June 5, 2011

Tendulkar, Ponting and the question of retirement

What are the signs that lead a player to decide on retirement? And are there any successors to these two greats?
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Whenever the conversation turns to ageing batsmen and retirement, there's much conjecture about what goes first, the eyes or the legs. In reality, it's usually the mind.

There are exceptions. Barry Richards admitted his eyesight began to fade during World Series Cricket. Given it was a tournament where a top-class fast bowler appeared at nearly every bowling change, it was an unfortunate time to start seeing the ball a little blurry. And New Zealander Martin Crowe was a top-class batsman whose knee injury forced him to retire roughly 400 short of 20,000 first-class runs.

However, it's generally something in the mind that brings a batsman to the conclusion that it's time to declare.

Greg Chappell, at his peak a mentally well-organised batsman, announced his retirement prior to his last Test. He needed 69 runs to pass Sir Donald Bradman as Australia's highest run-getter, and when asked why he made the announcement before the game, he replied, "My concentration had been wavering for a while, so I figured that was the only way to force my mind to work at full capacity."

His ploy succeeded, because, along with former India captain Mohammad Azharuddin, he's the only batsman to score a century in his first and last Test innings.

Brian Lara retired a few years ago, presumably because he had had enough. What is the likely fate of two other dominant batsmen from that era, Sachin Tendulkar and Ricky Ponting?

Tendulkar has suffered from injuries and the odd form dip during his glittering career, but his recent renaissance is proof there's nothing wrong with his eyesight. And his running between wickets during an extraordinary limited-overs double-century suggests leg problems won't force him out of the game.

Retirement can be hastened by any number of factors: other priorities in life, a sudden dread of training or lengthy stints in the field, or even the departure of long-time team-mates.

Tendulkar is a player who genuinely loves playing cricket. Certainly the contest between bat and ball and the challenge of maintaining high standards still hold an attraction for his competitive instincts. Nevertheless, with India's rise to the No. 1 ranking and winning a World Cup trophy, he must be close to completing his cricketing bucket list. The moment of realisation for him might be the retirements of Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman; if he looks around the dressing room and they are not there, suddenly Test cricket might not hold the same attraction.

Ponting has gone through a testing period. Lack of runs, an unexpected frailty against the short-pitched delivery, and then retirement from the captaincy must have made him think seriously about cricketing mortality. But his hundred against India in the quarter-final of the World Cup was Ponting at his fighting best, if not his most fluent.

His desire to play on could have him fight a battle on dual fronts. After relinquishing the responsibility of captaincy, to also bat lower in the order could be a mistake. Part of what has driven Ponting to be a top-class batsman is the challenge of resurrecting an innings and then setting a course, directing the process from the No. 3 position. The lack of that motivation, on top of not having the captaincy, might leave him with a slightly empty feeling.

One of the more drastic changes in the game is that the former-player dictum of retiring when people are saying, "Why did you?", rather than "Why didn't you?" is a lot harder to follow now with the riches available to the modern cricketer. There's also the attraction of a staggered retirement. Now a player can simply retire from one form of the game to prolong his career in another.

Ponting has hinted at touring the UK in 2013, but that has more to do with his captaincy record in that part of the world. Tendulkar, as with most things outside of batting, has wisely kept his cards close to his chest.

With the retirement of these two dominant batsmen imminent, it would be comforting to know there is a young player or two ready to take on their mantle. But while there are some good young batsmen around, the next dominant one hasn't yet surfaced.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is now a cricket commentator and columnist

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • ZA77 on June 8, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    If Tendulkar continue, he would become first one with 200 test matches with more than 300 innings. In one day, 500 one days with more than 100 centuries at international level. I think he should decide by himself, either he want to play or not. If yes, then no one should argue for his retirement. Suppose if he is not performing very well then opponent have advantage, not his team. If he is performing very well so there is no question for his retirement. Now we can say that he is history best among all. Like his 11 centuries against Australia, also his batting average more than 60 against Australia. Batting average 60 in Asia. Atleast batting average 40 in all countries in test with against all opponent more than 40. 110 times 50 or plus, 20 times 150 or plus, both are world record belongs to him. Highest no. of centuries with runs score more than 7000 with the help of centuries, another two records belongs to him. Except 400 runs, he has all other records.

  • on June 8, 2011, 10:53 GMT

    Pointing should be guiding next gen batsman in aus and once u see a star emerging ,he should retire, till then he should continue

  • TheOnlyEmperor on June 8, 2011, 6:35 GMT

    No other nation's ex-sportsmen want Sachin to retire more than the Aussies. Sachin and his performances in all formats of the game ( including T20 in the IPL) have astounded many a jealous critic on the way he seems to adapt himself to various formats and challenges there-in with the passage of time. The Aussies were once firmly convinced that the "max centuries in Test cricket" record will come to Australia through Ponting. That's a dream now. Sachin is pulling away even in the career aggregate department. The Aussies would truly be heart broken if Dravid were to go past Ponting in the aggregates just as Kallis did on the centuries chase! The Aussies have no great performers let alone a bunch that would bring them back to greatness and are afraid of falling apart from the "great cricketing nation" pedestal just as the Windies did in the late 80s!

  • ranes on June 7, 2011, 19:56 GMT

    I am really surprised how some people misunderstand the term dominant in this context. Being dominant doesnt mean you have to thrash every bowler. Its about being at the top of the game for a long time and both of them have achieved yet and the stats speaks for themselves. Respect to both these fine batsmen and may they retire on a good note..

  • on June 7, 2011, 19:56 GMT

    Another useless column from Ian Chappell. Sir, first of all, Tendulkar is going great presently, and he is not a burden on the team. No one wants him to get retire. Secondly, we all know what kind of form Ponting is going along. Considering his age, it is difficult for him to return n i am quite sure that CA must be looking for the right person who could replace him anytime.

  • InnocentGuy on June 7, 2011, 13:33 GMT

    @Alexk400, don't worry dude India is still the best test team and world champions in ODI. Plus BCCI is the unofficial governing body of cricket coz you know, they got the money, they got the power. And they control the puppets. So maybe a bone or two can be thrown if there's any one from other cricketing nations that need a chance. And then you can rate them based on how many games they win.

  • bigwonder on June 7, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    @Jim1207, everyone in the world has the right to talk about sports celebrity, Ian does not hold the rein on this. I think we should leave the retirement to individuals as there are many other factors than when Ian listed that can affect their decision such as family commitments, other business ventures. Lets leave them alone.

  • Hassan.Farooqi on June 7, 2011, 12:07 GMT

    There is no need for Tendulker to retire. He is physically fit, he is mentally stable, he is in form, he ducks politics, and he ducks controversies. He comes in quitely, makes his century without any stress, throws his wicket when he is tired, and walks out. Life is under cruise control for him. He has another good five years to go.

  • Sukumar_Kantri on June 7, 2011, 11:50 GMT

    What Ian had mentioned is absolutely true. These both guys - Saching & Punters should announce thier retirement when they feel they cant contribute to the team!!! Those who are claiming Sachin is not playing for Personal Records or Money.. First answer why he had played the full IPL seasons all the 4 years and opted for rest for the next series played by India? If he is really playing for Team India rather than his personal things, he should have took rest in few IPL games in every season and should have made himself available for the next International game India plays, but it dint happen. In the last 3 years Sachin opted for rest many times citing too much of cricketing schedule!!! If he comes out of IPL, he will have 50 days rest and can play for the whole year for Team India. But money matters for him rite???

  • swarzi on June 7, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    Good article Ian; however, I think that you're being unfair to one or two of the younger players around. For example, Johnathan Trott, who through no fault of his own was given a chance to start his career at relatively late stage, has performed at this 'early' stage much better that either Tendulkar or Pontin. Also in the real meaning of the term 'dominating batsman' I don't think either of them belongs to this group. This is the group that belongs to players such as Viv Richards, Brian Lara, Adam Gilchrist, Doug Walters, Gary Sobers. These are players who had the confidence that they were not taking chances whenever they meant to destroy 'any' bowler - they did it successfully with incredible consistency, in style, with arrogance and purpose. Tendulkar more than Pontin takes no chance. Whenever he gets out, it's to the credit of the bowler. Johnathan Trott plays similarly; he has every shot that thay all have. But he does not have over 2 billion fans backing him.

  • ZA77 on June 8, 2011, 11:06 GMT

    If Tendulkar continue, he would become first one with 200 test matches with more than 300 innings. In one day, 500 one days with more than 100 centuries at international level. I think he should decide by himself, either he want to play or not. If yes, then no one should argue for his retirement. Suppose if he is not performing very well then opponent have advantage, not his team. If he is performing very well so there is no question for his retirement. Now we can say that he is history best among all. Like his 11 centuries against Australia, also his batting average more than 60 against Australia. Batting average 60 in Asia. Atleast batting average 40 in all countries in test with against all opponent more than 40. 110 times 50 or plus, 20 times 150 or plus, both are world record belongs to him. Highest no. of centuries with runs score more than 7000 with the help of centuries, another two records belongs to him. Except 400 runs, he has all other records.

  • on June 8, 2011, 10:53 GMT

    Pointing should be guiding next gen batsman in aus and once u see a star emerging ,he should retire, till then he should continue

  • TheOnlyEmperor on June 8, 2011, 6:35 GMT

    No other nation's ex-sportsmen want Sachin to retire more than the Aussies. Sachin and his performances in all formats of the game ( including T20 in the IPL) have astounded many a jealous critic on the way he seems to adapt himself to various formats and challenges there-in with the passage of time. The Aussies were once firmly convinced that the "max centuries in Test cricket" record will come to Australia through Ponting. That's a dream now. Sachin is pulling away even in the career aggregate department. The Aussies would truly be heart broken if Dravid were to go past Ponting in the aggregates just as Kallis did on the centuries chase! The Aussies have no great performers let alone a bunch that would bring them back to greatness and are afraid of falling apart from the "great cricketing nation" pedestal just as the Windies did in the late 80s!

  • ranes on June 7, 2011, 19:56 GMT

    I am really surprised how some people misunderstand the term dominant in this context. Being dominant doesnt mean you have to thrash every bowler. Its about being at the top of the game for a long time and both of them have achieved yet and the stats speaks for themselves. Respect to both these fine batsmen and may they retire on a good note..

