England news April 18, 2014

Trott stands down after relapse

65

Play 06:57
Dobell: 'Trott didn't look as though he was enjoying it'

Jonathan Trott is to take an extended break from cricket having suffered a recurrence of the problems that forced him to leave the Ashes tour after the first Test in Brisbane.

Trott left Australia in November with what was described at the time as a "stress related illness" by the ECB. While he hoped that a period of rest ahead of the English domestic season would prove the cure for what he believed to be "burnout," he experienced a recurrence of the symptoms of anxiety and mental exhaustion that plagued him in Australia while representing Warwickshire in recent days. The news was confirmed by a joint ECB-Warwickshire statement on Friday morning.*

No time-frame has been placed upon his return. Indeed, it is quite possible there will be no return, even at county level.

Certainly this decision is highly likely to signal the end of Trott's international career. Not only may Trott be reluctant to put himself back into an environment that causes him such difficulties, but it seems unlikely that the ECB would want to burden him with such pressure or risk the possibility of a recurrence on the eve of a big game.

It may also raise questions about the ECB's handling of the affair. While Trott was full of praise for the compassion shown by Andy Flower, his team-mates and Hugh Morris at the time of his breakdown in Australia, the ECB's support has been less obvious since Trott returned to England.

It is understood that there has been little communication with the ECB and, in particular, the England team management and instead of the support that was promised, Trott has at times cut an isolated and forgotten figure.

Trott has also been stung by criticism in some sections of the media. While dealing with media scrutiny comes with the territory for professional sportsmen, for a man recovering from a stress related illness to have his motives doubted and explanations questioned has not helped the process.

Whether the strong criticism of former England captain, Michael Vaughan, proved particularly damaging to Trott's fragile recovery and was a contributory factor in this decision is hard to say, but the level of scrutiny - inevitable and natural though it is - has proved unbearable. Photographers have been found lurking in his garden and outside his daughter's school since his return from Australia.

The combination of a perceived lack of support and some harsh criticism resulted in Trott feeling on trial every time he has taken the field. He has now concluded he no longer wants to put himself, or his family, through the pain. The relaxed and happy Trott, freed of the concerns of cricket, bears little resemblance to the careworn Trott seen in Australia or around Edgbaston in recent days.

He informed his Warwickshire team-mates of his decision at the end of the Championship game against Sussex on Wednesday. It is understood he thanked them for their support but explained that he did not feel he could serve them if he was unable to concentrate or focus as he had been in the past.

While Trott batted particularly well in the first innings of the match - he top-scored with 37 as Warwickshire were bowled out for 87 - he was less impressive as the game wore on. He was struck twice by short balls from Chris Jordan in the second innings and then fell to a pull stroke off the same bowler. It was an innings that did nothing to refute those who suggest his problems have been born largely out of a struggle to play the short ball.

However, the key moment came when he dropped a catch. Standing at slip to the offspin of Jeetan Patel, Trott put down Ed Joyce on 91. Joyce went on to score an unbeaten 151 and win the game for his team. Trott appears to have blamed himself and his inability to concentrate as he once could. Three other players dropped catches in the same innings, but Trott has always been harder on himself than most. At one time, that self-demanding character drove him to levels of achievement of which most cricketers can only dream. For now, it appears to have become burdensome and destructive.

Aged 32, there is still time for a comeback. But if this is the final chapter, Trott will leave the game with a record of which to take pride. He scored a century in the first of his 49 Tests, against an attack that included Mitchell Johnson, was a part of three Ashes-winning sides and the Test and ODI teams that reached No.1 in the world rankings.

He is the only England player (to have played more than 20 innings) with an ODI average in the 50s - indeed his ODI average is 20% higher than any regular England player in history - and at domestic level he helped Warwickshire win two County Championship titles. He also has the highest T20 average of any England qualified player and, in 2011, he won the ICC Player of the Year award; arguably the highest accolade in cricket.

Stress and anxiety do not discriminate, however, and Trott appears to have decided that the man bent out of shape by cricket is not the man he wants to be. With a young family to consider, he seems to have come to the conclusion that on-field success in no longer worth the sacrifices required.

*10.30am, April 18: This story was updated with quotes from the ECB/Warwickshire statement

George Dobell is a senior correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Swisswatcher on April 18, 2014, 14:45 GMT

    Many of these comments alarm me. A few years ago I was myself diagnosed with, initially, stress-related exhaustion and, later, burnout and depression. It cost me my job (I was made redundant when ill) and helped end my marriage. I have followed Jonathan Trott's difficulties with a high level of empathy. This site has seen several articles and a plethora of comments regarding Trott's predicament. Few seem to display any understanding of the situation. Many are, I fear, unhelpful and disrespectful to both Trott and others with similar difficulties. The best article I have read, anywhere, was by Martin Crowe, published by Cricinfo last year. It helped me personally. I feel the best step, now, would be to leave the whole issue alone. Give Trott and his family all the time and space he and they need. No more journalists filing on this topic. No more paparazzi invading a family's home or, appallingly, a school. And, please, no more comments offering ersatz diagnoses or Wiki-based treatments.

