South Africa v Australia, 3rd Test, Cape Town, 5th day March 5, 2014

Where did Harris find the swing and strength?

Plain numbers will never explain how good Ryan Harris was in Cape Town, where he defied logic and a crocked knee to bowl Australia to a famous victory
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#politeenquiries: Everything about Harris was out of this earth

There is something floating in Ryan Harris' knee. The medical community thinks it is bone. It's probably magic. Or a little pebble of awesomeness. Nothing else explains his last over.

In the overs before, Harris could barely bend over when fielding at gully. His hands were at the top of his thigh, not down near his knee in the customary position. When he walked, you were watching someone with osteoarthritis move, or someone who had done a whole day of rodeo. And when he stood up at the end of each ball you could hear the creaking all around the ground. Even his hip flexor had given out, possibly from the flexing he was doing more and more just to get by. Crocked. Stuffed. Finished. Another over was surely beyond him. Another Test might have been as well.

His job was to stay out on the ground to celebrate the potential Australian win. The win that they couldn't get. Vernon Philander's hand and Dale Steyn's bloody-mindedness were drawing the Test. Here were two forces.

One, the South Africans, they just refuse to lose a Test series. They're better when the primal need for survival has been put on them by their own shoddiness. This time, they had extra motivation with their captain, hero and leader on his last mission. They couldn't have done more to draw this game if they decided to dig actual trenches at the Kelvin Grove end. Against them was a very movable force. The fluid in Harris' knee was moving the bone quite often.

Australia thought they'd get eight or ten overs out of him in the entire second innings. The wicket of AB deVilliers was in his fifteenth. You should never call this dismissal anything as dismal as a wicket. It was a triumph of man over superman. De Villiers is currently batting like the laws of physics don't apply to him. It is as if he has learnt to see into the future and decides on his shot as the bowler is coming in. Getting him out in this form, with his assistance is virtually impossible. Getting him out without his assistance from a busted down old man who should be on crutches should be impossible. The only thing impossible was the Harris outswinger.

Ryan Harris winces in the face of impossible.

Today he winced from leg slip, slip, gully, short cover, or anywhere else you put the guy who stopped being able to move. But he kept coming back, more broken than before.

Tasmania had tried to break Queensland during the last Sheffield Shield final. They had prepared a pitch made of actual deserts. They batted in a coma. And then when Queendlsand tried to move the game on, they picked up enough wickets to lead by almost 200 runs after the first innings. In the first innings, Queensland had bowled 173.4 overs. Harris had bowled forty of those and taken three wickets.

But in the second innings, he just kept going in his opening spell. It seemed endless. Harris, and everyone watching or playing, knew that the only chance of a Queensland victory was with him. Tasmania collapsed under his pressure to 5 for 16. Harris bowled what felt like all the overs, he smashed the ball into this lifeless pitch, he demanded that the ball move for him, and he put his entire career in jeopardy by bowling 54 overs for his adopted state in a losing cause.

It seems that Harris just cannot quit. So why would he listen to his surgeon, his doctor, his physio, or anyone, when they said he couldn't bowl again. He hadn't ever listened to his body. Fast bowlers don't start international careers over 30 in already broken down bodies and take over a hundred wickets. But Harris wouldn't listen to modern medicine, he wouldn't listen to science, he wouldn't even listen to cricket stats.

It seems that Ryan Harris just cannot quit. So why would he listen to his surgeon, his doctor, his physio, or anyone, when they said he couldn't bowl again. He hadn't ever listened to his body. Fast bowlers don't start international careers over 30 in already broken down bodies and take over a hundred wickets

His second last over of the day looked like his last, well his last of any note. He bowled a short quick one that scared Steyn. It was quicker than his over the previous night where he bowled an over of Shane Watson-paced slower balls.

