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Merv Hughes
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Merv Hughes

Australia|bowler
Merv Hughes

INTL CAREER: 1985 - 1994

Full Name

Mervyn Gregory Hughes

Born

November 23, 1961, Euroa, Victoria

Age

59y 141d

Nicknames

Fruitfly

Batting Style

Right hand bat

Bowling Style

Right arm fast

Playing Role

Bowler

Other

Selector

TEAMS

Merv Hughes was a big-hearted fast bowler who ultimately made a major contribution to Australia's fortunes. A crowd favourite, he was a lively character armed with an imposing run-up and delivery action, a classic fast bowlers' glare down the pitch, a mischievous sense of humour and a moustache of incredible proportions. And while his antics sometimes overshadowed his bowling, Hughes gave every ounce of effort to his country, and helped it to re-climb the ranks of Test cricket. Hughes made a comparatively modest entrance in the mid-1980s, but his value came to the fore against West Indies in 1988-89, when he lost pace partner Geoff Lawson to a broken jaw in the second Test. Hughes gained a hat-trick in that match, but his performance - 13 for 217 off 73.1 overs - illustrated his ability to combine the roles of spearhead and stock bowler.

By the mid-point of his international career, Hughes had improved his accuracy and variation and was using his bouncer, which remained a favourite throughout his career, with greater discretion. After ducks in his first three Test innings, he also become a handy batsman - albeit one who favoured a powerful, tail-enders' hoick over midwicket - and had a top score of 72 against the mighty West Indians of 1988-89. Hughes saved his greatest series performance for the 1993 Ashes tour, when bowling partner Craig McDermott was ruled out with a twisted bowel. Over the six Tests, Hughes took 31 wickets from almost 300 overs, helping Australia to a 4-1 victory.

Hughes sustained a serious knee injury during the series and made only a fleeting Test comeback the following summer, finishing with 212 career wickets. However, his enthusiasm for the game continued long after his international days. He appeared for the Canberra Comets during their experiment against the states in domestic one-day cricket, and became a veteran of his local club Footscray in Melbourne. A host of supporters' tours, he made the surprise step into high-level administration when he replaced Allan Border as an Australian selector in 2005. Dressed in a suit and with contemporary glasses he looks anything but the man who mixed jest with aggression as one of the country's most recognisable players.
Cricinfo staff

Career Averages

Bowling
FormatMatInnsBallsRunsWktsBBIBBMAveEconSR4w5w10w
Test53971228560172128/8713/21728.382.9357.901471
ODI333316391115384/444/4429.344.0843.10100
FC16534881174295938/8729.392.9958.80213
List A88446631511055/415/4130.004.2342.50210
Batting & Fielding
FormatMatInnsNORunsHSAveBFSR100s50s4s6sCtSt
Test53708103272*16.64223346.21029617230
ODI331781002011.1113474.62006460
FC16519645264972*17.5407560
List A884615264208.5100190
Merv Hughes scowling
Explore Statsguru Analysis

Debut/Last Matches - Player

Photos


Jon Holland receives his baggy green from Merv Hughes
Merv Hughes vents his frustrations during a charity T20 match
Merv Hughes celebrates a hat-trick at a charity T20 match
Peter Siddle talks to the selector Merv Hughes before pulling out of the third Test
Eye of the tiger: Merv Hughes prepares to throw a shuttle during Australia's net session at Edgbaston
Brett Lee and Australian selector Merv Hughes