Australia v England, 1st Test, Brisbane, 4th day November 24, 2013

Seismic victory points to power shift

128

Around Brisbane and the nation, on televisions, radios and - if they paid Cricket Australia's $20 fee - smart phones, Australians watched and waited for the end of a drought near enough to 11 months long.

Not since 1986 had the country agonised this long between Test match victories, nine matches and seven defeats passing since Michael Hussey marked his final international appearance with a five-wicket victory over Sri Lanka at the SCG in the first week of 2013. The fact this was an Ashes match only heightened the sense of delayed gratification.

Having clambered all over England on the pivotal second day, Australia's major obstacle was less the visiting batsmen than the fickle Brisbane weather, which at various times brought sunshine, torrential downpours and even the bizarre sight of rain falling on one half of the Gabba but not the other. At length the skies cleared and the television cameras rolled, leaving Ryan Harris and Mitchell Johnson to round up the final two wickets and commence the celebrations.

It was too late for Channel Nine, who opted only to show the match on their digital channel GEM into Sydney and Melbourne. Too late also for those who paid for Australia's losses, including the former coach Mickey Arthur, a string of batsmen like Ed Cowan, Phillip Hughes and Usman Khawaja, and CA's head of people and culture Marianne Roux, who quit her post in the week before the Test. But its arrival was just in time for the captain Michael Clarke and his team, their newish mentor Darren Lehmann, and the vice-captain Brad Haddin, an admirable contributor to his 50th Test in his 37th year.

As results go, this was seismic, pointing towards a shift in the balance of power between these two teams, and holing England significantly below the waterline. Australia have not led an Ashes series since 2006, when a hiding in Brisbane and a capitulation in Adelaide consigned the Andrew Flintoff/Duncan Fletcher duo to the most miserable of tours. Following a year of their own cataclysms, Australia now know they have the capacity not only to beat England but to brutalise them.

Clarke had said before the match he could not promise the world, but the performance his team put together over four days was ultimately world-class. They stuttered to begin with, the top six folding to Stuart Broad on the opening day, but from the moment Haddin joined Johnson, Clarke's men gathered in strength and purpose with every hour. That seventh wicket stand was a significant moment, holding up English efforts to roll through a previously frail batting order and gathering belief in the home dressing room.

Haddin's runs vindicated his continued presence in the team despite his advancing years, while Johnson's indicated he truly was in the relaxed, even and mature frame of mind he and his coaches had spoken of harnessing in the lead-up to the match. It set the scene for the drama of day two, when Australia took decisive hold of an Ashes match for the first time since their previous Test win over England in Perth.

Then, as now, it was Johnson who played the central role, though not with the swing that had so confounded England at the WACA. This time his weapons were steepling bounce and frightening speed, a combination that completely flustered the normally serene No. 3 Jonathan Trott, drawing a panicked innings and a dismissal right on the stroke of lunch. In that moment England were psychologically scrambled by a single dismissal, in a way perhaps not seen since Shane Warne's ball to Mike Gatting at Old Trafford in 1993. Their confidence ebbed away at the same time Australia's grew, resulting in the afternoon surrender of 6 for 9 and an enormous first innings deficit.

From there the match was Australia's to lose. For a team so unfamiliar with victory this year, this was not quite the straightforward task it appeared. Though England were clearly damaged by the effects of the second afternoon, their bowlers sapped of energy by the sort of turnaround Australia had become used to, they remained a strong and experienced team with a distinct dislike for losing, and a well-developed capacity for scrounging draws. Clarke's men had to keep striving, and it was to their great credit that they did.

David Warner played a large part in this, clattering a century the equal of any he had made previously, but so too did Clarke with a hundred that answered the howls of derision emanating from his first day dismissal to Broad, and at the same time ran roughshod over Graeme Swann. Here was a blow as significant as the one struck by Johnson over Trott, opening up old scars Swann still harbours from earlier meetings with Clarke, the man he regards as the best player of spin in the game.

Further battering from Haddin and Johnson lifted England's theoretical target to a sort of figure that numbs the mind of batsmen already afflicted by the heavy legs brought on by hours in the field. Trott's addled repeat of his first innings performance confirmed the fearful damage Johnson had inflicted, and his wantaway flick to the deep legside field was to prove contagious, repeated by Kevin Pietersen on the fourth morning.

Only the visiting captain Alastair Cook kept the Australians out for long, but even in his occupation the hosts found a major sign of progress. Nathan Lyon intervened after a rain delay to nip out Cook with spin and bounce, and then teased Matt Prior into glancing a catch to leg slip the next over. It was the sort of fourth innings contribution Australia have been seeking from Lyon for some time, the one nagging doubt that has kept him prone to harsh treatment from the selectors. Fortified by the presence of his trusted mentor John Davison, Lyon was a potent weapon at the Gabba, leaving the more heralded Swann well and truly in the shade.

That left the last rites to be administered, and they were to be done so in a manner befitting Australia's intimidatory angle of attack at England's batsmen throughout. To as many as nine men around the bat, the touring tail was routed by pace, short balls doing for Broad, Chris Tremlett and James Anderson while Swann snicked into the slips for his first pair in Tests. The humiliation was comprehensive, and the physical threat overt. If any room was left for doubt, Clarke himself removed it by being heard on the stump microphone to snarl at Anderson "get ready for a broken f***ing arm". These closing scenes were unsavoury but also significant - Australia intent on inflicting maximum casualties in the first match of the summer.

When Anderson's final skier plopped gently into Johnson's hands, the Australians formed a tight huddle. A tighter one was created in the dressing room, where Lyon bellowed Under the Southern Cross for the first time in the role Hussey bequeathed to him as leader of the team song. Teams can be forged by matches and moments like this. Millions of Australians around the nation have good reason to hope that, at long last, they now have a team to get behind.

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on November 25, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    Well it is far too early to predict Australia can brutalise England. Englad are a quality side and like many other teams, they have started an away tour badly. But 5 test series is quite long and there is ample time to bounce back. England need one inspirational performance to bounce back - a performance like Pietersen's 186 in Mumbai in 2012. I am sure English side is quite experience and have the ability to bounce back. Meanwhile, Aurstralia has done well but should be careful not to go overboard with celebrations as four more tests are still to come. For a neutral specctator like me, an english win here could have killed the interest. Australia have made the series lively.

  • TheBigBoodha on November 24, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    Don't know about a power shift, but it won't be easy for England to win here. Australia's batsmen will rack up plenty of big scores, and Anderson and Swann will find things much more tricky. Warner may also prove a massive headache. Looks like he's already getting inside a few skulls. He scores so quickly that he can take the game away from the opposition in half a session. Coming in first he can set the tone for a whole innings, and a whole game. He's now cocky after a few big scores, as we all know.

    It must also be said that this was a total brutalisation. The anger from Cook and some English players, media and fans emerges from physical fear, and only aggressive fastbowling can do that.

  • on November 27, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    The Gabba Test spun around that unlikely partnership between Haddin and Johnson. Mind you, there were many who were even disputing Johnson's selection on the first morning! This series is not over yet ...by a long way. The English are a hardy lot...and that invisible element in an Ashes series makes me believe that England can .. and most likely will ..... turn this series around! I prefer Australia to regain the Ashes ... but I'm picking England to retain the Ashes!!

  • on November 26, 2013, 21:39 GMT

    Wow people are getting carried away. That result was about two factors: 1) England batting feebly 2) A sensational performance from Mitchell Johnson. Simply he won that game absolutely singlehanded. Warner and clarke got nice hundreds in the second innings when the pressure was off but it was johnson who saved them in the first innings with bat and ball when it mattered. Johnson and harris may well cause plenty of headaches for england but Dave warner is excactly what his record suggests: not quite good enough.

  • First_Drop on November 26, 2013, 13:40 GMT

    It won't be a whitewash - Adelaide will not offer the bowlers the assitance they had in Brisbane. Nor will Melbourne or Sydney. But make no bones about it, many were saying that England would struggle before this series. With cook and Trott averaging 26 and 25 respectively in the last one (just completed), questions about Root, and Carberry effectively making his debut, England were always going to be in trouble. With Trot leaving the tour, things are getting worse. And Tremlett isn't good enough.

    Australia's only real question is Bailey and the no.6 position - we might find James Faulkner filling that role sooner rather than later. Young Nic Maddisnon is also knocking at the door.

    So, though Australia are not without questions, Englands are by far the more serious and they were clear well before the tour started.

  • CricketMaan on November 26, 2013, 13:11 GMT

    Will we see some more fast bowlig in Perth? Hope Mitch, Ryan and Siddle stays fit till then! Else over to England.

  • jb633 on November 26, 2013, 8:17 GMT

    @milepost, i can see nothing else but a drubbing on the cards here. This series will be another 06/07 affair and spell the end of our dominance over Oz for the next couple of series. Aus do have a class bowling attack it must be said. Our batting has been poor for far too long.

  • on November 26, 2013, 5:42 GMT

    Hang on a minute - power shift, England will now be brutalised, last rites. Sorry but one swallow does not a summer make.

    Whilst Australia aren't a one trick pony, they owe this victory to some very effective left arm fast bowling and poor decision making from Cook on the first day when he was in a position to brutalise Australia and administer the last rites.

    They are still a very fragile unit with some far from world class players. THere is a long way to go in this series and it is far too early to write off England.

