Sachin Tendulkar's 100th March 25, 2012

'I am madly in love with the sport'

Over 22 years, 652 international games and 100 hundreds into a career that shows no sign of flagging, Sachin Tendulkar talks about how he remains a student of the game
  shares 125

Sachin Tendulkar's 100th international hundred has created bigger ripples in cricketing waters than all his previous centuries. Adding colour to the excitement surrounding the milestone, Tendulkar invited editors from across India to his hometown, Mumbai. The evening was about "celebrating hundred hundreds", as the banner behind him declared.

What was meant to be an informal chat turned out to be an engrossing hour-long tête-à-tête, during which Tendulkar, to borrow a cricketing phrase, never took his eye off the ball. It was a consummate performance. Even his biggest fan, his wife, Anjali, who is rarely present at press conferences, sat quietly in a corner, listening intently to her husband's every word.

What do personal records mean in a team game?
When you contribute towards the team, trying to achieve the team's cause, that is when the records are created. No one first looks to create records and then looks to achieve the team's cause. Before any game, the team has a goal and while chasing that goal if certain records are set, it becomes a landmark and big news. But in our team meetings we never discuss records. We discuss how to win the match and what's the best way to do it. Along the way if somebody is able to break records and do something special, then we always feel good about it.

This is your 23rd year in international cricket. What has the last year taught you that your first 22 years did not?
To stay patient on 99 hundreds (smiles). Yes, this year was a difficult one. When I was on 99 hundreds during the World Cup, nobody spoke about it. The focus was on the World Cup. We won the World Cup and then everybody started thinking what's next and started questioning 'where can we focus [now]'. The focus was then on the hundredth hundred. My focus was not on it. My focus was as always to score a big hundred whenever I went out and contribute [to the team's cause], and that is what I have done in the past. As time went by there was so much hype created that naturally the focus [shifted], even though I did not want it [that way]. I felt it [the milestone] was there somewhere in my subconscious, though I kept telling myself that above all I just need to enjoy playing cricket and be myself. But when you get at least 100 reminders daily, it becomes difficult not to think about it. You are forcibly made to think about it.

That was getting tougher and tougher as the days wore on. I felt like telling everyone 'let's just talk cricket and not talk about the 100th hundred'. I went through the same pre-match preparations, but sometimes there are no reasons for failure and disappointment. I felt in Australia I was batting the best I have in the last 22 years. I was really pleased with the way I was moving and timing the ball, and the bat-swing. But somehow, at the crunch moment, you need luck to be on your side and I felt luck was not on my side on those occasions. I got close to scoring hundreds, but when the time came, things just didn't happen. Sometimes things happen in your life which you can't explain.

You look at solutions and raise questions, and ask why is this happening. But you just don't find the answers. Then, eventually, you look at scenarios when you haven't batted well and still ended up scoring big runs. What could be the reason? Luck. Sometimes you just get beaten by that much (gestures to indicate a little bit). How do you describe that? It has to be luck. In Mumbai, had I not been beaten by Ravi Rampaul and edged to [Darren] Sammy in the slips, I would have still been batting on 94. The next ball, if it's a two-paced pitch, I would leave it alone. Sometimes, it's important to get that wake-up call. Last season, that wake-up call didn't happen much and it just taught me to have patience and focus on my job, and the results will take care of themselves. I just focussed on my pre-match preparation and did not think too much. When you start a building, you don't think of the tenth floor. You start at the ground floor first. My preparations were not affected. I did not use any shortcuts - that again was a reminder that I had not relaxed. In fact, if anything, I just kept pushing harder and harder. Sometimes there are disappointments and I always use disappointments and setbacks to work harder, and try and take whatever positive [I can] out of it. That is something that I have learnt and, maybe, it [the wait for the landmark ton] was a reminder [of these things] after 22 years.

Sometimes, do you think that a sportsperson's life is cruel - people can easily forget what you have done over 22 years and focus on just the landmark?
I remember my coach [Ramakant Achrekar] telling me that this game can be cruel at times and not to worry as everyone goes through rough patches. When you are doing well, you don't worry and you don't question 'why are these things happening to my game'. Even a bad phase will pass by and nothing will be permanent. You will overcome all these obstacles. During my school days I learnt a lot, and those things help. Above all, the most important thing is to respect the game.

You spoke about the pressure of the 100 hundreds and how, subconsciously, it got to you. Do worry about the younger players in the team, about how they would cope with, maybe not something similar, but an achievement?
I think that is an important factor to focus and not think about the external factors, which sometimes weigh you down. There will be phases in their careers where the going gets tough, but that is a time that whatever you had practised over the years, and I am not taking about practising in the nets but off the field, helps. My advice would be to keep your eye on the ball and not what XYZ is talking. Sometimes it feels good when people are talking good things about you, but when you get into it, it does feel bad when people do criticise you. So there has to be a balance between reading good things and reading bad things, and you've got to maintain that balance and balance your emotions in the way you celebrate and the way you respond to disappointments. If the balance is there, then in those tough phases you will be able to deal with it, but if there is imbalance that is when the problem starts. It is up to an individual, and there is no particular formula to it: that if you do this or that, it is going to work. There are guys who get motivated by certain things and it is important to know yourself, as to what works for you and follow that.

Can you talk us through the experiences of your first hundred and the 100th ton?
I remember during my first hundred, I went in to bat when the team was 118 for 4 [109 for 4] and I went into bat when the senior players had all got out and the only thing that I had in my mind was I should stay not out. I managed to string together a good partnership with Manoj Prabhakar and I had to be careful in my shot selection that day. At the same time I was prepared to put the bad balls away. I was there with an open mind. I remember when I was batting on 87 or 88, I ducked into a bouncer from Angus Fraser and the ball hit the back of the bat and flew to fine leg. I was glad it did not go to the wicketkeeper or lob to any fielder. The hundred that I missed in New Zealand was on my mind and I did not want to miss my first hundred. After the hundred, Madhav Mantri, who was our manager at that time came and told me I had to address a press conference. I was confused as I had not attended a press conference and was very scared. He told me not to worry, that he would be there with me. I did not look back after that and it's been a fantastic journey.

The 100th hundred, I started off really well and then I felt the ball was coming off the track a bit slower than I would have liked. And during my partnership with Virat [Kohli], we both kept discussing what would be a good target and we both thought 275 to 280 would be a good total, as that wicket was not like the one on which the earlier game [India-Sri Lanka] had been played. We were constantly keeping an eye on the run rate that we were maintaining and it became critical to have wickets in hand. I was patient and just focussed on building partnerships. At the same time there were spells during which they really bowled well. I remember Mashrafe Mortaza bowled a maiden to me in the [batting] Powerplay. I had connected three good shots in that over and all three went to the fielder. And I told Virat and thought to myself, on a good day, those are three boundaries. That is what this game teaches you: sometimes you can edge between slips for a four and when you are batting well, three potential boundaries could get stopped. It is an unbelievable game. You just have to remain a student and learn so many things. When I got to my hundred, the reaction was I looked at the bat and looked upwards towards God and said 'it's been a tough time for me'. Why? Where did I lack in my commitment? Finally it had happened and I was really thrilled and I looked at the dressing room and I pointed my bat to the players, and also to the Indian flag that I have on my helmet. This is what I have done for the nation and everyone has been part of it.

Can you describe the pressure of the last year and the passion that you've played with for the last 23 years?
Hundred hundreds was not my purpose. To win the World Cup was. I don't regularly follow what people are saying about me. Because I feel I should have a clear mind while making decisions and hence I should not be thinking about what XYZ are saying. I am not in the Indian team to prove people wrong. I play this game because I love playing this game. Nobody forced me into it and it is my choice. There are going to be opinions. Whatever I do and whatever number of years I play, there are going to be opinions. But they may not be always correct. I take notice of something that is said that can make me a better player and not of someone who is passing his judgment by watching TV. That person does not know what is happening with my mind or what is happening with my body. I am the one who knows about it. Only I know whether I am motivated enough or passionate enough to be a part of the game. I kept telling myself I need to enjoy the game. If I am not enjoying the challenges associated with the game, then it does not work.

That was one thing on mind, but people do read newspapers, people around you read newspapers. My friends do not discuss these things and the same holds true for my family. They also understand that to perform to the best of my ability I need a clear mind. My mind cannot be occupied with all these thoughts. There's an unwritten rule that no one discusses what is happening [in the media with me]. But when you meet people on a flight, in the reception of a hotel or through room service, they tell you in a good way that 'we are praying for you to score a hundred today'. How do you escape that? You have no choice but to appreciate and acknowledge every little effort that they have made. After my 100th century, my wife, Anjali, told me that many of my friends had gone walking to Siddhivinayak temple [a famous place of worship in central Mumbai] before the tour. A couple of senior citizens had also prayed for me at a dargah [a Sufi shrine]. People do it because they want me to achieve the goal. As much as I value and appreciate that, it stays in [and plays on] your mind. Thankfully, she told me all this after I had scored my hundred.