  • armchairjohnny on April 18, 2014, 10:05 GMT

    As much as we all love cricket, it is and always will be just a game. It's a form of entertainment and that's all this game is. It's sad to see a few cynical and rather unsympathetic remarks being put out in the press about Trott. In the circumstances he has every right to put his own health and well-being before anything, or anyone else.

    As a loyal bears fan, I wish him a full recovery. All Warwickshire fans are completely behind Trott -- both on and off the field. We all hope he gets well and comes back strongly in the future. I also hope he stays well clear of the uninformed casual remarks made by abstract online entities (i.e: trolls online) and certain sections of the press who have nothing better to do, and know nothing of his situation or his type of illness. There's absolutely no excuse for us (fans, players, press, media etc) to not be supportive of him. Get well soon.

  • mirandola on April 18, 2014, 6:57 GMT

    Contentment is more important than cricket; life is more important than any game. Trott has been absolutely honest about his condition, has tried twice, and realized that first-class cricket is no longer contributing anything positive to his life, and he is no longer able to contribute consistently to a profession in which he has been outstanding. This is honesty and self-awareness of a rare order. There is absolutely no right for anyone else to comment about a decision which is personal and has clearly been extremely painful for him.

  • BDKu on April 18, 2014, 2:11 GMT

    It is really sad to see what has happened to good cricketer. This also shows to everyone stress is part of playing the game you love as well. Many dont understand it. Unless you are a qualified person you should not comment on anyones Phsycological issues. Each person in this world is different you just have to understand and accept it. I hope he gets over his problems and returns to the field. I think it is a good idea for international teams to employ qualified people to handle and detect these issues early so we dont lose good cricketers

  • on April 20, 2014, 6:07 GMT

    I dont quite understand.

    it takes courage to deal with such situations. Trott at one point used to have extreme mental toughness. he keeps saying that he set the bar too high for himself.... A psychatrist has to erase the fear of failure in this guy. its a purely psychological issue and can be cured in my book.

    its the fear of failure which makes people react like this.

  • on April 20, 2014, 4:59 GMT

    @stuart - yes, after the Australian press it must be refreshing to come home to the genteel English press in your garden and outside your daughters school.

    Very sorry to hear about trotty - hope he can recover well away from the game.

  • Nadeem1976 on April 18, 2014, 17:54 GMT

    Eng should let their players play T2020 leagues around the world. when you travel to different countries you feel different and some time change of atmosphere change the mind set. in boring cold winter of UK what would trot be doing as entertainment. i believe NOTHING. that's where open hot climate works best for a sportsman.

  • Stuart_Lord on April 18, 2014, 16:42 GMT

    I feel very sad for Trott, particularly since this may well signal the end of his international career. However, this is not the first time that this has happened - in the Ozzy 2006/07 ashes, Marcus Trescothick returned home for almost identical reasons. He has now returned to county cricket & is making a positive contribution for Somerset as their captain. In both cases, there was a high level of pressure on players to perform to the highest level, but only in 2013, did we have the questionable combination of back-to-back Ashes. Being an England test batsman in Australia, can be very difficult and stressful. The hostile pre-match speculation, sledging and general abuse levelled at you by the crowd can be bad enough. Add to that a very determined, hostile bowling attack and you have to be thick skinned and focused to get anywhere at all.. My personal hope is that Trott does make a comeback at county level and that England go on to trash the Ozzies again (preferably in down under)!

  • SDHM on April 18, 2014, 16:37 GMT

    Can't say I didn't see this coming, but that doesn't make it any less sad. Good luck Trotty, your personal happiness and well being are far more important than any game of cricket ever will be. If you come back and play again, I'll be overjoyed. If you don't, I will understand, and thank you for everything you did for English cricket. Enjoy your family and enjoy your life again. That is all that matters.

  • LeeHallam on April 18, 2014, 15:23 GMT

    A very sad, but not unexpected turn of events. He has been a fine player for England, and we will miss him. When I watched his interviews it seemed to me that he was trying to convince himself, as much as anyone else that it would be OK. The best thing he can do now is to go away and do something else. It is doubtful that even a positive reaction to what he said would have made enough difference, but those who attacked him should hang their heads in shame.