But he didn't look right. Instead of bashing through the crease like a Joe Frazier combination, steaming coming from his nose, his chest daring anyone to hit him, his legs were all over the place, and his fearsome torso looked attached to the wrong set of legs. His knee wasn't working, his hip was flexing poorly, and he was trying to play through it all and conquer a pitch that gave nothing.

On the second last ball, he slipped as he delivered. It looked, for the shortest of moments, like the injury that could end him today, tomorrow and forever. But he just went back to his mark and somehow got through the over. He was now noticeably limping. His action and run up was falling apart. He had surely bowled his last over, or at least, his last of anything approaching pace.

Nathan Lyon was tried, but had little luck. Watson came back on to wobble them about a bit. And had he wobbled them slightly better, or at least had Steyn playing at them, Harris might not have come back when he did.

When he came on, you couldn't shake the feeling that Ryan Harris shouldn't be bowling. Ryan Harris shouldn't be walking. Ryan Harris shouldn't be bowling Australia to victory. Ryan Harris shouldn't be running around the outfield having just taken the two final wickets in three balls. Ryan Harris should be with a surgeon, showing him how when he twists his knee, the bone clicks out of the bad bit and he can walk properly again.

Where did he find the swing or strength?

In the years to come it will read 24.3 overs, 15 maidens, 32 runs and four wickets. But unless it was written in synovial fluid, tears, bone, tendon and blood, no one will ever understand how good Ryan Harris was today. Whatever is in that knee, I hope they remove it, and get Ryan Harris fit again. Then I hope they show the removed item in a museum and schoolkids are bussed in to see it for years to come.

Jarrod Kimber was 50% of the Two Chucks, and is the mind responsible for cricketwithballs.com

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • MrAlastairCook on March 5, 2014, 22:25 GMT

    My favourite cricket article of the year, brilliantly written. It really does put Ryan Harris in the right perspective. I am sure the guy is not human....he is some sort of terminator sent from the future. He just keeps coming & coming like a tsunami until he overwhelms you taking whatever blows are delivered to him with not so much as a blink. Most batsmen in the world will be hoping this is the end for Ryno, but all cricket lovers will take greaqt stock in his parting comments "I'll be back". The stats might not say it but R. Harris should go down as one of Australia's all time great bowlers.

  • on March 8, 2014, 12:49 GMT

    Shaggy076, spot on. The action of pace bowling is very unnatural, and puts considerable strain on multiple vulnerable joints and muscle groups of the body. I bowl at only 110-120kph depending on how I'm feeling, how smooth my runup+action are going etc, and I'm always sore for the next few days, putting up with a stiff neck, sore from the side of my chest to my forearm, aching legs, knees that I routinely have to click and I only play at club level. For proper athletes this is the same, except they are putting much more force on their bodies to reach over 130kph, and for those that are able to reach 140+kph (let alone the few that manage 150+kph), this is a HUGE strain, it's very difficult to manage this no matter what your conditioning. It is a role that is GUARANTEED to injure you, some people can cycle for years competitively and not get anywhere near the injuries, but you'll find pace bowlers with shoulder\knee reconstructions, I'd mention more but I only have 3 characters left.

  • Shaggy076 on March 8, 2014, 11:46 GMT

    India_Boy; YOu may have played some cricket but did you ever bowl over 140 k/hr. Bowling is the most unnatural action, I myself try to bowl as fast as possible and think I have clocked over the 100 k/hr on the odd occasion but bowling a ball at pace is just as taxing as a 100 meter sprint. It takes a lot of energy to release the ball at such velocity. Harris bowled 24.3 overs in that second innings that is 147 legit balls (havent looked whether any balls were wides or no balls) but the point is it is a massive stress on a body that was already hurt before he started. Yes Marathon running, cycling for over 40 hrs, football are taxing. Some areas in cricket are a lot less taxing but the role of a fast bowler is not one of those areas.