Sachin, you have scored 15470 runs [in Tests]. The chunk between 13000 and 14000 was your fastest. You were 37 then, an age at which athletes actually fight their age, fitness and all sort of issues. Can you describe the challenges of reinventing yourself?

John Wright had told me that you should be the first player to score 100 international hundreds and that was way back, during the 2003 World Cup ... this is what he had told me, just to push me. The coach's job is to give the players that high and make sure that they are in the frame of mind to deliver, and possibly John was looking to do that.

It is about enjoyment. It is about feeling motivated enough. It is about the desire to deliver and how passionate I feel about the game. I am madly in love with the sport. At this stage, I enjoy every little moment. I know [mine] is a different body from what it was 20 years ago and that is never to be going be the same. But, possibly, what a 17-year-old mind could not do, a 37-year-old mind could do. So somewhere it balances out. It depends on how you see it, whether you see the glass half empty or half full: I see the glass as half full. That has helped me. I always looked at the positive side. I have not been very vocal [on the field], but the aggression need not always be vocal, the aggression can be within. If you look into the bowler's mind, he will know whether you are aggressive enough or not. Sometimes it can be your body language, maybe in the way you just leave the ball. And then the way you respond to the bowler, the eye-to-eye contact, that conveys lot of things. I believe in that.

Also when you are doing well, when you are putting in a lot of hard work and you see the results, it helps. It helps to push your training sessions, on-field net sessions and off-field gym sessions, and take that to a new level. I have done that. I remember two years ago when we went to New Zealand the first two games were Twenty20 matches. I was not part of the squad, but I requested the BCCI that I go with the team and practise there because I felt if I can be there, I can get acclimatised and practise. While I was not part of the squad, the whole team was practising in the nets, I was working whole time with the bowling machine. For the number of hours the whole team had practised, I had batted alongside on the bowling machine and I enjoyed it. I must have hit close to 800 or 900, or 1000 balls maybe, and that was just one session. I did a few sessions like that and I enjoyed it.

You do not worry about opinions but there is a point of view out there that believes that it is silly to combine Test and ODI hundreds, and so the pressure should not have been put on you in the first place. Do you believe that there is such a category - a hundred international hundreds? And have you been disturbed by India's form overseas in Test cricket? While the whole of India is celebrating what you have achieved, it has been one of India's worst performances overseas in Test cricket since you started playing.
I don't know … people are fascinated by this number game. So how does one keep that aside?

I remember a long time ago, in 2003, John Wright had told me that you should be the first player to score 100 international hundreds and that was way back, during the 2003 World Cup. We used to have many chats and this was during one of the chats - this is what he had told me, just to push me. The coach's job is to give the players that high and make sure that they are in the frame of mind to deliver, and possibly John was looking to do that.

Yes, it has been a tough phase for all of us in Test cricket. That is something we need to definitely look at. I felt the conditions [in England and Australia] were different for sure - what you call the home advantage. I felt the teams played good cricket. England were wanting to get to the No. 1 spot and Australia were also looking a good side. If you look at the Australian series, in every Test there was just one partnership that changed the game; otherwise the records [of both teams] were more or less the same. Look at the Perth Test, their [Australia's] first partnership was 178 runs [214]. The average partnership of the series was less than 20 runs and according to that the Australian team, in the first innings, instead of getting to 320 or 300 [369], should have got about 170. We had made 158 [161]. So [if not for the big opening stand and keeping in mind how many runs their other wickets aggregated, they would have just got around] a 12-run lead … you think differently and the whole game changes.

A similar thing happened in Sydney and then in Melbourne, where they were [about] 24 for four and then there was a partnership in the second innings. So if you see in all the matches, these partnerships have hurt us. Obviously we were not able to put up a big score on the board, but the surfaces were slightly different. So if you remove that one partnership from every match, more or less, the scores were the same. And that is going to happen. If we had won, then there would have been a big partnership from our team, but that did not happen.

After every hundred you look up to the skies and thank God. Have you always been God-fearing and has this belief strengthened over the years?
Yes, right from the day I started playing cricket, there was this Ganpati mandir [temple] at Shivaji Park and during our breaks, whenever I got thirsty, I would go there and drink the water from the tap there. I used to always feel that it is a kind of blessing and it is a kind of positive energy going through my body, and it is going to give me strength to go out and perform. Right from that time, right from day one, it has been there. That is the way I have been brought up. Not just while playing cricket, but even before that I used to watch my father at home and see my mother as well pray.

How do you compare this record to all the other milestones in cricket - like a bowler taking 800 Test wickets? Also, do you believe any other player can break this record?
I don't like comparisons. I think getting to 800 wickets is a great thing, absolutely fabulous. All the other players who have done well and have been successful at the international level, they have made huge sacrifices. There has been lot of discipline, commitment and dedication in their lives to serve their nation. I respect all of them, and even the guys who have not been successful, because to play for your nation you still have to go through the rigours and without that it doesn't happen. I don't like to compare and I respect every individual who has achieved something.

About breaking the record of hundred hundreds, I don't know. All the records are meant to be broken. If somebody breaks it, then he should be an Indian.

What keeps you going in ODIs, especially after winning the World Cup last year?
It is the passion for the game and as long as I feel the passion, as long as I feel the desire is there, as long as I feel that I can go out and deliver, I should be playing. But the day I feel I cannot do it, I cannot motivate myself even though I am performing, then it is time to look at making decisions. There might be phases where I am not performing well, but I am motivated enough and passionate enough, then I need not worry.

Looking back at the Australia tour, India lost the Test series and you were desperate to win the CB Series. Then there was your 100th hundred, something that you wanted to get out of the way to continue with the cricket. In a scenario like that there was the rotation policy: for someone who has never been dropped or even asked to rest, were you disappointed by - or were you included in taking - that decision?
It was discussed among the senior players, the captain and the management. It was clear that we wanted all the guys to play because in a tournament like that, when there are no long breaks between the games, then you also need to look at injuries. I am not saying that the players were injured, but then there are some borderline cases that you need to look after and that is what we were looking to do. It was not a question of dropping someone, it was a question of taking care of those borderline cases.

On the rotation policy, do you think certain things regarding that should not have come into the public domain?
Yes, I'm a believer of that, that certain things should not leave the dressing room. But every individual will have different opinion, every individual will react differently and he means different things. So I cannot answer for people who have spoken about it, as to what they intended to say. I don't know.

But it seemed like someone was trying to attack the senior players in the team by making certain kinds of comments …
Honestly, I can't fill in those blanks. Only that individual would know what he was trying to say. If anything is there, then, we travel in the same bus, we sit in the dressing room, we would share those things.

Did you feel bad about what was being said of the whole situation?
I don't follow [what is written in the newspapers]. I was in a good space. The only time when I had no choice was with the common man, who would read the newspapers and just keep wishing me for my 100th hundred. I am glad nobody would wish me after that.

You are a national icon and that is a tough job because the expectation of an entire nation is weighing on you. How does it affect your personal life and your family? Sometimes, you must think of just going away to a lonely island and disappearing?
I do that. Sometimes there are complaints that I don't respond to various things and I should be reacting more to spend quality time with my family. Anjali has been with me for a long time, right from the start of my international career, and she understands the pressures and demands of international sportspersons. I think without her support things would have been different. If my family did not understand what the demands were, then to manage all these things would have been really difficult. My family has played a huge role in [getting me to] where I am at the moment. Right from the start that was the unwritten law, that I only play cricket, I don't think of anything else, everything else will be looked after by my family. So I only focussed on the game and nothing else at all, so that has allowed me to be stress-free and not worry about anything that is happening outside the field of cricket. It has been just the cricket field and my family, because the rest of things have been managed by my family.

From 1995, when I signed for WorldTel with Mark Mascarenhas, that was a big moment for me. We went on to become good friends, but unfortunately Mark passed away in 2002 when England were playing in India. That was a huge blow, not because I lost my manager, but because I lost my friend who understood how I operated, how my family operated and never pressurised me to do ads whenever a series was going on because in cricket time it was only cricket. I clearly remember him telling me 'you only worry about scoring runs, you don't worry about anything else, that is my problem'. He gave me complete freedom and to have those kind of people around, who understand the way you think, that really helps and it has continued. After that I have had Vinod [Naidu], who has been with me now for 14 years, and Harish is here from WSG … all these guys have contributed. But the family factor is the most important factor and without their understanding, it is just not possible.

