England news September 4, 2014

Moeen calls for greater home support

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Play 01:40
Moeen not affected by crowd reaction

Moeen Ali has once again proved himself to be a fearless advocate of Britain's maturity as a multicultural nation by telling the British Indians who booed him at Edgbaston that he looks forward to the day when they all support England.

Moeen was persistently booed during the fourth ODI in Birmingham, the city of his birth, as some Indian supporters, most of them also British born, picked him out for special abuse in deference to traditional Indo-Pak rivalry.

"I just go out and block it out and try and play as best as I can," he said. "It's fine, it just goes straight over my head. I think it's maybe because my background is from Pakistan but it doesn't bother me."

Moeen, a practising Muslim, and instantly recognisable by the long beard that he proudly presents as a label of his faith, has previously expressed the belief that British-born Asians should support England.

He said at Headingley ahead of the final Royal London ODI that it was especially odd to hear Birmingham voices cheering on India. "Definitely - and they've got a Brummy accent or whatever and some of the chants are English chants. But it's just the way it is. Hopefully over time we can change that.

"I spoke to a lot of people and there were a lot of Asians there who were supporting England as well. But, obviously, the majority were supporting India."

Moeen was warned by the ICC in July after taking the field against India during the third Test at the Ageas Bowl wearing "Save Gaza" and "Free Palestine" wristbands. ICC rules state players should not wear messages relating to "political, religious or racial activities".

His evident pride in wearing the Three Lions of England promises to make him into a cult figure among England cricket supporters during a summer in which he has impressed with both bat and ball. He has shown it is possible to be both a devoutly practising Muslim and a ‎proud England cricketer and British citizen. Such are the tensions of multiculturalism in Britain, however, he never expected it to be an easy ride.

David Hopps is the UK editor of ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • dinosaurus on September 8, 2014, 7:20 GMT

    Captain Meanster, The issue is not that some British Indians support India - it is that they booed a player because of his origin or because of his religion. Both these things are (and really ought to be) taboo. What if a batch of "lager louts" turned to yelling abuse at those very Indians on the basis of *their* skin colour!! Such behaviour should not be tolerated, and I think such offenders should be removed from the ground by security personnel and barred for a year at least from attending matches.

  • gandabhai on September 7, 2014, 12:27 GMT

    Most British Indians will support England in every international match except when it's against India.

  • analyseabhishek on September 6, 2014, 17:28 GMT

    If you are born at a place, you should support the corresponding home team, period. If you happen to support the team playing against the home team, you should keep it private. Booing someone from the home team due to a crab mentality is simply not done. This is my personal view as an Indian living in India. You cannot keep your feet in two boats for too long. You cannot eat your cake and have it too.

  • danishsyed88 on September 6, 2014, 15:54 GMT

    I am a British-born Muslim and have lived most of my life in Pakistan. But that 'birthplace' feeling is a lot more strong, and therefore I always support England. I have to listen to some criticism from people here in Pak but have got used to it :D

  • on September 6, 2014, 15:38 GMT

    If cricket fans of South Asian origin want to support the lands of their fathers against England that is not a problem. If they support Australia against England that is more of a problem. Who do British Indians support when England play Pakistan?

  • Prats6 on September 6, 2014, 7:42 GMT

    Respect Moeen's views but everyone is entitles to support any team he/she wants. I have supported the weaker teams when they play India, does not mean that I don't like India. I have supported Pakistan when they play against many teams. Point - In sports, you support the team you love and it has nothing to do with where you live or was born.

  • Cpt.Meanster on September 6, 2014, 0:05 GMT

    @JG2704: My friend, you are missing the point of my comment. Allegiance should come from the 'heart', you can't buy or demand it. Obviously, British Indians are still proud to be 'Indians' thanks to their roots and heritage. You can't deny them that. That doesn't mean they won't support England if the team plays others. Sure, they will support England if the opponent is Pakistan or SL or Australia etc. But they adore their Men In Blue. Let's not make this a big issue.