  • on June 7, 2011, 19:56 GMT

    Another useless column from Ian Chappell. Sir, first of all, Tendulkar is going great presently, and he is not a burden on the team. No one wants him to get retire. Secondly, we all know what kind of form Ponting is going along. Considering his age, it is difficult for him to return n i am quite sure that CA must be looking for the right person who could replace him anytime.

  • InnocentGuy on June 7, 2011, 13:33 GMT

    @Alexk400, don't worry dude India is still the best test team and world champions in ODI. Plus BCCI is the unofficial governing body of cricket coz you know, they got the money, they got the power. And they control the puppets. So maybe a bone or two can be thrown if there's any one from other cricketing nations that need a chance. And then you can rate them based on how many games they win.

  • bigwonder on June 7, 2011, 13:29 GMT

    @Jim1207, everyone in the world has the right to talk about sports celebrity, Ian does not hold the rein on this. I think we should leave the retirement to individuals as there are many other factors than when Ian listed that can affect their decision such as family commitments, other business ventures. Lets leave them alone.

  • Hassan.Farooqi on June 7, 2011, 12:07 GMT

    There is no need for Tendulker to retire. He is physically fit, he is mentally stable, he is in form, he ducks politics, and he ducks controversies. He comes in quitely, makes his century without any stress, throws his wicket when he is tired, and walks out. Life is under cruise control for him. He has another good five years to go.

  • Sukumar_Kantri on June 7, 2011, 11:50 GMT

    What Ian had mentioned is absolutely true. These both guys - Saching & Punters should announce thier retirement when they feel they cant contribute to the team!!! Those who are claiming Sachin is not playing for Personal Records or Money.. First answer why he had played the full IPL seasons all the 4 years and opted for rest for the next series played by India? If he is really playing for Team India rather than his personal things, he should have took rest in few IPL games in every season and should have made himself available for the next International game India plays, but it dint happen. In the last 3 years Sachin opted for rest many times citing too much of cricketing schedule!!! If he comes out of IPL, he will have 50 days rest and can play for the whole year for Team India. But money matters for him rite???

  • swarzi on June 7, 2011, 11:41 GMT

    Good article Ian; however, I think that you're being unfair to one or two of the younger players around. For example, Johnathan Trott, who through no fault of his own was given a chance to start his career at relatively late stage, has performed at this 'early' stage much better that either Tendulkar or Pontin. Also in the real meaning of the term 'dominating batsman' I don't think either of them belongs to this group. This is the group that belongs to players such as Viv Richards, Brian Lara, Adam Gilchrist, Doug Walters, Gary Sobers. These are players who had the confidence that they were not taking chances whenever they meant to destroy 'any' bowler - they did it successfully with incredible consistency, in style, with arrogance and purpose. Tendulkar more than Pontin takes no chance. Whenever he gets out, it's to the credit of the bowler. Johnathan Trott plays similarly; he has every shot that thay all have. But he does not have over 2 billion fans backing him.

  • AjayVijayan on June 7, 2011, 10:00 GMT

    @ Alex. Don't shout your sarcasm. Statistics showcases your craft, talent, patience and performance. Why English are now behind A Cook and J Trott or G Swann, its because the numbers they scored or took. If Murali had only 300 Wickets in Test, would he be considered as the Legend. 800 Test wickets show his ability of taking wickets as a bowler, Similarly 14000+Runs in Test and 18000+ Runs in ODIs presents the genius of Sachin as a batsman. Cricket is a team game, and you should need wicket taking bowlers along with the batsmen to win matches, rather than Sachin Tendulkar winning all the matches.

  • popcorn on June 7, 2011, 9:20 GMT

    Ricky Ponting's mind is in the right place. His century against India in the quarter final in the World Cup demonstrated just that. He is the best no.3 batsman in Australia, and the world. Usman Khawaja is the next in line to replace him at No.3,but I don't see that happening any time soon. Maybe Michael Clarke decides to take that position,and Khawaja at 4.Still, when Ponting is still near his very best, and a amongst the Top 5 fielders EVER, there is no need for him to retire.

  • SachBro on June 7, 2011, 9:16 GMT

    @Alexk400 Your comments go on to show your imbecile cricketing brain. For Gods sake, do not compare Dhoni or Sehwag with Sachin. Compare Lara, Ponting, that would still be fair. Dhoni, please, when did he play a match winning knock in a test game against a good team in alien condition? Yeah, think and think hard, if he wasnt cap of the team, he would been dropped by now purely on his batting record. As for Sehwag, he is a flat track bully, check out his record in sub continent and outside it, and you will get the picture. Sachin and Dravid are the only two players whose records in every country deserve some attention. Before the wc final, do you remember when did Dhoni play a match winning ODI knock, think hard and then answer, Sehwag battered helpless BanglaDesh for his 175, if you take out the performance, check out his record in wc and you will get the picture, his record in SA Test series was pathetic at best, dont even get me started on Dhoni in it. Sach and Lax rocked there.

  • RISHI2016 on June 7, 2011, 8:59 GMT

    Another one who will be missed in this recent time is Our WALL... I find it quite annoying to compare Sachin and Ponting.. Ponting at best can be compared with Dravid .. he will still fall behind Dravid's charisma and intent.. Agression has lots of form and no one knew agression better than Dravid when he psyches bowlers out...

  • AlexAlderic on June 7, 2011, 8:12 GMT

    @Alexk400, I think your Jelous about Indian Team. We are not depent Only Sachin, VVS & Dravid, In India, We have lot of youngsters. You Don't worry about Us. We will continue & Contribute Our Play.

  • Aussasinator on June 7, 2011, 5:19 GMT

    Ian Chappel has the ability to raise issues which are mostly at the base of our minds but not fully expressed. He provides the trigger and most of the time he's engaging. He was absolutely right in many cases too. Over here, it is observed that readers are yet again dragging his statement of a phenomenon into a Sachin -Ponting superiority issue. That's not what he was trying to say.

  • on June 7, 2011, 3:38 GMT

    Alex. it is funny if you tell sachin is playing only for his personal records!!! I noticed so many times he got out to accelerate run rate for the team!!! Yes, he couldn't handle pressure like dhoni or he could not bat like sachin at that time, but you can't compare any player with how tension free sachin plays!!!!

  • Jim1207 on June 7, 2011, 3:11 GMT

    soundbala, Ian Chappell was better cricketer and better captain than Ponting. As an elderly ex-cricketer, he has all the right in the world to talk about any present cricketer's retirement, it's us who do not have much right to talk about them actually.

  • on June 7, 2011, 1:40 GMT

    @Alexk400...Furthermore, we, in India, don't rate performance by stats and not wins. That is outrageously bigotry remark and borderline racist.

  • on June 7, 2011, 1:36 GMT

    @Alexk400, if Sachin, Laxman, and Dravid retire, India will not win many tests. You forget that you need class, temperament, and sheer ability along with the destruction and power of Sehwag and Dhoni. You should first look up how many test matches Sachin, VVS, and Dravid have won for India. Cricket is a team game, and because of their collective contributions, India have been successful. As for your comments about Sachin, they speak volumes about your knowledge of the game.

  • soundbala on June 6, 2011, 23:44 GMT

    Is this guy serious ? Who is he to comment on other's retirement ??? Every player decides for himself when to quit, be in Sachin or Ponting.Iam, please dont write a column just for the sake of writing one. There are much better jobs available !!!!

  • InnocentGuy on June 6, 2011, 20:58 GMT

    Tendulkar needn't retire. He is NOT obliged to make way for youngsters. He is performing well and that's all that matters. He knows that he will stop playing the day he thinks that his performances aren't helping the team's cause. And if he thinks he is not performing well enough, I'm pretty sure it'll be way before the rest of the world thinks that way. So no need to worry on that front.

    As for Punter, same goes for him. He is down on self-belief. He very clearly still has it in him to go some more. As long as he performs well, there's no need to talk about retiring.

    Also, we never know when the next great will come from. Once again, as I have commented many times on Cricinfo, don't rubbish any player. No one has any idea who the next big thing in cricket will be.

  • Alexk400 on June 6, 2011, 20:33 GMT

    Best way to make sachin , dravid , VVS retire is dhoni gets injured for more than a year. Because once he is gone , indian team can not win games against SA or any top rated team. India can draw. They always have that ability draw the game with defensive play. With sehwag and dhoni , sehwag starts offensive , dhoni manges every oppurtunity that come his way to victory. very rarely he mess up winning chances like dravid , ganguly did many times before.

    Sachin will bat until he gets injured. He is always playing for personal records...if india need runs he will choke...it has been proven many many times over. Some culture rate people by their wins. In India it is useless stats.

  • shahzaibq on June 6, 2011, 20:08 GMT

    I won't get into any arguments over who should retire when, and whether Sachin has the Gods on his side, or is actually one of them... Here's my picks for the next potential greats: Good players to keep an eye on: U. Akmal Darren Bravo A. Mathews Kohli

    Great players of the future: Trott/Cook Amla/de Villiers

  • gunnerz on June 6, 2011, 18:02 GMT

    Ian is a hypocrite. Poor fellow... still waiting for Sachin's retirement whereas Sachin is scoring tons and double-tons now. Ian's comments really make me laugh. He criticized Sachin, he scores 200. He criticized Afridi, he picked up 21 wickets in WC. He praised Ponting, he was stripped off of captaincy. Who's next now Sir Ian? LOL

  • bigdhonifan on June 6, 2011, 17:33 GMT

    @Aina Maria Waseem ... Sachin Scored his 200 by running on his feets. Saeed Anwar used runner for most part of the innings. Sachin Scored against the stongest bowling line up, while anwar scored agains the weakest! Anwar didnt have the patience to hold the crease and score 200, he just scooped it to Saurav... Sachin played sensibly!! Do you need more prrof to establish Sachins 200 is better than Saeed Anwars??? Dont compare " One and only one" (Sachin) to "One in many" (Saeed Anwar).. May you wil next going to tell that Coventry is a better batman than Sachin...Lol

  • Aussasinator on June 6, 2011, 16:18 GMT

    Why doesnt Ian Chappell add the 'utility to the team' factor as an important variable in determining retirement, in keeping with the lofty Aussie tradition of the past. That way Ponting should have retired about a year ago when he began to be an obvious burden on his team and pushed Australia to new lows on all fronts.

  • Dhoni_fan_from_a_dada_era on June 6, 2011, 12:41 GMT

    has a punter vs SRT vs Bradman vs India vs Australia debate started on this forum? No??? surely you are joking mr feynman.