You have been a bridge between the seniors and juniors. You have been the constant. How has it been, having to adjust to the younger generation?
The difference has only been the choice of music. That has been where the problem is. Otherwise we do the same things. I spoke about aggression, which need not be always vocal. There are youngsters who want to react to things immediately. I keep telling them don't worry, after sometime you will have a different opinion about that. With age your thoughts change, the way you react changes. It is part of growing - what you did when you were 17, you do not do at 35. It happens to everyone.

Can you tell us more about the music being played in the dressing room?
I find difficult to pronounce ... Pitbull and what not. I don't know. It is because of my children I know these names. It is good fun. It is not about just me and my music. It is about what everyone is enjoying. In the dressing room you can't have everyone happy - you play one song and there will be four guys saying 'kya chal raha hain' (what is happening) and there are another five guys saying 'brilliant'. So you have to go with the flow.

There are questions about your retirement. You have not answered them completely?
I have answered them. Maybe you guys have not understood properly. I have always said that when I decided to retire, I will let you know. Where is the question of not answering?

Do you see yourself playing Test cricket in four years' time?
I don't know. When I started playing cricket, I didn't see myself playing for 22 years either. I don't know what is in store [for me]. It is in God's hands.

You are at a phase where there is a huge legacy behind you. Going forward, how would you look at it? Is there something on your mind akin to creating a Sachin Tendulkar foundation? Looking ahead, how do you see yourself connecting with brands?
While still playing cricket, I don't think I would be able to do all those things, like creating a foundation. But there will be a stage in life where I can start thinking about those things. At this moment, I am honestly not thinking of that and whatever I do, I do it privately and I don't disclose all those things. But I feel when I stop playing cricket, I will have more time on my hands and I will look at doing those things and react to those things.

WSG look after my brands and they come to me and ask me 'do you think you want to associate yourself with a particular brand'. There are certain things that I have stated I will not promote, and I am glad I have not promoted tobacco and alcohol. There were offers but I have stuck to my promise, and whatever the offers, I have said no.

Have you been approached by hospitals, doctors or other players to talk about the tennis elbow and how you can treat it?
Not really. That is something that I would want all sportspersons to stay away from - I hope they don't get injuries. I was associated with CARE hospital. They used my name and, in return, I had asked that all state-level sportsmen and sportswomen should be treated free of cost, and they have done that. That is my only association [with regards to helping sportspersons deal with injuries].

Do other cricketers ask your advice on injuries?
When I saw Praveen Kumar in South Africa last year, he had injured his elbow. Before the physio could examine it, I said apply ice and I said 'it doesn't look good I am sorry', because I knew it was tennis elbow.

You have said winning the World Cup was your dream. Any unfulfilled dreams left?
I don't have any other dream now. There were two big dreams: one was playing for India and the second was to lift the World Cup. That was my biggest dream.

Nagraj Gollapudi is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on March 28, 2012, 15:12 GMT

    @Al_Bundy1, wow! Take a bow mate! I couldn't have put it any better. Exactly my thoughts. Same to same - as we would say in Andhra Pradesh when we have the same shirt or shoe or when we are in agreement.... Well said mate.

  • on March 28, 2012, 7:33 GMT

    can any body tell me which match it was when sachin was on 196 and dravid declared the innings?? cant remember if it was against pakistan or australia. but the thing i can still remember is that he was batting for his double hundred and not looking to score quickly even when india had plenty of wickets in hand. and i can remember nobody in the cricketing world had any sympathy with sachin over missing out on the double ton. experts in fact admired dravid for the bold decision. clearly shows sachin has always had this habit of slowing down scoring to achieve personal milestones. exactly why people like imran khan have questioned his credibility as match winner. to win matches for team u must play for team.

  • silly_pt on March 28, 2012, 7:09 GMT

    @jay57870 on (March 27 2012, 13:58 PM GMT)-excellent comment that. I read the very logically written(he is always logical) Ian article you mentioned about. He emphasized on Sachin's 2nd coming which takes him ahead of Lara and Ponting. Though I consider Lara ahead of Sachin in Test Cricket(but who am I to compare in first place!!), the simplicity & conviction with which the Little Master bats can never be matched. Greg talks about Picasso, well, I would say Lara is Van Gogh of cricket & Sachin Tolstoy!! (Dravid & Kallis are just Dravid & Kallis yet 'Dravid' & 'Kallis'). Cricinfo publish.

  • on March 28, 2012, 6:55 GMT

    'I am madly in love with the sport'

    John Wright had told me that you should be the first player to score 100 international hundreds and that was way back, during the 2003 World Cup ... this is what he had told me, just to push me. The coach's job is to give the players that high and make sure that they are in the frame of mind to deliver, and possibly John was looking to do that......

  • stark-truth on March 28, 2012, 6:30 GMT

    So he wants to celebrate fully even though he has been unable to rescue the team from total ignominy in the last year as he team rocks from one failure to another? Then he claims to be a team man. What contradiction in terms! Tells you where really his priorities lay. Great player but over-glorified.

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 28, 2012, 3:08 GMT

    What SRT really wanted to say, but his promotors won't let him say is - I am madly in love with all the fame and money cricket has brought me. I would like to retire but these advertisers would stop paying me. You don't want me to live the life of an average Joe, like the rest of you, do you? So please tolerate me for some more time.

  • kristee on March 28, 2012, 1:44 GMT

    Simple, both his rather slow yet 'historic' century and poor bowling by his teammates are responsible for his 200th ODI loss and the consequent exit from the AC. Which was more is immaterial.

  • mansman on March 27, 2012, 23:07 GMT

    @ Shobhit Bhatnagar: "stop blaming sachin for everything bad that is happening in your life", could'nt have said it better. Well done!

  • Crikt.Afg on March 27, 2012, 21:52 GMT

    love u sachin ... what a player what apersonality what a humanity what a legend ... keep it up sachin and go for the 2015 world cup and win it again.... I can't wait to see him playing... Please sachin play in all kinda cricket and make us happy.. Luvs to u the Great Master

  • on March 27, 2012, 20:08 GMT

    @Valavan how do you know that buddy? Did you do any survey among non Indian fans to figure out who has more fans ? BTW, have you watched the standing ovations that Sachin received wherever he went in both the last 2 Australian tours ? And also in the last tour of England...Do you think any other player would have been admired like that ? Don't just go by the comments from certain section of media or from discussion boards. Go to the grounds and see the reality.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on March 28, 2012, 15:12 GMT

    @Al_Bundy1, wow! Take a bow mate! I couldn't have put it any better. Exactly my thoughts. Same to same - as we would say in Andhra Pradesh when we have the same shirt or shoe or when we are in agreement.... Well said mate.

  • on March 28, 2012, 7:33 GMT

    can any body tell me which match it was when sachin was on 196 and dravid declared the innings?? cant remember if it was against pakistan or australia. but the thing i can still remember is that he was batting for his double hundred and not looking to score quickly even when india had plenty of wickets in hand. and i can remember nobody in the cricketing world had any sympathy with sachin over missing out on the double ton. experts in fact admired dravid for the bold decision. clearly shows sachin has always had this habit of slowing down scoring to achieve personal milestones. exactly why people like imran khan have questioned his credibility as match winner. to win matches for team u must play for team.

  • silly_pt on March 28, 2012, 7:09 GMT

    @jay57870 on (March 27 2012, 13:58 PM GMT)-excellent comment that. I read the very logically written(he is always logical) Ian article you mentioned about. He emphasized on Sachin's 2nd coming which takes him ahead of Lara and Ponting. Though I consider Lara ahead of Sachin in Test Cricket(but who am I to compare in first place!!), the simplicity & conviction with which the Little Master bats can never be matched. Greg talks about Picasso, well, I would say Lara is Van Gogh of cricket & Sachin Tolstoy!! (Dravid & Kallis are just Dravid & Kallis yet 'Dravid' & 'Kallis'). Cricinfo publish.

  • on March 28, 2012, 6:55 GMT

    'I am madly in love with the sport'

    John Wright had told me that you should be the first player to score 100 international hundreds and that was way back, during the 2003 World Cup ... this is what he had told me, just to push me. The coach's job is to give the players that high and make sure that they are in the frame of mind to deliver, and possibly John was looking to do that......

  • stark-truth on March 28, 2012, 6:30 GMT

    So he wants to celebrate fully even though he has been unable to rescue the team from total ignominy in the last year as he team rocks from one failure to another? Then he claims to be a team man. What contradiction in terms! Tells you where really his priorities lay. Great player but over-glorified.