  • cricketsubh on November 26, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    i donot think this england have the batsmen to score big runs in these australian pitches only cook and pitersion can score runs but they are both out of from and also bowling with swan out of from heavy work load on brod and anderson shoulders .aus winning they should think bring some younger players in to team my 2nd test team 1.warner.2.rogers.3.doolen.4.clarke,5.smith.6.berly.7.haddin..8.johnson.9.harris.10.siddle.11.lyon.watson need to drop u watson give inof chances to cement his place but he fails selector need to pick young players for the future selector can bring new player in this time after this series aus go to south africa if watson fails in this ashes he will be drpoed and new player get a chance in s.a so way not give chance a young player in australian condition .

  • disco_bob on November 26, 2013, 3:30 GMT

    @c3vzn, fair enough. Just seems like normal heat of the moment argy bargy. Ridiculous that Clarke can get publicly rebuked because the stump mic was left on. Is CA trying to give the public the impression that, that sort of language is not the norm.

  • on November 25, 2013, 4:42 GMT

    Well it is far too early to predict Australia can brutalise England. Englad are a quality side and like many other teams, they have started an away tour badly. But 5 test series is quite long and there is ample time to bounce back. England need one inspirational performance to bounce back - a performance like Pietersen's 186 in Mumbai in 2012. I am sure English side is quite experience and have the ability to bounce back. Meanwhile, Aurstralia has done well but should be careful not to go overboard with celebrations as four more tests are still to come. For a neutral specctator like me, an english win here could have killed the interest. Australia have made the series lively.

  • TheBigBoodha on November 24, 2013, 11:46 GMT

    Don't know about a power shift, but it won't be easy for England to win here. Australia's batsmen will rack up plenty of big scores, and Anderson and Swann will find things much more tricky. Warner may also prove a massive headache. Looks like he's already getting inside a few skulls. He scores so quickly that he can take the game away from the opposition in half a session. Coming in first he can set the tone for a whole innings, and a whole game. He's now cocky after a few big scores, as we all know.

    It must also be said that this was a total brutalisation. The anger from Cook and some English players, media and fans emerges from physical fear, and only aggressive fastbowling can do that.

  • on November 27, 2013, 0:58 GMT

    The Gabba Test spun around that unlikely partnership between Haddin and Johnson. Mind you, there were many who were even disputing Johnson's selection on the first morning! This series is not over yet ...by a long way. The English are a hardy lot...and that invisible element in an Ashes series makes me believe that England can .. and most likely will ..... turn this series around! I prefer Australia to regain the Ashes ... but I'm picking England to retain the Ashes!!

  • on November 26, 2013, 21:39 GMT

    Wow people are getting carried away. That result was about two factors: 1) England batting feebly 2) A sensational performance from Mitchell Johnson. Simply he won that game absolutely singlehanded. Warner and clarke got nice hundreds in the second innings when the pressure was off but it was johnson who saved them in the first innings with bat and ball when it mattered. Johnson and harris may well cause plenty of headaches for england but Dave warner is excactly what his record suggests: not quite good enough.

  • First_Drop on November 26, 2013, 13:40 GMT

    It won't be a whitewash - Adelaide will not offer the bowlers the assitance they had in Brisbane. Nor will Melbourne or Sydney. But make no bones about it, many were saying that England would struggle before this series. With cook and Trott averaging 26 and 25 respectively in the last one (just completed), questions about Root, and Carberry effectively making his debut, England were always going to be in trouble. With Trot leaving the tour, things are getting worse. And Tremlett isn't good enough.

    Australia's only real question is Bailey and the no.6 position - we might find James Faulkner filling that role sooner rather than later. Young Nic Maddisnon is also knocking at the door.

    So, though Australia are not without questions, Englands are by far the more serious and they were clear well before the tour started.

  • CricketMaan on November 26, 2013, 13:11 GMT

    Will we see some more fast bowlig in Perth? Hope Mitch, Ryan and Siddle stays fit till then! Else over to England.

  • jb633 on November 26, 2013, 8:17 GMT

    @milepost, i can see nothing else but a drubbing on the cards here. This series will be another 06/07 affair and spell the end of our dominance over Oz for the next couple of series. Aus do have a class bowling attack it must be said. Our batting has been poor for far too long.

  • on November 26, 2013, 5:42 GMT

    Hang on a minute - power shift, England will now be brutalised, last rites. Sorry but one swallow does not a summer make.

    Whilst Australia aren't a one trick pony, they owe this victory to some very effective left arm fast bowling and poor decision making from Cook on the first day when he was in a position to brutalise Australia and administer the last rites.

    They are still a very fragile unit with some far from world class players. THere is a long way to go in this series and it is far too early to write off England.

  • cricketsubh on November 26, 2013, 4:47 GMT

    i donot think this england have the batsmen to score big runs in these australian pitches only cook and pitersion can score runs but they are both out of from and also bowling with swan out of from heavy work load on brod and anderson shoulders .aus winning they should think bring some younger players in to team my 2nd test team 1.warner.2.rogers.3.doolen.4.clarke,5.smith.6.berly.7.haddin..8.johnson.9.harris.10.siddle.11.lyon.watson need to drop u watson give inof chances to cement his place but he fails selector need to pick young players for the future selector can bring new player in this time after this series aus go to south africa if watson fails in this ashes he will be drpoed and new player get a chance in s.a so way not give chance a young player in australian condition .

  • disco_bob on November 26, 2013, 3:30 GMT

    @c3vzn, fair enough. Just seems like normal heat of the moment argy bargy. Ridiculous that Clarke can get publicly rebuked because the stump mic was left on. Is CA trying to give the public the impression that, that sort of language is not the norm.

  • Kolpak1989 on November 25, 2013, 22:58 GMT

    It will be very hard for England to come back from a shellacking of this magnitude. With Trott flying home, the Australians getting in their face and the fickle English media and supporters turning on them all too quickly and baying for changes to the lineup (despite this being their best team) the players will be spending a lot of time with their heads down staring at their bootlaces. If England don't win in Adelaide (the pitch that will suit them most) it's all over red rover.

  • milepost on November 25, 2013, 21:12 GMT

    @TheBigBoodha, spot on, can't really add more to that. I can't see a recovery, I think England are gone, almost literally now and it's a tough ask to counter world class pace with an out of sorts batting lineup. Adelaide pitch is a drop in and I bet CA don't drop in anything that England might want to bat on. How quickly the tides turn. All the best to Trott, hope he does make it back to international cricket, quality player and does his team proud.

  • Saffa7 on November 25, 2013, 19:21 GMT

    Well done OZ and Mitch. Tuned in each morning at 2am. This was REAL cricket worth 100 ODI's or 1000 "Mickey Mouse" T20's. Looking forward to your visit here soon, but then I wont be rooting for you; just for a real contest. Thanks for the come back.

  • borninthetimeofSRT on November 25, 2013, 17:25 GMT

    It is so good to see Aussies show the vintage game and how! Mitchell was awesome with both the bat and the ball. And Aussies showed the hunger to win, by all means. I wish they get to the top four before the Championship begins. What worries me though is that the world might end after the Ashes, so it seems. There is bad blood, and to every one's bad taste, it has nothing to do with cricket. It is not needed, and looks very theatrical, almost as it has been all planned, those jibes and sledges. Just about a week ao we witnessed Sachin's farewell, and I felt so proud to belong to a country that plays cricket. Any sport is beyond the game itself, but it is for the nations to choose where they want to be enemies - on or off the field. Windies were enemies on the field, but I see that in the Ashes, everyone's enemies off the field. I request all players to follow Sachinism and respect the sport while they play their game. And let every one be proud of belonging to a cricketing nation.

  • Rickboy on November 25, 2013, 16:07 GMT

    Congratulations to Australia who played hard and won. England were outplayed, but at the end of the day, only one team can win...Being an Australian fan since my childhood I was always pleased when they beat the opposition. Nevertheless Michael Clarke's behaviour did not sit well with the great game of gentlemanly cricket...Pointing a finger at Anderson and saying what he said was stupid and idiotic! Especially knowing that you were going to win that test match. I have now lost some respect for Clarke and wonder if he can captain without exhibiting such hooliganism? Good luck to them.

  • on November 25, 2013, 16:02 GMT

    Drop Watson, he rarely makes runs when it matters and seldom makes the big match defining score that is required of your no. 3. Also George Bailey is NOT of test match quality, he's good for an entertaining 20/30 odd but there are far better first class players. Smith also is not a pernamment solution at no.5, to keep his place in the team he needs to bowl his leggies more and he shows no interest/ improvement in his bowling. Despite dropping Khawaja and Hughes, Aus still have weak players in the top order. For next test: 1) Rogers 2) Warner 3) Doolan 4) Clarke 5) S. Marsh 6) Haddin 7) Faulkner 8) Johnson 9) Harris 10) Siddle 11) Lyon

  • on November 25, 2013, 15:53 GMT

    cricket is really ironic and funny game just 12 years ago whole world used to wait like australia to win their first match after 15 to 20 matches due to australian dominance in whole cricket in 2000s. Now australia was begging for their first win in 11 test matches. How funny and ironic cricket is. However it was good performance by aussies and bad performance by england. England looks like exhausted team because they won the last ashes in eng just three months ago and now they are on the road to defend it again. Cricket and schedule is cruel. England will not be able to come back in this series because they are tired.