  • Vishnu27 on March 7, 2014, 20:15 GMT

    India_boy: probably time to stop saying stuff. If you want wax lyrical about other sports go to other sports sites. This is a cricket site & an article dedicated to strain Ryan Harris has put his body through for many years. Most people here can appreciate that & enjoy the dedication & salute Kimber has provided to a warrior & all-round good bloke. Most people, except you.

    I've played lots of cricket too, "so I have a fair idea what I'm talking about" also

  • on March 7, 2014, 13:50 GMT

    Great article, to go with one of the best test series (certainly 3 test series) we've had for a long time (the greatest 3 test series ever? Probably still the 1988 West Indies v Pakistan series - Marshall, Ambrose, Walsh Imran, Wasim and Qadir among the bowlers - 6 all time greats). Among all the hype surrounding Mitch (who can go from worldbeater to total liability), it's easy to forget how good Ryan Harris actually is (100 wickets at an average slightly lower than Steyn's should remind you). Just a pity there aren't two more tests.

  • SharathSridhar on March 7, 2014, 8:37 GMT

    The pain passes but the beauty remains. Outstanding article!

  • on March 7, 2014, 6:11 GMT

    Jarrod Kimber, take a bow along with Ryan Harris. You just keep outdoing yourself with your writing. Kudos.

  • smweb2.0 on March 7, 2014, 5:33 GMT

    One of the best articles on Espncricinfo - an article which would inspire people to do the impossible. Ryano proved that as much as physical, cricket is a mental game too. When he came on, it was evident that Ryan Harris shouldn't be bowling or walking. Would he able to make the batsmen play? But the first delivery he bowled was a near perfect yorker, one the hardest deliveries to bowl in cricket, as you need tremendous skill plus effort to bowl one. The next delivery was a bit wide of Morkel, going down leg, but you could understand what his intention was. In the third ball of the over he got what he was looking to do - a delivery coming back to the left-hander, hitting the stumps. It was too good for No. 11 who has just come to the crease and was saving a test match. An incredible example where a human's mental strength has outgrown the physical hurdles. Kudos Ryan Harris.

  • India_boy on March 7, 2014, 5:11 GMT

    Everybody please calm down. On the outset, I'd like to apologise to anyone I may have unintentionally offended through my opinion. Secondly, I merely said that even the slightest injury in cricket attracts poetries and myths alike, whereas in other sports, injuries and physical stress much much harder go unnoticed merely because they're considered a part of the game. Cycling, marathon, basketball, football, athletics, gymnastics etc. put enormous strain on the body. I never said RH's effort wasn't epic, and I completely admire Aus/SA teams' culture and hard work ethics much more than my own team's, but my core implication was that cricket is a little lethargic compared to a few other sports and thus a little extra effort becomes the stuff of legends. And yes, I have played a lot of cricket, just like every other Indian, from chalk to foil cricket to leather ball cricket, so I have a fair idea what I'm talking about . Cricinfo I request you to publish this please

  • cricfootyfan on March 7, 2014, 4:10 GMT

    Ryan, you are an inspiration to any sportsman who wants to excel. In fact, you are an inspiration to mankind - you teach them how to fight all odds and be successful if you have the conviction, belief and desire. Hats off to you!!

  • MrAlastairCook on March 5, 2014, 22:25 GMT

    My favourite cricket article of the year, brilliantly written. It really does put Ryan Harris in the right perspective. I am sure the guy is not human....he is some sort of terminator sent from the future. He just keeps coming & coming like a tsunami until he overwhelms you taking whatever blows are delivered to him with not so much as a blink. Most batsmen in the world will be hoping this is the end for Ryno, but all cricket lovers will take greaqt stock in his parting comments "I'll be back". The stats might not say it but R. Harris should go down as one of Australia's all time great bowlers.