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 28, 2012, 3:08 GMT

    What SRT really wanted to say, but his promotors won't let him say is - I am madly in love with all the fame and money cricket has brought me. I would like to retire but these advertisers would stop paying me. You don't want me to live the life of an average Joe, like the rest of you, do you? So please tolerate me for some more time.

  • kristee on March 28, 2012, 1:44 GMT

    Simple, both his rather slow yet 'historic' century and poor bowling by his teammates are responsible for his 200th ODI loss and the consequent exit from the AC. Which was more is immaterial.

  • mansman on March 27, 2012, 23:07 GMT

    @ Shobhit Bhatnagar: "stop blaming sachin for everything bad that is happening in your life", could'nt have said it better. Well done!

  • Crikt.Afg on March 27, 2012, 21:52 GMT

    love u sachin ... what a player what apersonality what a humanity what a legend ... keep it up sachin and go for the 2015 world cup and win it again.... I can't wait to see him playing... Please sachin play in all kinda cricket and make us happy.. Luvs to u the Great Master

  • on March 27, 2012, 20:08 GMT

    @Valavan how do you know that buddy? Did you do any survey among non Indian fans to figure out who has more fans ? BTW, have you watched the standing ovations that Sachin received wherever he went in both the last 2 Australian tours ? And also in the last tour of England...Do you think any other player would have been admired like that ? Don't just go by the comments from certain section of media or from discussion boards. Go to the grounds and see the reality.

  • ikingkk on March 27, 2012, 18:29 GMT

    I think Sachin's records are more important than Asia cup. Cuz Asia cup happens every year but we don't get player Sachin even in a century.

  • nasersid on March 27, 2012, 18:16 GMT

    I had great respect for him both as an outstanding cricketer and human being until I saw how desperate and selfish he became for the 100th 100. He is truly a legend of records but as a team player and looking out for India's well being I beg to disagree with all fans here. He is now a self centered record/money hungry egoistic person who thinks he is above the game. He must leave gracefully before he starts making himself (a fool from a legend he once was).

  • ikingkk on March 27, 2012, 18:13 GMT

    What a MAN.....what a commitment......What a player.................

  • gauravbanodha on March 27, 2012, 16:51 GMT

    jay57870 chappel brothers are very shrewd. perhaps they dont want sachin to retire and team india to progress ; )

  • zico123 on March 27, 2012, 16:45 GMT

    Sachin - the biggest sportsman ever, no matter what few people say he plays for records or personal achievements, but at the end of the day scoring 100th 100 is not a matter of joke, only a genius can do it, and all those 100 100 runs have gone into Indian teams score book, so it has helped team's cause. all the best Sachin to play 2015 WC and win it again!

  • jay57870 on March 27, 2012, 13:58 GMT

    Amazing what a 100th 100 can do! The world is turned topsy turvy - at least the worldview from Down Under. OMG! Greg Chappell now proclaims: "Sachin Tendulkar is the Picasso among batsmen ... Bradman must have been Michelangelo"! Yes, the same Greg who was fired as India's coach in 2007. He now realises his mistake and regrets falling out with Sachin. Last year he was axed as talent manager by CA. He was even banned from the dressing room for his 'disconcerting influence'! And look at brother Ian Chappell. He now rates "Tendulkar slightly ahead of Brian Lara and comfortably in front of a fading Ricky Ponting"! Yes, the same Ian who - in some bizarre sibling sympathy - issued a wimpy "Mirror, Mirror on the wall, who is the best batsman of all?" dictum to Sachin. Ian's answer then: Brian Charles Lara. Well now it is: Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar. Macho man Ian has retracted as have many others. Sachin lets his bat do the talking. Such is the Staying Power of the Little Master!!!

  • FRRR on March 27, 2012, 13:41 GMT

    how a young player is supposed to come and take place of Tendulkar; when he himself is not leaving the place and using his influence to stay in indian team. Selectors are afraid to drop him because indian ppl will get mad and start rioting. Shame on Tendulkar ,,, Lara and Pointing were better players on field and off field.

  • gmt3872001 on March 27, 2012, 13:40 GMT

    WHAT AN EXCEPTIONAL : PRODIGY , SPORTSMAN , CAREER , CHARACTER , HUMAN BEING !!! I' m PROUD TO SAY HE' s THE WORLD NO. 1 & AN INDIAN !!! CONGRATS SACHIN ON A TRULY WONDERFUL CAREER !!!

  • kristee on March 27, 2012, 12:56 GMT

    A somewhat overrated player, I'd say. And I'd rate Kohli's Perth innings above his, considering the respective attacks and scenarios. Neither team lasted through the 2nd new ball this time around unlike then. Also, Kohli's match aggregate was exactly the same as T'kar's then . Still, people go for reputation when judging players.

  • SatyajitM on March 27, 2012, 12:34 GMT

    What a lot of people are forgetting that even during lean period too Sachin is among the better batsmen in the team. For both Eng and Aus tours he was second highest run getter from the team (obviously those performances were below his own standards). In fact after the second test in Aus, Ian Chappel (not exactly a Sachin fan) told that he is India's best batsman at the moment. Retirement is personal decision for every player, selectors can choose or drop players based on their performance, and Sachin is not doing too badly in that front. On the Ban match, it was plain poor bowling which lost India the match. Pak could restrict Ban around 230 in both matches and SL put them under pressure with 230 on board. Either of these two teams would have won hands down had they scored 290 againt Ban. Fact is India's batting was the best in the tourney while their bowling pathetic

  • on March 27, 2012, 12:01 GMT

    He is a giant as a man as well as a cricketer. To question his motives is crass to say the least!

  • khps on March 27, 2012, 11:15 GMT

    Let the frustrated guys may shout against you but we all love you and wanna see you in next world cup 2015

  • AdamDthecricketer on March 27, 2012, 10:59 GMT

    Sachin is still good enough to play international cricket.When a younger player challenges his place thaen he should consider retirement but for now just stop asking him the question of retirement because when he feels he isnt good enough to play he will stop.

  • FRRR on March 27, 2012, 10:12 GMT

    It looks as if he is madly in love with the money in cricket these days. Sorry Tendulkar but you were always overrated by others and now you are overrating yourself.

  • on March 27, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    Congratulation to Sachin Tendulkar. and i wish to see him on World Cup 2015 .... All the best

  • on March 27, 2012, 9:54 GMT

    I like to sachin play in 2015 world cup... all the best

  • on March 27, 2012, 9:49 GMT

    Really happy Master Blaster, Give your place to young stars*

  • Sumeet.Gupta on March 27, 2012, 9:40 GMT

    To all critics here, enjoy till it lasts buddy. You never know when it is going to end :(

  • on March 27, 2012, 8:16 GMT

    My Dear Cricket followers pls understand the game of cricket is to love/enjoy and be part of it so many ways SACHIN TENDULKAR is the greatest sportsmen of any era.He is a role model for the world how he present him self in the cricket field and outside the cricket field.He is great human being on earth so down and humble.It was honor to meet Sachin in 2007 world cup.I played highest level of cricket in Pakistan First-Class from 1975 to 1988 did lot of contribution hold record for tenth wicket partnership in 1981-82 and first pakistani to score double century after following-on.Cricket is my life i always carry on in my life.Cricket is complete education and way of life.We should thankfull to Sachin Tendulkar to give his services for 23 years.Cricket is the only game bring closer to each other.INDIA/PAKISTAN/SRI_LANKA/and BANGLADESH should have joint venture to permote each other countries like ENGLAND/AUSTRALIA/SOUTH AFRICA/NEW-ZEALAND do.There is so much talent in sub-continant.Think

  • TheOnlyEmperor on March 27, 2012, 8:11 GMT

    In any game, inorder to excel you need to display the attitude, stamina and inclination to excel and actually work towards it. That's what Sachin's career is about. His career stats are awesome without doubt especially given the fact that he was surrounded by players for the most part of his career who were either incompetent, tainted by scandals, media showmen etc. Even today, people look up to Sachin to produce a big score if India has to perform well. It's not about how much you score but the effect you have on the opposition when you are at the crease. With an outstanding array of shots, every bowler marvels him when he's hit to the boundary. His career strike rate is impressive as is his disposition to score boundaries. Even after 22 years, he fields in any position on the ground and rarely mis-fields or drops catches. He handles pressure, maintains his dignity and is a great ambassador for India and cricket the sport. Belittling him is futile. He's a giant. Grow up guys!

  • on March 27, 2012, 7:56 GMT

    My doubt is that can he play 2019 world cup?

