Andrew Flintoff's injury woes October 4, 2009

'The next time I get injured, I will be gone' - Flintoff

Cricinfo staff
31

While rumours of his future career moves continue to swirl, Andrew Flintoff has admitted that he is one injury away from calling it quits. Flintoff is to spend the next three months in Dubai to aid his recovery from the latest operation to his right knee and make a return to England's one-day team as their star allrounder, but did not mince words when assessing himself.

"The next time I get injured, I will be gone," he was quoted as saying by PA Sport. "Realistically, with the operation I've had, I have a limited shelf-life. I'll try to draw that out for as long as I can.

"But if the knee or anything else goes, that will pretty much be it. I've been injured since I was 13. Me and bowling have never actually gone together."

Flintoff, 31, retired from Test cricket at the end of England's Ashes-winning summer, and 24 hours after helping them regain the urn he underwent arthroscopy to his injured right knee. He admitted in a newspaper interview last month hat there is a chance he may never play again, but his main ambition remains to play in another World Cup and has targeted the one-day leg of England's tour of Bangladesh next February as a realistic date for a comeback.

His latest bout of rehabilitation suffered a minor setback in early September when it was revealed that he was afflicted by deep vein thrombosis in his right calf, though the ECB was quick to release a statement describing it as "a common complication of surgery".

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • 2.14istherunrate on October 5, 2009, 17:33 GMT

    If he is just one injury away from calling it quits then why does he not leave before the next injury. Common sense should tell him to give his body the rest of his life and to look after it.Hard I know when you are used to such activity but something he should consider I s any game worth more pain and suffering? Otherwise the selectors should tell him it would be nice ltop have him but he is not really needed. Time to go Freddie!

  • fahad.butt on October 5, 2009, 14:03 GMT

    I think Flintoff is the only match winner all-rounder in the english side. He has made some significant performances both with the bat and the bowl. Without him, the english side looks 'incomplete'. He is like the backbone of the side and he performs whenever his team needs him. When Flintoff is in for a bat, you never know what might happen. Its really sad when such great players have to retire in such manner. I would definately like to see him play the 2011 world cup.

  • stugul on October 5, 2009, 13:32 GMT

    Whoah, Whoah, Whoah everybody. Calm down. I think some objectivity is called for here. Flintoff is a good player with some outstanding performances who's body has given up on him. He realises that more than anyone. Regarding media hype and over-inflated player assessments - yes, the english media are guilty of this but I seem to remember the same happening when India came back to beat Australia (Laxman big runs) and Harbhajan took all of those wickets. Was this not also the "greatest series" of all time? Was Harbhajan not the greatest player of all time? In both respects the answer is no. The media have copies to sell and so they hype up players and series to do so. It is not Flintoff's, or KP's or Ishant Sharma's or Munaf Patel's or Muhammed Asif's or Stuart Broad's or Mitchell Johnson's or Morne Morkel's or JP Duminy's fault that they are marked as the next big thing. It sells copy; it does not mean the individuals think they are great. Think about it before laying in to everyone.

  • rohanbala on October 5, 2009, 10:11 GMT

    I fully agree with Gun88Gun88 and Markworthy... No wonder, Flintoff and KP belong to the great "pretending" team (England) which is still basking in the 2005 Ashes glory.

  • Nagapattinam-Kunjumani on October 5, 2009, 8:14 GMT

    Talent together with performance and stats make one a great player. Flintoff, IMHO, is a good bowler who can hold the bat. From what has been going on in the recent times, we get a feeling that he's being treated like a demi-god, which is disgusting, to say the least. English cricket has a long way to go! Stop bragging and start performing!

  • SyedArbabAhmed on October 5, 2009, 7:49 GMT

    I wonder how strongly build people like Flintoff are so much injury prone.