  • on March 8, 2014, 12:49 GMT

    Shaggy076, spot on. The action of pace bowling is very unnatural, and puts considerable strain on multiple vulnerable joints and muscle groups of the body. I bowl at only 110-120kph depending on how I'm feeling, how smooth my runup+action are going etc, and I'm always sore for the next few days, putting up with a stiff neck, sore from the side of my chest to my forearm, aching legs, knees that I routinely have to click and I only play at club level. For proper athletes this is the same, except they are putting much more force on their bodies to reach over 130kph, and for those that are able to reach 140+kph (let alone the few that manage 150+kph), this is a HUGE strain, it's very difficult to manage this no matter what your conditioning. It is a role that is GUARANTEED to injure you, some people can cycle for years competitively and not get anywhere near the injuries, but you'll find pace bowlers with shoulder\knee reconstructions, I'd mention more but I only have 3 characters left.

  • Shaggy076 on March 8, 2014, 11:46 GMT

    India_Boy; YOu may have played some cricket but did you ever bowl over 140 k/hr. Bowling is the most unnatural action, I myself try to bowl as fast as possible and think I have clocked over the 100 k/hr on the odd occasion but bowling a ball at pace is just as taxing as a 100 meter sprint. It takes a lot of energy to release the ball at such velocity. Harris bowled 24.3 overs in that second innings that is 147 legit balls (havent looked whether any balls were wides or no balls) but the point is it is a massive stress on a body that was already hurt before he started. Yes Marathon running, cycling for over 40 hrs, football are taxing. Some areas in cricket are a lot less taxing but the role of a fast bowler is not one of those areas.

  • Vishnu27 on March 7, 2014, 20:15 GMT

    India_boy: probably time to stop saying stuff. If you want wax lyrical about other sports go to other sports sites. This is a cricket site & an article dedicated to strain Ryan Harris has put his body through for many years. Most people here can appreciate that & enjoy the dedication & salute Kimber has provided to a warrior & all-round good bloke. Most people, except you.

    I've played lots of cricket too, "so I have a fair idea what I'm talking about" also

  • on March 7, 2014, 13:50 GMT

    Great article, to go with one of the best test series (certainly 3 test series) we've had for a long time (the greatest 3 test series ever? Probably still the 1988 West Indies v Pakistan series - Marshall, Ambrose, Walsh Imran, Wasim and Qadir among the bowlers - 6 all time greats). Among all the hype surrounding Mitch (who can go from worldbeater to total liability), it's easy to forget how good Ryan Harris actually is (100 wickets at an average slightly lower than Steyn's should remind you). Just a pity there aren't two more tests.

  • SharathSridhar on March 7, 2014, 8:37 GMT

    The pain passes but the beauty remains. Outstanding article!

  • on March 7, 2014, 6:11 GMT

    Jarrod Kimber, take a bow along with Ryan Harris. You just keep outdoing yourself with your writing. Kudos.

  • smweb2.0 on March 7, 2014, 5:33 GMT

    One of the best articles on Espncricinfo - an article which would inspire people to do the impossible. Ryano proved that as much as physical, cricket is a mental game too. When he came on, it was evident that Ryan Harris shouldn't be bowling or walking. Would he able to make the batsmen play? But the first delivery he bowled was a near perfect yorker, one the hardest deliveries to bowl in cricket, as you need tremendous skill plus effort to bowl one. The next delivery was a bit wide of Morkel, going down leg, but you could understand what his intention was. In the third ball of the over he got what he was looking to do - a delivery coming back to the left-hander, hitting the stumps. It was too good for No. 11 who has just come to the crease and was saving a test match. An incredible example where a human's mental strength has outgrown the physical hurdles. Kudos Ryan Harris.