  • on March 27, 2012, 7:03 GMT

    I still dont believe why people cannot see beyond the records that Sachin has created and look into the wonderful man that lies behind all those records? Yes, he has an incredible record and one day someone might be able to break all or most of them...but i dont see any other person to show such outstanding persona even when every single donkey (read critics and media) in this world is on his back asking one silly question: Why dont you score 100th? as if he doesn't want to...?? I bet any player who is under so much of pressure from everyone around him would have shown a backlash after that hundred (see Gambhir's and Kohli's reactions), but the way Sachin celebrated his 100 against Ban, showed the true class of a genius. Records apart, the gentleman that he is...i salute him. The only thing i ask his critics is to stop blaming sachin for everything bad that is happening in your life and let him enjoy and entertain millions for as long as he want and can.

  • AdamDthecricketer on March 27, 2012, 6:23 GMT

    Why are you so crictcal of Tendulkar? No matter what age you are if you are still good enough to play international cricket there should be no stopping you. He still is good enough so stop telling him to retire.

  • on March 27, 2012, 6:10 GMT

    Vibhor Yadav I do not want THE MASTER to retire.... Long live SACHIN RAMESH TENDUAR !!!

    Wake up Man, everything that starts has to come to end & SRT is no exception either.

  • silly_pt on March 27, 2012, 2:52 GMT

    @Valavan on (March 26 2012, 17:41 PM GMT): it's just one" international non indian" fan that matters - Sir Don Bradman Period

  • joseyesu on March 27, 2012, 2:45 GMT

    Anybody can give a prepared speech, but we could see him completely when he gave the maiden to mortaza. Mad to get the century than the Game.

  • Mel-waas on March 27, 2012, 2:28 GMT

    Age is just a number. Sachin please play till you are 50 yrs old or maybe 60. Please show the world that this number (called age ) means nothing

  • Meety on March 27, 2012, 2:04 GMT

    Interesting article. I think now that Dravid has retired, it will be important for Sachin to stay on for another year, maybe more if VVS retires soon too.

  • kristee on March 27, 2012, 1:57 GMT

    Valavan, he need not CAPTURE that record; he already holds it. Actually his 100th century had exactly corresponded to his 200th ODI loss! And, overall, he's featured in more than 250 international losses. Something hard to beat, too. I'm not saying this to belittle him. Merely stating facts.

  • on March 27, 2012, 1:51 GMT

    You should play till you are making scores, its that simple.

  • on March 27, 2012, 1:17 GMT

    C'mon guys. He is madly in love with Cricket. Have you been in love? I am moved by his statement. Earlier, even I wanted him to retire, but not now. He is truly in love. I can not ask a man of his genius to give up his love, if he is winning games for India. I love SRT. Always wil love you Sachin. You dont know how much happiness you have given to us Indians.

  • on March 27, 2012, 1:04 GMT

    As a West Indian I thank Tendukar for being a sportsman and as long u still making runs for your Country y retire. Tendukar is a brand for Cricket.

  • KumarEn on March 27, 2012, 1:01 GMT

    Sachin says,"When I got to my [100th] hundred, the reaction was I looked at the bat and looked upwards towards God and said 'it's been a tough time for me'...Even the God would have thought as much, this guy is not retiring at least now , asking more & more favors from me, Its a real Tough Time even for a God.

  • StopSmoking on March 27, 2012, 0:26 GMT

    @ Valavan he also is 2nd on the most number of wins as well after Ponting. What does it tell you? Does it tell you that one player can't win this many matches and it's a team sport? People are obsessed with what Sachin does and what he says .. how he plays? Is in form? Is he scoring at proper rate when he is nearing century? Has he scored everywhere? Has he scored runs against proper team? Blah blah and then BOOOM they suddenly get blind when it comes to other players around the around. Has anyone asked why this kind of obsession happened with just one player? I will tell you why! Because Sachin forced us to praise him .. criticize him .. adore him ... talk about him during most of our cricket talks ... negative or positive .. Sachin has become part of our cricket talking life. Why? Because Sachin made us do it. And that's is WIN for Sachin and Team India. Sachin is challenge to next upcoming players. Can they create this kind of persona? It will take at least 20+ years of cricket.

  • on March 26, 2012, 23:11 GMT

    Here is a man who is nearing 40 still competing with the youngsters and scoring runs and passionate as ever for the sport. The ONLY yard stick in any sport is performance and nothing else. If Sachin is performing I don't really understand why people bring out some nonsensical logic and ask him to retire? One or two series performances is not a yardstick for some one like Sachin and mind you, even though he didn't score many runs he was playing well atleast in Australia. Please understand that you are talking about one of the ALL TIME GREATS in cricket. I don't understand how and why people think that they know better than him about his game and cricket as a whole. Its really funnly.

  • moBlue on March 26, 2012, 22:58 GMT

    @LillianThompson: don't judge something when you haven't experienced it yourself. we IND fans of sachin tendulkar went through some very bleak periods when he was in his late teens and throughout his 20s when sachin was the ***only player*** in the entire team - despite all the impressive names you rattled off! - that gave us any hope of never-saying-die and fighting for IND because we knew he had it in him - in terms of mental toughness, grit, and intelligence, and not just talent - and he did so on multiple occasions too numerous to count. a number of players in the IND team, a few of them senior to sachin, those days were involved in match-fixing as well - azharuddin was banned for life you may have heard! so we know why we love our sachin, thanks but no thanks to your input! we were there! if it weren't for sachin, we know the golden era of IND cricket would never have come about! ever think of that? he is the first one - after sunny G retired -to believe!!! ...and that too at 16!

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 26, 2012, 22:35 GMT

    Completely agree with @LillianThomson. He always has very objective comments. 10dulkar started as a wonder boy, but after playing for 22 years, he's still a boy. He could never become a leader like Imran Khan, or a scholar of the game like Rahul Dravid or Shane Warne. He could have used his immense talent for the greater good of Indian cricket. Instead he wasted it in pursuit of material things like fancy sports car, and private bungalow.

  • Al_Bundy1 on March 26, 2012, 22:30 GMT

    Please bring back Greg Chappell. He's a no-nonsense guy. He will get rid of all non-performers, starting with SRT.

  • Lord_Dravid on March 26, 2012, 22:13 GMT

    @Max Yazdan Ahmed..hasnt it occured to you that there's enough room for india to try out youngsters?even more so now that dravid has gone? i find it nonsense wen people like you say he should retire to give way to younger players..you sound very jealous.

  • on March 26, 2012, 21:59 GMT

    Hats off to this living legend....Don't blame him, every individual has the right to be selfish in some way or the other...he is no exception as far as this subject is concerned. He is Destiny's child, let him concentrate on his game.We hope he serves the country to the fullest of his potential which is unseen yet... i mean it.....Who would have ever imagined someone scoring 100 international hundreds...this is beyond imagination and this will remain beyond the same... nobody will ever cross this humongous feat.... eventually i would like to quote hats off MASTER for serving this country which is passionate about this sport let it be some family issues evry one is glued to there tv. sets when sachin is batting......are dont say anything sachin is batting...we feel him as part of our own.......RESPECT FOLKES....

  • on March 26, 2012, 19:32 GMT

    Steve Jobs once said "Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary." It is important to bear in mind that determination, desire to succeed…fire in the belly, achievement orientation, etc. are the building blocks of success. One has to be inspired rather than requiring external motivational strokes to push oneself on the path of success. Great man...having ardently followed his career from the time he started, he never ceases to amaze me with his humility and simplicity! We are blessed! All those heaping abuse on the man need to remember Steve Jobs on being trapped by their dogma's. Get out of it guys. Wake up and learn something.

  • on March 26, 2012, 19:17 GMT

    Sachin Please retire then you will become a legend India needs to give chance to young talents they are not getting chances because of senior players he is a legend already he does not need to play anymore.. better give time to his children and teach them cricket

  • Crikt.Afg on March 26, 2012, 18:49 GMT

    @ Labolg Nezitic ! Dear If you want to build a future team you must have the experience there to guide them from matches to matches and from pitches to pitches so presence of Sachin is extremely important for the other junior players to be guided...and if the little master has made his only 100th 100 against B'desh his 99 other centuries have been against the toughest of the teams like AUS, SA, PAK, SRI and England...Please keep in mind this.. And he already mentioned that his retirement belongs to him when to decide so please stop saying FIND THE EXIT DOOR because Im sure he does what he wants, not what you want . . .

  • Rivka on March 26, 2012, 18:17 GMT

    There are even those Indians who hate this extraordinary sportsman because they think he has achieved enough - without ever being able to understand what he has achieved. The reason for this is that our wonderful game has been reduced to a cheap slogging copy in the form T20, where a batsman of Tendulkar's caliber cannot display his skills, nor show why he is technically special. A generation is now growing up with this meaningless slogging - I refuse to call it cricket. If the ODI format took away some of the charm of the long version of the game, T20 will completely destroy everything that distinguishes cricket from any other quickfire sport. And then there won't be anyone left to understand the genius of Sachin Tendulkar.