  • jay57870 on June 6, 2011, 12:20 GMT

    What do Harold Camping and Ian Chappell have in common? Both are False Prophets: They blew it big time with their horrendous predictions -- Camping with his end-of-the-world pronouncements in 1984 & 2011; and Ian with his end-of-Sachin dictum in 2007. And here they go again: Camping mathematically readjusts his Doomsday date from May 21 (after it failed to happen) to Oct 21; while Ian tweaks his "mirror" logic to reflect Sachin's "imminent" retirement by throwing in his poster-boy Ricky Ponting under the bus as well! Two for the price of one!! OMG, these holy priests never seem to learn from their follies. Chappell has this uncanny knack to rationalize (meaning wish) a foolish certainty in his beliefs, no matter how convincing the evidence to the contrary: Feelings & Wishes over Facts. Ian, you're dead wrong! Thank God, Sachin completely ignores this man and lets his bat (and facts) do the talking. For God's sake, let Sachin decide when he wants to retire!

  • Biggus on June 6, 2011, 10:29 GMT

    @Aina Maria Waseem-Excellent comments, in fact some of the best I've read here recently. I'm also completely sick of one-eyed fan(atic)s.

  • TontonZolaMoukoko on June 6, 2011, 10:14 GMT

    A decent article. I tried to refrain from looking at the comments as I knew there would be the usual "stop comparing Tendulkar to Ponting" idiocy that normally takes place.

    Does Chappell say either should retire? No. Does Chappell compare the two? No.

    He's just noting the parameters that may be factors to decide when these two great batsmen retire. Open your eyes people.

  • on June 6, 2011, 9:37 GMT

    @Midhun Menon P: If Ian Chappel was a bad columnist, he wouldn't be attracting comments to his articles like bees to honey. @Jay Kamdar: You mean Sachin surpasses Bradman is everything EXCEPT career average. @200 admirers: Actually Saeed Anwar's 194 is comparable to Sachin's double. Saeed's mistake was not making the last 6. The attitude of fans shows that contribution to the team is far less important to psychological landmarks. The last 6 runs that Saeed failed to make carry so much more weight than the 194.

  • on June 6, 2011, 9:34 GMT

    Regardless of what Ian Chappel said previously, in this article he is merely wondering when and why Ponting and Tendulkar will retire. He is NOT comparing them and he is NOT telling them to retire. People should once and for all end this petty habit of trying to aggrandize one legend while belittling another. This is downright insulting to these great players. Favourable comparison with contemporaries would be as embarrassing as favourable comparison with past greats would be gratifying to any player. Cricinfo comments are full of such nonsense.

  • hamwil80 on June 6, 2011, 8:59 GMT

    @Pacerone: "I was at a test match and people were sleeping when Kallis was batting.never seen that with Kapil,Sobers or Imran. Cricinfo knows that Kallis has not played interesting innings like these players. Boring stuff on dead wickets". Dead wickets in South Africa!! You must be joking. Remind me how the exciting Sewhag fairs on dead South African wickets? And there was nothing boring about Kallis' fighting hundred in the last test against India this summer. Maybe you just don't appreciate good test cricket.

  • Mike_C on June 6, 2011, 8:44 GMT

    Both Ponting and Tendulkar have been great players, but looking at the ICC Test rankings, Tendulkar is joint No 1 (with Kallis) whereas Ponting has plunged down and is only 31st, suggesting that of the 2, Ricky is the one who ought to consider his future. Indeed, if it wasn't for the lack of young batsmen pushing him for his place, he would be gone already, as Australia are normally very ruthless.

  • AjayVijayan on June 6, 2011, 7:07 GMT

    Lots of article criticizing Sachin...Lol..One even says Sachin to retire for creating opportunity for another..hehe so funny n kidding. Sachin is in his finest form for the past 2,3 years, he has been scoring heavily in Tests and ODIs. These runs he scores are important which was vividly displayed in the WC2011 matches. Had he retired long before, we may never would have witnessed 200* in ODIs, now on the verge of 100 International Centuries. No other batsmen of all era had came so close to such records. Well we don't need to speak of sachin or give replies to Sachin Haters, because the record itself speaks of his greatness. And one would never forget these runs were scored by carrying the burden hope and aspiration of a billion people, which no cricketer in the history would have experienced. As one said, when a batmen goes to the middle of crease he is alone, But Not with Sachin, along with his is One Billion People, their hope and aspiration. Stats along wth Emotion makes him great

  • on June 6, 2011, 6:11 GMT

    Australians do not go by the name or records I mean performances. Current form is important They also know who should Captain? Please do not compare players no one is greater than the game but about money it is hard to tell.

  • Jim1207 on June 6, 2011, 5:15 GMT

    Meety, Yeah so it be. He deserves that.

  • prakash_mishra on June 6, 2011, 4:19 GMT

    the debate about who is better is ridiculous to me..Tendulkar has reached his heights..highest run getter in two formats and only reason someone else leads in T20 is because he doesn't play T20...you can see the glimpses when he plays for Mumbai Indians..he was still the second highest run getter despite Gayle's madness this year..no need to remind he was highest in last year's IPL.Ponting on the other hand led Australian team for so many years and it was during his time when Australian team saw greatest heights as well as lows. he was bit unfortunate to have lost company of gilly,hayden, martin,langer,warne n' mcgrath.he has led australian team by setting standard by himself at so many times.Both of them were champions of our era. It was sheer delight to seem them dominating bowlers for so many years and it wud be unfair to the game making comparison between these two giants.well when one questions their retirement, I believe both of them know when it is the right time to announce.

  • vedichitesh on June 6, 2011, 3:22 GMT

    Well its up to the GREATS to decide when to hang their boots.... My belief is Sachin should stop ODIs as there is nothing more to be achieved for him.... He should play IPL and Tests...... IPL will give money which every sportsman deserves and Tests will allow him to serve cricket which he enjoys the most.... It will also help him extend the Test career for couple of years..... Ponting too should do the same.....Will love to see these legends for some more time...... do not know when will it be enough anyway

  • on June 6, 2011, 3:21 GMT

    Bradman is clearly the best test match batsman of all time, But as he didnt play ODI's, a best ODI batsman can be chosen, i would pick from Viv Richards, Sachin Tendulkar, Michael Bevan and Michael Hussey as my top 4, its hard to pick a top one because they all play different roles. Sachin has a bit lower Average then the other 3, but has played most games, scored most runs, played at top of order, scored the most tonnes by far and has the biggest score ever in an ODI.

  • Meety on June 6, 2011, 2:22 GMT

    @ Jim1207 - by your arguements (Kallis v Punter), Kallis is clearly a greater cricketer then SRT. Batting averages comparable + 270 wickets = Better!!!!!

  • on June 6, 2011, 0:50 GMT

    I think Shaun marsh could be a truly top class test batsman as he has the technique, the shots and the temperament. Australia need to call it a day with Phil Hughes and focus more on marsh. Watson needs to be put in at no.5. If ponting stays in the Tom he is in this year I can't see him making the 2013 ashes.

  • on June 6, 2011, 0:24 GMT

    THIS TWO PLAYERS ARE REALY FANTASTIC PLAYERS,AND I DON'T THINK THAT ANYONE SHOULD DETERMIN WHEN SOMEONE SHOULD LIVE THE GAME.I BELIEVE THAT WHEN EVER THEY THINK IT'S TIME TO LIVE THEY WILL.

    THE GRATEST BATSMAN THAT THE WORLD HAVE EVER SEEN"SIR BRIAN CHARLES LARA",WERE FORCED TO RETIRE FROM THE GAME,AND WE DON'T WANT TO SEE THAT TREND CONTINUE WITH OTHER GREATS.FROM MY END I THINK THAT LARA COULD OF PLAY UNTIL HE HAD REACH 41 OR 42.

  • smudgeon on June 6, 2011, 0:04 GMT

    I wouldn't be too worried about what happens to India when Sachin retires - there's plenty of depth in Indian batting. I'd be more interested to see what happens when Zaheer goes, whenever that happens. Good quick bowling in India has always been rather thin on the ground (aside from Srinath & Dev), and the only current decent quick I see is Ishant, who I think is much better suited to conditions outside of the sub continent. Whether he manages to live up to his early promise is another matter. As for the current Best Batsman In The World™, we all know it's really Ashish Bagai (no contest), so why all this Ponting-Tendulkar-Kallis nonsense?

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 22:20 GMT

    We need to admire Ponting for his decision to stay on with the team during crisis without retiring and trying to build a winning team combination even though his own form has been deserting him. But the problem is he must not become a walking wicket frequently and hinder some other young batsman from coming into the squad, thereby defeating all his good intentions. The way he played world cup quarterfinal was superb, he is a big match player and he needs to consider every match like that in future till he retires, particularly Ashes.

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 22:09 GMT

    Stark62, Sachin last year went to South Africa with no practice, no ODI matches played except a full season of IPL 2010. You might want to go and check Tendulkar's stat IN south africa 2010 series against Steyn, Morkel, etc., If you hate IPL, let it be. Do not put all the blame on IPL, If India is going to suffer defeat to England, it would only mean that England played well not India did not play well because of IPL. To be honest, that's not a wise conclusion.

  • knowledge_eater on June 5, 2011, 21:32 GMT

    Re: there is no 'great' batsman yet. How do we know that? Let them play >15 years you will see another decent player in no time, or even 10 years. I was born in the SRT RD Kumble VVS Saurav era and watched how Viru, Gauti, Zak have grown and has evolved their game. So, I will never get tired of seeing them play. So, let's just mute the 'R' word for few years, let them do whenever they want to. I am not fed up. Never will be. India is not suffering much with presence of seniors around, believe it or not, I was so worried when Kumble retired and thought we won't be able to take 20 wickets now, but we haven't done so bad after that, even with erratic Bhaji. I am not sure about this .. but it's funny to see how Australian supporters are giving up that easy with their team, may be, lot to do with their selectors. I mean cheer up, what happened to that 'great' shield academy, that has produced great players. Fix that first. I see India and SA as a dominant force in next 10 years.