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:50 GMT

    if KP makes a good performance it will surely deflate Australia. lets hope he does one and we get a good competition on hand

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:19 GMT

    With this crushing win, even as a neutral observer I get a feeling that it might be difficult for English to bounce back. But on second thoughts, it is very much possible. All they need to do is gain a momentum.Ofcourse easier said than done. Just exactly how Aussies gained momentum in the first match. I think England team is no pushovers and one inspirational performance from anybody can pull them back and all this crushing talk would vanish into thin air!!

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:11 GMT

    England here played too gentle cricket. They could have avoided playing that last over before lunch by wasting couple of minutes and the history of the test would/might have been different than what it is now. More over the turning point of the match is they did not have wicket taking No.3 and No.4 bowlers that suite to Australian bouncy pitches pace pitches. When OZs were down at 100/5 England never tried to pin them down instead went smooth on them by offering No.3 and 4 bowlers who let the hook off of the lower order batsmen. We all should remember that was the turning point of the match. Another thing is they are underplayed Johnson and never thought of him as a threat. I'm very certain they didn't watch him in India it seems. My Choice of 3rd bowler is Fin and 4th Monty than Swan, or would say next match at Adelaide play both Swan and Monty and go with 5 batsmen like they did in India. Let them not take too much from the last first match and certain they will bounce back.

  • geoffboyc on November 25, 2013, 13:40 GMT

    England have their work cut out now because of the nature of this defeat; they badly missed the boat on Thursday when MJ came in to bat at 130 for 6. But there isn't actually much between these teams and there are a few technical deficiencies among the Aussie top six too; Johnson has his own demons and England have to hope they come back or, better still, try to help them back.

  • bunsenburner on November 25, 2013, 12:11 GMT

    Navinator - I suppose it could be compared to the thrashing the Aussies gave the poms last Ashes at Perth, but I think the difference 3 years ago was that it did feel like a bit of a one off at the time as England had dominated the previous test in Adelaide and half of the first at the Gabba. If the pitch in Adelaide is a slow as it traditionally is it will be really interesting to see how Johnson goes and how the English top order play him. You would think he wouldn't be as effective but if you are bowling at 94mph you are still going to be a handful on any wicket! It's very sad to see Trott leave the tour but it does mean that the English selectors have one less decision to make as moving Bell or Root up to 3 (who did look pretty good in the 2nd innings) looks a lot more solid.

  • AndyDee on November 25, 2013, 11:49 GMT

    Not sure about a power shift as yet as England along with South Africa are the only two teams in the world capable of beating the Aussies at home. If it was India or anybody else then yes, Australia would go on and crush them on these bouncy wickets. But because it is England they still have a chance, but they need a massive turn around, they were brutalized big time, have never seen a battering like it, especially because the bully got an almighty belting. Australia has made a habit of savaging sub-continent teams at home, if they do it to England then I will be really impressed.

  • siltbreeze on November 25, 2013, 11:26 GMT

    Firstly, England have been well and truly shellacked by an Aussie side that was positive, aggressive and relentless. But it's just one game, and to describe it as seismic or a power shift is ridiculous. For me there are still question marks about four of the Australian top six, and if England pick a proper third seamer our bowling attack is at least as good as theirs. The Aussie players and media are reacting like they're surprised to win and have forgotten how it feels.

  • dunger.bob on November 25, 2013, 11:21 GMT

    The selectors might be banking on more overs from Watson and using Smith as a 2nd spin option. Watson would probably bowl well on a drop in by just keeping it tight, but it's more defensive than attacking. Watto isn't likely to pick up a bag of wickets but a good spinner might. .. anyway they seem to have made up their minds already so there's no point speculating I suppose.

    If there has been a seismic shift, there was a decent aftershock in the Trott withdrawal. Poor bloke, but at least it forces England to do something now. I think he would have been OK in Adelaide from the Mitch perspective. No-one should get their block knocked off there. My guess is there is other stuff we don't know about behind his decision.

  • NAVINATOR on November 25, 2013, 11:17 GMT

    bunsenburner - Yes it was a big win, more so in context than exactly in runs. But lets be fair...england still have better batting than Aussie, barring Clarke, no one is consistent enough to be relied upon. Having said that, what this win has given is the sense of Home advantage back to aussie mindspace. And considering it is a home series, anything less than a 4-1 win is medicore for any home team nowadays. I won't read much into this one win for now, might even end up being a one-off win.

  • on November 25, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    Don't know if the Australian team are all that good, but it has been obvious for a year or more that the England team are way past their best. The old guard are over the hill and the youngsters don't yet have the experience to handle pressure situations. You can't 'regroup' in the middle of an Ashes tour but England need to take a long hard look at themselves once they get home. For the time being a little more self-discipline and better shot selection would not come amiss.

  • sachin_equal_to_bradman on November 25, 2013, 10:21 GMT

    @Nutcutlet : your so called GREAT team is DANCING AND SHIVERING against hostile bowling!!!! Such a treat to watch english batsnab hopping!!!! Now would u ever tell indians are weak in playing short pitch bowling???? Jus atleast now understand that GOOD BOWLING will make any BATSMEN HOPPING!!!

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:14 GMT

    typical drivel from the Aussie press. England are still the better team, the Aussie batting line up is still weak, the bowling attack still poor and prone to injury, the selectors still prone to chopping and changing the team on random whims. Still predict England to win the series 3-1.

  • bunsenburner on November 25, 2013, 10:13 GMT

    Navinator - exactly it is just one win and only win but it was a pretty big win which of course now makes the Aussies favourites. If England win the toss at Adelaide then I think the series is back on though as I can see them bouncing back BUT if the Aussies win the toss (and presumably bat) then I can see them scoring a bucketload and batting England out of the match and series. Even if it ends in a draw in Adelaide I can't see England winning the Ashes. If England bat first and post a score then Swann will be a completely different bowler and a possible match winner as he will be able to exert some pressure which of course he wasn't able to in the 1st test because of England's feeble batting.

  • NAVINATOR on November 25, 2013, 9:44 GMT

    One win & Aussie are way overboard. With statements like "Historic win", "one of the most remarkable turnarounds in the history of test cricket"....It's too much for too little. Aussie used to win such tests pretty frequently not many years ago. Off late, they have been so pathetic that this one win seems to them like a magic. I am glad that they won, even happy that they showed Eng their real place, but then, isn't everyone winning at their home nowadays?

  • bunsenburner on November 25, 2013, 9:35 GMT

    I think the toss in Adelaide is going to be so so crucial as to whether England can get back into the series. If they win it they have a chance as they have to win in Adelaide but if they don't win the toss I can't imagine Aus losing and they will certainly win in Perth so the Ashes would be over. I wouldn't give up on England though as they have shown that they can bounce back from heavy defeats and they are quick learners. Aus big favourites now though.

  • Bonehead_maz on November 25, 2013, 9:25 GMT

    Unless CA have a different drop in pitch to the one we've see so far, I can't believe we are playing the same 13.

  • inthebag on November 25, 2013, 9:19 GMT

    Sure there are 4 more to go and anything can happen, it's called stating the obvious, but the manner in which this game was played is significant. England may fight back but they'll have to do it against a group of players that, for the first time, has completely humiliated them. Sounds like a siesmic shift to me.

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:56 GMT

    I would so love to know what Sir Ian has to say about his 5-0 prediction. The England top order has not fired for months and there is nobody with the talent to challenge them for a place. Trotty has gone home. So where are the runs going to come from?

    Alongside this was an attack that did not fire either - result an absolute hammering and it did not come too soon.

    England must regroup and deliver in the next game, or fear a massive crushing series defeat.

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:55 GMT

    Wow - what rhetoric. Yes England batted really badly, but they've played against these bowlers many times before. Have they suddenly been replaced by much better ones? Have Engand permanently forgotten how to bat? No in both cases. England's bizzare selection of Tremlett to trundle in, barely ever worrying the 80Mph mark when they have Finn in the camp therefore carrying a passenger in a 4 man attack. Swann's inability to turn the ball. Pietersen and Trott failing twice, Cooke, Carberry, Bell and Root not making the most of starts. Broad outbowled Johnson Aussies - hate to say it - but the way he bowled, the form of the players he got out and his match figures all tell the same story. The bowler of the match was Broad - not Johnson

  • lokyshanks on November 25, 2013, 8:30 GMT

    Too early to predict the outcome of the series and i would ask the Aussies to stay away from any brash celebrations , after all they are just about to make a comeback after having been "brutalised " themselves ,my advice change the language and the face of the AussiesCricket Team,[ we love to see them win], whether winning or losing ,no need to make a mountain out of this victory , better, simply relish the win savor the success ,dont visualise any brutaity....

  • u.moral on November 25, 2013, 7:54 GMT

    I have always been curious why was Phil Jaques dropped in the first place

  • Sir_Ivor on November 25, 2013, 7:42 GMT

    Nutcutlet, I was delighted to read of the Maginot Line and Plan 'B'.I suspect that England have under-estimated Australia in their build up to this Ashes series.Their main bowlers Anderson and Swann were probably expected to run through the Aussie batting. That did not happen. I have always felt that Jimmy is best in English conditions. In India he got away with dubious reverse swing. Swann is still good, but maybe the Australians have grown comfortable against spinhaving played in India in the IPL and more recently in ODIs. Broad bowled very well and his height is an advantage. But Tremlett is the dark horse and he could surprise.Rowan Tyson I am told that the Adelaide pitch is a drop in one this time, Not the batting beauty and spin wicket. So I thinkthe toss will be crucial. England have a good chance there I think.