  • on March 26, 2012, 17:41 GMT

    I do not want THE MASTER to retire.... Long live SACHIN RAMESH TENDUAR !!!

  • Valavan on March 26, 2012, 17:41 GMT

    Its great Sachin is continuing to play. he can also capture the record from Shiv chanderpaul, who featured in most International losses. That could add to his personal record book. Who cares of batting records as long as matches are lost. This is the very reason, why Rahul dravid has most international fans ( i mean non indian fans) than Selfish Ramesh Tendulkar. cricinfo please publish.

  • Johnny_129 on March 26, 2012, 17:30 GMT

    Sachin Tendulkar - what a player, what a man!!! Simply great...God bless Sachin. Whenever a player achieves as much and attracts as much attention as Sachin has, there will always be people trying to bring him down - this will be done for various reasons...either jealousy, promotion of other favourite players or simply a lack of knowledge in the game. Unfortunately, Sachin has been a victim of his success. One thing's for sure, Sachins records and his contribution to Indian cricket will not be surpassed....at least not in our lifetime!

  • Wolfpac on March 26, 2012, 17:28 GMT

    I hope players like Kohli learn from the attitude of this guy, I am a Sri Lankan but when it comes to Sachin we are all your fans. Murali and Sachin the Bradman of our time

  • on March 26, 2012, 16:39 GMT

    Sachin is a great player and the highest run-scorer; but Lara was more talented; Jayasuriya was more exciting; Viv Richards was more intimidating.

  • on March 26, 2012, 16:10 GMT

    and we are in love with you Sachin. You have played the sport like a true son to the sport and we know you will continue to do so forever.

  • Nampally on March 26, 2012, 16:07 GMT

    As long as a player is fit & producing, age should not be a factor in retirement. Sachin Tendulkar is still India's best batsman as evident watching him play. So the Media should stop haunting him with the question "When will you retire"? A great sportsman knows when he can produce and when it is time to say good bye! I am glad to hear Sachin gave the "Media" his say on this subject. The best advise was given to Sachin by Shane Warne: Don't let the Media hound you into retirement!. Media + some crazy cricket fans + so called Cricket Pundit do more harm than good. They are just arm chair critics not contributing anything nor changing the result by their uncalled for criticism. If one enjoys his work & makes positive contribution, nobody in the World can be forced into retirement. Why should an all time "Cricket Great" be? India owes its batting strength over the past decade to Sachin, Dravid, Viru & Laxman. Just because Dravid announces his retirement, Sachin is not obliged to follow!

  • on March 26, 2012, 15:58 GMT

    Sachin is simply superb and great:)...

  • Herath-UK on March 26, 2012, 15:50 GMT

    Jayasuriya too said so in his forties,so you are not alone ! Ranil Herath - Kent

  • screamingeagle on March 26, 2012, 15:06 GMT

    You read and wonder; how does this guy go on maintaining such high levels through all these years. The answer was also there in the interview. Keep it simple and want it bad enough. Hats off to you Sachin, no one like you in the cricket world. As regards the retire now calls, that is the fave pastime, build up someone and then tear him down. Normal stuff in India.

  • on March 26, 2012, 15:01 GMT

    Those who are saying he should just retire from 1-day now will bash him when he does retire (from one day) and plays 20-20 saying he's playing for money now and doesn't want to serve his country!

  • AjaySridharan on March 26, 2012, 14:15 GMT

    The guy can retire whenever he wants. The selectors should have the spine and drop him from the squad if they don't see a role for him in the team...especially in ODIs. There's no doubt Sachin tried hard for his 100th hundred, but sometimes I feel he tried harder to be too modest. And please, no matter what your records are, don't keep calling playing cricket as "serving your nation".

  • NALINWIJ on March 26, 2012, 14:07 GMT

    Sachin has now achieved all the milestones now and I suppose he might have to hold the fort till India is ready for him to retire and India face a hiatus in their batting.

  • sandunk on March 26, 2012, 14:04 GMT

    Why is it others business to decide on his retirement? You guys dont have anything better to do? I presume failures in some sort and frustrated at another persons success? or just a nosy mind...

  • akpy on March 26, 2012, 13:00 GMT

    thanks for the full transacript..i also watched the full video. Usually, i find media highlighting such interviews selectively and even here, TOI gave a headline like 'sachin says only he can decide on his future' 'sachin says 2015 wc a possibility'..well, he was merely answering the question that was put to him. I for one cannot fathom why there are indians hating this man and can only put it down to insecure fans of other greats, esp dravid, though players like dravid are not to be blamed for this. If one had followed cricket closely, you can recall so many aspects of brilliance from this one cricketer with bat and ball, fighting it out for india in all conditions and extraneous circumstances. And, to hear some people who cant score 10 runs in a street cricket team, speak nonsense about sachin, is a bit sad and insane. We are in for a treat in IPL and next season, as he is going to bat freely and express himself for sure.

  • kcpingle on March 26, 2012, 12:55 GMT

    What a man ! What commitment !! An institution to excel for people from all walks of lives !

  • LillianThomson on March 26, 2012, 12:33 GMT

    The respect Indian posters have for Tendulkar is impressive, but bizarre. In the 90s he had Azharuddin, Shastri, Kapil Dev and Kumble for company. Then he got Dravid, Ganguly, Laxman and Srinath. Later he got Zaheer Khan and Harbhajan and Dhoni. Yet every team with Tendulkar under-achieved, especially in away Tests, and it's not hard to see why. He sees his career as 100 hundreds and a home World Cup. Unlike team-mates with superior intelligence and education (Kumble, Laxman, Dravid) he doesn't get that top players are judged by how they perform in Tests in adversity. He is stuck as the boy-Prince who cannot lead either as a captain or even as a fighter. Tendulkar used to be one of the best five contemporary batsmen in the world until he passed his peak 3 or 4 years ago. If he had had the IQ and personality of a Dravid he would have established himself as superior to Lara, Kallis, Sangakkara and Ponting, rather than their equal.

  • on March 26, 2012, 12:22 GMT

    Sachin is great...his passion and love for the game is awesome...

  • Narumanchi on March 26, 2012, 12:14 GMT

    It looks like all the Companies endorsed by him are now controlling him. Well, if I were in Sachin's shoes, I too would have been tempted to play on and on when I ear about 10 Crores every year. Who does not like money? Sad to know that a great team man like Sachin too is human like being like us. Perhaps he doesn't want to retire till his Son Arjun too plays alongside with him and that would be a very great record to reap rich dividends to all the brands supported by him. Just imagine the ad where Sachin and Arjun together would say "Boost is the secret of our energy".And Yes inspite of all his greatness I somehow felt that he is very particular of Hundreds. If we can have some study done on the average balls taken by him to move from 90s to 100 in comparison with his peers like Ponting, Lara etc, my point may be proved right.

  • on March 26, 2012, 11:59 GMT

    @Vishal Raj, big hundred means scoring more than 150, ummm, how many players have scored more than 150 in 30 years ODI history.

  • smalishah84 on March 26, 2012, 11:56 GMT

    Have to say that Tendulkar has so much humility despite him being such a big icon.

  • on March 26, 2012, 11:54 GMT

    Thanks Sachin for being there for the last 22 years.

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:50 GMT

    This student needs to be rusticated.

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:35 GMT

    I bet Mumbai and possibly Yorkshire wished he'd played more First Class Cricket, he than might have 100 FC centuries to go with the 100 International 100's.

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:33 GMT

    like road building, team building is a matter of FUTURE outlook. If the road is good today, doesn't mean it will last forever. You don't build new roads only after the present one breaks down. The present road (SRT) served excellent... NO DOUBT... but new roads (read players) should be planned / built and for that the old road should give way. PLEASE RETIRE for the sake of future!

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:28 GMT

    You made a laborious ton against B'desh (having failed against other major teams for a whole year). Now you got the voice to justify yourself in the lengthiest interview. enuf if enuf... PLEASE FIND THE EXIT DOOR... you have achieved a lot already... let someone aspire to grow. Jus like U … someone would need 70-100 matches to make their mark.

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:28 GMT

    where is greg chappel guys? india needs him badly. his methods were made fun of when he was in india. but i think he was going the right way when he was trying to develop team spirit in players. team spirit is exactly what our players lack. sachin's interview is a perfect example. asking sachin to retire is like asking a bug to donate blood. its a waste of time. it is never going to happen. cant see anybody in india that can make it happen. india needs greg chappel.