  • Yorker_ToeCrusher on October 5, 2009, 7:46 GMT

    Flintoff is an outstanding cricketer from all angles.He has produced some of the most nastiest bowling spells and and he stood up and get counted when England really needed some one.For me he is an not an overrated player,but an under achiever sidelined by injuries.Cricket needs charecters like him which sadly is not in good supply. -sreekanth,bangalore

  • Shahzad_Tirmizi on October 5, 2009, 7:42 GMT

    Flintoff is an excellent cricketer & its so sad that he may retire at the age of just 31. Nowadays cricketers have became so greedy they risk their fitness while playing tournaments like IPL just for the sake for money. Now if Flintoff just quit playing IPL he may pro-long his international career.

  • kpisthebest on October 5, 2009, 6:53 GMT

    From what I saw of Anderson on some of the flattest wickets in the Caribbean in 2009 I would definitely say he has improved as a bowler.

    So there is no need to criticise a bowler who is steadily improving in an article which is not even related to him!!!

  • Avery_Mann on October 5, 2009, 4:19 GMT

    Tedious, over-hyped and underachieving - the English cricket world (players, commentators, writers) in a nutshell.

  • 2.14istherunrate on October 5, 2009, 17:33 GMT

    If he is just one injury away from calling it quits then why does he not leave before the next injury. Common sense should tell him to give his body the rest of his life and to look after it.Hard I know when you are used to such activity but something he should consider I s any game worth more pain and suffering? Otherwise the selectors should tell him it would be nice ltop have him but he is not really needed. Time to go Freddie!

  • fahad.butt on October 5, 2009, 14:03 GMT

    I think Flintoff is the only match winner all-rounder in the english side. He has made some significant performances both with the bat and the bowl. Without him, the english side looks 'incomplete'. He is like the backbone of the side and he performs whenever his team needs him. When Flintoff is in for a bat, you never know what might happen. Its really sad when such great players have to retire in such manner. I would definately like to see him play the 2011 world cup.

  • stugul on October 5, 2009, 13:32 GMT

    Whoah, Whoah, Whoah everybody. Calm down. I think some objectivity is called for here. Flintoff is a good player with some outstanding performances who's body has given up on him. He realises that more than anyone. Regarding media hype and over-inflated player assessments - yes, the english media are guilty of this but I seem to remember the same happening when India came back to beat Australia (Laxman big runs) and Harbhajan took all of those wickets. Was this not also the "greatest series" of all time? Was Harbhajan not the greatest player of all time? In both respects the answer is no. The media have copies to sell and so they hype up players and series to do so. It is not Flintoff's, or KP's or Ishant Sharma's or Munaf Patel's or Muhammed Asif's or Stuart Broad's or Mitchell Johnson's or Morne Morkel's or JP Duminy's fault that they are marked as the next big thing. It sells copy; it does not mean the individuals think they are great. Think about it before laying in to everyone.

  • rohanbala on October 5, 2009, 10:11 GMT

    I fully agree with Gun88Gun88 and Markworthy... No wonder, Flintoff and KP belong to the great "pretending" team (England) which is still basking in the 2005 Ashes glory.

  • Nagapattinam-Kunjumani on October 5, 2009, 8:14 GMT

    Talent together with performance and stats make one a great player. Flintoff, IMHO, is a good bowler who can hold the bat. From what has been going on in the recent times, we get a feeling that he's being treated like a demi-god, which is disgusting, to say the least. English cricket has a long way to go! Stop bragging and start performing!

  • SyedArbabAhmed on October 5, 2009, 7:49 GMT

    I wonder how strongly build people like Flintoff are so much injury prone.

  • Yorker_ToeCrusher on October 5, 2009, 7:46 GMT

    Flintoff is an outstanding cricketer from all angles.He has produced some of the most nastiest bowling spells and and he stood up and get counted when England really needed some one.For me he is an not an overrated player,but an under achiever sidelined by injuries.Cricket needs charecters like him which sadly is not in good supply. -sreekanth,bangalore

  • Shahzad_Tirmizi on October 5, 2009, 7:42 GMT

    Flintoff is an excellent cricketer & its so sad that he may retire at the age of just 31. Nowadays cricketers have became so greedy they risk their fitness while playing tournaments like IPL just for the sake for money. Now if Flintoff just quit playing IPL he may pro-long his international career.