  • JayCee on November 25, 2013, 7:40 GMT

    One swallow does not a summer make! Having said that, my forecast is that England will lose the series but the remaining matches will be hard fought. We are also going to see a couple of careers end.

  • on November 25, 2013, 7:16 GMT

    supporting as a team is the for australia success in this match..as the wickets falling for england,they regrouped as a team with high confidence levels...with the way the teams confidence at present...australia is going to win ASHES

  • VivGilchrist on November 25, 2013, 7:00 GMT

    I don't know about an unchanged team. I would definitely add a 2nd spinner to the squad for Adelaide. Lyon and OKeefe bowl well together and should be an option on that pitch.

  • ihaq1 on November 25, 2013, 6:23 GMT

    australia should realize that teh other grounds in australia are slower and less bouncier and more inducive to spin...The english team should also look into playing Finn and Rankin...and maybe they can rest Trott...Ballance in teh lower middle order and Root coming in at one down or even teh aggressive Bell...England should also realize that batting first should be a priority as politics, strategy and the fear factor than come into play...and obviously they must not sell Cook's wicket as a good opening stand is almost essential...maybe Rankin/Finn in for tremlett or playing four quicks...Finn too bowls well in tandem with teh top two of english bowling...

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on November 25, 2013, 6:13 GMT

    Well, any doubt as to who is the boss would be cleared by now . With Eng's lack of class as brutally exposed by young Aus and the lack of quality in Eng cricket like the 2 best in the world teams SA and Aus ,we can all but say the Ashes is as good as done . With any less than a 4/5 -0 Aus sweep of the Ashes and back to their rightful place in the MCG trophy cab in a month or so there are but other points of interest albeit academic in the shade of larger most imp. scheme of the Ashes itself. Just I want to point out a few. Like just how many 5/10 wkt hauls and poss. MoM titles can Mitch conjure as even he in this form will have comp. from an in form and equality quality fellow pacers like Harris ,Siddle etc. My pick for MoS is Mitch . Also will be an int. to see how many more big tons will likes of Warner ,Clarke and co. pile on vs the struggling Eng bowling . Though expecting a few young Aus bats a bumper series with bat ,my pick is Clarke to top runs and 100s chart .

  • Kong_Howe on November 25, 2013, 6:05 GMT

    I am uncertain about the last line of this article. I am a long-time supporter of the Australian Test team although I am not an Aussie but I have always "Had a team to get behind" through thick and thin. A true supporter is decidedly not a fair weather supporter - proud to be one only when the team is doing well.

  • on November 25, 2013, 6:02 GMT

    where is James Anderson?He truely has been instrumental of late in England's resurgence as one of the best teams in the world.There is no denying the fact that he is world class but has disappointingly failed to deliver at Brisbane.If England aim at salvaging pride in rest of the current Ashes Anderson must fire otherwise he should get fired.

  • Digitror on November 25, 2013, 5:56 GMT

    Ummm, it's only been one match, folks. I am a massive Mitchell Johnson supporter, but he has been erratic emotionally in the past, so we need to see if he has new staying power. Take Johnson out of the equation, and it's not that much different to the team that were steamrolled in England. So let's keep up the support, but postpone the triumphalism until maybe midway in this Ashes series.

  • on November 25, 2013, 5:45 GMT

    Too soon to react.tjough Harris Johnson siddle and lyon. This attack better than English. I believe the series will be decided by Aussie batting. How well they cope up with Broad and Anderson. .

  • Rags57 on November 25, 2013, 5:37 GMT

    Is Australia celebrating too much too soon? Saying England will get brutalized or supporting Warner's view that Trott is too scared of Johnson and comparing Johnson's bowling to Warne's dismissal of Gatting seems too much. Johnson was great in this match but he has been known to be erratic - while Warne was consistence personified in an entire career. I am keen that Australia win this Ashes and would like to wish them the very best - so it will at the very least restore the balance of power in test cricket but going overboard with predicting an England brutalization at the hands of Australia when four test matches are still to be played is surely counting the chickens before the eggs are hatched. If Australia genuinely want to win the Ashes they should focus on cricket and on the field and not off it.

  • Ramesh_Joseph on November 25, 2013, 5:34 GMT

    The Aussies are acting as if they have won the Ashes. They have to remember that there are 4 more matches left and the English will come back hard. Mitchell Johnson is no Dale Steyn and his consistency over 5 matches is doubtful. The Aussie batting is still brittle. I expect England to win the Ashes.

  • heathrf1974 on November 25, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    The next match at Adelaide will give a very good indication with how both team's batting is going. Was Australia's batting a one off and/or is England on the slide? Adelaide is typically good for batting for most of the first three days, so the quicks will have to work at it. Then it is up to Swann and Lyon to threaten the opposition's second innings. The toss may also have an important influence.

  • Hindh on November 25, 2013, 5:13 GMT

    England got a massive reality check and their inflated egos after beating an aged and tired Indian team has been shattered thanks to Aus... These Eng batsmen fell to same Pace and bounce which they used to mock indian batsmen.. How ironic...lol

  • valvolux on November 25, 2013, 5:09 GMT

    England always come back hard, there's little to suggest they won't again. But they take nothing from the first test except they know australia will collapse at least once every test match. They always took some sort of momentum into the second test, and australia always took some dissappintment...monty and Jimmy's partnership in cardiff leaving australia gutted, 1/500 odd in Brisbane after conceding a massive first innings lead, leaving australia gutted, winning by 14 runs this year, leaving australia gutted. Then they pounded a dejected australia in the second test. No one is writing england off, that's for sure. But if they dont get a win out of adelaide, they will be right up against it, given the waca is Johnsons best ground and england traditionally get smashed there. However I wouldn't be at all surprised if the result is completely reversed in adelaide, with swann taking most wickets and trott top scoring. Its that sort of pitch.

  • Lermy on November 25, 2013, 5:01 GMT

    What a great Australian Michael Clark is. Yes I know you get sledged too poor darling, but threatening to break the arm of a number 11 batsman and then having the quick bowler attempt to do just that when the game was already beyond doubt. Up till then I was enjoying the Australian resurgence. Now I hope they get beaten in the next tests.

  • on November 25, 2013, 5:00 GMT

    Gopalakrishnan Balasubramanian, I think you're doing a grave injustice to Ryan Harris, Peter Siddle and Nathan Lyon by suggesting the "Aussie bowling starts and ends with Johnson". Sure, Mitch Johnson took the spoils at the Gabba, but Harris, Siddle and Lyon applied strong pressure from the other end and all have pretty respectable Test records. I'd like to see Jimmy Pattinson up and firing for the WACA Test, but unless he plays the next two Sheffield Shield games that won't happen. I fully expect England to now show far more resolve than their meek capitulation in Brisbane, but tip Australia to win a great series 2-1.

  • mk49_van on November 25, 2013, 4:45 GMT

    I would have waited until the third test was done and dusted before passing such definitive judgment. The Aussie batting is still very weak - and could easily crumble twice in the next test (or the next two or three).

  • INDSlider on November 25, 2013, 4:37 GMT

    Very good alround performance by Ausie team in a good sporty pitch.

  • INDSlider on November 25, 2013, 4:35 GMT

    Surely we are the new world champions. We will be undefeatable by any team in no time. We need a proper statistical ranking method that the results are weighted by the team strenghts and pitch conditions. Current ranking system won't do any good as it favours the teams mostly winning against minnows and in home conditions.

  • dunger.bob on November 25, 2013, 4:32 GMT

    Seismic Shifts, Power Transfers. Hey, that sounds a lot like my tractor. Keep your hands off it Brettig. I think it's way too early for any of this sort of talk. Way, waaaay too early. Adelaide is the next assignment and I hope that's all the players are concerned with.

    I think we need to play a second spinner there but the squad is already announced as unchanged. I can't see them bringing in Faulkner barring injury, so it's going to be exactly the same team. I think they're trying to send a subliminal message to England by announcing the squad so early. It's a "Well, we're all set to go. How are you blokes going?" sort of thing.

    Anyway, like a lot of others I fully expect the Poms to hit back hard and they're lucky we're rolling into Adelaide and not Perth. I'd be happy with a draw in .aide but won't be surprised if we find the roles somewhat reversed there.

  • PunchyPom on November 25, 2013, 4:24 GMT

    @Thegimp - tend to agree that this time does feel slightly different... yet still a bit too early to call it a seismic change. What I also cant help thinking is that even when Aus were bad - South Africa struggled to win in Australia too. Its a hard place to win regardless of opposition. Not a great place to lose form at the start of a tour. If we have a similar result in Adelaide (not just in margin of victory, but of personal performances by MJ, Trott, Swann etc etc), then I think its all over for England and this story is spot on. 2-0 down with Perth to come has a smell of 2006/07.