  • India_boy on March 7, 2014, 5:11 GMT

    Everybody please calm down. On the outset, I'd like to apologise to anyone I may have unintentionally offended through my opinion. Secondly, I merely said that even the slightest injury in cricket attracts poetries and myths alike, whereas in other sports, injuries and physical stress much much harder go unnoticed merely because they're considered a part of the game. Cycling, marathon, basketball, football, athletics, gymnastics etc. put enormous strain on the body. I never said RH's effort wasn't epic, and I completely admire Aus/SA teams' culture and hard work ethics much more than my own team's, but my core implication was that cricket is a little lethargic compared to a few other sports and thus a little extra effort becomes the stuff of legends. And yes, I have played a lot of cricket, just like every other Indian, from chalk to foil cricket to leather ball cricket, so I have a fair idea what I'm talking about . Cricinfo I request you to publish this please

  • cricfootyfan on March 7, 2014, 4:10 GMT

    Ryan, you are an inspiration to any sportsman who wants to excel. In fact, you are an inspiration to mankind - you teach them how to fight all odds and be successful if you have the conviction, belief and desire. Hats off to you!!

  • on March 7, 2014, 3:58 GMT

    Go the South Aussies, Rhino and Boof, why we will be No.1 very, very soon

  • Ozcricketwriter on March 6, 2014, 23:38 GMT

    I had picked for Siddle and Harris to both miss out on the 3rd test, to be replaced by the in-form Jackson Bird and the previously great James Pattinson. How wrong was I? Harris did well in the first innings, equally as well as Johnson I felt, but then in the second innings, when Johnson was starting to flounder, in came Harris, against all rhyme or reason, when he could barely move, and, while there was obviously a bit of luck in getting through the defences of Steyn and Morkel, it was earned luck. He kept pushing for them to make a mistake, however small, and capitalised. I saw that in spite of similar figures between Johnson and Harris for the match, Harris moved from 4th to 2nd, leapfrogging Johnson, as well as Steyn, as a result of his performances in this match. I perhaps don't agree based on performance but based on effort it is well earned. Pre-series Australia didn't have the great bowling rankings that South Africa do, but now they are very much ahead. Well earned too.

  • Lysnkey on March 6, 2014, 23:22 GMT

    Phps a tad overwrought JK, but Harris *was* admirably determined & skillful, producing results under intense personal & game pressure. And is India-boy just being provocative? Is the imagined level of suffering in a sport a useful measure of its worth? How'd you compare the different types of pain? Is the psychological pain of chess greater than the physical pain of running? I know cycling can be one of the most 'purely" painful activities. There's no weight bearing but the 'aerobic' pain is acute & it's extremely dangerous; many ppl race with dreadful injuries; and it require fast thinking while suffering extreme pain. I've played cricket, I've cycled: cycling hurt more, more often, and for longer. OTOH basketball & soccer are clearly wastes of time: fast & slow versions of the same thing. The pain is in the spectators' minds: "Haven't We Seen All This Before? When Will It End?" I've heard some ppl say the same about cricket. Let's put that aside tho' and celebrate Harris's efforts.

  • kempvet on March 6, 2014, 22:33 GMT

    India_boy I am sure that archery, an Olympic sport, must place tremendous strain and pain on the body, not to mention equestrian sports as well, so your logic about cricket not being worthy as an Olympic sport is also flawed. Why do Indians often seem to belittle any efforts made in cricket matches between AUS and SA.

  • analyseabhishek on March 6, 2014, 21:34 GMT

    @VivGilchrist- He has mentioned one such instance. You should be knowing about it. Paul Rone-Clarke's rejoinder is a much better one! I'm surprised when India_boy says there is hardly any pain or stress in the body! Ever been hit by a Cricket ball? Or even catch a Cricket ball when its travelling? Ever tried to bowl fast?

  • on March 6, 2014, 19:10 GMT

    You're a bloody genius Jarrod Kimber. Well written mate.

  • on March 6, 2014, 18:41 GMT

    India_Boy - I have so much to say to you about your miserable post, but I'm sure Cricinfo won't post it. So I will just say - sour grapes. I have bad knees myself, and I can assure you that they are no fun. I can barely get up the stairs some days, so how he was able to keep trundling in, not to mention bowling two of the best yorkers you'll see to win the game for the Aussies, is beyond me. Joyless and miserable. Get over yourself.