  • knowledge_eater on June 5, 2011, 21:11 GMT

    Eyes and Legs do matter, actually, Re: Mind, well, that can be taken care of with proper homework and support/environment of the Team, Dressing room and Board's proper support. It should be said now, that Sachin is still playing not to prove anything anymore, but he wants to play, he still wants to be there. I mean he is no where near his 'that' best, but still ended up scoring 2nd highest runs in WC and IPL11, (with highest in IPL10). He is doing his job more than expected from him. Him taking occasional breaks from ODI has ensured and created well enough window for Kohli, Raina and earlier Gauti. I mean Re: argument on giving chance to youngsters, tell me how Gauti has replaced Saurav (esp. in ODI) so well without anyone really missing him. People think, India may lose their dominance as soon as RD/SRT/VVS are gone. Beware, India has already prepared youngsters, I am just worried about other teams. Ponting can't perform at best, when his team is not dominant force, SRT has. BCL has.

  • on June 5, 2011, 20:47 GMT

    @Stark62...Sachin's being going to England since he was a boy. Don't think the master will have a problem. Btw, he wasn't rested. He chose to rest. :) Also, the Indians will have practice games versus county sides and the England Lions, so they should be ok.

  • DaGameChanger on June 5, 2011, 20:02 GMT

    I believe just like boxing when you consider best batsman there are different categories. For me Lara was unbelievable but yet inconsistent. When he score he scored massive and quick. I would put him more with Sehwag. While Sachin and Ponting even Kallis are different category. They are marked for their consistency. They went in and out in all formats scoring heavily and very consistently. Then there is third category where players rise when you pressure is high. Players like Hayden, Geoff Boycott, Dravid, Gambhir, VVS.

  • on June 5, 2011, 19:58 GMT

    @ brulox: dude i'm a big SRT fan and i agree Bradman is the greatest batsman. but Don would not have averaged 100 even in the era of flat pitches. in the age of reverse swings, doosras, technology where u can identify a batsman's weakness, sledging, variety of bowlers (not just england), different formats of the game, too much highest level cricekt, good bowlers (when Don played there were only few good bowlers) and most importantly PRESSURE from expectations. remember how much Don averaged in the bodyline series (something similar can happen). AND he never played on pitches like india and sri lanka with good bowlers.

  • Stark62 on June 5, 2011, 19:45 GMT

    I can see Tendulkar having a poor run this summer against England!

    Why? Because he has only played ipl and hasn't been included in the ODI or even the Test squad. I can understand resting him for the ODI's but Test squad is well, really?

    I don't care how good of a batsmen you are but you have to have some practice before a tough Test series in conditions where, the ball will swings wildly.

    I could be wrong but that's how I personally feel.

  • Adityak on June 5, 2011, 18:46 GMT

    give some time and Umar Akmal will be the next dominant batsman with records at his feet.

  • Winsome on June 5, 2011, 18:37 GMT

    If Punter wants to go to England on the next tour, he probably will regardless of form as the Aus selectors do not have any ability to call time on his career. They are invertebrates to a man.

  • Manas888 on June 5, 2011, 18:07 GMT

    Mr Chappel...if U know abot cricket then don't comment ....about sachin 's Ability He's something which you Australians Never ever Execpt he the Gre8st Batsman who ever hold the Bat...

  • waspsting on June 5, 2011, 18:07 GMT

    in an ideal world, a great player could choose when to go for himself. that's not how it goes in reality. Ponting is worth his place in the side as a player - that's all that SHOULD count - but people will snipe him for the teams failures and his own poor form. Is there anyone better to replace him? if not, then whether he's not as good as he USED to be shouldn't matter. Tendulkar is different, so revered that he can actually choose when to retire for himself. I think he'll see to it that his records are safe from Kallis and Ponting before retiring. as for Chappell... he always had a bee in his bonnet about going before being forced out, as some fine Aussie cricketers were, notably Bill Lawry. hence his preoccupation with this topic. As for Greg Chappell, i strongly suspect his retiring when he did because he wanted to give the upcoming tour of the West Indies a miss. can't blame him for that, but Ian's version makes it sound much more 'noble' than it probably was.

  • brulox on June 5, 2011, 17:53 GMT

    Jay Kamdar - a typically obsessive SRT supporter. Seriously better than Bradman? Obviously you were joking. If not you are sorely mistaken - have a look at their records. Next, do you really think Ponting will surpass SRT? You must be massively insecure about your SRT obsession, because it wont happen. Ponting is a long way short of SRT these days so I don't think Ian Chappell has any reason to want Ponting to overtake SRT's records. Both should remain until they can add something to their test teams and until they think enough is enough. Ponting, sadly, is probably very close...

  • melvn on June 5, 2011, 17:42 GMT

    If ponting wants to extend his career a little more,it would deterorate his records further. Ponting had a magical run during the 2003-2007 period. If he retired on 2007 we would have loved to compare him with tendulkar. His batting average has dipped a lot since then , if he continues to play for another 2 years ,it would even go below 50. Ponting must realise that it wont be the same as once ,with players like Mcgrath,warne,Lee, Hayden, Gilly around you and virtually no pressure. Comparing Sachin with Lara is always welcome. Sachin with ponting doesnt make sense anymore.

  • PACERONE on June 5, 2011, 17:37 GMT

    I am going to stop reading most of the comments put on here.Some of you are so bias that it makes me sick.I am going to the W.I and my reason is to see VVS Laxman bat live.He is the batsman who has won games and saved games for India in difficult situations. Not Tendulkar or Kallis.I was at a test match and people were sleeping when Kallis was batting.never seen that with Kapil,Sobers or Imran. Cricinfo knows that Kallis has not played interesting innings like these players. Boring stuff on dead wickets.

  • on June 5, 2011, 17:34 GMT

    Ian remains obsessed with sachin retiring so that Ricky can surpass Sachins records in tests , ha .. Aint gonna happen mate no matter how loud u scream or shout . Sachin surpasses brad man in everything and remains the best all time. He is not gonna retire until all the other guys around him I.e Ricky pointing retire. All the great records will stay under Sachins name !!!! Mark my words .........J

  • on June 5, 2011, 17:33 GMT

    this is ian's favorite topic !! when ever he gets nothing interesting to write abt he will always end up here !

  • on June 5, 2011, 17:12 GMT

    @ Ahmed Imran is the best all rounder. The first 20 odd tests he played messed up his stats. Take them away he averages less than 20 with ball more than 50 with the bat. But yes Kallis has now scored more centuries in less teststhan pointing. Pointing slightly ahead in total runs due to more 200 plus scores. But all and all both very equal with the bat. With Kallis being a lot better over the last two.

  • on June 5, 2011, 17:00 GMT

    Dear Mr Chappell, my dad told me how great u were as a cricketer. I admire you for that. But as a columnist and a commentator you are a big big zero. Both Sachin and Punter knows when to hang their boots. What means do u say captaincy was the only motivation for ponting for the next ashes? I still remember the article you wrote on sachin during 2006 where you famously prophesized that his career is near to end. I am sure Sachin has lot more to offer, not sure about Ponting though.

  • srprev on June 5, 2011, 17:00 GMT

    Mr.Nayeemuddin Mohammad u must be joking by Elevating Umar to be Greatest Batsman after Lara... Even Umar AKmal won't have had such a dream like u had now..Just pray to God that Umar doesn't get retired before Ponting and Sachin get retired mate....

    Anything Possible now in PCB and Pakistan cricket..

  • ps34bay on June 5, 2011, 16:59 GMT

    Not sure why we need to focus on players' retirement. I fail miserably understanding "retirement" being made a subject of discussion so often. We will know when they retire, and when there are players around good enough to fill-in their shoes. Retired cricketers should spare these talented folks the thought each time they go out but don't perform the best.

    Knowing Sachin's love and passion for the game, not sure if he would have something like a "cricketing bucket list". Rahul or VVS retiring should have no influence on Sachin; there's much more to Sachin playing the game than the attraction created by cricketers around him. Ponting is one of the best Australian batsmen and also one of the most successful captain, he hasn't had the best year so far but he is too good to be considered for dismissal so soon.

  • Ayo4Yayo on June 5, 2011, 16:34 GMT

    @Moneypenny, what do you mean Tendulkar never played under pressure? He was the only depended person in Indian team and still is one of them. You are right about there's no comparison between Tendulkar and ponting, because what Tendulkar has achieved ponting will never catch up to that. Hats off to Tendulkar and salute him. On the otherside Ponting was never put under pressure because he had players like Gilly, Hayden, McGrath. After those great players retired, ponting's real character showed that he is uncapable of winning matches without those players. Any other australian player could have became team captain and achieved same results during that era. To conclude, ponting was never a great player nor a great captain. MS Dhoni will and ever be the best captain that cricket had seen or will see. Period.

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 16:34 GMT

    Moneypenny, You may not know the actual facts. Tendulkar captained from '96 to 2000 for 25 tests with test average of 51, which is good if not exceptional captaining a side like India in '90s. Ponting otherwise had a very easy captaincy stint of managing legends. Ponting would choose stupid decisions like always batting first no matter what the conditions are but still his legends and himself would win the games easily and prove critics wrong so Ponting's captaincy is not an exceptional record at all. Tendulkar also walked 20 miles uphill while carrying burden of 10 other people. Ponting actually did not have to carry any burden at all while having a team full of match winners. Sachin's captaincy skill was not good so he gave up not because his batting would get affected - spoils that myth that Sachin was not good in batting while captaining. It gave birth to Ganguly and Dhoni's captaincy and the rest is History. Ponting's test average in last 4 years is around 40s, Sachin far better.

  • on June 5, 2011, 16:24 GMT

    its an interesting article , honestly speaking I don't either see Sachin or Ponting playing after 2013 ir-respective of their forms. The only reason I see Kallis is usually omitted from the comparisons could be -- he was never a destructive player who could just take the game away from a team in jiffy like the Sachins or Pontings. Kallis was more of a constructive player who built a solid platform. His bowling makes him an excellent all-rounder no doubt about that.

  • on June 5, 2011, 16:09 GMT

    Well, All we can say that retirement of a person in his respected field of life is depend on either full satisfaction or depression of work. Cricket is game of gentleman. And gentlemen players should retire after their fully satisfaction from game. Ponting have either depressed or satisfied, he knows himself. But, surely Sachin Tendulkar is one who will never retire without his all instincts feels that he is 100% satisfied in this Cricket game.

  • SnowSnake on June 5, 2011, 16:06 GMT

    Cricket was not as lucrative a business as it is now, so Batmen will play as long as they can. A lot depends on how much reflexes play a role in an individual's batting. Ponting has reached his retirement age. Sachin can go on until he is 42 because his batting is mostly technique. With helmets and fast bowlers' retirements, I think even Viv. Richards should consider coming back into WI test side.