  • kpisthebest on October 5, 2009, 6:53 GMT

    From what I saw of Anderson on some of the flattest wickets in the Caribbean in 2009 I would definitely say he has improved as a bowler.

    So there is no need to criticise a bowler who is steadily improving in an article which is not even related to him!!!

  • Avery_Mann on October 5, 2009, 4:19 GMT

    Tedious, over-hyped and underachieving - the English cricket world (players, commentators, writers) in a nutshell.

  • Number1CricketFan on October 5, 2009, 3:52 GMT

    What's the point of having such a great talent if that player can not perform to the best of his abilities. No proffesional cricketer should be retiring from test cricket at the age of 31. Freddie is undoubtedly a brilliant player, but he should have been achieving way way more.

  • SHARPSINGLES on October 5, 2009, 1:35 GMT

    i have no probs with that flint, i guess you know when its the right time to call it quits you really got a big heart guy best wishes great one.

  • 67305 on October 5, 2009, 1:31 GMT

    Whilst I always thought Flintoff had "potential"I dont think he deserves the accolades he has been given over the years,he has not had any more than 12 matches in his whole career where he has been really outstanding and therefore I class him as totally OVERRATED.

  • Gun88Gun88 on October 4, 2009, 22:11 GMT

    flintoff is cricket's Ronaldo, last season he was so desperate to make a comeback and when he got IPL contract bye bye England. He criticises ECB for sending the English team to India after the Bombay attack but wants to play for Madras. He and KP are the most selfish cricketers I have ever seen.

  • kirangupta on October 4, 2009, 20:51 GMT

    I think it will be hard for flintoff to retire from every format because he is a great allrounder

  • michaelgale on October 4, 2009, 15:23 GMT

    These are fascinating posts. Few are especially positive about Flintoff and one cannot forget the role he has played in the last two Ashes series, in the UK. He was the man for three or four key moments in both series. However the disasters in Australia and his behavior in St. Lucia illustrate that heroes for a few moments do not constitute longer term players of value. He is a the typical hero of the pre recession world. We ignore his flaws (statistically is he that good) for the moments of mass hysteria he bought to us.

    I wish him the absolute best for the future, but England cricket needs to build a system for consistant victories and not rely on these rare moments for its future. Cricket Australia can with a population less than one third of Englands produce streams of great players for the team.

  • MartinAmber on October 4, 2009, 14:35 GMT

    It's simultaneously depressing and delightful to read the cynicism of some posters towards Flintoff. Depressing because it's easy to forget how valuable he was for 2-3 years, but delightful because it proves that we cricket fans don't uncritically swallow the rubbish produced by the media regarding this man. To some of us, Mr. Flintoff, you'd gone already when you announced your retirement from the only form of international cricket that matters; and the sort of press releases that have emerged from your camp since (bungee jumping, etc) suggest that you'd be wise to keep a low profile for a very long time. Finally, the idea that he "produced match-winning performances when it mattered" is a pernicious myth, even if you only look at the two Ashes series since 2005. 06/07 nothing; and I will contend till my dying day that his contribution to the 2009 win was absurdly overrated.

  • merindah on October 4, 2009, 14:08 GMT

    Flintoff the player who people who dont like cricket like ie old ladies and english bandwagon jumpers. He loves himself as much as (maybe more than) the media does. You only have to look when he was man of the match in an ashes test. He got 4 Aussie tailenders, poor jimmy andrerson gets the top order in the 1st ing aust out for nothing... wins the test for england and the media and public thank flintoff for 4 tail enders in the 2nd dig!!!! he is a joke!!!