  • mithun2880 on March 26, 2012, 10:26 GMT

    "To retire when you are at your peak in the game", is it ? Who wrote this law ?! Sachin has and will always create his laws !!! Don't tell him to retire...He is the only person to decide, When to retire !!!

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:15 GMT

    Truly, Sachin is great.His humbleness and passion for the game is always admired by all...

  • on March 26, 2012, 10:05 GMT

    advising sachin on retirement is like asking bug/mosquito to donate blood. india needs greg chappell back. cant see anybody in india man enough to compel him to go.

  • Vishal_Raj on March 26, 2012, 9:49 GMT

    Sachin should retire for these reasons-

    1)If he wants to play ODI he better play in most ODIs, he cant be playing selective ODI and disturb the team combination whenever he feels like playing.

    2) In ODI nowdays you need to perform dual role as a batsman/ good fielder/part time bowler right now he fits in 1 criteria only and in that too he is not consistent. 3) morever he is unable to take adv of field restriction/powerplay and he is not getting Big 100 as a opener.big 100 means taking ur team through like virat did in hobart and against pakistan right till end which his fitness at present doesnt let him to do so he remains avg and would just score 50/100 aftre every 8-10 matches and get out.

    4) his fitness, His age and does he really has in him to take India to finals of next WC 2015 in australia wher he performed so poorly recently - I doubt better give a deserving youngster a chance.

  • on March 26, 2012, 9:32 GMT

    People who say he plays for himself, I am sorry but they do not know the human nature well. Everyone wants to achieve high marks, everyone wants to be the best, but in doing so if he is labelled as playing for himself its utter neglegence to this GOD of a Man's dedication and hard hard work. Before saying anything like that just remember that this Sachin Tendulkar was the same man who went back to represent his country immediately after his father's death mid way in the tournament. What was the need!!Because he wanted to score a Hundred for himself? All those who try to bring bad name to this Genius, go back and think will you ever ever do this?? He values his Country and Cricket more than himself.. He is the greates ever born to play cricket. Let him be! PERIOD

  • on March 26, 2012, 8:56 GMT

    This man is above everyone in the world of cricket. The problem with creating so many records is that people label you as a record-hungry person without a single grain of knowledge about that person. HATS OFF!

  • on March 26, 2012, 8:54 GMT

    Achieved Almost Every Everything..A National Icon..Still so much Down To Earth.. Perfect example of Dedication, Commitment, Motivation, Discipline, Passion..and so on..!! Tonnes of things to learn from this interview..!! Love you Sachin..!!

  • Crikt.Afg on March 26, 2012, 7:57 GMT

    Very well said Sachin ,,, loves to you and hats off to you for being such a great man beside being the legend in the World of Cricket... Those who criticize sachin, no doubt they are not indian because he is being respected in all over the world even in Pakistan people love him because of his talent and his achivements for his team... I am from Afghanistan and every one here watching cricket loves Sachin and has a deep respect for him. But why some people don't like him and want him to retire ? the answer is simple, those who don't like him they are the supporters of the opposite teams and for sure Sachin must have broken their dreams by his batting and performance so they want that Sachin should retire from International cricket so that they can win matches against India... For sure there is no replacement for the Little Master and we are very very happy that he is going to continue playing for India as long as he wants...LOVE YOU SACHIN

  • on March 26, 2012, 7:42 GMT

    RESPECT MAN RESPECT...................

  • SamuelThorpe7 on March 26, 2012, 7:38 GMT

    We Love you Sachin. We want to see you play forever. We will not get a Sachin Tendulkar again for 100 years. First things first, We are looking forward to host England and Aus and show them what we can do. Cleansweep those Green Pitch Bullies. We all know they will struggle. Dont give them an inch. Bat them out of every game and create sqaure turning pitches everywhere. Humiliate them. You are Virat are my favourite and you too alone create problems for any bowling attack. Keep playing Sachin. You are batting as good as you have in your career. GO INDIA !!!!

  • on March 26, 2012, 7:27 GMT

    Many may feel the century of centuries was easy as it came against a weak opponent. Initially, I will admit to have this misconception. But if you look back at the series and how well Bangladesh have bowled in the tournament (Dare I say the best bowling attack of the tournament). With top class spinners - Razzaq and Shakib, in wonderful form - Mashrafe and Nizmul. It was one of the best bowling performances by Bangladesh and dare again I say: best in 2012 Asia Cup. Noone could cross 250 mark except India due to class of the master and a new master in the making.

  • prashant1 on March 26, 2012, 7:25 GMT

    GOD.....is back !!! woooo hoooo !!....Awesome to see the naysayers cringe and squirm even after 23 yrs........LOOOVE it !!!

  • MiltonMathews on March 26, 2012, 7:20 GMT

    Down to earth, simple, no strings attached, logical and hence many things to learn from this interview for any lay person. For the outlook Sachin has Cricket is too small a canvas of life for him. I wish he would apply himself to serving nation and humanity. That is the challenge for that gift of rare outlook that God has bestowed on him. It is easy for such person to gift away peripherals of his huge estate, but the challenge is in the next step of his - people are watching. Now you are still a cricketer but that will end one day then applying the kudos they gave you (giving back) to themselves. In other words you are already in a position to limit your role to a 'passive' cricketer after your 'active' years or look at the need of the hour for our country and humanity as whole... and apply yourself to best of your ability. And I believe this choice of yours will be more rewarding and satisfying to you and thereby vouchsafing your temperament(outlook)

  • on March 26, 2012, 7:19 GMT

    Just dont understand what the celebration is all about...WC was won on April2nd last year(almost a year back..so it cant be that)since then we lost ODI Series 0-4 to England,was ousted from CB series without entering the finals,did not enter finals of Asia cup either.This is the worst performance EVER by a reigning world champion within 12 months of winning the WC.still Sachin has "invited media people from around the country to celebrate"..hiw can an individual win when the team has hit the bottom....really puzzling.....Any answers..anyone..

  • isharavithana on March 26, 2012, 7:16 GMT

    I like Sachin Tendulkar not because of his records; he is a great sportsman who deeply loves to sports!!

  • SRT_211503 on March 26, 2012, 7:13 GMT

    What a personality...!!! If no one is perfect in this world...then he is the closest candidate to becum MR.PERFECT... Proud to be INDIAN...

  • stark-truth on March 26, 2012, 6:42 GMT

    Good interview but some hyperbole though. Single century in over a year (that too against Bangladesh) of international cricket, including most ignominous 0-8 Test Series thrashings from England and Australia, and he says he's at the top his game?

  • on March 26, 2012, 6:40 GMT

    tatz sachin for us..man of simplicity and humble..no promotions for alcohol and tobacco ..... respect the game, enjoy the game & score runs.... no one can replace sachin and all critics u guyz keep shouting for nxt four years.... where sachin will be playing 2015 world cup....

  • Laulin on March 26, 2012, 6:30 GMT

    He keeps things so simple and straight forward. Another person who is similar is A.R. Rahman. Both of them on Top of the world and yet so humble and attributing their achievements back to God.

  • Rahul_78 on March 26, 2012, 6:26 GMT

    The guy respects his peers and juniors, loves his wife and kids and worships his parents. He has been the best role model you wish to have for your kids. There might come an individual who will break all records held by Sachin but I dont think there will be many role models to look up to of Sachins class and caliber. Not only Indian cricket but world cricket has been fortunate to have Sachin. We need to savor him till he lasts. Respect to the greatest batsmen India has ever produced.

  • on March 26, 2012, 6:24 GMT

    an inspiring one..u r a legend of cricket..no doubt in it..

  • indianzen on March 26, 2012, 6:06 GMT

    Tears rolled out on reading this statement... "Finally it had happened and I was really thrilled and I looked at the dressing room and I pointed my bat to the players, and also to the Indian flag that I have on my helmet. This is what I have done for the nation and everyone has been part of it.".. SACHIN a true Patriot... The nation salutes you...

  • BigDataIsAHoax on March 26, 2012, 5:54 GMT

    He is madly in love with himself and his 100s and his advertisement revenue. That's what he means. I hope he gets a string of low scores after that immaterial, degrading, pathetic, lethargic, self-centred 100th 100. Thanks for your contribution. Go now! Don't embarass us.

  • BigDataIsAHoax on March 26, 2012, 5:51 GMT

    Blah Blah. I can't stand the sight of this guy any more!!

  • bigdhonifan on March 26, 2012, 5:45 GMT

    Virat calls him Sachin Sir..... Yes he is the Legend!