  • on June 5, 2011, 16:05 GMT

    @ Moneypenny: You're right. Sachin didn't walk 20 miles uphill carrying the burden of 10 other people. He ran up that hill carrying the burden of 10 million.

    He might not have have the pressures of captaincy, but for most part of his carrier he carried the pressure of being responsible for India's batting card. Not something Ponting has done until recently and even then he's failed miserably.

    Lara is the only modern batsman, andlater Chanderpaul for a while, that has had to carry the burden of his teams batting alone. So when you're judging batsman, let's not get these stupid factors in for arguments sake!

  • on June 5, 2011, 15:48 GMT

    Why doesnt anyone mentions Jacques Kallis ? Kallis probably has more workload than these 2 legends , On his day if not with the bat he can get the team home with his aggressive bowling..... Cricinfo mentions kapil dev and Imran khan in legends of cricket when Kallis is anyday better than these 2 , come on guys show some respect to cricket

  • vpk23 on June 5, 2011, 15:31 GMT

    Sachin scored his First ever 100 in England, So it would be ideal that his 100th too be embedded there..Tantalizing..Would'nt that be. Maybe a retirement after that will be on the cards...

  • on June 5, 2011, 15:23 GMT

    A few days ago Tendulkar in an interview said that he is enjoying his cricket and has not even thought of retirement.... Can Ian not find another topic to write on, except prophesizing SRT retirement...? I am sure he has deadlines to meet and certain number of articles to write per week etc. etc.... but please Cricinfo, we like to read some sensible stuff.. He should try and speak to those guys before writing such stupid comments like his mates having retired, he would contemplate retirement... SRT's mates were Vinod Kambli and Sanjay Manjrekar... both retired about 10-15 years ago... and by that standard, SRT should have retired 10 years ago... indeed it was Ian Chappell and Co. who professed that SRT should have retired after 2007 World Cup... and they had to eat their own words after the stunning performance from Sachin in all forms of the game he played in...

  • trackwhack on June 5, 2011, 15:21 GMT

    chappel, give up. stop putting ricky and tendulakr in the same bracket. they are not. I cant figure for the love of god why ponting is still playing. but it sure will be fun when ishant and bhajji make him look like a fool later this year

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 15:03 GMT

    Dr.Grass, Kallis is definitely a better cricketer than Ponting. With better test average than Ponting and with 270 test wickets, Kallis is way ahead than ponting even so as Kallis had to face Australian legendary bowlers. Kallis is better allrounder than Sachin but Kallis never had to face legendary South African bowlers. Sachin faced both australian and south african bowlers and has proved against everyone everywhere. I would say because of Kallis' bowling skills, he is equal to Sachin in their era, nothing less or nothing more. Chappel must give credit to Kallis, he is the most under-appreciated genius of the era.

  • Thunee_man_Naidoo on June 5, 2011, 15:03 GMT

    I think it's ironic that during Sachin's dip in form, Ponting was at his recent best. And now pontings not doing so good, Tendulkar's climbed back to the top.

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 14:50 GMT

    Tom Layton, you are absolutely correct in your facts. Many people do not want to admit that Ponting is not at his best. He has not been playing consistently since 2007. But many people were denying that till 2009 and then after starting to lose Ashes one after another now people are admitting the fact. Ponting has batting averages of 67 in 2005 and 89 in 2006. Since 2007, his year-wise batting averages in Test cricket is 38, 47, 39 and 37 which is a poor result for a great cricketer. The funny fact is that McGrath retired in Jan 2007 and Australia's dominance and consistency also vanished since then. This proves that Ponting played like a genius because he has a winning team and wonderful legends playing along with him. Once the others retired, Ponting could not be the same. Whereas Sachin played so well when India had weak team and bowling attack around him in '90s and has played exceptionally well when champions came around him as well, which differentiates him from Ponting.

  • mogan707 on June 5, 2011, 14:36 GMT

    As long as the player is fit enough and eager to contribute to the sport,we cannot expect a player to retire unless he is forced to do so.The second one is about the question of more dominant batsmen comparable to the likes of Vivian Richards, Sachin, Ponting, Kallis. Unless test cricket is played more we cannot find batsmen conquering pace and spin.Twenty20 has made an illusion in modern and young budding cricketers that playing for just 20 overs will earn their livelihood for a year.Literally speaking Twenty20 is slowly killing the more competitive,testing test cricket.And not mention the bowlers;that they are slogged everywhere in Twenty20 and makes them look mediocre. One last thing to say from Indian perspective: Batsmen in this era are like actors in films(Hindi,Telugu,Tamil,Malayalam) who long last for decades, but the bowlers are like actresses in the similar films who long last for only two to three years maximum of about a decade.

  • ashlatchem on June 5, 2011, 14:16 GMT

    Interesting article. I don't know if it's just me but I think India is going to deal with the loss of the big 3 (VVS, Dravid & SRT) better than Oz will do with losing Ponting. India have a whole bunch of young batsmen coming through and I can see Yuvraj (who seems to have matured to me) and Badri coming into the fold again soon and with their experience and that of the other seniors should make it easier for the likes of Kohli, Vijay, Pujara etc. Who can all be world beaters. Oz on the other hand have good youngsters (Ferguson, Marsh etc) but don't seem to really have a plan so Ponting will have a while to stick around and remind us all of what he is capable of. The only question is can he do it till 2013? SRT seems to be playing more freely than ever and will leave of his own accord. Not sure the same thing will happen for Ricky he may have given up the captaincy but the pressure is going to be constant till he retires his choice or otherwise..(I hope it's his!)

  • Moneypenny on June 5, 2011, 14:09 GMT

    I don't think it will be fair to put all these batsmen in the same category. Ponting and Lara achieved all of this while taking the pressure of captaincy whereas Tendulkar was free to concentrate on his personal batting. Though he is a good player but Tendulkar never had the pressure of Captaincy. It is not the same thing to walk 20 miles uphill while carrying burden of 10 other people than strolling on a flat surface without worrying about anyone else. While putting him with Bradman just remember Bradman had an average of nearly 100.Otherwise Tendulkar has done well though.

  • on June 5, 2011, 13:57 GMT

    If Umar Akmal is the best batsmen currently,I would say Chris martin is the all time best batsman...Tendi & Ponting are undoubtedly Great & no New fledgling looks interested in Test Cricket either...So,they can keep playing for as long as they want.Otherwise ppl will ask them to make a comeback just like they did in case of Shane Warne...

  • on June 5, 2011, 13:30 GMT

    India has plenty of batsman that can replace VVS, Dravid and Sachin, they have Badrinath, kohli, rohit sharma, makund, rahane, saurabh tiwary, pujara and manoj tiwary just to name a few. Ok, india just has too much batting talent lying around!!

  • jagatr on June 5, 2011, 13:25 GMT

    Why do people continue to buy into the Ponting myth? He has never fared well against quality bowling - he has consistently failed on the subcontinent - he couldnt even handle a mediocre bowler like Ishant Sharma on a lively wicket at Perth. Check his records against the new-look England attack - or the Stein-Morkel combination. He is at best an goodish batsman who was lucky he never had to face quality bowling for a large part of this career - and was doubly fortunate to play for a team that was so dominant. Imagine his record if he had to face up to Pigeon, Gilly and Warney!

  • banter123 on June 5, 2011, 13:04 GMT

    A wise cricketer always aims for a graceful exit and dreams of retiring when he as an individual and the team are on there peak. The master blaster since many years has played selectively for the country which for sure has improved his mental aspects of the game and still there are no signs of rust on this run machine. The Tassie tycoon post captaincy affair with batting would be interesting to watch.. These are the men who have to follow a brutal fitnees regime and work all day hard on there bodies,if we count IPL as a form of cricket we saw what the likes of Warne,Gilly could do.So lets not us decide when they should retire,like an young school boy who enjoys his last days of school we must enjoy there last moments of batting.

  • CricketChat on June 5, 2011, 13:03 GMT

    For high profile players like Sachin and Ponting, I guess it is hard to quit unless they find something do in their post playing career that matches their on field success, self-worth, importance. That's why I liked players like Gavaskar, Warne who planned their post plating career well ahead and smoothly transitioned into them.

  • on June 5, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    Sachin has been unsuccessful in his many sojourns to Lords so far, to score a century. It would appear that he would like to score his 100th international century at Lords or in England, then retire. That is my reading of what he has in mind, and why he did not tour the West indies.

  • HarishVS on June 5, 2011, 12:41 GMT

    @naim_bd - best answer for excuses about Tendulkar giving way for younger batsmen! Indian cricket wil be poorer by Tendulkar's retirement. There are no any immediate replacements to fill this giant shoes. We may need BCCI to alter cricket rules to allow 15 players instead of 11 to accomodate No.1 to 10 full of batsmen if Tendulkar retires.........

  • crikey on June 5, 2011, 12:28 GMT

    Greats only retire when they have had enough of the tripe that is thrown their way by journalists and so called supporters of the game when things don't go so smoothly for a while.The older they get the less time they get to adjust their game. See Gilchrist , Hayden and the Waugh twins.

  • on June 5, 2011, 12:20 GMT

    Foolish to predict Dravid will retire before Sachin, insane that VVS will. How were you as a batsman serioisly? I don't think great!

  • on June 5, 2011, 12:19 GMT

    I've just finished reading Nasser Hussain's autobiography, and found the chapter surrounding his retirement very touching. Seeing a young rising captain held back (Vaughan) and a talented debutant (Strauss) fighting for his place, he stepped down, rather than clinging on. I think his career-finishing century and win was proof that there was something left in the tank, but he finished his career still able to deliver, rather than a player with nothing left to give.