  • on November 25, 2013, 4:23 GMT

    This English team is made of sterner stuff and can tough it out on a long series like this one...I can visualize 'Loud-Mouth' Warner not being able to score a century of runs in all the innings put together in the rest of the series...Also, the Aussies bowling starts and ends with Johnson, who has a habit of not lasting a full series or starts tanking (not intentionally), by 2nd or 3rd test in a long series....While, the English is not on par with Windies of 80s or Aussies of late 90s/early 2000s, they have a very good bowling attack and a batting that cannot fail for lon...expect them to make a very strong comeback...

  • kahvas on November 25, 2013, 4:13 GMT

    England need to bring in Panesar in place of Tremlett

  • GRVJPR on November 25, 2013, 4:06 GMT

    Power Shift?? Where was the power at first place. England was always overrated!

  • premclement on November 25, 2013, 4:01 GMT

    I am surprised no one talks about the home advantage Australia has in this test series, similar to England in summer. If it was happened in India, all of them would say "oh India has home advantage or India can not play on bouncy pitches". Does this test show that Eng also can not play fast and bouncy wickets?

  • on November 25, 2013, 4:00 GMT

    To 'brutalize' means to turn people into brutes. It may work against Australia.

  • Thegimp on November 25, 2013, 3:50 GMT

    @PunchyPom ....There seems to be a different feel mate. This wasn't a win based on a 180 from Clarke, there was a flavour of team involved, Haddin, Warner, Clarke, Johnson, Siddle, Lyon and Harris. Each played their part. A long way to go I will admit but this is the cough the motor gives, that blink of hope, when you know the engine will start. It may not be roaring to life but it is starting to cough, which is more than what we have had in recent times.

  • Biggus on November 25, 2013, 3:36 GMT

    Hang on a sec, let's not get too carried away. We've won one game and we were after all in pretty dire trouble in the first dig at one point. Dare to dream for sure, but I wouldn't be saying ANYTHING until we've wrapped the series up. Our batting is still problematic and were Harris to be injured I suggest that would induce a 'seismic shift' the other way, for Johnson can only really let loose if we're tight elsewhere. England MUST try to counterattack him to shake him up a bit, and KP is the only one with the requisite firepower to do it. They may look an entirely different outfit on the flatter tracks. It's way too early for big talk, we should all stop hyperventilating and enjoy the moment while steeling ourselves for the remainder of the series.

  • Sugath on November 25, 2013, 3:34 GMT

    Well done Australia and the Poms have been truly drubbed. I bet this will be a white wash, and may be Premier Cameron would like to watch the next four tests.

  • PunchyPom on November 25, 2013, 3:07 GMT

    Not sure about a seismic shift - it wasnt long ago that England completely trounced them at Lords, the press assumed Australia were heading for a period of consistent big defeats, yet Old Trafford, Chester Le Street, The Oval were very close run matches more akin to each other's abilities The Aus batting line up is still very weak. Smith, Bailey, Watson, Rogers form the majority of the batting line up and each one would even struggle to make a combined Eng/Aus team. They are just as capable of a dramatic collapse as England are - possibly more likely in most eyes. Once England's bowlers hit their straps (they are out of season), Aus could struggle just as much as Trott. Ashes tours are long series and teams change beyond recognition by the end ... lets not forget Perth 2010... Big Mitch was firing with 9 wickets and England were all over the place. Sound familiar?

  • flowersintherain on November 25, 2013, 3:07 GMT

    Perhaps it's premature, but I'm beginning to see parallels to the 1958-59 series - a supposedly unbeatable England being unable to cope with an Australian pace attack of Davidson, Meckiff (ahem!) and Rorke, while the vaunted English bowlers - Trueman, Statham, Tyson, Lock, Laker et al - looked very ordinary. The final outcome was 4-0 to Australia and if I am not mistaken the one draw was a result of rain.

  • hornet18 on November 25, 2013, 2:59 GMT

    One swallow certainly doesn't make a summer and England will be wiser for the sucker punch the Aussies just gave them. However, there is clearly a Mojo to this side that was not there a few months ago in the U.K. It reminds me a bit of 1989 when AB was sick of being the nice guy and being beaten by England. Clark seems to have drawn a similar line in the sand and is keen to see it shoved in England's face.

  • Cantbowlcantbat on November 25, 2013, 2:53 GMT

    I cannot believe what I am reading in the aftermath of the 1st Test. To write off England is way too premature. We don't even know which Mitchell Johnson will turn up in Adelaide. This was a much needed win by Oz and the team seems much more settled than in England earlier this year. However, there are still problems in the top order and I cannot believe that Cook, KP, Trott, Swann, Prior and Anderson et al are a spent force.

  • wouldlovetoplayagain on November 25, 2013, 2:42 GMT

    Interesting symmetry - Mitchell Johnson scored 103 runs (for loss of one wicket), and conceded 103 runs (while taking nine wickets.)

    Thus his match contribution was 9 for 0 (or 8 for 0 if you count his own wicket)

  • trumpoz on November 25, 2013, 2:41 GMT

    Meety has hit the nail on the head - England are a class act when they are firing, but the way the test series is scheduled it happens that their weakness is exposed twice in the first three tests. Adelaide is must win for England, as a draw could well see them staring down the barrel of 2-0 after the WACA (which can be pencilled in as a probable win for they Aussies after the GABBA performance).

  • Front-Foot-Lunge- on November 25, 2013, 2:32 GMT

    "The humiliation was comprehensive, and the physical threat overt." Couldn't agree more. England were well and truly humbled.

  • bigwonder on November 25, 2013, 2:30 GMT

    Well played Australia, it was a deserving performance by the team. England still has 4 games to respond back and they probably will come back strongly. England fans will again come up with lame excuses for their defeat. I think they should question ECB's over emphasis on type of food being served to the their players instead of their skills. It's called paralysis by analysis.

  • camcove on November 25, 2013, 2:09 GMT

    Jeremy 303 - Interesting comments about Cosgrove and SOK. I also believe that they would perform well if given the chance. I would see SOK as a complement to Lyon, rather than a replacement. I listened with interest to KO'K talking about him yesterday. I have always regarded Holland as a better left arm finger spinner, simply because he does more with the ball. Yet SOK continues to produce fantastic 1st class numbers, and he is an excellent fieldsman and batsman. KO'K talked about his accuracy and ability to tie batsmen down as his greatest attribute. On Cosgrove, I doubt if you would ever see him flummoxed by a short ball the way Rogers was. I don't agree that Smith is under pressure, but Bailey is. I note that Silk scored another ton (a young fellow with huge potential), as did Cowan. (Cowan would still be in the selectors' thoughts, I'm sure). Doolan had a double failure. Maddinson wouldn't have to do too much to push his way into contention also. We should be wary of Swann in SA!

  • on November 25, 2013, 2:05 GMT

    Some thoughts about the Adelaide test coming up. History has suggested it's a bit slower and flat, and against SA, a draw and 2 burned out bowlers. So I would change the 11, Have Hughes opening with Warner, either drop Watson or keep him at 3. Clarke stays at 4 or moves to 5. You have a handful of up and coming new batsman, Silk for example, who could slot into the middle order. Then you can have the option of dual spin for Adelaide, O'keefe and Lyon competing for wickets if the game is heading for a draw, spin from both ends. They did it last week in the Shield and it was good. Johnson can stay in the side, Harris can be rested and Coulter-Nile, or some other in-form pace bowler can take his place, Siddle can remain in the side so long as he doesn't burn himself out. Johnson-O'keefe-Siddle-Lyon combination, the 5th bowler can either be Watson, or his dropped counter-part Faulkner, who Im sure would average more than the 20 or so Watson has in the last 3 years.

  • chicko1983 on November 25, 2013, 2:05 GMT

    @ Peterincanada - Don't forget the batting by Haddin, Warner and Clarke in your assessment. Watson, though out of form, still scored the second most runs in the English summer series out of either team (averaged 40) so he is a very good player if he gets it right.

  • chicko1983 on November 25, 2013, 2:02 GMT

    @ Dan Parker - you are basing your experience of Mitchell Johnson on 2010-2012 Mitchell Johnson, not the 2009 MJ (who 2013 MJ looks like) who won the world cricketer of the year with 63 wickets. Also, Pattinson and Cummins are as fast as Johnson but more accurate - Pattinson in Australian conditions ran through South Africa and India, averaging low 20s and bowling up around 150kPa, England dont want to face him (even though he is injured). Can't wait for when Cummins, Pattinson, Starc, and Bird are fit. Add in Coulter-Nile, Hazelwood, Sandu, and Richardson, there wont be a let up of Aussie quicks who can torment English in Australian conditions for another 10-15 years. And thats assuming no more youngsters coming through!

  • blah_blah on November 25, 2013, 1:34 GMT

    Australia need to stay one step ahead. Hopefully Craig McDermott works on Johnson pitching the ball up and getting his in-swinger going. How devastating will it be for Trott if he gets his stumps knocked over from a Johnson yorker?

    To follow on from Michael Vaughan comments: now England need to win the 2nd Test or will they be "no chance" with the 3rd Test looming in Perth?

    Should be a great Test in Adelaide, expecting the poms to hit back. It's a continuation of the fantastic contest of the previous series, but with a twist.

  • 2.14istherunrate on November 25, 2013, 0:44 GMT

    Get Real! remember Edgbaston 1997? Hahahah! Not so much the light at the end of the tunnel as the lights of a train going the other way.