  • Swisswatcher on April 18, 2014, 14:45 GMT

    Many of these comments alarm me. A few years ago I was myself diagnosed with, initially, stress-related exhaustion and, later, burnout and depression. It cost me my job (I was made redundant when ill) and helped end my marriage. I have followed Jonathan Trott's difficulties with a high level of empathy. This site has seen several articles and a plethora of comments regarding Trott's predicament. Few seem to display any understanding of the situation. Many are, I fear, unhelpful and disrespectful to both Trott and others with similar difficulties. The best article I have read, anywhere, was by Martin Crowe, published by Cricinfo last year. It helped me personally. I feel the best step, now, would be to leave the whole issue alone. Give Trott and his family all the time and space he and they need. No more journalists filing on this topic. No more paparazzi invading a family's home or, appallingly, a school. And, please, no more comments offering ersatz diagnoses or Wiki-based treatments.

  • armchairjohnny on April 18, 2014, 10:05 GMT

    As much as we all love cricket, it is and always will be just a game. It's a form of entertainment and that's all this game is. It's sad to see a few cynical and rather unsympathetic remarks being put out in the press about Trott. In the circumstances he has every right to put his own health and well-being before anything, or anyone else.

    As a loyal bears fan, I wish him a full recovery. All Warwickshire fans are completely behind Trott -- both on and off the field. We all hope he gets well and comes back strongly in the future. I also hope he stays well clear of the uninformed casual remarks made by abstract online entities (i.e: trolls online) and certain sections of the press who have nothing better to do, and know nothing of his situation or his type of illness. There's absolutely no excuse for us (fans, players, press, media etc) to not be supportive of him. Get well soon.

  • mirandola on April 18, 2014, 6:57 GMT

    Contentment is more important than cricket; life is more important than any game. Trott has been absolutely honest about his condition, has tried twice, and realized that first-class cricket is no longer contributing anything positive to his life, and he is no longer able to contribute consistently to a profession in which he has been outstanding. This is honesty and self-awareness of a rare order. There is absolutely no right for anyone else to comment about a decision which is personal and has clearly been extremely painful for him.

  • BDKu on April 18, 2014, 2:11 GMT

    It is really sad to see what has happened to good cricketer. This also shows to everyone stress is part of playing the game you love as well. Many dont understand it. Unless you are a qualified person you should not comment on anyones Phsycological issues. Each person in this world is different you just have to understand and accept it. I hope he gets over his problems and returns to the field. I think it is a good idea for international teams to employ qualified people to handle and detect these issues early so we dont lose good cricketers

  • on April 20, 2014, 6:07 GMT

    I dont quite understand.

    it takes courage to deal with such situations. Trott at one point used to have extreme mental toughness. he keeps saying that he set the bar too high for himself.... A psychatrist has to erase the fear of failure in this guy. its a purely psychological issue and can be cured in my book.

    its the fear of failure which makes people react like this.

  • on April 20, 2014, 4:59 GMT

    @stuart - yes, after the Australian press it must be refreshing to come home to the genteel English press in your garden and outside your daughters school.

    Very sorry to hear about trotty - hope he can recover well away from the game.

  • Nadeem1976 on April 18, 2014, 17:54 GMT

    Eng should let their players play T2020 leagues around the world. when you travel to different countries you feel different and some time change of atmosphere change the mind set. in boring cold winter of UK what would trot be doing as entertainment. i believe NOTHING. that's where open hot climate works best for a sportsman.

  • Stuart_Lord on April 18, 2014, 16:42 GMT

    I feel very sad for Trott, particularly since this may well signal the end of his international career. However, this is not the first time that this has happened - in the Ozzy 2006/07 ashes, Marcus Trescothick returned home for almost identical reasons. He has now returned to county cricket & is making a positive contribution for Somerset as their captain. In both cases, there was a high level of pressure on players to perform to the highest level, but only in 2013, did we have the questionable combination of back-to-back Ashes. Being an England test batsman in Australia, can be very difficult and stressful. The hostile pre-match speculation, sledging and general abuse levelled at you by the crowd can be bad enough. Add to that a very determined, hostile bowling attack and you have to be thick skinned and focused to get anywhere at all.. My personal hope is that Trott does make a comeback at county level and that England go on to trash the Ozzies again (preferably in down under)!

  • SDHM on April 18, 2014, 16:37 GMT

    Can't say I didn't see this coming, but that doesn't make it any less sad. Good luck Trotty, your personal happiness and well being are far more important than any game of cricket ever will be. If you come back and play again, I'll be overjoyed. If you don't, I will understand, and thank you for everything you did for English cricket. Enjoy your family and enjoy your life again. That is all that matters.