  • Saadi69 on June 5, 2011, 12:19 GMT

    Ponting is too good a player to quit right now. He has had a current dip in form but I would be very surprised if he does not find a way back. That is what makes these players so great. Whenever they are in difficulty they find a method, whether it be difficult conditions or having difficulty against a certain type of bowler they figure out a method which will work for them. That is what seperates the good from the great. I personally think that Ponting still has cricket left in him he has the talent all that he needs is the motivation to continue. If he can find that then I dont see a problem with him trying to continue to play

  • on June 5, 2011, 12:10 GMT

    @ RAVI KRISh....its Ian Bro

  • on June 5, 2011, 11:17 GMT

    @manuiitb you r spot on...............................I think "plain n simple love for the game is more important than his peers retiring or any other reason".................Peer retiring is not at all imp ...........and now Tendulkar has new peers in SEHWAAG and YUVI...................Gangully, the long term Tendulkar's oppening partner left him and Sehwag joined him..Did it affect him................Definately yes, it only improved his own performance........Sehwag's fast scoring rate and removal of slow Dravid & Gangully from ODI only helped Tendulkar as he did not have to score fast anymore to cover for others low scoring rates.....................Dravid's retirement from Test will only help tendulkar's cause

  • on June 5, 2011, 10:59 GMT

    Ponting has been a wonderful batsman to watch for as long as I can remember (I'm 17 years old) but it was almost painful watching him surrendur his wicket so meakly during the ashes. He is little more than a walking wicket in tests. If he reitres now, with the tonne against India his defiant last stand, he retires with his record intact and his name preserved in history. But if he tries to play on until 2013 he'll finish up as a great batsman who was forced out of the team after refusing to admit that he'd lost it.

  • Vipin.Bajaj on June 5, 2011, 10:39 GMT

    I do believe that there is lot of cricket left in Sachin Tendulkar. Opting out from ODI's and playing tests is going very nicely so far for Sachin, because the team India has perfect balance. Coming back to Ponting, his bat has dominated over decade in world cricket, we should not forget failures are bound to happen in cricket, we cannot comment on the talent he posses.. Remember the form is temporary, but the class is permanent.

  • Munkeymomo on June 5, 2011, 10:35 GMT

    @ahmadzubeee considering this will be a 4 test series I would be in disbelief if Sachin DIDN'T get his 100th international century. England can bowl as well as they can at him but it would be a brave man to bet against him getting another ton. In a very selfish way I'm glad he isn't playing in the west indies, it will give us in the UK the chance to see the incredible landmark. Whats the odds on him saving it for lords??

  • naim_bd on June 5, 2011, 10:23 GMT

    some ppl say that Tendulkar should retire to give the youngsters more chance to play International cricket. but should u abscise the best (or one of bests) batsman of the team to accommodate one with much lower aptitude? young players have to take the place by making better performance than sachin. No one playing their best retired to leave a place for the 16yrs old sachin.

  • on June 5, 2011, 10:09 GMT

    Here we go another prediction from Greg and the retirement of Sachin. Last time Chappell called for Tendulkar to retire was right after 2007 WC debacle. We all know Tendulkar only got better after that and so much so that he has had the best time of his career post 2007.

    I guess that was it for Ponting but now watch how his fortune is going to turn around :-)

    Oh BTW Chappell also called for McGrath to retire prior 2007 WC but then McGrath ended up the most successful bowler in the world cup 2007. Go figure... too many coincidences with Chappell and call for retirements or predictions.

  • dhoni890 on June 5, 2011, 9:41 GMT

    i feel that Ponting shall retire even tendul kar because he has acheived everything that anyone could possibly do so they both should retire

  • on June 5, 2011, 9:39 GMT

    I see both sides of the argument but at the end don't we owe it to Tendulkar and Ponting and co to choose their own times to call upon their own careers. They are outstanding talents. The number of occasions I fear for my team and curse Ponting's arrival at the crease defies belief. It says it all. They possess the magic to win the game from ANY position imaginable. They are STILL the BIGGEST wickets to take. Its the will of the younger man to keep the legend down out of fear that when they strike back they will be unable to do anything about it. I want Ponting do go out on the top of his game. I might support India but I respect talent when I see it. He is without a shadow of doubt the GOAT number 4. Sachin has had the faith to stay in the game. He COULD have been a waste of talent and given in during the injuries and dip in form . No-one is perfect and therefore Sachin bring tears to my eyes every hundred he makes. He has fought and fought and I respect that trait more than any.

  • 4test90 on June 5, 2011, 9:36 GMT

    If Sachin plays for another 9 years he will equal Wilfred Rhodes' seemingly unattainable record of having played Test Cricket in 5 decades (1899-1930), who is to say that he can't do it ?

  • moBlue on June 5, 2011, 9:27 GMT

    "With the retirement of these two dominant batsmen imminent, it would be comforting to know there is a young player or two ready to take on their mantle. But while there are some good young batsmen around, the next dominant one hasn't yet surfaced," says chappell! that comment exemplifies the problem with this whole article. ian chappell is talking about tendulkar and lara [ponting never was in the same league!] as if they were 2 world-class batsmen who dominated an era, and wonders which other dominant batsmen would next "take on their mantle". he doesn't get it, does he? tendulkar, lara and kallis were once-in-a-lifetime players, not once-in-a-generation dominating "talented" players like ian and greg chappell! players like ian and greg chappell are a dime a dozen in the overall arc of cricket history! chappell's comments seem ridiculous when one remembers don bradman told his wife sachin reminded him of himself! would chappell have said bradman could have been replaced when he left?

  • Nicholas_101 on June 5, 2011, 9:21 GMT

    How on earth can you talk about Ponting and Tendulkar and not mention Kallis!? Surely you have to consider him to be in the same league as these two players!?

  • on June 5, 2011, 9:13 GMT

    The Throne belongs to whom has the guts to sit on it. Tendulkar does, so does Ponting. Mr.Chappell needs a break. This is a overdone article by him. Both Tendulkar and Ponting very well knows or will know when to say bye-bye to cricket. Till the time they are around its pleasure to watch them. We miss many favorite players of ours who have retired like the Kapil Dev's, the Gilchrist's, the Waugh brothers, our own Dada, Jumbo, Lara etc to name a few. We are lucky that we still get to see the greatest, and the near perfect Tendulkar and a classy Ponting to see infront of us is sheer pleasure!..Mr.Chappell get some rest please!!

  • vaths22 on June 5, 2011, 8:51 GMT

    obviously sachu is the greatest batsman of all times but one cannot write off ricky. he has proven his class in his own way as a leader. so yes i go wid chappel in saying that a dominant guy hasn't emerged in either team.

  • hamwil80 on June 5, 2011, 8:50 GMT

    more impressive that Kallis stays fit, given the bowling he does, isn't it? He and Sachin have another 3/4 years in tests; pressure will force Ponting to retire sooner

  • cricmatters on June 5, 2011, 8:38 GMT

    Ricky Ponting need to find his mozzo again to justify his place in the Australian team while Tendulkar is in the best form of his life at the moment. Australian Selectors have been kind to Ponting so far but that could change if he fails again this summer. Steve Waugh could have easily played another season or two but was forced to retire. History repeats itself as they say and time is running out for Ponting. Why there is no mention of Kallis who is in similar age group and seems to in tremendous form like Tendulkar recently?

  • ahmadzubeee on June 5, 2011, 8:31 GMT

    With the growing age your reflexes do become slow and it also becomes difficult to pick the ball early. Sachin and Ponting are no exception. If you watch any of their innings which they played ten years ago, you can clearly notice the difference. Sachin never seemed so vulnerable to away swingers as he is nowadays. Pull shot was the trademark shot of Ponting and today it has become his weakness. The reason why these two are still able to hold their place in the team is that they know their limitations and have immense experience. It would be better if they decide to retire on a high note(like steve waugh and brian lara). I think Sachin may decide to retire after the English tour. Anderson and Swann vs the little master would be an interesting battle in English conditions and he might reach his 100th international century.

  • jonesy2 on June 5, 2011, 8:10 GMT

    tough to say i mean if ricky can get back into form (i believe its just psychological, like a lot of the aussie batsmen at the moment) then he should play on for a while longer at least through till 2012 then i think him and the other legends in katich and hussey should retire at the same time and then allow the next set of future greats (marsh, khawaja, hughes, ferguson) to kick off their careers.

  • on June 5, 2011, 8:06 GMT

    I agree. Ability wise Umar Akmal appears to be the next dominant batsman. But he lacks the environment that could groom him into one of the all time greats.

  • prashant1 on June 5, 2011, 7:54 GMT

    If any one can go one for another 5 yrs it is Tendulkar - The Greatest batsman that was, is and ever will be. (and will someone pls tell kiwirocker that everyone around is quite fed up of his cut/copy childish rants in every Tendulkar article.?) Surprising he isn't sick of them himself by now.

  • Governor on June 5, 2011, 7:44 GMT

    I think Chappelli is telling Ricky to retire after the end of the 2011-2012 season.

    Ricky can only bat at 3 or 4 and I cannot see him batting at 5.

    And, in the best interests of Australian cricket he should retire to make way for a young Aaron Finch to bat at frist drop in the 50 over and test match format!!

    Aaron Finch has all of the attacking attributes to bat at first drop. He is a strokemaker and he has the attitude of a natural number 3. A natural number 3 wants to score runs at 3 to 4 runs per over and is willing to take the balance of power away from the opposition.

  • shravkumar on June 5, 2011, 7:36 GMT

    Sachin Tendulkar may be enjoying the game but he has achieved everything in his illustrious career. Even the elusive world cup is a done-deal. Its time for him to bid adieu to pave way for younger generation of players, otherwise India will lose many young players. It may be recalled here that in the 70s some of the best spinners in Indian cricket like Shivalkar, Rajender Goel and rajender singh hans were not fortunate enough to wear the India Cap. Then the selectors made the monumental mistake of not playing them. History should not be repeated. In a nation of one billion every aspiring and deserving young cricketer should get his chance to prove his mettle.

  • on June 5, 2011, 7:33 GMT

    Ian Chappel, Please retire from writing columns. You need rest and Cricinfo please give much needed rest. He needs to spend time with his family otherwise he will write a column how Sachin and others should spend time with their family

  • Jaggadaaku on June 5, 2011, 7:24 GMT

    Nayeemuddin Mohammad must be living in the dream world of his own self. I mean Umar Akmal is gonna be the best batsmen after Brian Lara??? So, he means Brian Lara is the best of the best batsman and Umar would be the second. Who is Umar? Umar Akmal is not even compare to any aspect of his own country's other batsmen such as Yunis Khan, Inzamaam Ul Haq, Zaheer Abbaas, and Miandad. So, becoming the best batsman of the world for Umar is just ridiculous thought and this kind of thought created in the retarded people like Nayeemuddin Mahommad. Grow up buddy. There should be the boundary of jealousy. World and we all would understand if you had said that "the Umar would be the best batsman of current Pakistan team", but compare him with Sachin, Punter, and Lara is insanity. Don't you think that????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

  • AKS286 on June 5, 2011, 7:21 GMT

    sir ricky ponting will not retire bcoz he is a mastermind ,dynamic ,warrior, player ,leader , role model, hero, legend, ikon, & IMMORTAL. sachin tendulkar is a record breaker player but don't have the above qualities. i learn leadership qualities 4rm sir ricky ponting. all managers & MBA student must learn from him.