  • on March 26, 2012, 5:31 GMT

    Winner is not the one who always win.... True Winner is the one who rises from the ashes of failure. He has always been my inspiration. I have great respect for him.

  • on March 26, 2012, 5:18 GMT

    Sachin is an amazing player and enjoyed the sport to the fullest. But when dreams are fulfilled now, shouldn't he give up ODI and start thinking to retire? Shouldn't he make way for aspiring young batsmen and allow him to grow up in stature? Beyond a point it looks selfish to me..........

  • iphone1 on March 26, 2012, 4:32 GMT

    You are truly a great SRT. Keep going..........

  • on March 26, 2012, 4:31 GMT

    It is stupid to consider that people will stop watching cricket if Sachin stops playing cricket.....We all enjoyed T20 WC win without sachin. 1983 WC win was without sachin.....cricket existed before him and will exist after him. He is great player but he will never be bigger than game.

  • Gupta.Ankur on March 26, 2012, 4:31 GMT

    Sachin is the greatest cricketer the game has seen.

  • on March 26, 2012, 4:27 GMT

    He has examples not only how to play cricket but also how to behave in situations. I am Sri Lankan fan. More than his batting, I like his attitude as sports man.

  • shahbazhussain on March 26, 2012, 4:18 GMT

    being Pakistani, but I always paid respect to Sachin from bottom of my heart as true game lover. being such nice and such awesome cricketer you have won billions heart Sachin. We all love your game and your attitude. You are a living encyclopedia of cricket. people should learn from you whether they belong to cricket or not. You are truly an institute which has 10000s of living examples in one package like your runs on the board. Salute you!

  • on March 26, 2012, 4:15 GMT

    ‎'I' dont need advise on retirement from any body. critics dont have right to advise me on retirement because 'I' havent learned the game from them. it was 'my' decision to play cricket and not theirs. it is 'my' hard work that has got me this far. only 'I' will decide when to retire from the game.- isnt this height of disgracefulness?? not once does he say his selection depends on the will of the selectors. such words cant be of a player who is devoted to the team. such highly self centered, arrogant and obstinate players dont deserve a graceful retirement. dont know why people ask him about his retirement plans. why cant he be dropped? if his arguments are to be accepted then what is the need to have a selection committee. it should be left to players to select or drop themselves. really indian cricket and specially the selectors need to get over this myth that sachin is great and should drop him from odis so that the team can move forward.

  • on March 26, 2012, 3:31 GMT

    *A to Z Qualities that every person to be learned from Sachin:

    A: Admiration, Adulation, Attention B: Belief, Brave C: Charity, Commitment D: Dedication, Devotion, Durable E: Encouragement, Endeavor F: Fearless G: Gratitude H: Humanity, Humble, Honest I: Intensity, Innovation J: Jive K: Kind L: Loyal M: Motivational, Master N: New ideas O: Overhaul P: Perfection Q: Quality R: Respect S: Steady, Silent T: Temperament, Technique U: Undertakings V: Volatile W: Wonderful X: X-treme Y: Youthful Z: Zero Gravity (Down to Earth)

  • Raja.Khurram on March 26, 2012, 2:43 GMT

    Tendulkar just never ceases to impress :) Warm regards from a Pakistani.

  • sachin86 on March 26, 2012, 2:43 GMT

    The greatest batsman of all-time.Respect.I'm glad that he didn't rule out playing 2015 WC ,even though it's a distant possibility, but it's implying that sachin is gonna stay here for at least 2 more years and he is not gonna retire in the near future.Wow!it's really amazing how this man is maintaining this level of consistency even after 23 years.Kudos!

  • on March 26, 2012, 2:28 GMT

    What a god. Has there ever been a humbler sportsman ever? A hundred hundreds and still runs between the wickets like a schoolboy. And I know that he is a huge Dire Straits fan. Tell all the kids in the dressing room to listen to some awesome music :)

  • QTS_ on March 26, 2012, 1:11 GMT

    One perpetual symbol of humility in the Indian team. The rest of the squad can take notice when (if?) they become number one in any format in the near future.

  • on March 26, 2012, 1:08 GMT

    John wright thank u for giving sachin such a task...!!!! and he has fulfilled it 2day..!!!

  • cricmatters on March 26, 2012, 0:01 GMT

    I hope there are no more articles on Sachin as it will bring all the sachin haters out of the woodwork. People fail to realise that all round good team performances win matches irrespective of individual milestones and records. There is no point in blaming Sachin if Indian bowlers could not defend a total of 290 against Bangladesh. He is not only a good cricket player but a very good human being first. That is what makes him so special.

  • Nadeem1976 on March 25, 2012, 23:35 GMT

    This guy is the most humble cricketer in history of cricket. Whether he play for next 5 years or retire today, i have great respect for this guy. Sachin is larger than life super cricketer, india should let him play as long as he wants. Don't put pressure on him to retire. Come on India he gave you 23 years of his life and you guys are still not great full and want him to retire without his wish. Give respect to this guy. He still has hunger for the game and don't look old at all. 39 age might be retiring age for other cricketers but not this genius. I hope Sachin plays freely like 1998 once again and we can see the greatest batsman playing best of cricket once more. Have fun.

  • on March 25, 2012, 21:16 GMT

    wonderful interview... learnt so much about what the great man was going through... respect.....

  • on March 25, 2012, 19:53 GMT

    sachin tendulkar truly a legend forget his records forget his contribution to Indian cricket just see the humanity of the man after so much still down to earth who will think (expect for the question asked on his records ) he is what he is .SACHIN TENDULKAR RESPECT

  • on March 25, 2012, 19:35 GMT

    RESPECT THIS MAN B4 CRITICIZING HIM !!IF HE WAS SELFISH HE D VE USED THE NAME USED BY THE HOSPITALS FOR MONEY BUT SEE WHAT HE DID THATS A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR HIS PERSONA ON AND OFF THE FIELD

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • on March 25, 2012, 19:35 GMT

    RESPECT THIS MAN B4 CRITICIZING HIM !!IF HE WAS SELFISH HE D VE USED THE NAME USED BY THE HOSPITALS FOR MONEY BUT SEE WHAT HE DID THATS A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR HIS PERSONA ON AND OFF THE FIELD

  • on March 25, 2012, 19:53 GMT

    sachin tendulkar truly a legend forget his records forget his contribution to Indian cricket just see the humanity of the man after so much still down to earth who will think (expect for the question asked on his records ) he is what he is .SACHIN TENDULKAR RESPECT

  • on March 25, 2012, 21:16 GMT

    wonderful interview... learnt so much about what the great man was going through... respect.....

  • Nadeem1976 on March 25, 2012, 23:35 GMT

    This guy is the most humble cricketer in history of cricket. Whether he play for next 5 years or retire today, i have great respect for this guy. Sachin is larger than life super cricketer, india should let him play as long as he wants. Don't put pressure on him to retire. Come on India he gave you 23 years of his life and you guys are still not great full and want him to retire without his wish. Give respect to this guy. He still has hunger for the game and don't look old at all. 39 age might be retiring age for other cricketers but not this genius. I hope Sachin plays freely like 1998 once again and we can see the greatest batsman playing best of cricket once more. Have fun.

  • cricmatters on March 26, 2012, 0:01 GMT

    I hope there are no more articles on Sachin as it will bring all the sachin haters out of the woodwork. People fail to realise that all round good team performances win matches irrespective of individual milestones and records. There is no point in blaming Sachin if Indian bowlers could not defend a total of 290 against Bangladesh. He is not only a good cricket player but a very good human being first. That is what makes him so special.

  • on March 26, 2012, 1:08 GMT

    John wright thank u for giving sachin such a task...!!!! and he has fulfilled it 2day..!!!

  • QTS_ on March 26, 2012, 1:11 GMT

    One perpetual symbol of humility in the Indian team. The rest of the squad can take notice when (if?) they become number one in any format in the near future.

  • on March 26, 2012, 2:28 GMT

    What a god. Has there ever been a humbler sportsman ever? A hundred hundreds and still runs between the wickets like a schoolboy. And I know that he is a huge Dire Straits fan. Tell all the kids in the dressing room to listen to some awesome music :)

  • sachin86 on March 26, 2012, 2:43 GMT

    The greatest batsman of all-time.Respect.I'm glad that he didn't rule out playing 2015 WC ,even though it's a distant possibility, but it's implying that sachin is gonna stay here for at least 2 more years and he is not gonna retire in the near future.Wow!it's really amazing how this man is maintaining this level of consistency even after 23 years.Kudos!

  • Raja.Khurram on March 26, 2012, 2:43 GMT

    Tendulkar just never ceases to impress :) Warm regards from a Pakistani.