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Media Releases

Statement by ICC Acting Chief Executive following announcement by CAS that it has no jurisdiction in WADA's dispute with Pakistan players

Following the announcement by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) that it has no jurisdiction to decide the dispute between the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and two Pakistan players, Shoaib Akhtar and Mohammad Asif, the Acting Chief Executive of t

James Fitzgerald
03-Jul-2007
Following the announcement by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) that it has no jurisdiction to decide the dispute between the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and two Pakistan players, Shoaib Akhtar and Mohammad Asif, the Acting Chief Executive of the International Cricket Council (ICC) Faisal Hasnain has issued a statement.
"We note the CAS decision of 2 July and we also note and acknowledge its regret that it could not act in this case. As far as we are concerned the matter is now closed," said Mr Hasnain.
"We at the ICC, and all the other parties involved in this case, have learned a lot from this experience. The ICC remains committed to a zero-tolerance approach to the use of banned substances in cricket and we are working hard with our Members to ensure a case like this does not happen again.
"Since we became a WADA signatory in 2006, we have been striving to make sure cricket does not develop a major problem in this area. I believe we are getting it right.
"The ICC Member Services Department is in close contact with all our Members regarding the issue of drugs. We have recently appointed a full-time officer whose job it is to liaise with our Members and WADA in all anti-doping matters and to ensure the countries that take part in ICC events understand the importance of delivering player education in a timely and effective manner.
"We began drug testing in 2002 and we are proud of the fact that since then we have not had a positive drug test at any of our events. That is not to say we can be complacent - far from it - and we are engaged in a robust campaign to make sure all our Members become WADA-compliant by 2009 at the latest.
"This date has been moved forward from an original deadline of 2010 and we are encouraging our Members to get their anti-doping protocols in place as soon as possible. In the mean time, we will continue carrying out drug tests at our events, including the next one, the ICC World Twenty20 in September.
"Following this case, we have amended the ICC Anti-Doping Code to ensure we have more powers to intervene if we feel a Member is not doing all it can in the fight against drugs in cricket.
"In line with the amendments, the ICC now has a right of appeal if a Member that is not WADA-compliant makes a decision which is inconsistent with the WADA code.
"Furthermore, while such an appeal is pending, the relevant players can be target tested by the ICC up to 60 days before one of our events.
"The menace of drugs has been visited upon most sports over the years and cricket is no exception. The challenge for us is to make sure they do not become a major factor in our game and that everyone can continue to watch safe in the knowledge that they are viewing a fair contest between top athletes untainted by banned substances.
"I believe the ongoing work being carried out in this area shows our ongoing commitment to drug-free sport."
The ICC Chief Executive Malcolm Speed is on leave.

James Fitzgerald is ICC Communications Officer