  • on June 5, 2011, 7:15 GMT

    When will Ian Chappell retire from commentating and writing rubbish articles??

  • on June 5, 2011, 6:55 GMT

    Tendulkar is enjoying the game better as there are a lot of others who have come up with match winning performances.He is playing freely than ever before.For some one who has shouldered the burden of the team for more than a decade,it would be very hard to ask him to retire.I think we must let him decide when he should.I think he is showing better commitment than most of the youngsters in the team.They way he conducts himself on and off the field is an example for any aspiring cricketer or sportsperson for that matter.How he has handled the pressure and the fame over his remarkable career speaks about the true legend that he is.As far as comparison with Ponting goes, well Ponting has done well when he was a captain he had a world class unit of batsmen around him.Sachin on the other hand has palyed better without captaincy.So now it is Ponting's turn to prove how good he is without the burden of captaincy by scoring runs.

  • on June 5, 2011, 6:34 GMT

    I dont know what this article or the comments are meant to be. But one thing is for sure, Mr. Nayeemuddin Mohammad is the best cricket commentator, statistician, historian, ______ (add things you want to) the world has/will ever see.

  • on June 5, 2011, 6:23 GMT

    there are some players who can be the next legends in future like virat kohli, alister cook LJ Trott and watson, but kohli has to prove himself in tests while watson and trott has the age problem, cook can be one of them but at the moment only AB Devilliers and Amla are the complete packages for future bcoz of their current form in both tests and ODIs plus they also have the advantage of age and experience.

  • Samnbr on June 5, 2011, 6:21 GMT

    Come on Ian...Why u want retire tendulkar...when his age is rising....he is in gaining more records and playing in full strength.stop your this useless words buddy. we don't want stop our legends cric life.

  • on June 5, 2011, 6:16 GMT

    I still can't understand why only these 2 r touted as the world's best everytime , sachin undoubtedly is at his peak again u can say been in stunning form and he's a champ batsmen so is ponting but wht abt players like kallis and dravid who have scored more than 10,000 runs in each format and have been solid as a wall for their resp team, comeon kallis dravid should be included in the world's finest players of this century along with sachin ponting lara too as their contribution to the game and their resp country has been sensationaly , and yeah abt retirement these players have played long enough to know when to retire so lets give them tht space :) and hope tht they play for as long as possible cos these r top players of tht last classical era, from here on it's anyways goin to be the gen Y group. so lets cherish their game as long as they r there :) for me sachin dravid ponting kallis all have been legends of the game :)

  • bala-chala on June 5, 2011, 6:09 GMT

    The only problem with this article is that it will spark all these jingoistic comments from people who claim to be the greatest fan of sachin. Otherwise, I see some promise in AB de Villiers to fill in the shoes of ponting and sachin. In fact, it is obvious that he is even more talented than the two. In any case I see people taking more notice of Sangakkara and Mahela who have been phenomenal in their own rights. They just havent got the attention that they deserve.

  • vattettan on June 5, 2011, 6:07 GMT

    Considering their overall career, it would be difficult to say there is no one to replace them currently. But one can certainly say that no prodigy has arrived since Sachin, the way he did. I believe Virat Kohli could have similar records as Sachin and Ponting currently has, provided he keeps going the way he currently does.

  • MI23 on June 5, 2011, 6:03 GMT

    Tendulkar is the one who has still that passion towards game and still enjoying/loving playing cricket

  • on June 5, 2011, 6:03 GMT

    @Nayeemuddin Mohammad: Umar Akmal dominates only spin bowling and has very mediocre average both in test and odi. I don't know how he will dominate the cricket. As for Gilchrist he had lot of talented players down the order so even if he fails anyone can continue. Its not same for Sachin and Lara most of the time. He should be both aggressive and carry on the innings.So Sachin and Lara are the most dominant not Gilchrist, Jaysuriya and all.

  • KAIRAVA on June 5, 2011, 6:01 GMT

    @Alexk400: India has got Ajinkya Rahane & Cheteshwar Pujara who very often score double centuries and even triple centuries in domestic matches. Both average more than 60 in First class matches and are still only 24 years old.

  • skyeshwin on June 5, 2011, 6:00 GMT

    @Nayeemuddin Mohammad Umar Akmal is a more talented and more dominant batsman than Ponting and Sachin???? LOLZ !!!!! Everyone loves their own country's team but does'nt mean that one has to go over the top to show one's love for the country...... Both Ponting and Sachin have played in teams which were both in crisis and healthy situations.... Anyway keep up the good jokes....

  • masks on June 5, 2011, 5:59 GMT

    @ Nayeemuddin Mohammad Umar Akmal ....yeah right.Give us a break!

  • KAIRAVA on June 5, 2011, 5:56 GMT

    Sachin Tendulkar would retire after the home series in March 2012, but only after fulfilling his last remaining dream - helping India conquer it's "last frontier" in Australia in Jan 2012. So we can expect to see the Little Master play in another 14-15 tests during this period.

  • donda on June 5, 2011, 5:52 GMT

    What is the problem with Ian chappel. why he wants Tendulkar and Ponting to retire. Cricket has left with 4 to 5 legend players now and Ian wants all of them to retire. Come on Ian chappel, let us enjoy the greatness of Tendulkar and let us see how good Ponting is without captaincy burden.

    Both are extremely fit and if they can see the ball, time the ball and put the ball in gaps then why not keep on playing. Remember sir jack hobs scored his second half of 100 centuries after the age of 40.

    Please Ian stop playing your drama of retiring legends forcefully.

  • on June 5, 2011, 5:52 GMT

    Alex, VVS won't be out after scoring a few single digit scores. He's one of the modern greats and has earned the right to retire gracefully. Jeptic, I guess its a matter of perception and a lot of subjectivity goes in when you consider the batting greats of an era. I certainly don't consider Ponting to be on the same plane as Tendulkar and Lara. But as you said, lets not take the discussion that route. Nayeemuddin, you're perhaps mentioning about the strike rates when you say more dominant, the author meant making more runs across all formats.

  • din2383 on June 5, 2011, 5:45 GMT

    who cares same man said that sachin shuld look at mirrior he will get his answer after 2007 world cup.they all tries to unsettle sachin greg chappal,ian chappal,sanjay manjreaker, they spited venom against sachin in 2007-08 season. look at sachin said nothin he replied back with scoring so many runs in test and odis.u ordinary cricketers stop abusing sachin he is great.eitherway auusies never like ganguly,sachin ,laxman,dravid,kumble because they always standed to auusies and never allowed to win them when aussies were no1 team.

  • harshacc on June 5, 2011, 5:38 GMT

    There are quite a few batsmen who have what it takes to be great on the Horizon and one great batsman who is denied his place.When will Kallis be given his due as a great? I am an Indian BTW

  • DaisonGarvasis on June 5, 2011, 5:17 GMT

    Sorry to say Ian, you would never leave Tendulkar alone, would you? You talked/demanded Tendulkar retirement a good 4-5 years ago saying his time is up and he is not playing good enuf anymore. Had he retired then taking your good advise, cricketing world would have been waiting for the first double hundred in ODI' still - not to mention other things he achieved in this last 4-5 years. Now you can dismiss me saying "nobody is allowed to talk against Tendulakar when Indians are around". Well, all your efforts to put lesser players alongside Tendulkar is proof enuf you envy him. Sachin can play long after Ponting has retired if that is the comparison you are trying to make. Ponting's best shot - the pull - has deserted him and is now marked as his downfall. And at the moment one cant point anything like that on Sachin. Pointing out that his team mates retiring as being the reason for his retirement is pathetic. You cant find a better reason eh??? Keep Trying, you might get it one day.

  • deegowd on June 5, 2011, 5:16 GMT

    The latter part last decade saw a huge decline in bowling greats world-wide (Walsh, Ambrose,McGrath, Warne, Akram, Waqar, Saqlian?, Kumble, Donald, Pollock, Murali, not to mention the could-have-been-greats like Brett Lee, Shane Bond and Malinga). Now what we see in the world bowling doesn't even come close to what we saw in the 10 years before 2006. While you could compare Steyn to Donald or Zaheer to Wasim, we haven't stopped missing those guys yet. And to think that we'll be seeing an out flux of great batsmen too is despairing. While Australia have already lost some and so have Windies in Lara, we still had Sachin, Ponting, Kallis and the ever-so-pleasurable-to-watch Dravid and Laxman. SL and SA seem to be getting better in the batting department, but the standards elsewhere are falling and we are seeing more bits-and-pieces all-rounders lining up. Guess the next decade will be that of the bits-and-pieces cricketers.

  • MarkBobbyChandy on June 5, 2011, 5:08 GMT

    @ Nayeemuddin Mohammad : Are you kidding me or what. Umar Akmal might be the best batsman pak has, but he does does not have the class that batsmen like sachin, ponting and lara has. Adam Gilchrist, Virender Sehwag , Yuvraj, and Jayasuriya more dominant than sachin and ponting. I guess you're studying too much.

  • Jim1207 on June 5, 2011, 5:05 GMT

    People, please do not talk again and again that Chappell told in 2006 Sachin to retire and Sachin proved him wrong. Yes, Ian would be happy to agree that he was wrong. Get over it and we do not have to repeat in every forum. However, Ian is not asking anybody here to retire, he is just analyzing what goes on players' minds. We should be really fortunate to get comments from a person of Ian's stature.

  • Percy_Fender on June 5, 2011, 5:05 GMT

    Sachin has had mates like Kapil and Vengsarkar to share the dressing room in his early days and Rahul Dravid and VVS Laxman for nearly a decade and a half. I am not too sure if he would make a decision to retire merely because he finds that his mates are no longer there. Indian cricket does not work that way I am afraid. As long as he is a world beater he will go on. The only thing that will make Tendulkar quit the game is injury. When he does not have the physical ability to sustain the modern day pace of the game. Ricky Ponting, also an all time great, will on the other hand retire because of the media. He has this 'up yours' attitude which will probably cause him to leave in the face of relentless pressure and criticism.