  • Omarrz on September 5, 2014, 20:05 GMT

    isn't this surprising that players with Pakistani descent has played for England (Sajid Mehmood, Owais Shah, Kabir Ali, Moeen Ali), Australia (Fawad, Usman), South Africa (Imran Tahir), Zimbabwe (Sikandar Raza)

  • jb633 on September 5, 2014, 17:49 GMT

    Moeen Ali has just gone up in my estimation as an English fan. After this disgraceful treatment I will want Aus to humiliate India in every facet of the game (Which I am sure they will have no issue doing). Can't wait to watch Mitch get at them.

  • on September 5, 2014, 14:35 GMT

    Irrespective of where you live, it is extremely difficult to sever all links from your roots. Your favourite could be any team or player, but no one has a license to be indecent or abusive to any team or player. The fact that some one from your background has qualified to represent another country's National Team, should by itself, merit recognition & support from a true sports lover. Going the other way, only proves the narrowness of one's thinking.

  • dinosaurus on September 8, 2014, 7:20 GMT

    Captain Meanster, The issue is not that some British Indians support India - it is that they booed a player because of his origin or because of his religion. Both these things are (and really ought to be) taboo. What if a batch of "lager louts" turned to yelling abuse at those very Indians on the basis of *their* skin colour!! Such behaviour should not be tolerated, and I think such offenders should be removed from the ground by security personnel and barred for a year at least from attending matches.

  • gandabhai on September 7, 2014, 12:27 GMT

    Most British Indians will support England in every international match except when it's against India.

  • analyseabhishek on September 6, 2014, 17:28 GMT

    If you are born at a place, you should support the corresponding home team, period. If you happen to support the team playing against the home team, you should keep it private. Booing someone from the home team due to a crab mentality is simply not done. This is my personal view as an Indian living in India. You cannot keep your feet in two boats for too long. You cannot eat your cake and have it too.

  • danishsyed88 on September 6, 2014, 15:54 GMT

    I am a British-born Muslim and have lived most of my life in Pakistan. But that 'birthplace' feeling is a lot more strong, and therefore I always support England. I have to listen to some criticism from people here in Pak but have got used to it :D

  • on September 6, 2014, 15:38 GMT

    If cricket fans of South Asian origin want to support the lands of their fathers against England that is not a problem. If they support Australia against England that is more of a problem. Who do British Indians support when England play Pakistan?

  • Prats6 on September 6, 2014, 7:42 GMT

    Respect Moeen's views but everyone is entitles to support any team he/she wants. I have supported the weaker teams when they play India, does not mean that I don't like India. I have supported Pakistan when they play against many teams. Point - In sports, you support the team you love and it has nothing to do with where you live or was born.

  • Cpt.Meanster on September 6, 2014, 0:05 GMT

    @JG2704: My friend, you are missing the point of my comment. Allegiance should come from the 'heart', you can't buy or demand it. Obviously, British Indians are still proud to be 'Indians' thanks to their roots and heritage. You can't deny them that. That doesn't mean they won't support England if the team plays others. Sure, they will support England if the opponent is Pakistan or SL or Australia etc. But they adore their Men In Blue. Let's not make this a big issue.

  • Omarrz on September 5, 2014, 20:05 GMT

    isn't this surprising that players with Pakistani descent has played for England (Sajid Mehmood, Owais Shah, Kabir Ali, Moeen Ali), Australia (Fawad, Usman), South Africa (Imran Tahir), Zimbabwe (Sikandar Raza)

  • jb633 on September 5, 2014, 17:49 GMT

    Moeen Ali has just gone up in my estimation as an English fan. After this disgraceful treatment I will want Aus to humiliate India in every facet of the game (Which I am sure they will have no issue doing). Can't wait to watch Mitch get at them.