  • on March 6, 2014, 18:24 GMT

    i have just copied the whole article and kept for myself to inspire myself. Cant find a more better article nor can find a more gutsy performance from the Aussies, especially from Harris, Clarke, Warner. Despite being an Indian, I just love following Aussie cricket, their brand of cricket. Very sad to see Graeme going out on a losing note, he could have linger on like many of our Indian greats but instead choose to make his way out himself. A great series shall go down as one of the best in Test cricket.

  • Rememberthegame on March 6, 2014, 12:22 GMT

    Congratulations Australia. Ryan Harris invincible. And without the whiny sniping that overtook his teammates during a tough days test cricket. (As one commentator said " I wish that they'd leave the comments to the intelligent ones." ) Harris restores pride and honour to the game. What a credit to himself his country and to cricket. A true hero for the young ones to follow.

  • VivGilchrist on March 6, 2014, 11:38 GMT

    @india_boy, I hope it feels good to play down such a heroic effort. By the way, when was the last time an Indian cricketer displayed this level of guts?

  • on March 6, 2014, 11:35 GMT

    @Indiaboy. I can see so many sports in the Olympics that put massively less stress on the body. Fast bowling is right up there in the top 20 in terms of stress to the body. You don't meet many people who were fast bowlers in their youth whom in their 60's who can still walk without a limp or the aid of a stick or at least one or two leg operations. Cycling? No idea how turning your legs around in a circle...and nothing else... became an Olympic sport. No impact stress what so ever.. unless you fall off.

    As for Dressage? Rhythmic gymnastics? Fencing? Synchronized swimming? Sailing? Trapoline? Badminton? Jeepers. not only all as dull as ditchwater but each as physically stressful as a snooze in the park compared to fast bowling. All inexplicably Olympic sports. Basketball? That's seriously parochial with only about 3 nations in the world even remotely interested in it. Not saying it's a bad sport - just saying no-one much outside the USA plays it. But it's Olympic.

  • Bockee on March 6, 2014, 9:52 GMT

    Even if he never bowls another ball in anger, let us all remember how great he was in this test match.

  • Rahul_78 on March 6, 2014, 9:31 GMT

    Oh yes Test Cricket! The guts, the pain, the blood and the glory! Ryan Harris's effort on one and half legs against the likes of AB Devilliers will live long in the memories of the people. It looked like Harris will explode into pieces during one of his deliveries. So fragile was his appearance to the viewers. But looks can be deceptive. As SAF found out in those 2 magic deliveries. If any youngster or cricket critic ever advocates shorter form of the game or deplores test cricket then Ryans harris's effort should be shown to them. Hats off and Salute to Ryan Harris. Long live the test cricket.

  • India_boy on March 6, 2014, 8:58 GMT

    A little less with the poetry please. We agree this guy was in pain, but sports in general and cricket in specific is littered with examples of people playing through excruciating pain. What RH faced for half an hour, some sportsmen face during days at end, in their chosen sports, cycling and marathon for example. Athletes are about to fall down, their tendons, ligaments, muscles rotn apart, but they keep running/cycling as if their life depends on it. Coming out to bat or bowl with your jaws put together with wires/bandages is another classic example. I'm not belittling his effort, but going into a game knowing you are injured and suffering pain through the course of the game and still going on are 2 entirely different things. This is another reason why cricket will never be an olympics sport, there is hardly any pain or stress on the body, compared to other sports. cricinfo pl publish

  • on March 6, 2014, 8:26 GMT

    You beauty!! Both the article and Rhino! No words!

  • on March 6, 2014, 8:18 GMT

    wonderful!! I just loved man v/s superman...

  • StKilda1966 on March 6, 2014, 7:51 GMT

    Who has the bigger pain threshold out of Ryan-o and Watto?