  • satyam.sharma on June 5, 2011, 5:02 GMT

    @Nayeemuddin Mohammad: Thanks for the laughs. BTW God only knows when Chappell will come out of his Tendulkar-Ponting obsession. After the last 3 years, it's almost blasphemy to even mention the two in the same breath or sentence. Does Chappell realize he's the only commentator left still analysing Tendulkar and Ponting in the same article? As for successors, sure, we'll have to wait several decades before another like Tendulkar emerges, but I'm not so sure about Ponting's legacy. The last several years have proven him to be just another "good batsman of his times" overall, and although a successor to Ponting from Australia seems unlikely in the near future, there'll surely be plenty batsmen like him in international cricket over the next few years.

  • Venki_indian on June 5, 2011, 5:02 GMT

    @Nayeemuddin Mohammad you must be joking mate..How can Umar Akmal be compared to the greats...he is not consistent enough and lacks temperment...

    I hope Sachin and Ponting will play test cricket for couple of years...

  • on June 5, 2011, 5:01 GMT

    Tendulkar has 2 appropriate replacements, Virat kohli and Badrinath. Both can play all 3 formats and score big runs. Ponting doesnt have a replacement ready to go, there is no one i can think of at the moment in state cricket, chris lynn is maybe the closest. Tendulkar has another 2 years in him at least

  • cricketizgood on June 5, 2011, 4:52 GMT

    "Umar Akmal is the best batsman" That words shows jealousy on the best batsman of the era. Who is Umar Akmal ? I haven't heard of him. Just to tell you that there was a time that whole Indian cricket team was depended on Sachin and used to follow him to the dressing room after his dismissal.

  • jimbond on June 5, 2011, 4:51 GMT

    My memory may be failing me, but I seem to remember Ian touting Duminy as the next best hope as the world's best- to succeed Ponting. Of course, now that Ponting is no longer exactly the world's best, or that Duminy is not even the second best batsman in the South African side, may have stopped Ian from repeating his words. The fact is, while Tendulkar and Ponting may no longer be the best batsmen in their respective sides, they are still better than the worst batsmen in the team. Hence they have every right to continue as long as they are better than the worst batsman in the team, and as long as they want to play. What Ian or me, or anyone else thinks is irrelevant to the question. When these guys do reture, I am sure there would be players of roughly the same (current) calibre to take their places.

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:41 GMT

    dominant means getting runs consiistently against all teams thats wt sachin and pointing did.

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:31 GMT

    One cannot compare current forms of SRT and Pointing. SRT has rose from minor dip and in past 2 years has shown to be in best of forms. Pointing on other hand is losing his form gradually. As typical aussie, this chappel is always trying to get rid of SRT but keep failing badly. :) @Mohammad... Umar??? Who is he?? He is nowhere in any class close to any average player.. not even in any discussion. hahaha... poor you!!

  • vparisa on June 5, 2011, 4:24 GMT

    @ Nayeemuddin Mohammad, Yuvraj singh really??? He does not even play test cricket for India. How can he become dominant force? People you have mentioned are impact players who can change the game at will but not dominant batsmen. They score more 30s and 40s in quick time. Lara, Sachin, Ponting, Kallis, Inzy to a certain extent are the most dominant batsmen of our generation. You must be joking about Umar Akmal. If you think Umar Akmal is more talented and more dominant than ponting and Sachin,then Rohit Sharma is the greatest cricketer ever. Have you ever heard of certain Younis Khan in current Pakistan Cricket team, Umar Akmal is no match to him.

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:20 GMT

    Ponting will rettire in 2012 and Tendulkar in 2013. Mark my words.

  • SunilPotnis on June 5, 2011, 4:18 GMT

    Tendulkar is like machine and personally I don't think he should continuebecause he has everything one can get from the cricket; every possible record, world cup, rewards financial and otherwise, so why rob young talent from the much needed international exposure at an early age. Imagine if Tendulkar was deprived an opportunity when he was 16 yrs old and could not make an entry into international level because some successful senior just was occupying space even though playing well.

    He is great batsman statistically but I still think he has yet to reach the class of, Sunil Gavaskar and Sir Issac Vivian Alexander Richards, as a true match winner.

  • sircha on June 5, 2011, 4:13 GMT

    Tendulkar must retire simply because there are too many youngsters waiting in the wings to be blooded in the international arena. He is doing an injustice to the nation by simply holding his position. He may have been in the best of form in recent years but many a career has been wrecked by the obstinacy of a few legendary cricketers. Remember, India is a land of a billion people struggling for opportunities. If we want to see another Tendulkar in future, we certainly have to let go of this one! And am a big fan of Tendulkar. But it is important to look at the greater good.

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:00 GMT

    So many comparisons between Sachin & the Don. It would have partly been justified had Sachin retitred with "99" centuries - that would have left a legacy and a testament of world class , both of which for me he seems to lack

  • on June 5, 2011, 3:33 GMT

    Tendulkar is in best form... Few years ago Chapel advised Tendulkar to retired... But from that time SRT got his best form.. So don't advised srt on retirement... He is great(perhaps greatest) enough to take his own decision..

  • manuiitb on June 5, 2011, 3:33 GMT

    I think plain n simple love for the game is more important than his peers retiring, a wearing body or mental fatigue, especially for Sachin. His excitement and passion for the game is unmatchable. He still has that spark in his eyes possessed by a little kid who just got a turn to bat. Until that remains he shouldn't retire. People come and go, Sachin is the only constant. Being lucky enough to have never seen cricket without him I personally can't even imagine watching the game with him not there.

  • maddy20 on June 5, 2011, 3:07 GMT

    These two are perhaps the best batsmen for their respective countries. They cannot be replaced! It will be Interesting to see how India will find a replacement to Sachin, Laxman and Dravid!

  • on June 5, 2011, 3:06 GMT

    Sachin and Ponting are not the most dominant batsmen in the last two decades. Brian Lara, Adam Gilchrist, Sanath Jaysurya, Virender Sehwag and Yuvraj Singh are more dominant than both Sachin and Ponting across all formats of the game.

    How does Ian Chappel say that the next dominant batsman has not yet surfaced. Umar Akmal is a more talented and more dominant batsman than Sachin and Ponting, but Umar Akmal is playing for a team that is in turmoil. If Umar Akmal plays for a team like Ponting or Sachin did, he will surpass both Sachin and Ponting and can match Brian Lara and Adam Gilchrist.

    Umar Akmal will be the the greatest batsman after Brian Lara.

  • Jeptic on June 5, 2011, 2:53 GMT

    Well written....And guys who are reading this, PLEASE DON'T start comapring these two - Perhaps two of the three greats batsmen of ALL time (the next being Lara). And correctly said - Successors have NOT raised there heads. It would be difficult if not impossible to find batsmen of equivalent calibre to match them.

  • Alexk400 on June 5, 2011, 2:36 GMT

    The problem for India is no young batsman scoring double century in domestic cricket often to displace Dravid or Sachin. VVS laxman probably soon will be out if he scores few single digit scores.

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  • Alexk400 on June 5, 2011, 2:36 GMT

    The problem for India is no young batsman scoring double century in domestic cricket often to displace Dravid or Sachin. VVS laxman probably soon will be out if he scores few single digit scores.

  • Jeptic on June 5, 2011, 2:53 GMT

    Well written....And guys who are reading this, PLEASE DON'T start comapring these two - Perhaps two of the three greats batsmen of ALL time (the next being Lara). And correctly said - Successors have NOT raised there heads. It would be difficult if not impossible to find batsmen of equivalent calibre to match them.

  • on June 5, 2011, 3:06 GMT

    Sachin and Ponting are not the most dominant batsmen in the last two decades. Brian Lara, Adam Gilchrist, Sanath Jaysurya, Virender Sehwag and Yuvraj Singh are more dominant than both Sachin and Ponting across all formats of the game.

    How does Ian Chappel say that the next dominant batsman has not yet surfaced. Umar Akmal is a more talented and more dominant batsman than Sachin and Ponting, but Umar Akmal is playing for a team that is in turmoil. If Umar Akmal plays for a team like Ponting or Sachin did, he will surpass both Sachin and Ponting and can match Brian Lara and Adam Gilchrist.

    Umar Akmal will be the the greatest batsman after Brian Lara.

  • maddy20 on June 5, 2011, 3:07 GMT

    These two are perhaps the best batsmen for their respective countries. They cannot be replaced! It will be Interesting to see how India will find a replacement to Sachin, Laxman and Dravid!

  • manuiitb on June 5, 2011, 3:33 GMT

    I think plain n simple love for the game is more important than his peers retiring, a wearing body or mental fatigue, especially for Sachin. His excitement and passion for the game is unmatchable. He still has that spark in his eyes possessed by a little kid who just got a turn to bat. Until that remains he shouldn't retire. People come and go, Sachin is the only constant. Being lucky enough to have never seen cricket without him I personally can't even imagine watching the game with him not there.

  • on June 5, 2011, 3:33 GMT

    Tendulkar is in best form... Few years ago Chapel advised Tendulkar to retired... But from that time SRT got his best form.. So don't advised srt on retirement... He is great(perhaps greatest) enough to take his own decision..

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:00 GMT

    So many comparisons between Sachin & the Don. It would have partly been justified had Sachin retitred with "99" centuries - that would have left a legacy and a testament of world class , both of which for me he seems to lack

  • sircha on June 5, 2011, 4:13 GMT

    Tendulkar must retire simply because there are too many youngsters waiting in the wings to be blooded in the international arena. He is doing an injustice to the nation by simply holding his position. He may have been in the best of form in recent years but many a career has been wrecked by the obstinacy of a few legendary cricketers. Remember, India is a land of a billion people struggling for opportunities. If we want to see another Tendulkar in future, we certainly have to let go of this one! And am a big fan of Tendulkar. But it is important to look at the greater good.

  • SunilPotnis on June 5, 2011, 4:18 GMT

    Tendulkar is like machine and personally I don't think he should continuebecause he has everything one can get from the cricket; every possible record, world cup, rewards financial and otherwise, so why rob young talent from the much needed international exposure at an early age. Imagine if Tendulkar was deprived an opportunity when he was 16 yrs old and could not make an entry into international level because some successful senior just was occupying space even though playing well.

    He is great batsman statistically but I still think he has yet to reach the class of, Sunil Gavaskar and Sir Issac Vivian Alexander Richards, as a true match winner.

  • on June 5, 2011, 4:20 GMT

    Ponting will rettire in 2012 and Tendulkar in 2013. Mark my words.