  • on September 5, 2014, 14:35 GMT

    Irrespective of where you live, it is extremely difficult to sever all links from your roots. Your favourite could be any team or player, but no one has a license to be indecent or abusive to any team or player. The fact that some one from your background has qualified to represent another country's National Team, should by itself, merit recognition & support from a true sports lover. Going the other way, only proves the narrowness of one's thinking.

  • India_boy on September 5, 2014, 13:23 GMT

    Just look at this way - who do Brit-Indians support when Eng plays any other country? Obviously they support England, this is where loyalty comes. Supporting your country of birth , isn't that the sane thing to do? If an English supporter was living in India, will they start supporting India over England? ask yourselves!

  • JG2704 on September 5, 2014, 11:37 GMT

    @Meanster - Your comms just reek of a fairweather attitude. I have no issue with Ali being booed (although it is petty) , but you talk like people support a team because they are winning. Yes we all know which team is better but surely your team is your team no matter how well or badly you're doing

  • RFC73 on September 5, 2014, 11:19 GMT

    I respect Moeen but he's wrong here. People should have the right to support whoever they want. Did all the english people who emigrated to Australia support Australia?. This sounds too much like Norman Tebbit's "cricket test" for my liking.

  • sublime_sport on September 5, 2014, 11:08 GMT

    @wapuser Unfortunately (for us Indians) the political and historical situation between India and England is not the same as between India and Pakistan. So, no comparison. That being said, any true fan should be able to appreciate good cricket-even from an opposition player.

  • NP_NY on September 5, 2014, 10:32 GMT

    @ShahJR: "Does it make sense to be a British citizen and support India?". Sure it does. Like you said, this is sports not politics, England is not at war with India. A sports fan can choose whoever he/she wants to support. And players like Anderson are not helping England's cause. He may not have been held accountable by the cricket powers, but the fans WILL speak their mind.

  • Wafer on September 5, 2014, 10:31 GMT

    I think Nasser Hussain said something similar 15 years ago!

  • russell1967 on September 5, 2014, 10:23 GMT

    I have a great deal of respect for Moeen as a player and a person. I hope his raising of this issue will lead to those who abused him (for it is nothing less than that) taking a long hard look at themselves.

    It may well be that, as another commenter has said, they would support England if they weren't playing against the nation of their parents birth but that is no reason to abuse a player who is perfectly entitled to play for his country.

    In cases like this, the offending people should be reported to the police for racist abuse or at the very least, reported to the stewards and removed fro the ground

  • ShahJR on September 5, 2014, 10:07 GMT

    Does it make sense to be a British citizen and support India? I don't think so. Moeen is bang on. I'm from England so I'm a die hard England fan, it's really that simple. Indians in England have the power to make cricket a much bigger sport here, just by supporting England. This is sports, not politics, we can be proud of our country in that sense.

  • on September 5, 2014, 9:45 GMT

    as a muslim and as a Bristish national he has every right to be proud of his country. And be proud playing for england

  • on September 5, 2014, 9:08 GMT

    @Robin292 - I don't understand why you think non-County members has difficulties in buying test tickets. There was massive publicly given to the fact that tickets were generally available and not selling - how can any cricket follower have been unaware of this?

    You are right to say that the cost of tickets is often too high, but the one area where the ECB have made progress is in offering very reasonably priced seats to juniors.

  • on September 5, 2014, 9:05 GMT

    this reminds me of how a section of indian supporters support pak team esp in hyderabad and north kerala while matches are played in india. not a pretty sight or comfy feeling. can understand how brits must feel

  • Dr.Vindaloo on September 5, 2014, 9:05 GMT

    My own view is that immigrants will always want to celebrate their heritage and that it's absolutely right that they do so. I would never expect a second, third, fourth generation Indian, Pakistani or West Indian immigrant to support England against the country of their ancestors. That's their badge of honour and the cricket provides a perfect stage on which to wear it. Booing the opposition is a different matter though, and has unfortunately become a feature of ODIs featuring certain countries these days. I don't think these are genuine cricket fans though - that's why they only show up for ODIs and T20s.