  • LeeHallam on April 18, 2014, 15:23 GMT

    A very sad, but not unexpected turn of events. He has been a fine player for England, and we will miss him. When I watched his interviews it seemed to me that he was trying to convince himself, as much as anyone else that it would be OK. The best thing he can do now is to go away and do something else. It is doubtful that even a positive reaction to what he said would have made enough difference, but those who attacked him should hang their heads in shame.

  • TheCricketEmpireStrikesBack on April 18, 2014, 12:30 GMT

    A lot of good will towards Trott being shown by fans of various teams. I also wish him well. The open discussion of this issue, whilst awkward for high profile individuals, continues a trend in cricket started by Martin Crowe in his excellent, insightful and courageous articles into how to face inner demons.

    No problem was ever solved by denial or attempting to sweep it under the carpet and real solutions can hopefully be found if those with experience in this area such as psychiatrists are willing to open up. I am struck by the similarities between Martin Crowe and @LillianThomson's thoughts regarding the need to face the problem, at least as a starting point.

  • george204 on April 18, 2014, 12:08 GMT

    "Photographers have been found lurking in his garden and outside his daughter's school"?!? That's just not right. It may have gone on in the dark days of the 1980s, but nowadays we wouldn't accept it if it was done to a royal, a politician or a footballer so why should we accept it being done to a lowly cricketer? When Leveson is threatening press freedom in this country, this is the very last thing the media want to be seen doing. Get a grip.

  • thebeardedblunder on April 18, 2014, 10:55 GMT

    Re:LillianThomsom - ta, points taken.

  • jmcilhinney on April 18, 2014, 10:55 GMT

    I think one thing to consider in all this is at what point someone deserves sympathy and consideration for their mental travails and when it's OK to criticise them. I believe that mental fortitude is just one of many things that we are all born with a particular level of and we can make the most of it or squander it through our actions. Trott is clearly not mentally strong enough to be able to sustain a cricket career at the international level, but I say that as an observation more than a criticism. There should be no more shame in that than there is in not having enough cricket ability to play it internationally or being good enough at dancing to make a living at it. Most would agree that Trott deserves support and understanding but what about others who "don't have the temperament", although to a lesser extent? Shane Watson comes to mind as someone who has been criticised for not being mentally strong enough for international cricket. Is it OK to criticise players like that?

  • keptalittlelow on April 18, 2014, 10:52 GMT

    Feel sorry for Trott. This puts in perspective Michael Vaughan's outburst at poor Trott, I am sure Vaughan will be sorry now for saying such things against poor Trott.

  • LillianThomson on April 18, 2014, 10:09 GMT

    @thebeardedblunder I was at the Gabba Test last November and the combination of being a psychiatrist and a cricket not made me instantly aware of what I was seeing.

    I saw it there with Ijaz Ahmed 14 years earlier - although he bounced back on slower decks - and with Zaheer 30 years ago.

    An excellent batsman's reflexes slow as they age and they lose confidence in their ability to judge the line and length of faster bowlers. They over-compensate by attacking much more than normal and get out to soft dismissals.

    But players like Misbah, Gooch and Boycott show that even in advanced age you can master fast bowling by sticking to the basics.

  • shillingsworth on April 18, 2014, 9:53 GMT

    @LillianThomson - Your online diagnosis is interesting but, unless you've actually spoken to the patient, I suggest that you presume too much. For a consultant psychiatrist to express an uninformed opinion would seem to me somewhat unprofessional.

  • cloudmess on April 18, 2014, 9:50 GMT

    This is extremely sad news for Jonathan Trott and for English cricket - at some stage this summer, I was looking forward to seeing the return of our reassuring no 3. When Vaughan was critical of his recent interview, I remember writing that Trott may have been playing down and making light of his symptoms quite deliberately. The gutter press obviously haven't helped the situation, and the ECB have shown their (characteristic) complete lack of support - I wish a few of the men who currently run our national game would consider emulating Trott. At least it's a victory for the Neil Burns school who lament the "South Africanisation" of the English game - terrible what the likes of Fletcher, Flower, Pietersen, Trott, Strauss etc have done to our game over the past 15 years.