    3 goods games (2005 ashes) does not make someone a "great"

  • Vynny on October 4, 2009, 12:25 GMT

    Freddie's overall record does not reflect the vast reservoir of talent he had or indeed has. However, there are many things that don't show in the statistics and there is no doubt that Freddie should be remembered as one of the best all rounders ever to play for England. He was a big occassion player and produced match winning performances when it really mattered. There is no doubt that but for injury his record would have been vastly superior to what it reads now. I accept that anyone could say this but it really is very relevant with Freddie. Let's not forget that he had to play through the pain barrier on many occassions and still managed to produce. Andrew Flintoff is a massive personality, a great entertainer and a great, great cricketer. Our sport needs people like him.

  • Ennigmaa on October 4, 2009, 11:45 GMT

    The guy sure does have a heart on field. If only he had the heart to restrain his habit pertaining to alcohol. I cannot publish articles here just google alcohol and sports injuries, you will know what I am talking about. Even a layman knows if you are overweight you are prone to more injury. He sure could have much better if he was so passionate about cricket and his home country.

    I obviously did not follow him to make statement on his drinking. Its his own confessions to media I am making my view.

  • boris6491 on October 4, 2009, 9:32 GMT

    Why would England (or any franchise for that matter) be interested in investing in him hearing him say something like this let alone the fact that he does not even merit the phrase 'overrated' as he is beyond that stage? England are honestly dummies to be running after this man all the time. He is no Botham, he is just a good bowler who is a bit handy with the bat in my view. Yes, he would be useful in the limited overs format, particularly 20/20 cricket but I wouldnt risk bringing him in to my side. Chennai spent a ridiculously excessive amount of money to bring him to their franchise last season, to watch him injure himself after a handful of games and cry off after he leaked runs galore and barely made any. Its time for not just England, but the world to look beyond this player. I just wonder if they ever will. He receives more publicity than the likes of Tendulkar, Ponting, Muralitharan and their fellow true 'greats' of the game. He is just too volatile a player.

  • jaininkashi on October 4, 2009, 8:53 GMT

    I fully agree wid Apoorv. It's not about statistics, its abt what he has done on the field. He i character man!!! He lifts the entire team, is up against the opposition's best & set batsmen. Just see what wickets he takes. He always gets d best/settled batsman. He gives his full & stretches to d limit. In west Indies recently, he was injured & still bowled his heart out on the fifth day on a flat unhelpful pitch. That performance could end his career. He is a team man to core. He sets the platform for others to contribute. And for statistics, no need to go to Kulasekra, consider Anderson, He has 7 5-wicket hauls but he gets wickets only in helpful swinging conditions where as Freddie gets 'em, everywhere. He is one man oppostion is fearful of. He is match-winner though statistics dont show that. Hats off to u Freddie. Thanks for being around. It was pleasure watching u play. I still wish you should skip a lot of meaning less ODIs & not the test against IND/SA/Aus.

  • AJQK10 on October 4, 2009, 8:21 GMT

    With a batting average at 32.01 and 141 wickets in 169 games lets not hold our breath. He remains the most vain, smug and unrealised talent around, the nastiest remnant of the pre-recession age of the icon. England should ditch him and move on.

  • jamesb on October 4, 2009, 8:10 GMT

    I seem to remember Flintoff smashing the Saffa bowling all round the park on more than one occasion. I was at the Oval when he did it, hit Ntini for 6s for fun. Maybe Saffa is smarting from his team's glorious performances in the Champion's trophy? Yet another choke.

  • sindgeon-smythe on October 4, 2009, 8:07 GMT

    Another non-story from the Jordan of the cricket world

  • apoorv_singhal on October 4, 2009, 7:56 GMT

    Flintoff has almost single-handedly given us few of the greatest test cricketing memories in this decade.. do you remember any of the countless meaningless mammoth run-feast tests in the subcontinent? and dont get started on the statistics.. there are players like kulasekara who is the no. 1 ODI player, and he can hardly strike fear in the batsmen's hearts..

    dont blame him for getting injured because he gives his 100% on the field, and stretching an injury prone body to the limit everytime he plays..