  • AFanOfGoodCricket on September 5, 2014, 8:59 GMT

    As an Indian it is embarrassing when Indian fans boo or abuse players. I think the problem is people forget they are watching a sport and think if they have paid for a ticket entitles them to do anything. I hate such fans. They have no respect for sport and shouldn't even be allowed near a stadium.

  • 122notoutWestByfleet1996 on September 5, 2014, 8:52 GMT

    if you are born in England, then you are English. I can understand those born overseas supporting the nation of their birth, but 2nd generation on onwards citizens should have an allegiance to the country of their birth.

    If I moved to Australia, I would support Australia as my national team, unless they were playing England. I would expect my children if they were born there to support Australia no matter what.

  • md111 on September 5, 2014, 8:44 GMT

    'The Indian fans spend their money and buy the tickets for the one day games and they deserve to boo whoever they feel like.' - Really? That is the oafish answer we got for years from football until they finally saw the light (things still not sorted though). Surely you don't want cricket to go the same way or is it to late now? People getting more out of booing the oppo than cheering their own side, such a shame

  • Flash_hard27 on September 5, 2014, 8:30 GMT

    Cricket is my first sporting love but I also hold a season ticket for my local football team in the UK and go to all their home games. 20 year ago attending a cricket match in the UK was a very different experience to attending a game of football and was better for it. That delta is closing and I for one do not like it. I have never booed the opposition at cricket and will clap an opposition hundred or five wicket haul, even if it is an Aussie in the ashes. I am not being sanctimonious here, I am happy to boo and shout at football and all attendees buy their tickets knowing and expecting that to be part of the experience (rightly or wrongly!).

    I do like a beer or two at the cricket and will banter with both English fans and opposition fans at a game but their is no place for booing the opposition in cricket. If you plan to do that please stay away it supposed to be a game for gentleman

  • countsam on September 5, 2014, 7:59 GMT

    He who paid the piper calls the tunes. The English media and supporters ignore the One Day game as if it does not exist. This is the reason why England can never compete with the IPL. If the team is wearing the national colours and represent the country then they must make every effort to win in every format it competes. The Indian fans spend their money and buy the tickets for the one day games and they deserve to boo whoever they feel like.

  • DevSheffield on September 5, 2014, 7:28 GMT

    When I moved to UK, I decided to support England football team and then cricket team as well. However, I was constantly abused and shouted at when I was out on the road during the football world cup (previous one in S Africa), even though I was cheering for England and then I went to a match and was pushed and shoved by some yobs... i was put off... I even decided to move back to India... but was given another opportunity by a new employer, so decided to stay on... But since then I have never supported England team whether it is football or cricket... its always the opponent I support, doesn't even matter who it is... Some would say thats hypocritical as I live here... but I am well integrated into the society, I have English friends and do all things that people do in England.. but I have drawn a line at supporting England in any games. I think others might have had similar experiences and that is probably why people still support India, Pakistan or others.

  • Seamer_Singh on September 5, 2014, 7:22 GMT

    The only way to shut the crowd up is to perform with the ball. Just as Mitchell Johnson did ;)

  • Robin292 on September 5, 2014, 6:13 GMT

    Moeen forgets that the Indian supporters cheered him at Old Trafford..this is just banter. As far as lack of support for the Indian Test team : this is not true. Plenty supported India but most ticket buyers were county members, who happend to be English. So blame the county network for not connecting??! Do not believe the the tv and radio commentators when they say India don't care about Test cricket...they lack knowledge of Indian cricket. Trust me, I know this. David Lloyd didn't know about the Indian seamers and Ishant Sharma was the only name he knew. Do not believe what you hear. Also difficult to plan for Test matches if you're taking he whole family. Most Indian supporters would take the family..it's not necessarily a day of drinking for all. Trust I've covered most points???

