 10:14 GMT

    RIP Mr Patudi... Good to see that he is NOT being compared with Dhoni as captain because that would have been an insult to compare a true Gentleman like Patudi with Dhoni!!

  • POSTED BY cricarnab on | September 23, 2011, 10:13 GMT

    Goodbye Tiger. Rest in peace

  • POSTED BY kabe_ag7 on | September 23, 2011, 9:19 GMT

    Jeffrey Archer on twitter - "Just learned of the death of the Nawab of Pataudi, the most charming, gentle and kind man I've come across in my life-long love of cricket."

  • POSTED BY nandydesikan on | September 23, 2011, 8:38 GMT

    Tragic day for a behind-the-scenes hero as he has shied away from the spotlight of being a Nawab and pursued his dream of breaking the draw-a-test-equals-win-the-test jinx. From all the recollections by other great legends I have read about, he is an epitome of the fact "a true great goes beyond just numbers". Hail Mr Nawab of Pataudi..

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 8:34 GMT

    4 young Indians I used to teach all posted recognition of his death on Facebook. To be remembered in such a way by cricketers 2 generations after yours shows what a great man he was and the contribution he made to establishing modern cricket in India.

  • POSTED BY subri1 on | September 23, 2011, 8:22 GMT

    the year 1984 - we had just won the world cup. I had the privilege of meeting Mr. Pataudi at my club. I was awed. He bought me a beer and agreed to do an interview for my college rag mag. Dates were fixed and hands shaken. But I forgot . Too late I rushed to his house in Mumbai... but despite the delay he was waiting. The interview was to be about him and cricket during his years in the Indian team, because i was so unprepared and "youthful"? it went somewhere else. To Indias world cup and the stars in it.It wasnt a short interview it streched for as long as I wanted it . I wonder who else would have suffered someone like me and my absolute apathy for a legend. If I could ask God for one thing, I would definitely ask him to wind back the clock so I could have one more chance to speak to him. His cricketing abilities are already recorded. His friends are testimony to his character and I - a nobody - a testimony to his humanity. What a man.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 8:12 GMT

    Saw him play at Bab-e-Ali stadium at Bhopal while he was still a student of Oxford.He scored some 60-odd. Also had the privilege of watching another of his rare innings at Bab-e-Ali in which he played with another legend Capt Mushtaq Ali. Both of them lit up the stadium with a flurry of sixes. Was also touched by his humility.The famous commentator Berry Serbhadhikary upbraided him after he dropped a catch in the outfield in another game played in Sr Pataudi memorial tournament. "Sorry Berryda I disappointed you," Pat said. He would occasionally drop in at Hamidia College grounds and join us college cricketers for a game. With his soft manners he ruled the hearts Nawab or no Nawab.

  • POSTED BY Percy_Fender on | September 23, 2011, 7:45 GMT

    I have never seen 'presence' on the cricket field as much as I saw in Tiger Pataudi and Imran Khan. The only others who fell in this category are West Indians. Sir Frank Worrell and Sir Gary Sobers. When these mighty men took the field, the crowd just looked on in awe. Considering the fitness levels that prevailed in those days ( with the exception of Borde and Hanumant who were also brilliant fielders) one looked forward to the ball going to Pataudi

  • POSTED BY P.SenthilRaj on | September 23, 2011, 7:26 GMT

    Very Sad ...Tiger Pataudi is a true legend......

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 7:20 GMT

    Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi had played some 40-odd international test matches and scored half a dozen centuries with only one eye!!! RIP NAWAB OF PATAUDI :-(

  • POSTED BY crocker on | September 23, 2011, 7:12 GMT

    He was the planner who converted a generation of indians into cricket fanatics, the fruits of which are being reaped by BCCI today. May be, because he was the youngest captain and not prejudiced by so called experience, he could employ innovative ideas in his plans. His stategy of using available resources to maximise gain was seen in his captaincy. Using 3-4 spinners, close-in fielders etc revolutionised cricketing thought at that time - and missing today. Famous spinning quartet, fielders surti, engineer, wadekar, abid ali, venkat have their reputation due to Tiger. He knew how to use them. Only indian captain who never grumbled and made any excuses. Chetan Chauhan, above, has given a meaningful insight into the mind of Tiger. People will always remember him.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 6:57 GMT

    The stardom, the Indian cricketers are enjoying these days is because of the legend "Tiger" MAK Patudi. He was the first and foremost "Super Start" and a true leader in Indian cricket and an inspirational cricketer who inspired millions to become a cricket lover.

  • POSTED BY SouthPaw on | September 23, 2011, 6:21 GMT

    The Nawab of Pataudi, Jr was known for his great dignity and self confidence and (Royal) wit, although he was a very quiet man who spoke very little. Yet, he was direct and forthright when he did.

    What I remember is when he was asked how he was sure that he could continue to play cricket after the loss of sight in one eye, he said "English bowling"!