  • Sagarneel on April 18, 2014, 9:42 GMT

    @latecut_04: Although your question was directed to LilianThomson, here's my 2 cents as a pharmacist - SSRI's (Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors) are a group of drugs that are used for the treatment of depression (which often has anxiety as a co-morbidity). Although the mechanism of action of these drugs are beyond the scope of this forum, put in simple words, they help the body retain chemicals called exitatory neurotransmitters (Serotonin) thus preventing depression, which is majorly caused due to a lack of Serotonin (and a few other neurotransmitters). The symptoms that you've mentioned (lack of motivation, sad mood, hopeless feeling) are all symptoms of depression, and once the disorder (depression) is effectively managed, the symptoms go automatically (imagine having a fever due to an infection, once the infection is treated, the fevel goes). Don't worry, you don't sound daft at all, many non techies would be at sea while trying to understand IT stuffs :-).

  • subcontinent-expert on April 18, 2014, 9:32 GMT

    I think he should try YOGA/Meditation.... Since he has problems due to mental fatigue yoga will help him gain his selfconfidence...

  • Mervo on April 18, 2014, 9:31 GMT

    He needs a new job, away from cricket. Time to do some study.

  • Winsome on April 18, 2014, 9:30 GMT

    You have to feel for the guy. His last interview did seem like he was in denial, but if he can't play, he can't. I think the ECB are being a little unfairly blamed here. They are not responsible for EVERYTHING to do with a player's mental health.

  • pom_don on April 18, 2014, 8:58 GMT

    A lot of folk here saying this is about facing fast bowling, do they have any brains? Trott has faced many fast bowlers in the past without issues & in his county game he is not facing mega pace so obviously that is not the issue, 'panic attacks' 'stress related illness' however you call it is much deeper than that, I live with someone who went from totally 100% normal to a nervous wreck & it is shocking to see & comprehend how it happens, good news is after a while ( a long while) normality has returned, but it was a struggle for both of us, hope Trotty gets firing on all cylinders very soon, he was/is a great player & a credit to the game.

  • thebeardedblunder on April 18, 2014, 8:27 GMT

    Memo to LillianThomsom : who said Trott's issues are all about fast-bowling? Are you not being a tad presumptuous?

  • latecut_04 on April 18, 2014, 8:20 GMT

    @Lilian Thomson--Thanks a lot for your valuable comments .But could you specify what is meant by SSRI. Also reading your last post I assume this is the treatment or remedy for anxiety. But doesn't the condition 'stress related' involve lack of motivation, sad mood, hopeless feeling etc as well. Or will the stated methods help someone overcome all these as well. Sorry if I sound dumb, but being a software engineer I am absolutely clueless about this. Looking forward to your valuable response. And thanks cricinfo for providing such a brilliant platform. I am sure many more are noting these posts. Thanks again @Lilian Thomson

  • MasterBlaster100 on April 18, 2014, 8:15 GMT

    Anyone would find it stressful facing 90 mph bouncers if like trott they were two strides down the wicket and their only technical answer is to lunge further forward at the ball! Fine player otherwise. Great ODI player too never properly appreciated

  • LillianThomson on April 18, 2014, 7:48 GMT

    To those who asked me to reply about my earlier comments.......

    Many forms of anxiety are based on real dangers: snakes, spiders, heights, having your head knocked off by a 150K bowler.

    There are only two actions you can take. You can remove yourself from the feared thing and ensure that your life keeps you away from it. Or you can have graded exposure, first in small, controlled amounts.

    I remember Geoff Boycott and Zaheer Abbas in the seventies in a similar situation. Boycott left the firing line, briefly, but mastered quick bowling in the nets and came back better than before.

    My advice to Trott would have been to face really quick but full bowling in the nets, then gradually shorten the length, then move on to real bowlers in a controlled setting, then the real thing.

    Batsmen have done this since time immemorial, and it has worked. By all means combine it with therapy and SSRI medication.

    But do it in a methodical manner, over a few months, and return feeling in control.

  • on April 18, 2014, 7:42 GMT

    Poor man. Let down by very poor management.

  • JG2704 on April 18, 2014, 7:38 GMT

    Sad for Trott. It seems to me he was playing it all down a month or so ago.It's strange how these conditions can develop after years of doing things the same way and also how these things affect those who seem so calm and unflustered in all they do.

    I doubt very much Trott will ever play for England again which is sad but he has been a massive part of the best achieving Eng side in ages - albeit for a 2-3 year period.

  • latecut_04 on April 18, 2014, 6:59 GMT

    This should settle things although a bit unfortunate. Trott didn't do a runner from last Ashes although his last interview caused many to level such an accusation. He was and is still suffering from stress and he shouldn't be blamed for that. Now he himself probably would have understood that only now. @LillianThomson-being an expert could you please elaborate on what you think is the right way to tackle the illness. It could be really informative, helpful and insightful. All the best, love and support--Trotty.