  • on November 25, 2013, 0:36 GMT

    I agree with those denouncing this article as knee-jerk and melodramatic. England have won the last three ashes series, in which the last two were totally comprehensive. In the current XI, only Michael Carberry has not experienced Ashes victory. Whilst in the Aussie XI, only Michael Clarke has been in an Ashes winning side. Yes, Australia played very well but to suggest their first victory in 11 months points to a power shift is totally ludicrous. If Australia go on to win the Ashes making bold statements like that would be fair enough. However, to make such remarks after only one game in the series, regardless of the margin of victory, is premature in the extreme.

  • OneEyedAussie on November 25, 2013, 0:21 GMT

    While it is true that there is still a long way to go in this series, it is also true that the next test at Adelaide has now become a must win for England. They will be under extreme pressure as Australia were at Lords - particularly if they don't win the toss.

  • wellrounded87 on November 25, 2013, 0:10 GMT

    I for one am not going to get too carried away with this win. England have got plenty of class players not performing at their best (Cook, Trott, KP, Prior) It's only a matter of time till these guys start hitting some form and when they do is when we'll see if this Australian team is as good as they looked for this test.

    There is a pretty good mix of youth and experience but when Rogers and Haddin go in the near future we need to be smart in selecting their replacements. Doolan has been in great form as has Chris Lyn, we should be giving these guys as much top level cricket as possible. For the keeper spot i think Chris Hartley is a no brainer. Behind the stumps he's the best in the country and he is in great form with the bat. Playing gritty innings under pressure time and again for QLD.

    I also think Faulkner needs to come in at the expense of Watson. The Watson experiment has failed time and time again. He showed in this test he lacks the patience for test cricket.

  • riahcmra on November 24, 2013, 23:58 GMT

    in a nutshell both teams bowled well ... both teams had patchy batting - but Australia came good ... England fell apart England should play Bell at no.3 ... wouldn't write off Khawaja - he is class he seems the obvious opening successor to Rogers in the future

  • on November 24, 2013, 22:03 GMT

    Power shift??? How quickly some journos forget!! The Poms were out gunned in at the Gabba in 2010/11 before Strauss/Cook/Trott got the them out jail, out gunned in the 1st test in 2009 before Anderson/Monty got them out, crushed in the 1st test at Lords in 2005 just as badly as this last one - and they WON all 3 series!!

    If we're 2-0 up after Adelaide then let's talk about power shift but before then guys like Warner should shut up and not bag players who have better test records than him and know how to hit hundreds overseas. In the recent past it was the experienced guys like Warney, Punter & Pidgeon who did the talking - at least they had the runs and wickets to back it up. I'm sure MJ will be putting a lid on it and make sure his players stay focused - after all the Poms only need to draw the series.

  • Number_5 on November 24, 2013, 21:23 GMT

    Wow. I had Eng down to win this series 2-1 after draws in the first 2 tests due to rain and the flat Adelaide deck. Many Aus and Cricket fans believed the 3-0 result in Eng this winter was a lot closer than the score suggests. Many others did not. The Eng bowlers looked good but struggled to back up in the second dig with little time to recover. Swan looks to be struggling but will find the flatness of the Adelaide deck more to his suiting I believe. The Eng batsman have some work to do and will find solace in returning to a venue they have reaped runs in their last 2 visits. A win is crucial. Then Perth, where Mitch plays at his best and Melb / Syd which before this series you said would suit Eng better than Aus. Aus has played its hand and its now up to Eng to retort. We are set for a cracking series.

  • on November 24, 2013, 21:01 GMT

    I remember Edgebaston 1997 when something similair happened. England then were the team that hadn't led an ashes series for a while and blew the Aussies away. Turned out to be a mirage.....

  • whoster on November 24, 2013, 17:07 GMT

    I think we need to let the dust settle before England are written-off in this series. England are nothing if not resilient, and time-and-again, they've bounced back from heavy defeats. That's not to say they'll do so again in Adelaide, but a sense of perspective is required here. Australia are going to have to play a lot more good cricket in this series to earn the Ashes, and like in Perth three years ago, England were blown away by a magic first innings spell from Johnson. A single victory - albeit a very big one, is little evidence of a power shift. If England continue to struggle in Adelaide, then maybe that's the case.

    There's no disguising the fact that Trott has a major problem against quality pace bowling, but he's a tough player, and Mr Warner would be wise to reserve judgement for the time being - especially as he hasn't as yet got the Test record to go about publicly dissing fellow professionals.

    We'll know a lot more after Adelaide - but very well played Australia.

  • Meety on November 24, 2013, 16:59 GMT

    Post 06/07 - I have believed there wasn't a lot of difference in talent between the 2 teams. England on paper were edging ahead in that regards once Punter & Huss departed. The big difference was stability & planning for England versus a shambles for Oz. I believed that Clarke's captaincy was the one area where we had a distinct advantage over the Poms. However, now Oz have some sort of momentum & belief & that I believe can bridge a class gap. Adelaide is almost sudden death for England - as I believe their problems at the Gabba will only be intensified at the WACA. If England don't win at Adelaide (draw very likely) - they probably will be 2 nil down after the WACA. Dunno how Cook will go with that type of pressure going into the MCG/SCG tests???

  • Peterincanada on November 24, 2013, 16:51 GMT

    @Dan Parker I agree with you that the victory owes everything to Johnson's effort with both bat and ball. However there are too many question marks in the batting to say that there has been a shift in power. Rogers, Bailey Smith and Watson are not convincing. I think Watson and Smith were beneficiaries of some very poor England selections at the Oval and made some very easy runs. People wrote Jonson off as only being good at the Waca. Now he is only good at the Waca and the Gabba and will not be a threat at Adelaide. I am not sure about that. He was pretty hostile in India and in England on slower pitches than Adelaide albeit with the white ball. If there is a shift in power it is through the bowling and not the batting as Johnson was well supported by the other three. It will make for an interesting match.

  • gramedgar on November 24, 2013, 16:31 GMT

    Hard to believe stalwarts like Trott, Prior and Swann's have all played so poorly, and apart from Swann, totally lost their mojo. That defeat hurt but it was a great game and the series is set up to be a cracker, Test Match Cricket, I love you.

  • ScottStevo on November 24, 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Three days ago, Australia were strangers in their own land. Now, apparently there's a shift in power. Just as the first article was written distinctly prematurely, so too is this. It's great for the series that Aus have got a big win here but there's still 4 test matches to go, and I can't see Aus bowling Eng out for scores under 200 too regularly. As MJ so calmly stated in his post match interview with Sky, it's a great start, but there's still a long way to go and a lot of hard work ahead. At least Eng now know, we're in it to win it. In fact, I think that their was a hint of arrogance within the Eng camp that Aus were in disarray and they'd merely turn up, post scores of 500-2 comfortably and cruise to big wins with their bowlers rumbling us in similar fashion to what they've been on the receiving end. This arrogance also extends so far as I think they don't believe Aus is any place to give them a bit of spray - and they've been taken aback by it. If you dish it you've got to cop it

  • rk350 on November 24, 2013, 14:09 GMT

    I am a huge cricket fan, but the knee jerk responses after every big win/loss by a side are just ridiculous, and make the entire media look utterly foolish. In some of England's best series in the past few years (Australia last time, India last year, and the drawn series in South Africa some time ago) they have had one loss which has looked awful. But 1-0 is 1-0 regardless of if it was 360 runs or 6, and the next test is an entirely new proposition.

    The fact is unless one side is vastly superior, individual tests, even series, can go either way - that's what makes cricket interesting. Lets keep the superlatives for later in the series shall we?

  • PFEL on November 24, 2013, 13:55 GMT

    Cricket Australia's Warm-up game tactics have worked a treat. Notice that at the request of the ECB the tour match opposition was strengthened significantly - in the Batting department. Yet before the first test England had faced no real high quality bowling (the Aus A bowling attack was a 5th 11 at best!, with only 2 specialist quicks and the 8th choice Australian spinner). As a result England were hopeless in their first outing against quality bowling.

  • CodandChips on November 24, 2013, 13:46 GMT

    Well played Australia. As I've said, they're on the rise while we're on the decline

  • on November 24, 2013, 13:35 GMT

    all the doom and gloom and prediction of England's demise from various print media journalists when you remember their position on Australia after day one gives me considerable mirth... let's take a calm look at this... Mitchell Johnson was the difference in this match on a pitch that assisted him... you take him out which is what would have happened if Pattinson or Cummins had been fit and you would have to wonder... except for the Perth test on the infamous WACA pitch, he will be mostly unsighted for the rest of the summer..

  • Chesty-la-roux on November 24, 2013, 13:28 GMT

    A lot of people are talking about respect. A real cricketer, gentleman, and genuine allround great is about to take the field. Turn on your televisions, and bow down, Broad, Anderson, Warner et all. Jacques Kallis is in the room.

  • Nutcutlet on November 24, 2013, 13:18 GMT

    For a while now England has had little thinking to do. The 3rd seamer option was about as tricky as it got, yet Tremlett was always going to play unless Finn/ Rankin was red-hot. Prior's Achilles got better. Sorted. Day one: 2/3 England's, 1/3 Oz's. Still, no worries. The batting guns were primed & all the Oz bowlers had been analysed in minute detail. All known quantities: no fear, all would be well. And that's when the script was blown away. I don't think that England expected Mitch Johnson & Ryan Harris to get more, much more out of that Gabba strip. Surely no one was going to best Broad. Surely, Lyon couldn't find more than Swann. Yet at the point when KP & Carberry were jointly becalmed, it was obvious that a storm was about to break. The rest has already passed into Ashes legend. Eng is now shell-shocked & the serious thinking needs to start. Some seriously underperformed (JT, KP, MP, GS, JA) the rest exc. SB & AC's 2nd inns: ordinary at best. The Magenot line has failed! Plan B?