  • AJ_Tiger86 on October 4, 2009, 6:47 GMT

    When it happens, it will be the saddest day for cricket in recent memory. Flintoff is one of the greatest all-rounders of all time.

  • DaNyo on October 4, 2009, 6:33 GMT

    I wished he played as much as he talks. Definetly the most over rated cricketer of the modern era who runs into injuries without even playing:S.

  • version1 on October 4, 2009, 6:28 GMT

    Too right Saffa. Really..what has Flintoff done as great acheivements? Has mediocare average, never really wo game on his own.

  • nccc on October 4, 2009, 6:21 GMT

    So why read the article Saffa?

  • Saffa_Teza on October 4, 2009, 5:58 GMT

    .....Who cares. So tired of hearing about possibly one of the most over-rated players in the last decade.

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  • Saffa_Teza on October 4, 2009, 5:58 GMT

    .....Who cares. So tired of hearing about possibly one of the most over-rated players in the last decade.

  • nccc on October 4, 2009, 6:21 GMT

    So why read the article Saffa?

  • version1 on October 4, 2009, 6:28 GMT

    Too right Saffa. Really..what has Flintoff done as great acheivements? Has mediocare average, never really wo game on his own.

  • DaNyo on October 4, 2009, 6:33 GMT

    I wished he played as much as he talks. Definetly the most over rated cricketer of the modern era who runs into injuries without even playing:S.

  • AJ_Tiger86 on October 4, 2009, 6:47 GMT

    When it happens, it will be the saddest day for cricket in recent memory. Flintoff is one of the greatest all-rounders of all time.

  • apoorv_singhal on October 4, 2009, 7:56 GMT

    Flintoff has almost single-handedly given us few of the greatest test cricketing memories in this decade.. do you remember any of the countless meaningless mammoth run-feast tests in the subcontinent? and dont get started on the statistics.. there are players like kulasekara who is the no. 1 ODI player, and he can hardly strike fear in the batsmen's hearts..

    dont blame him for getting injured because he gives his 100% on the field, and stretching an injury prone body to the limit everytime he plays..

  • sindgeon-smythe on October 4, 2009, 8:07 GMT

    Another non-story from the Jordan of the cricket world

  • jamesb on October 4, 2009, 8:10 GMT

    I seem to remember Flintoff smashing the Saffa bowling all round the park on more than one occasion. I was at the Oval when he did it, hit Ntini for 6s for fun. Maybe Saffa is smarting from his team's glorious performances in the Champion's trophy? Yet another choke.

  • AJQK10 on October 4, 2009, 8:21 GMT

    With a batting average at 32.01 and 141 wickets in 169 games lets not hold our breath. He remains the most vain, smug and unrealised talent around, the nastiest remnant of the pre-recession age of the icon. England should ditch him and move on.

  • jaininkashi on October 4, 2009, 8:53 GMT

    I fully agree wid Apoorv. It's not about statistics, its abt what he has done on the field. He i character man!!! He lifts the entire team, is up against the opposition's best & set batsmen. Just see what wickets he takes. He always gets d best/settled batsman. He gives his full & stretches to d limit. In west Indies recently, he was injured & still bowled his heart out on the fifth day on a flat unhelpful pitch. That performance could end his career. He is a team man to core. He sets the platform for others to contribute. And for statistics, no need to go to Kulasekra, consider Anderson, He has 7 5-wicket hauls but he gets wickets only in helpful swinging conditions where as Freddie gets 'em, everywhere. He is one man oppostion is fearful of. He is match-winner though statistics dont show that. Hats off to u Freddie. Thanks for being around. It was pleasure watching u play. I still wish you should skip a lot of meaning less ODIs & not the test against IND/SA/Aus.