  • Sagarneel on April 18, 2014, 6:45 GMT

    As a cricket fan, this is sad news. Trott was one of the most composed batsmen to have played for England, and would impart a sense of calm to the supporters and anxiety to the opposition while at the crease. I wish he finds a good counselor who could help him regain his mental strength, and makes it a point that he returns to the side. With KP out, England would need someone like Trott to bring them out of the slump, they are in presently.

  • crktttt on April 18, 2014, 6:42 GMT

    Trott should have been advised against giving any interviews to the media during his recovery and comeback. The ECB needed to have done this. It is mostly their fault.

    The criticism he has received while trying to pull off a recovery & comeback, is the reason for this.

    Unfortunately, media treats anything that is said by a person, as being said in a court of law. Every statement, word is dissected, analyzed, criticized.

    Trott was trying to downplay his issues and make a comeback. That is what anyone would try to do.

    If this is the sequence of events that is going to happen after a player reveals that he has issues, then players will be reluctant to reveal such things.

  • thebeardedblunder on April 18, 2014, 6:41 GMT

    Wishing you and your family all the best wishes Trotty. There truely is no other sport other than cricket that can be so hard on one's mental state. A read of David Frith's book 'By his own hand' gives a very good insight into the cruelty of cricket. Failing with the bat and dropped catches can be just one ball away and this can weigh massively on one's mind, bringing huge personal introspection and negative thoughts. Couple that with the pressure of 'life in a goldfish bowl' watched over by some shamefully unsympathetic press must be very debilitating at times. And as for press-photographers lurking around his home and at his daughter's school-well that is utterly unforgivable. Absolutely shameful!

  • Front-Foot-Lunge-Needs-A-Hug on April 18, 2014, 6:32 GMT

    @LillianThomson, as an astronaut, I'm bemused by your assumption that you know what headspace Trott is in. By your reckoning he just needs a few nets with Mitchell Johnson bowling and he'll be right as rain lol! The English press can be nasty, ideally they will leave him alone and stop hanging around his kids school, that is vile behaviour.

  • xtrafalgarx on April 18, 2014, 5:50 GMT

    Told you all it was not 'burnout' the man couldn't accept his own situation and has payed the price.

  • landl47 on April 18, 2014, 4:59 GMT

    I'm sorry, but not surprised, to read this. Stress-related illnesses are seldom cured by a few months rest. Whether Trott will play county cricket again I don't know (Marcus Trescothick has been able to handle it), but I doubt he'll play for England again. He had some fine performances and was part of a very successful side.

    @electric_loco: that's odd- there was a J. Trott who scored 445 runs in 7 innings with 2 not outs for an average of 89 in the 2010/11 Ashes series in Australia, in which an M. Johnson also played. Presumably, if what you say is true, it can't have been the same two people. Unless, of course, you're wrong and no-one reading your posts could imagine that would be the case.

  • OneEyedAussie on April 18, 2014, 4:28 GMT

    I didn't enjoy watching him bat but nonetheless this is incredibly sad news for Trott, his family, his fans and his employer the ECB. International Cricket is a tough gig and the most stressful part of it is facing top quality fast bowling. I thought for sure that his international career was over when he left the Ashes tour but it's terrible to think his FC career could be over too. Best of luck Trott.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on April 18, 2014, 4:07 GMT

    Though image of him facing the great M Johnson will be foremost in minds of fans, cant forget prolific runs he scored in a few series at home. Was a model of consisistency ,almost Don-esque when NW,WI toured Eng in few series.Scored a heap.

  • electric_loco_WAP4 on April 18, 2014, 3:57 GMT

    Its certainly end of him in top grade ckt. Was no more than aug. player though he scored mostly at home vs weaker teams like WI,NZ.Of course struggled vs top attaks like no.1 bowler Mitch, and no.1 attack Aus. Also v SA. publish.

  • on April 18, 2014, 3:42 GMT

    It's highly dissapointing to see one of the classiest batsman suffering through problems which might lead him into quitting the game.He always looked like a batsman who was born to bat.Departure of Trotters will be a massive loss to the game.

  • on April 18, 2014, 3:39 GMT

    Sad isn't it that there is no one to advice him? No amount of physical rest can cure the burnout which is in fact an illness related to mind, but gets its exposition with the body. So the western world thinks physical rest, sessions with psychiatrists are the cure, but it not as already shown with Marcus. The solution is to begin meditation, and that too the breathing. Please note it is not about forcing to breath but to observe the phenomena that is taking place. With time provided it is done daily first say 10 minutes and gradually increase it to about one hour, you begin to feel that your mind has become one pointed, no longer digressing from the focal point that of breath. But when it is totally concentrated you begin t see any thoughts that keeps arising and ceasing. You no longer keep chasing after those thoughts, but let go of them. That process daily done at least one to two hours a day will immediately tell you that your mind even when not meditating is not stressed or burnt.