    Pataudi, RIP

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 6:19 GMT

    Pataudi was not only a brave captain, but he was very much popular among the team mates too. Gavaskar had described the lighter side of his character on his book "Sunny Days". Pataudi invited the Indian team for some picnic and bandits attacked and kidnapped Indian players. Later, it was discovered that those bandits were Pataudi's servants. It was really funny and entertaing story.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 6:15 GMT

    Very very shocking news...We lost real tiger of India. Hats off to him that he played with one eye....greattt

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 6:02 GMT

    It is a great loss to Indian cricket. What a personality MAK Pataudi is! His astute leadership, that too at a tender age of 21, brought Indian cricket to glory. I am his ardent fan since I followed cricket from my school days, way back in 60's. Though he scored half a dozen centuries, his 70 odd runs with his leg injury against Australia in 1964 at Mumbai is rated amongst the cricket critics as his best knock. He was mainly responsible for grooming the Indian spin quartet, PRASANNA, BEDI, VENKAT & CHANDRA, into a striking force, which brought many glories for India. Personally, Pataudi is very humorous and kind hearted. I personally convey my heart felt condolences to his family members and I wish Almighty to give strength to them to bear the irreparable loss.

  • POSTED BY RogerC on | September 23, 2011, 5:58 GMT

    Thanks to Tiger for giving the world many exciting days of cricket. In terms of star value, the only other comparable player to him in world cricket is Keith Miller. Tiger lived a fulfilling life and died without much suffering. RIP, Tiger.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 5:33 GMT

    I had the pleasure to see him play several matches and also the pleasure to meet him he was my favourite cricketer

  • POSTED BY FourSomeFearSome on | September 23, 2011, 5:20 GMT

    OMG... I can not believe tiger is no more... it is a great loss, I heard his stories from my dad. I talked to my dad today. He was shocked, he saw him play in Mumbai. May he rest in peace.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 5:14 GMT

    very very sad news mansur ali khan pataudi was pass away.he was one of the best player in the world.one of the best captain in the world. he was led India .md atif rahman

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 4:50 GMT

    Tiger played many long and inspiring innings on a cricket field however his most important innings - inning of his life ended abruptly. They said that England tour this year was a perfect storm. Many unexpected and unwanted events happened starting from Zahir's injury all the way to India loosing this series. But no one thought the real white wash would hit the world of Indian cricket within a month... We lost the greatest of all - Tiger Pataudi. Sadly, the man himself handed over his trophy to England caption before he left this world; one last time. -May God rest his soul in peace...

  • POSTED BY Percy_Fender on | September 23, 2011, 4:46 GMT

    I followed Tiger Pataudi's career even when he was at Oxford. I was taken in by the prospect of seing another India prince play for India. Another one from our own Sussex ! I remember,Tiger playing for for Free Forresters against Lancashire in 1960 had scored a great century. Brian Statham opened their bowling. The following match was against Yorkshire and Pataudi scored another 100. Fred Trueman led thateir attack. He would later have that accident and lose vision in one eye.I thought that was the end of my hopes.But incredibly, Tiger was selected for the Delhi Test against Dexter's England in 1961.He scored very little Then onto Calcutta, and he scored a 60 plus.Then came the last Testat the Chepauk in Madras. He scored a great 100 in 116 minutes of excellent stroke play. After that he never ceased being a part of the collective imagination of the many cricket lovers in this country. Whether prowling at cover point or just walking on the field with very little movement of his hands.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 3:15 GMT

    Pataudi was an inspirational character and if impeccable integrity. He played a long innings for the glory of Indian cricket much beyond his 46 tests. He inspires me for he overcame his handicap and excelled at the international level.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 3:09 GMT

    A great cricketer for the ages

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 2:53 GMT

    I am very sad by the news of demis of Nawab Sahab.....may God rest him in Peace....he was so prominent figure and first Superstar of Cricket...he brought charm to Cricket....he was First Imran Khan.....loss of legend....loss of true gentleman.....RIP....as these figure goes...one chapter of history gets closed...but what one can do....

  • POSTED BY cric_freak88 on | September 22, 2011, 22:39 GMT

    im not an indian .. but this is not a loss to indian cricket .. but to world cricket .. but to world in general .. he was a legend .. self believer ..impossible was nothing for him

    i think in the end he has gone to a better place ( paradise ) .. may his soul rest in peace , Ameen !