  • on September 5, 2014, 5:53 GMT

    Black Prince hits the nail on the head.

    My own query is if someone chooses to live here, they must prefer England to wherever. So why do they not support their preferred country? Alternatively why not go to live in the other country if they prefer that one? Most peculiar!

    And booing is childish. It might be appropriate to football, but cricket is a game for a different sort of crowd one would think.

  • on September 5, 2014, 5:48 GMT

    Don't worry Ali because support of almighty is their with you so play good cricket that's it...

  • Malik_Murad on September 5, 2014, 4:56 GMT

    Dear Moeen, This is the charm of international sports to make the audience and spectators free to support any team in the world. When the T20WC was going on in Bangladesh, the local govt asked the spectators in the ground to avoid flying any other countries' flags; this was opposed by the whole world because you can't restrict the audience to support a specific team. I am a Pakistan Cricket Fan but if Pak-Eng series will take place; I will cheer when the Saeed Ajmal will take wicket but will also boo when Misbah will show defensive captaincy, simultaneously when Cook will play good shot we will applaud definitely and won't stop cheering Afridi for his sixes. This is the charm of any sports, no one can stop the fan for their love to their heroes.

  • on September 5, 2014, 4:43 GMT

    I do tend to agree with Moeen. All these people be it Indians or of other races have moved to England for better life, relegating their previous nation in which they were born. Here I refer to first generation. They enjoy all they can in England, including NHS, Pension and other things that come their way, but in the cricket field has a turnaround to support their former nation. One might argue that it is natural, but then one must also appreciate that they came for better life than in the nation they were born, and thus should appreciate the good life they have got and the nation they are now in.

  • Realistic_cri_fan on September 5, 2014, 3:46 GMT

    Dear Moeen Ali, if your team played according to the spirit of the game or if your team shows some fight then no one will boo your team.Would you cry if Pakistan fans support Pak if they play against you?It's up to the individual whether to cheer or boo.They can support whoever they want similarly they can boo whoever they want.Anyways you are my new favorite cricketer and I like your attitude and your style of play.You are no longer an underdog.

  • on September 5, 2014, 1:36 GMT

    Well, Melbourne has a large Sri Lankan population and whenever SL play at the MCG, it feels like the Premadasa Stadium. But AUS cricketers never complain about the lack of support. Maybe that will change in next couple of generations, but for now immigrants will continue to support their country of heritage rather than their country of birth. My cousins who AUS born, still support SL passionately, but they love AUS as a country

  • immi2711 on September 5, 2014, 1:25 GMT

    I think his comments came out wrong or are interpreted incorrectly. He was merely asking people to support England. No matter your background, but if you are born in England, do show some support for the local boys.

    Having said that, in my opinion, he should be able to weed through the crowd noise. You go to some other country and people are going to boo you, but rise above it, and play the game, and win hearts and minds through your game.

    As much as I dont like Steyn or Aussies (the team), I am in awe of their sport professionalism, and wish my team showed half of that pride and professionalism, when they step on the field....and yes I am a PAK fan.

  • Mushtanda on September 5, 2014, 0:45 GMT

    The same Moeen would have no problem if these were Pakistani-origin fans doing it

  • Dilmah82 on September 4, 2014, 23:48 GMT

    The booing was probably because the fans like most people can see England have got their ODI gameplan and selection, especially fo captain horribly wrong. And they are too stubborn to admit it! They are basically going to conceed any chance in 2015 World Cup with the way things are at present

  • Cpt.Meanster on September 4, 2014, 23:38 GMT

    If England could at least bat for the full 50 overs, the crowd would have something to cheer about. They are obviously supporting India, who played well. Besides, there is no law that states British Indians should only support England. If you think they should be 'forced' to do that, then I feel Britain is far from being multicultural. If you want to see a shining example of multiculturalism, come to Canada - a tolerant nation where people support whomever they want. When the FIFA World Cup happened recently, Canadians of various cultural backgrounds cheered on their favourites teams, most of the time, the nation of their heritage or birth. The Maple Leaf was totally forgotten, big deal. Even when Canada appeared in the FIFA World Cup some time in the 1980s, most Canadians cheered on other teams. Sport is about cheering for your favourite team or player(s). It shouldn't be biased.