  • LillianThomson on April 18, 2014, 3:14 GMT

    I am a Consultant Psychiatrist and I'm appalled both by this development and the premature end of Trescothick's international career.

    The key to treating anxiety disorders is exposure to the feared stimulus, and the most dangerous action is to avoid it.

    Unfortunately, the old pros were right in this regard, and modern sports psychologists seem in many cases to make things worse by taking people out of the firing line.

  • tickcric on April 18, 2014, 3:10 GMT

    Good luck in whatever you do Trott. It will be nice to have you back in cricket but it's more important that you stay nice and happy. Congrats on a fantastic career.

  • Patchmaster on April 18, 2014, 3:00 GMT

    Good luck Trotty. You'll be back mate.

  • BradmanBestEver on April 18, 2014, 2:19 GMT

    Take it easy mate. All the best.

  • on April 18, 2014, 2:16 GMT

    only respect for this man ... best of luck

  • disco_bob on April 18, 2014, 1:41 GMT

    Trescothick has shown a comeback in Test cricket, especially in the circumstances that Trott found himself in, is for all practical purposes, impossible.

  • on April 18, 2014, 1:34 GMT

    Well, good on him and God bless.

  • Ms.Cricket on April 18, 2014, 1:18 GMT

    It is a serious thing to have a mental or stress related illness, it is another thing to be complaining of 'burnout' at the start of a tough Ashes series.

  • FreddyForPrimeMinister on April 18, 2014, 0:45 GMT

    I thought at the time that Michael Vaughan's comments were disgraceful and so they now seem. Trott's explanation of "burnout" could so easily have come from his personal hope of avoiding long-term mental stress and also his desire to get back playing for England at the earliest opportunity. For the most part I've always thought of Vaughan as a delightful chap but in this case his comments were crass and sadly seem borne of someone too keen to make a story for himself in the media. Man up and apologize Michael.

  • bobmartin on April 17, 2014, 23:31 GMT

    Unfortunately, like all public figures, Trott has not been able to hide himself away from media scrutiny. This was therefore inevitable....The price of fame in todays media dominated society is sometimes greater than its rewards..

  • kanzacs on April 17, 2014, 23:28 GMT

    "Photographers have been found lurking in his garden and outside his daughter's school" - it is beyond time that these sort of invasions of privacy, harassment and trespass were actually punishable with stronger laws. I feel for Mr Trott and wish him a full recovery. Life is too short. Cheers, from an Aussie.

  • on April 17, 2014, 23:24 GMT

    Very well balanced and thoughtful writing. Its refreshing to see an appreciation of the nuances and complexity of the situation and a fitting tribute to Trott's outstanding cricketing contribution, irrespective of the long term outcome.

  • on April 17, 2014, 23:16 GMT

    I don't know Jonathan, but with all sincerity I wish him all the best and I hope he rediscovers his old self quickly and painlessly.

  • FieryFerg on April 17, 2014, 22:52 GMT

    Unfortunate it has come to this, but Trott was poorly advised to give the interviews he did a few weeks back. The criticism of his comments by Vaughan et al was entirely justified as it was Trott himself who insisted it was burn-out and not stress related. Some of his comments about mental health were crass. His agent or whoever at Sky persuaded him to do it should be ashamed. Hopefully now he will get the privacy and treatment required to sort things out and England move on.

  • CricketingStargazer on April 17, 2014, 22:32 GMT

    This is very sad. And the public has not been very sympathetic to him at times. There is more to life than destroying yourself for sport.

  • Pipthebear on April 17, 2014, 22:21 GMT

    Lets hope that Trotty comes back after a short break and can win this battle. Only he knows what he's going through but it clearly is an issue which he needs to resolve. Hopefully he will back for the second half of the summer and that this isn't the last we see of this fine cricketer.

  • GeoffreysMother on April 17, 2014, 22:11 GMT

    This is a great shame for Jonathan - though I tended to think he was initially in denial of the seriousness of the condition. He put added pressure on himself by claiming it was only burnout and he would be ready to resume against Scotland in May. Sadly this is often the case when people are desperate not to give in to such an illness or to let people (family and colleagues) down. The press I read has (including George here) have been very sympathetic and responsible about his situation. It is sad that others obviously haven't. Photographers at his daughters school is unforgivable.Publishing their names and e mails might be a good way of letting them know how it feels! Best wishes Jonathan; and if it is a life out of cricket then there are many things beyond the game equally fulfilling. Sometimes we all (including readers and followers) need to put sport into perspective.