  • Nilesh_T on March 6, 2014, 7:16 GMT

    Hearty salute Ryano..take a bow, you are a true champion indeed, a role model for young kids watching your heroics. A rare example of putting your body on the line for your country through sheer mental strength, perseverance, grit and respect for your country, captain ,coach and colleagues. Your effort on one leg matches the time when Anil Kumble came on to bowl with a jaw covered in bandages, when Kapil Dev bowled and batted through the pain barrier and it was widely recognised that he would do so even if he had to come to the middle in a stretcher for his country. You are a live example of " ..theirs not to reason why,..theirs but to do and die.." from The Charge of the Light Brigade by Lord Tennyson. You delivered quietly when it mattered most and I wish the Indian selectors and players take a leaf out of your book. Especially the bowling resources who cannot even knock off tailenders and are responsible for the utterly dismal showing in overseas tests. Wishing you all the best luck

  • santhoshg016 on March 6, 2014, 7:05 GMT

    oh harris was awesome.. i still remember harris when he debut to Australia he was not a great bowler he was a medium pacer and he was conceding runs bowling lose balls.. But once after he came back he got some good serious pace, Swing and line and length.. I dont know how could be it possibel to get a speed as age go passes but this guy was really a great man for Australia Cricket.. Though i am an INDIAN i love to see australia cricet and follow them.. I have seen lot of cricketers from Australia who give their best in Field Everytime.. whether win or lose they work hard and love their Cricket.. What a game yesterday we had that was a such a great bowling from Harris. Australia now back in the form they have won Ashes, one day series, now South Africa series... Congrats Aussies

  • smudgeon on March 6, 2014, 6:28 GMT

    Nothing else you can say about Harris, really - except that I hope with all my cricket-sick-heart that Harris makes a speedy recovery and we see one more series from him. Excellent article Jarrod!

  • DanTas on March 6, 2014, 6:19 GMT

    And, when his days on this earth are over, his big heart can be placed next to that of Phar Lap.

  • Ragav999 on March 6, 2014, 4:59 GMT

    Thanks for writing this wonderful article on one of the modern greats. Bowlers are not well acknowledged in the modern era and this article goes some way towards correcting that flaw.

    Ryan Harris is worthy enough to be mentioned in the same breath of any great fast bowler who has played Test cricket so far. His consistency, attitude, heart and dedication to the team cause is unparalleled. He will be remembered fondly alongside Glenn McGrath and Dennis Lillie as best Australian bowlers of all time.

    It was fantastic to see Harris celebrate after taking the last wicket partly because it is so rare to see him running like that. To bowl so many overs in the previous Test with such a fragile body and then back it up here, I don't have words to describe the commitment of Ryan Harris. I hope he gets an awesome reception at the Australian airport.

    Stuart Clark had a similar shortened career having made his debut late. I hope he also gets the credit that he deserves

  • AndyPe on March 6, 2014, 4:31 GMT

    an incredible performance by Rhino. Words just don't do justice to his performance this summer. Cricket academies around the world should put a Harris highlights package on for every new student showing what it means to never give in and play on through the pain barrier. In fact the entire third test of this series should be shown as well so they know what the greatest form of the game means to play and participate in.

  • on March 6, 2014, 3:34 GMT

    I'm just in awe of that guy. I want him as Australia's next PM. He has more character, heart and guts than all our MPs put together. Rhino for PM! what a great slogan!

  • Meety on March 6, 2014, 2:57 GMT

    Funny thing about Rhino - I think he is a way better ODI bowler than Test bowler! I think if Oz field a Harris/Starc/McKay pace attack for the W/Cup - we win!

  • Meety on March 6, 2014, 2:55 GMT

    @ dunger.bob on (March 6, 2014, 0:07 GMT) - yes but we'll be able to do a stat-filter on S/Rates, where he will sit favorably for years to come! Better Average than Davo & Lillee!

  • on March 6, 2014, 1:43 GMT

    Would not want anyone else going in to battle on my team. Shades of Andy Robert's attiitude.