  • Cpt.Meanster on September 4, 2014, 23:29 GMT

    Moeen, ask your team mates to win first and then comment on crowd support. The public obviously 'knows' which team is better. Think about it.

  • Black_Prince on September 4, 2014, 22:50 GMT

    I think few of us are missing the point. He wants everyone to support the England team while its down. It was the same way when they were down in Tests matches. How superbly they bounced back and crushed India. Obviously a fan can support anyone and can boo or cheer anyone. That is the beauty of the game.

  • on September 4, 2014, 22:43 GMT

    Well said Rajib. Moeen is looking for true cricket fans like you. You are the kind of fan that he likes.

  • swingbothways on September 4, 2014, 22:09 GMT

    It's worth pointing out that these same Indian fans who are booing Eng in cricket are supporting Eng in football.In fact football is probably their preferred sport and that is why they behave in the way they do. BTW well batted Moeen - he batted like a subcontinental.

  • on September 4, 2014, 22:05 GMT

    Well said Moeen, 100% correct.....

  • Rebel_Who_Follows_All_The_Rules on September 4, 2014, 21:33 GMT

    Can't help but laugh at all the Sensitive Sallies who have popped out of the woodwork... as @ Mike Phillimore said, if the people pay money to watch a game they can support whoever they want to.As for Mr Ali, maybe... just maybe if your team was any good at odi's more fans would actually support you.. hope for the same rousing support for India in the next game... 4-0!!!!

  • Coolcapricorn on September 4, 2014, 21:23 GMT

    Being of Pakistani origin, does he think that fans of Pakistani origin residing in the U.K. will not be supporting Pakistan when they next come to tour England? Is he going to have a go at them too & tell them that they should be supporting England instead? These things will change slowly over time with the younger Asian generations born in the U.K. unlike their parents or grandparents - so we should just let nature take its course!

  • neil99 on September 4, 2014, 21:16 GMT

    This sounds like its cone from captain Cooks book on how not react. The public paid good money and they're entitled to voice their opinion. Without the crowds these cricketers would be nobodies - just like the vast majority of county cricketers.

    The team is supposed to win games Moeen, if that escaped you. Now trot off back to the nets. You see, I can treat you with the same disdain you show England supporters.

  • gsingh7 on September 4, 2014, 21:15 GMT

    mostly were booing anderson for his lack of sportmanship for jadeja in particular and indians in general. no body in this world can stop indians from booing him till he plays cricket and even afterwards. this is the way it is, give respect take respect. nobody can force anybody to give u respect. moeen should keep his views inside of cricket boundary as anderson and all those who supported him will be booed till the end of times.

  • on September 4, 2014, 21:06 GMT

    Supporting a team is one's personal choice and it should not be dictated by race, religion, ethnicity or, dare I say, nationality. However, supporting your home team comes naturally to most by the sheer nature of familiarity with the players, involvement with the game at the grassroot level and knowing more about the team through mentions in the national media, which you would expect will cover the home team more than any other.

    Unfortunately, most supporters of Indian subcontinent origin, born in the UK, feel so cut off from the mainstream that they can't relate to "their national team". What is also evident from observing the Indian fans in the crowd in Birmingham is that watching a game of cricket is the last thing on their mind. For these supporters of teams of their ethnic origin, a game of cricket against England seems like an opportunity for some form of retribution for England's colonial past or connecting with their ancestral land. Either way, it's bonkers to see!