  • Beertjie on November 24, 2013, 13:12 GMT

    Agree @gregt123 on (November 24, 2013, 11:23 GMT) Assuming Bresnan is the 3rd pace bowler, and Swann has a bigger impact at Adelaide, Aus will now have the self-belief missing for so long. Sure there's still a long way to go and at Adelaide Johnson will be less effective, but unless Harris breaks down I can't see England winning. Siddle, Lyon and Watto will be tight and Harris will reverse effectively, so at least a draw is more likely. On the other hand, we may not have seen the end of the usual Aus collapso performances in a series! Sets up a cracking Ashes whatever happens.

  • Jeremy303 on November 24, 2013, 12:50 GMT

    Let's see if the Aussies can maintain this type of pressure throughout the series. I honestly doubt it. Firstly, I think that Australia is just as susceptible to technical flaws and have them exposed - probably by the moving ball and by quality spin (Adelaide and Sydney?). Smith, Bailey, Watson and Rogers need to post big runs. I think MARK COSGROVE should be in the side, although he hasn't had the best summer thus far. Also, we have to be cautious about Australia's bowling attacks fitness. Harris could struggle to play all five tests and on a flatter track Mitch Johnson will have to bowl more overs at high pace. Perhaps Patto will be fit enough to play some Shield before Perth test? Another note: SOK is still the leading spinner in the country. Yes, Lyon is doing a great job but SOK should be given an opportunity should one arise.

  • AussieSam on November 24, 2013, 12:46 GMT

    The mention of the Gatting ball got me thinking... There are some kind of eerie parallels between this Test and the 1st Test of the 1993 series, but instead of being dominated by spin bowlers this match was dominated by pace bowlers. In 1993 Australia batted first and scored a below par 289 mostly due to a 6-for from one of the England bowlers (Peter Such). Then England got skittled in not many overs (74.5), making 210, mostly due to one particular bowler, who came into the series surrounded by hype, making a big impact on the psyche of the England batsmen and getting a 4-for. Australia then came out and dominated the England bowling, declaring at just over 400 (432), setting an ungettable 500+ target. England batted a bit better in their 2nd innings, but it was only really the captain/opening batsman (Gooch) who showed enough grit to take on Warne and not be intimidated.

    They didn't lose quite as badly in 93 but that loss is what ended up defining the series. A premonition maybe?

  • Big_Chikka on November 24, 2013, 12:44 GMT

    australia have tuned into england big time, and since the summer england seem to have gone from bad to worse, while australia look better. cook shouldn't have brought up espect in relation to trott and warner, makes trott look weaker. needs massive step up from england now.....turning this round from here will be a proof positive of a good england side. if i were betting though, my cash wouldn't be on england just now.

  • Bonehead_maz on November 24, 2013, 12:42 GMT

    How can we have an unchanged squad for Adelaide ? Who is our second spinner ? (or do they have a different drop in pitch for Adelaide, rather than the current new drop in pitch ?).

  • on November 24, 2013, 12:34 GMT

    A bit of hyperbole, Imho. 1 test win after 9 winless tests doesn't quite translate to a power shift. Will have to wait for the next 1 or 2 to come to that conclusion.

  • blogossip on November 24, 2013, 12:09 GMT

    England need bowling firepower. Aussies have rolled them with pace. it was ominous in England Australia was on the rise and it was only a matter of when rather than if. Australia will take the urn and England now need a lot of soul searching. I was baffled by poor tactics of allowing singles so thatr Clarke to be targeted considering he scored 4 double 100's in a calendar year sometime ago.

  • igorolman on November 24, 2013, 12:09 GMT

    The big story here is Swann. He'll surely play in Adelaide - his record is too good over too long not to (for all those Aussie Swann-baiters, what's Beer's test average? Doherty's? McCain's? Hauritz's? Agar's? I can't even remember the rest ...), but he was well and truly put under the pump here, and he needs to find an answer quickly, or I reckon he will call it a day at the end of the series.

    He needs some help from Cook, too. Fair enough to put a man back straight for Warner after he lofted him first ball, Warner's got a rep for shine-or-bust batting. But once he showed that he was happy to accumulate singles off decent balls by coming down and patting it to long-off, you have to gamble and bring the man back up. Else you're saying 'here, have three or four an over for no risk', and since Swann is the holding bowler in good conditions - and this was a good pitch, making England's capitulation the more humiliating - to lose him throws all the plans out.

  • dsig3 on November 24, 2013, 11:57 GMT

    Great to get the win, but its going to be very tough for us in Adelaide. It's not a power shift yet. Would of been nicer if there was less carry on at the end. Jimmy will never be able to cop what he routinely dishes. The England team know in their hearts they got bullied, they don't need to hear it from us. Better to keep quite and knock their blocks off.

  • Digimont on November 24, 2013, 11:54 GMT

    @DiscoBob, I'm a through and through one eyed Aussie, and I can confirm that Clarke said those words. He was on camera at the time, so I saw him say them as well. What I can't tell you though, is what Anderson said beforehand. He certainly said something first, to Bailey at short leg, then to Clarke - his voice did not come out on the pitch mikes, but his lips were flapping first.

  • siddhartha87 on November 24, 2013, 11:45 GMT

    Clarke's captaincy was amazing in this game.Hopefully Aussies make this 5-0

  • c3vzn on November 24, 2013, 11:42 GMT

    @disco_bob We all heard Clarke say it and it was legendary. You can even watch it on YouTube if you search the phrase.

  • HenryPorter on November 24, 2013, 11:39 GMT

    Seems that "respect" and "disrespected" have gotten a lot of coverage in this Test, with an unbalanced emphasis on batters. One of the real stories is the relentless disrespect that Mitchell Johnson has had from multiple directions and for multiple years. His rise and fall and comeback, in the face of so many hurdles, is a great tale that should be told and celebrated. Much moreso than coverage of inane heat-of-the-moment-sledges that will soon be forgotten. The other real and important story from today is Nathan Lyon, whose harsh treatment yet potent role in the game is rightfully acknowledged in this piece.

  • izzidole on November 24, 2013, 11:26 GMT

    This was no ordinary victory but sheer brute force by the aussies to inflict a crushing victory over England that made them look a very mediocre side in world cricket . Barring their captain Alistair Cooke the England batsmen looked clueless against good fast bowling and was no match for the aussies who have just handed the England team and their supporters a very good lesson not to get too arrogant and underestimate the opposition in the future. I guess this was all sorted out today in the middle as a retaliation by this massive 361 run victory by Australia with more to follow in the rest of the ashes series.

  • aus_trad on November 24, 2013, 11:23 GMT

    Wow...who'd have thought it? I tipped England to win this series, maybe 2-1, based on somewhat greater on-paper strength, and a psychological hold born of recent successes over Aus. England were, however, always going to be beatable: they have problems at 2, 3, 6 and 7, the are really missing Bresnan as 3rd pace bowler, and Swann was always going to struggle to have a big impact (apart, maybe, from Adelaide). As for Aus, to win the series, lots had to (and still has to) go right: few injury problems, and much better "execution" than in recent Ashes contests. Well, in this test, they executed (with the ball) about as well as they could have (in fact, a number of England's batsmen were well and truly "executed"), with Johnson back to his magic best... One victory does not win a series, however: there's still a long way to go. At Adelaide, Johnson will be less effective, Swann more so; and (crucially), more of the Aus top 6 have to make runs. England will come back hard - make no mistake

  • disco_bob on November 24, 2013, 11:15 GMT

    Daniel, did you personally hear Clarke utter those exact alleged words to Anderson? It doesn't sound like Clarke to me, I'm more inclined to believe what was reported over the radio which did not contain the expletive and referred to Anderson's helmet.

  • SurlyCynic on November 24, 2013, 11:13 GMT

    Swann looked like he wanted to get out rather than face Johnson. He's always backed away and bottled out of facing quick bowling, but this match was particularly pathetic. He talks a big game but lacks the courage needed in tough test cricket.

  • Liquefierrrr on November 24, 2013, 11:12 GMT

    It amazes me that some people speak so highly of this England team.

    Anderson - avg 30 Swann - avg 29 Broad - avg 30 Tremlett - avg 27 (bowls around 124km/h)

    Prior - never scores when it counts and hasn't a clue with the gloves (never has)

    Cook - class batsman, defensive captain Carberry - looks solid but not special KP - a masterclass Bell - superb Trott - a terrified lamb who has some real problems now, avg 36 for last 2000 runs Root - a talented yet questionable youth (will need time)

    England's bowling is particularly forgettable. Not only that, in a few VERY short years from now, it WILL have been forgotten.

    I'm not saying Aus are a better side, though they annihilated England here, humiliated them. But that burden is not on us, it is on the fans and ex-players and sensationalist media that would have us believe England are an amazing side.

    They simply are not and (with this lot) never will be.

    What is a fact, aside from the figures above, is 2/215 off 53 = swannsong time.