  • Thegimp on March 6, 2014, 1:16 GMT

    Well said Jarrod, everytime I get tired at work today after staying up all night watching the great game I will think of Harris. Does he know how much a bottle of his sweat will go for online? There is a team of US NAVY Seals in a submarine just off the Cape ready to abduct him and start a breeding program for the next generation of Super Warrior. Ryan Harris is Thor!!!

  • dunger.bob on March 6, 2014, 0:07 GMT

    He's a bull dog. Simple as that. The more he gets hurt the more determined he gets. It's a good thing he's got that big, broad chest because you need something that size to hold his huge heart. .. Years from now people will say "Ryan who" because he'll be low on the list of wicket-takers. We, however, know better than what the stats will say.

  • on March 5, 2014, 22:45 GMT

    What a wonderful ode to Harris. A true champion!!! Big brave balls is what I have tio say. He's put his career on the line for this AUS win. Good luck with the surgery Ryno and hope to see you soon in the Baggy Green again.

  • xmantra23 on March 5, 2014, 22:44 GMT

    ryan harris , the true warrior.

  • on March 5, 2014, 22:19 GMT

    Rousing words, Mr Kimber, Thank you!

  • heathrf1974 on March 5, 2014, 22:16 GMT

    He epitomizes the good things about cricket; excellence and mental and physical toughness without the lip.

  • JFAB on March 5, 2014, 22:12 GMT

    I enjoy your writing more and more Jarrod Cheers, John

  • on March 5, 2014, 21:58 GMT

    Will Ryan Harris' knee be put in the museum next to Pharlap's heart? It should be! He is an out and out champion!

  • JJJake on March 5, 2014, 21:20 GMT

    Incredible effort by Harris. You can't manufacture guts and determination like that.

  • InvisiblePJs on March 5, 2014, 21:09 GMT

    Jarrod - this was an emotive, enthralling piece of writing - it made my spine tingle - thank you!

  • InvisiblePJs on March 5, 2014, 21:09 GMT

    Jarrod - this was an emotive, enthralling piece of writing - it made my spine tingle - thank you!

  • JJJake on March 5, 2014, 21:20 GMT

    Incredible effort by Harris. You can't manufacture guts and determination like that.

  • on March 5, 2014, 21:58 GMT

    Will Ryan Harris' knee be put in the museum next to Pharlap's heart? It should be! He is an out and out champion!

  • JFAB on March 5, 2014, 22:12 GMT

    I enjoy your writing more and more Jarrod Cheers, John

  • heathrf1974 on March 5, 2014, 22:16 GMT

    He epitomizes the good things about cricket; excellence and mental and physical toughness without the lip.

  • on March 5, 2014, 22:19 GMT

    Rousing words, Mr Kimber, Thank you!

  • xmantra23 on March 5, 2014, 22:44 GMT

    ryan harris , the true warrior.

  • on March 5, 2014, 22:45 GMT

    What a wonderful ode to Harris. A true champion!!! Big brave balls is what I have tio say. He's put his career on the line for this AUS win. Good luck with the surgery Ryno and hope to see you soon in the Baggy Green again.

  • dunger.bob on March 6, 2014, 0:07 GMT

    He's a bull dog. Simple as that. The more he gets hurt the more determined he gets. It's a good thing he's got that big, broad chest because you need something that size to hold his huge heart. .. Years from now people will say "Ryan who" because he'll be low on the list of wicket-takers. We, however, know better than what the stats will say.

  • Thegimp on March 6, 2014, 1:16 GMT

    Well said Jarrod, everytime I get tired at work today after staying up all night watching the great game I will think of Harris. Does he know how much a bottle of his sweat will go for online? There is a team of US NAVY Seals in a submarine just off the Cape ready to abduct him and start a breeding program for the next generation of Super Warrior. Ryan Harris is Thor!!!