  • haq33 on September 4, 2014, 21:04 GMT

    Nice answer Moeen. You must really have stung them with all those test wickets. You have every right to highlight their stupidity by way of such a smart response. Indian fans are officially becoming the longest running joke around in cricket, no wonder - they set themselves up for it with their comments and attitude. It is a cultural phenomenon that they are just plain jealous of asians doing well for themselves, especially when it is outside of the subcontinent. By the way, I heard Bopara was looking for work so maybe India can take him.

  • saifkhanBD on September 4, 2014, 21:01 GMT

    Enjoy the cricket! Support the cricket. Yea, good idea. Pity that many fans prefer jingoism, bigotry, intolerance instead!!

  • torsha on September 4, 2014, 20:59 GMT

    You should concentrate on your performance, not what people say about you, Ali. When Jadeja booed in tests, you didn't say a word, did you?

  • Haleos on September 4, 2014, 20:41 GMT

    @Ian Radcliffe - Have you seen matches played in birmingham and leeds against pakistan? Die hard pakistani fans who would never even have been to pakistan.

  • Haleos on September 4, 2014, 20:39 GMT

    Would he say the same if it was pakistani born british who regularly support pakistan? Even 2 year olds are seen having green flags painted on their faces.

  • JG2704 on September 4, 2014, 20:38 GMT

    When I 1st read the headline etc I thought he was having a go at England fans booing their own side.

    I was going to say that if that was the case then fair enough. Cheering would surely be sarcasm.

    I wonder if that may explain why Moeen was the only batsman who played with fire in his belly/showed positive intent?

    Personally - while I think booing is petty and juvenile - if these guys are paying the bucks to get in the ground then it's up to them

  • on September 4, 2014, 20:12 GMT

    This is part of game...If u r disturb..u r gone...concentrate on cricket, they will cheer you too..there are many grt sportsmen who gets all respect where ever they go. U r good player..u will have different opinion for the same people.

  • Regwec on September 4, 2014, 19:59 GMT

    Well said, Mo. Cricketer of the year, for me.

  • Kcila on September 4, 2014, 19:56 GMT

    The fact is that Indian supporters failed to turn up to the Tests as India's players clearly don't care about Test cricket any more and the fans have given up on it. Meanwhile England fans gave the ODIs a wide berth as the England team haven't a clue as far as the shorter game is concerned. Hence the partisan crowds. Sadly booing is just another sign of partisanship!

  • on September 4, 2014, 19:44 GMT

    Goodness sake. First of all we complain that crowds are thinning, now we complain about who the crowd supports! Tamils in Sri Lanka support India, Muslims in India support Pakistan, Indians in Trinidad support India. Who cares! I loved watching Mark Waugh bat and always wanted him to score a 100, and I have no cultural connection with Australia. I'm not Pakistani but Waqar was my favourite fast bowler. Enjoy the cricket! Support the cricket!

  • on September 4, 2014, 19:14 GMT

    I saw the highlights of this match, and was appalled at the lack of England support. Something wrong here I am sorry to say. Well done Mr Ali.

  • DalesGuy on September 4, 2014, 18:46 GMT

    @coatsie89: Hope you have conveyed the same sentiments to those who kept booing Jadeja whenever he steeped into the cricket grounds around the country!

  • critihas on September 4, 2014, 18:36 GMT

    A number of comments, from what appear to be Indian supporters, are claiming no one has any business telling spectators whom to support. I wonder if they would be as sanguine if there were support for Pakistan in an ODI match held in India?

    From what I have seen or heard of Moeen so far, I am really impressed as a cricketer and a principled human being. Here's hoping he doesn't share the fate of many British Asian cricketers and does go on to seal his place in all formats of the game. The cricket establishment in England has not had a great history of managing British Asian players. Bopara, Panesar, Samit Patel among those who've played for their country recently come to mind. This has been discussed on CI earlier too, http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/647169.html among other articles.