  • xtrafalgarx on November 24, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    While everyone was laughing at us, what they didn't realise is that we could only get better.What they don't understand is the lessons that were being learnt, a tough tour of India, toughest place to tour for most teams, A tour of England, one of the best teas in the world today at their home, we have them a better run than the scoreline suggested.

    A tour of South Africa follows this Ashes, we have been playing the top teams in the world at their homes, these tough times the team has gone through will surely make the stronger for the next time, the tough victories bring the together.

    Australia have been struggling, but they could only get better.

  • Liquefierrrr on November 24, 2013, 11:05 GMT

    What an absolute gem of an article - England are well under the gun here, the pressure of this cataclysmic loss & also the burden of expectation (which still rests firmly on their shoulders), not to mention the absolutely calculative mental disintegration upon Trott, will make things much harder than they could ever have imagined.

    Warner played a calculative, correct, typical & aggressive role with the bat & in the press, which has English players and fans crying.

    Johnson terrified the English team for the duration of the match.

    Prior looked pathetic with gloves & bat, showing that Haddin, who does it when it matters, is far superior in both departments.

    England will say one or both of these two things:

    1. It is Australia's first win in 9 tests (factual, but latest and fullest and most of these people are those who didn't give us a sniff, so it is their way of backtracking)

    2. We are sore winners. Fact is Eng gave as good as they got.

    No leg to stand on, absolute hiding.

  • Lara213 on November 24, 2013, 11:04 GMT

    A bit early to talk of 'power shifts', how often have we heard that in previous Ashes after crushing Aus wins, as in 2009 after Headingley and Perth in 2010/11? England has proven over the last ten years they are a dangerous team to write off.

    I'm wondering if this result will in fact be the making of England rather than Australia. The last couple of years they've coasted too often and lost their focus and believed victory was their friend they just had to coax back at the last minute.

    The nature of the defeat and Australia's graceless triumphalist reaction may only end up infusing England with a ruthless determination and resolution not to let up for the rest of the series.

    Before the series England's goal was not just to reatin the Ashes but build a platform to regain number one spot and this may just be the tonic to give them back that sense of purpose they seemed to have lost.

  • on November 24, 2013, 11:02 GMT

    carberry is no good, let root open the innings with cook, push carberry down the order or pick at least another batsmen, panesar for tremlett will do a lot of good in Adelaide...

  • spence1324 on November 24, 2013, 10:58 GMT

    Well done to Australia for finally winning a test match, its been a while from a england fan.

  • Lara213 on November 24, 2013, 10:57 GMT

    A bit early to talk of 'power shifts', how often have we heard that in previous Ashes after crushing Aus wins, as in 2009 after Headingley and Perth in 2010/11? England has proven over the last ten years they are a dangerous team to write off.

    I'm wondering if this result will in fact be the making of England rather than Australia. The last couple of years they've coasted too often and lost their focus and believed victory was their friend they just had to coax back at the last minute.

    The nature of the defeat and Australia's graceless triumphalist reaction may only end up infusing England with a ruthless determination and resolution not to let up for the rest of the series.

    Before the series England's goal was not just to reatin the Ashes but build a platform to regain number one spot and this may just be the tonic to give them back that sense of purpose they seemed to have lost.

  • milepost on November 24, 2013, 10:52 GMT

    Great article Daniel. A huge momentum shift, Lehman bringing in players in form and giving them confidence and there seems a more gelled team vibe. Can England bounce back? No, I can't see how after this, it's not like Trott and Prior had one bad game, they have just continued their poor runs and now look totally lost. If anything Australia could possibly strengthen their three and five positions but will they change a wining lineup? England must make changes, Trott would have to spend equal time in the nets and on the psychiatrist's couch to even be considered for selection. Tremlett, well we all knew that before the game. Carberry looked pretty good actually, Broad had one good innings bowling. I have the feeling that England will be simply overwhelmed. But it's cricket so who knows.

  • PrasPunter on November 24, 2013, 10:48 GMT

    God Bless Australia !! Go Aussie Go !!

  • jockoz on November 24, 2013, 10:47 GMT

    Totally agree. Any condemnation of Clarkes words to Anderson need to erase arch their history back to the last Ashes in England when Anderson was giving it out. It seems that everyone is quick to jump on the Aussies for this but the Poms are just as guilty and then cry about it when on the receiving end. Their delaying tactics have long been appealing going back to the drawn Cardiff test in 09 and they should be punished for doing so. Sees they are guilty of what the great Ozzy teams of old were accused of in that they don't like it when the shoe is on the other foot.

  • on November 24, 2013, 10:46 GMT

    I don't feel too bad about West Indies thumping by India after seeing how England folded so badly. I believe England can bounce back from this as they have shown in the past.

  • on November 24, 2013, 10:46 GMT

    I don't feel too bad about West Indies thumping by India after seeing how England folded so badly. I believe England can bounce back from this as they have shown in the past.

  • jockoz on November 24, 2013, 10:47 GMT

    Totally agree. Any condemnation of Clarkes words to Anderson need to erase arch their history back to the last Ashes in England when Anderson was giving it out. It seems that everyone is quick to jump on the Aussies for this but the Poms are just as guilty and then cry about it when on the receiving end. Their delaying tactics have long been appealing going back to the drawn Cardiff test in 09 and they should be punished for doing so. Sees they are guilty of what the great Ozzy teams of old were accused of in that they don't like it when the shoe is on the other foot.

  • PrasPunter on November 24, 2013, 10:48 GMT

    God Bless Australia !! Go Aussie Go !!

  • milepost on November 24, 2013, 10:52 GMT

    Great article Daniel. A huge momentum shift, Lehman bringing in players in form and giving them confidence and there seems a more gelled team vibe. Can England bounce back? No, I can't see how after this, it's not like Trott and Prior had one bad game, they have just continued their poor runs and now look totally lost. If anything Australia could possibly strengthen their three and five positions but will they change a wining lineup? England must make changes, Trott would have to spend equal time in the nets and on the psychiatrist's couch to even be considered for selection. Tremlett, well we all knew that before the game. Carberry looked pretty good actually, Broad had one good innings bowling. I have the feeling that England will be simply overwhelmed. But it's cricket so who knows.

  • Lara213 on November 24, 2013, 10:57 GMT

    A bit early to talk of 'power shifts', how often have we heard that in previous Ashes after crushing Aus wins, as in 2009 after Headingley and Perth in 2010/11? England has proven over the last ten years they are a dangerous team to write off.

    I'm wondering if this result will in fact be the making of England rather than Australia. The last couple of years they've coasted too often and lost their focus and believed victory was their friend they just had to coax back at the last minute.

    The nature of the defeat and Australia's graceless triumphalist reaction may only end up infusing England with a ruthless determination and resolution not to let up for the rest of the series.

    Before the series England's goal was not just to reatin the Ashes but build a platform to regain number one spot and this may just be the tonic to give them back that sense of purpose they seemed to have lost.

  • spence1324 on November 24, 2013, 10:58 GMT

    Well done to Australia for finally winning a test match, its been a while from a england fan.

  • on November 24, 2013, 11:02 GMT

    carberry is no good, let root open the innings with cook, push carberry down the order or pick at least another batsmen, panesar for tremlett will do a lot of good in Adelaide...

  • Lara213 on November 24, 2013, 11:04 GMT

    A bit early to talk of 'power shifts', how often have we heard that in previous Ashes after crushing Aus wins, as in 2009 after Headingley and Perth in 2010/11? England has proven over the last ten years they are a dangerous team to write off.

    I'm wondering if this result will in fact be the making of England rather than Australia. The last couple of years they've coasted too often and lost their focus and believed victory was their friend they just had to coax back at the last minute.

    The nature of the defeat and Australia's graceless triumphalist reaction may only end up infusing England with a ruthless determination and resolution not to let up for the rest of the series.

    Before the series England's goal was not just to reatin the Ashes but build a platform to regain number one spot and this may just be the tonic to give them back that sense of purpose they seemed to have lost.

  • Liquefierrrr on November 24, 2013, 11:05 GMT

    What an absolute gem of an article - England are well under the gun here, the pressure of this cataclysmic loss & also the burden of expectation (which still rests firmly on their shoulders), not to mention the absolutely calculative mental disintegration upon Trott, will make things much harder than they could ever have imagined.

    Warner played a calculative, correct, typical & aggressive role with the bat & in the press, which has English players and fans crying.

    Johnson terrified the English team for the duration of the match.

    Prior looked pathetic with gloves & bat, showing that Haddin, who does it when it matters, is far superior in both departments.

    England will say one or both of these two things:

    1. It is Australia's first win in 9 tests (factual, but latest and fullest and most of these people are those who didn't give us a sniff, so it is their way of backtracking)

    2. We are sore winners. Fact is Eng gave as good as they got.

    No leg to stand on, absolute hiding.

  • xtrafalgarx on November 24, 2013, 11:11 GMT

    While everyone was laughing at us, what they didn't realise is that we could only get better.What they don't understand is the lessons that were being learnt, a tough tour of India, toughest place to tour for most teams, A tour of England, one of the best teas in the world today at their home, we have them a better run than the scoreline suggested.

    A tour of South Africa follows this Ashes, we have been playing the top teams in the world at their homes, these tough times the team has gone through will surely make the stronger for the next time, the tough victories bring the together.

    Australia have been struggling, but they could only get better.