  • POSTED BY on | September 22, 2011, 22:31 GMT

    Indian cricket has lost a hero, subcontinent has lost an icon and world cricket has lost a legend, that cannot be praised enough. Unlike others I will not talk about his achievement with the lack of vision, as for me, Tiger never let his disability hinder his ambition. He was bigger than that. He was a visionary, a fighter that brought the name of Indian Cricket on the face of the world and left a legacy, that is still shining. Sincere condolences to his family, his friends and Indian Cricket. May his soul rest in peace. Tiger's fan from Pakistan

  • POSTED BY phoenixsteve on | September 22, 2011, 20:32 GMT

    Obviously a great loss to Indian cricket bit furthermore a great loss to this wonderful sport we all enjoy. A truly classy gentleman who combined style with grit and epitomised the spirit of Cricket. My sincere condolences to his family and all lovers of the game.....

  • POSTED BY on | September 22, 2011, 20:01 GMT

    I never seen his batting but as a cricket fan praying for his soul.......

  • POSTED BY GoldenAsif on | September 22, 2011, 19:46 GMT

    Pataudi is the Kardar (Abdul Hafeez Kardar) of indian cricket i.e. the first great cricket captain to emerge from that country

    nicknamed Tiger, Mansur Ali Pataudi is the first cousin of:

    - Shahryar Khan, ex-PCB Chairman and foreign secretary & - Major Gen. Isfandyar Ali Pataudi (a general in Pakistan army)

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • POSTED BY GoldenAsif on | September 22, 2011, 19:46 GMT

    Pataudi is the Kardar (Abdul Hafeez Kardar) of indian cricket i.e. the first great cricket captain to emerge from that country

    nicknamed Tiger, Mansur Ali Pataudi is the first cousin of:

    - Shahryar Khan, ex-PCB Chairman and foreign secretary & - Major Gen. Isfandyar Ali Pataudi (a general in Pakistan army)

  • POSTED BY on | September 22, 2011, 20:01 GMT

    I never seen his batting but as a cricket fan praying for his soul.......

  • POSTED BY phoenixsteve on | September 22, 2011, 20:32 GMT

    Obviously a great loss to Indian cricket bit furthermore a great loss to this wonderful sport we all enjoy. A truly classy gentleman who combined style with grit and epitomised the spirit of Cricket. My sincere condolences to his family and all lovers of the game.....

  • POSTED BY on | September 22, 2011, 22:31 GMT

    Indian cricket has lost a hero, subcontinent has lost an icon and world cricket has lost a legend, that cannot be praised enough. Unlike others I will not talk about his achievement with the lack of vision, as for me, Tiger never let his disability hinder his ambition. He was bigger than that. He was a visionary, a fighter that brought the name of Indian Cricket on the face of the world and left a legacy, that is still shining. Sincere condolences to his family, his friends and Indian Cricket. May his soul rest in peace. Tiger's fan from Pakistan

  • POSTED BY cric_freak88 on | September 22, 2011, 22:39 GMT

    im not an indian .. but this is not a loss to indian cricket .. but to world cricket .. but to world in general .. he was a legend .. self believer ..impossible was nothing for him

    i think in the end he has gone to a better place ( paradise ) .. may his soul rest in peace , Ameen !

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 2:53 GMT

    I am very sad by the news of demis of Nawab Sahab.....may God rest him in Peace....he was so prominent figure and first Superstar of Cricket...he brought charm to Cricket....he was First Imran Khan.....loss of legend....loss of true gentleman.....RIP....as these figure goes...one chapter of history gets closed...but what one can do....

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 3:09 GMT

    A great cricketer for the ages

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 3:15 GMT

    Pataudi was an inspirational character and if impeccable integrity. He played a long innings for the glory of Indian cricket much beyond his 46 tests. He inspires me for he overcame his handicap and excelled at the international level.

  • POSTED BY Percy_Fender on | September 23, 2011, 4:46 GMT

    I followed Tiger Pataudi's career even when he was at Oxford. I was taken in by the prospect of seing another India prince play for India. Another one from our own Sussex ! I remember,Tiger playing for for Free Forresters against Lancashire in 1960 had scored a great century. Brian Statham opened their bowling. The following match was against Yorkshire and Pataudi scored another 100. Fred Trueman led thateir attack. He would later have that accident and lose vision in one eye.I thought that was the end of my hopes.But incredibly, Tiger was selected for the Delhi Test against Dexter's England in 1961.He scored very little Then onto Calcutta, and he scored a 60 plus.Then came the last Testat the Chepauk in Madras. He scored a great 100 in 116 minutes of excellent stroke play. After that he never ceased being a part of the collective imagination of the many cricket lovers in this country. Whether prowling at cover point or just walking on the field with very little movement of his hands.

  • POSTED BY on | September 23, 2011, 4:50 GMT

    Tiger played many long and inspiring innings on a cricket field however his most important innings - inning of his life ended abruptly. They said that England tour this year was a perfect storm. Many unexpected and unwanted events happened starting from Zahir's injury all the way to India loosing this series. But no one thought the real white wash would hit the world of Indian cricket within a month... We lost the greatest of all - Tiger Pataudi. Sadly, the man himself handed over his trophy to England caption before he left this world; one last time. -May God rest his soul in peace...