  • wake_up_india on September 4, 2014, 18:19 GMT

    This may sound strange but I have a daughter who is US born, whose parents are of Indian origin and who supports England as a cricket team. Not kidding. Goes to show that race does not always determine sport following, although she may be the only example of this type of aberration.

  • coatsie89 on September 4, 2014, 18:12 GMT

    Go Mo. People who boo him, grow up. Disgusting that he gets booed. Some of the treatment of some players is an absolute joke. Why are some cricket fans becoming like football fans, embarrassing.

  • on September 4, 2014, 18:01 GMT

    Extremely talented in my view. Should keep his business inside boundary lines.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:24 GMT

    Love his attitude, I have watched him closely in the test series and the ODIs- he has been the standout performer just for the sheer commitment, honesty and respect he treats the game with.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:21 GMT

    Im sorry Moeen, if you have just paid £70 for a ticket to watch your team go down without a fight again and again then you are entirely within your rights to give your opinion. People were not booing you, or what is a super Indian team - but the complete lack of fight and direction from England in general.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:17 GMT

    It does not matter who the crowd supports ... who is he to tell what the supporters to do. better to concentrate on his game.

  • Diaz54 on September 4, 2014, 17:15 GMT

    It is one thing to support a country of your choice even though these busy hold British passports, but to boo someone who is playing for his country is unacceptable in my opinion. They in fact should be proud that some one like Ali, Bopara and Carberry through their own efforts are able,to make it it to the top! Have respect!!

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:13 GMT

    To each their own, who are we to demand support.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:12 GMT

    good to see Moeen playing for England. they should have all cultural people. Moeen performed better then others and he is consistent. even i support indian when india play but i like to see more asians and africans players in England team. good luck moeen.

  • BlakeHoulihan on September 4, 2014, 16:53 GMT

    I really respect this man even from all the way across the other wise of the world. Not an English or Indian cricket supporter but everything about this man makes me want him to succeed. Keep fighting Moeen Ali!

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  • BlakeHoulihan on September 4, 2014, 16:53 GMT

    I really respect this man even from all the way across the other wise of the world. Not an English or Indian cricket supporter but everything about this man makes me want him to succeed. Keep fighting Moeen Ali!

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:12 GMT

    good to see Moeen playing for England. they should have all cultural people. Moeen performed better then others and he is consistent. even i support indian when india play but i like to see more asians and africans players in England team. good luck moeen.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:13 GMT

    To each their own, who are we to demand support.

  • Diaz54 on September 4, 2014, 17:15 GMT

    It is one thing to support a country of your choice even though these busy hold British passports, but to boo someone who is playing for his country is unacceptable in my opinion. They in fact should be proud that some one like Ali, Bopara and Carberry through their own efforts are able,to make it it to the top! Have respect!!

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:17 GMT

    It does not matter who the crowd supports ... who is he to tell what the supporters to do. better to concentrate on his game.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:21 GMT

    Im sorry Moeen, if you have just paid £70 for a ticket to watch your team go down without a fight again and again then you are entirely within your rights to give your opinion. People were not booing you, or what is a super Indian team - but the complete lack of fight and direction from England in general.

  • on September 4, 2014, 17:24 GMT

    Love his attitude, I have watched him closely in the test series and the ODIs- he has been the standout performer just for the sheer commitment, honesty and respect he treats the game with.

  • on September 4, 2014, 18:01 GMT

    Extremely talented in my view. Should keep his business inside boundary lines.

  • coatsie89 on September 4, 2014, 18:12 GMT

    Go Mo. People who boo him, grow up. Disgusting that he gets booed. Some of the treatment of some players is an absolute joke. Why are some cricket fans becoming like football fans, embarrassing.

  • wake_up_india on September 4, 2014, 18:19 GMT

    This may sound strange but I have a daughter who is US born, whose parents are of Indian origin and who supports England as a cricket team. Not kidding. Goes to show that race does not always determine sport following, although she may be the only example of this type of aberration.