  • shillingsworth on April 17, 2014, 22:10 GMT

    The 'perceived lack of support' angle makes no sense. Presumably the best cure was to spend time away from cricket and seek whatever medical assistance was required. By definition the first demanded no involvement on the part of the ECB. Ideally the second would also involve a medical professional independent of the ECB.

    As for the media criticism, Trott surely brought some of this on himself by conducting ill advised interviews with the media.

  • umpsthatsmydog on April 17, 2014, 22:08 GMT

    Congratulations and full praise must go to Trott. A straight up man putting his family first. May his plight do some good at educating the sporting world that all are susceptible to mental illness, that it is mainstream and only becoming ever more prevalent. If the tone of this article is correct then shame on the ECB. Too busy helping the BCCI count their money than care.

  • kitten on April 17, 2014, 22:04 GMT

    I feel very sad for Trott. And perhaps, it may be the last we see of him as a professional cricketer. But, I think it is the correct decision that he has taken. Your health, and your family come first. Cricket is just a game, and if one is under a lot of stress playing it, and this in turn has an impact on one's family, and one's health, then call it quits. I, personally, salute his outstanding batting for England, and all opponents must have heaved a sigh of relief when he left Australia to return to England. Jonathan Trott, if you do not return to cricket, please accept my thanks for your wonderful performances over the years, and I wish you and your family all the very best of Good health, and happiness in the years to come.

  • on April 17, 2014, 22:04 GMT

    If it's effecting him as much as it seems to be then he's better off away from it.

  • on April 17, 2014, 21:40 GMT

    Get yourself back on the mend Trotty.

  • TripleCenturian on April 17, 2014, 21:27 GMT

    My heart goes out to him and I hope he can return to play. You wonder if the best cure might be a century rather than any medicine or tablets so he stops feeling the pressure so much.

    You also wonder if some of those quick to criticise him are now regretting their accusations aimed at him when they appear to be ill informed? Some of those should focus on commenting on cricket only on the pitch and leave wider comments well alone when they are unqualified to comment.

    Good luck Trotty. You may not be the prettiest player but you were damn effective and the best number 3 we have had for decades.

  • Cubitt on April 17, 2014, 21:18 GMT

    Some thought he was just putting on a brave face when he said he was ready to play again, appears so unfortunately. Best of luck to him.

  • Cubitt on April 17, 2014, 21:18 GMT

    Some thought he was just putting on a brave face when he said he was ready to play again, appears so unfortunately. Best of luck to him.

  • TripleCenturian on April 17, 2014, 21:27 GMT

    My heart goes out to him and I hope he can return to play. You wonder if the best cure might be a century rather than any medicine or tablets so he stops feeling the pressure so much.

    You also wonder if some of those quick to criticise him are now regretting their accusations aimed at him when they appear to be ill informed? Some of those should focus on commenting on cricket only on the pitch and leave wider comments well alone when they are unqualified to comment.

    Good luck Trotty. You may not be the prettiest player but you were damn effective and the best number 3 we have had for decades.

  • on April 17, 2014, 21:40 GMT

    Get yourself back on the mend Trotty.

  • on April 17, 2014, 22:04 GMT

    If it's effecting him as much as it seems to be then he's better off away from it.

  • kitten on April 17, 2014, 22:04 GMT

    I feel very sad for Trott. And perhaps, it may be the last we see of him as a professional cricketer. But, I think it is the correct decision that he has taken. Your health, and your family come first. Cricket is just a game, and if one is under a lot of stress playing it, and this in turn has an impact on one's family, and one's health, then call it quits. I, personally, salute his outstanding batting for England, and all opponents must have heaved a sigh of relief when he left Australia to return to England. Jonathan Trott, if you do not return to cricket, please accept my thanks for your wonderful performances over the years, and I wish you and your family all the very best of Good health, and happiness in the years to come.

  • umpsthatsmydog on April 17, 2014, 22:08 GMT

    Congratulations and full praise must go to Trott. A straight up man putting his family first. May his plight do some good at educating the sporting world that all are susceptible to mental illness, that it is mainstream and only becoming ever more prevalent. If the tone of this article is correct then shame on the ECB. Too busy helping the BCCI count their money than care.

  • shillingsworth on April 17, 2014, 22:10 GMT

    The 'perceived lack of support' angle makes no sense. Presumably the best cure was to spend time away from cricket and seek whatever medical assistance was required. By definition the first demanded no involvement on the part of the ECB. Ideally the second would also involve a medical professional independent of the ECB.

    As for the media criticism, Trott surely brought some of this on himself by conducting ill advised interviews with the media.

  • GeoffreysMother on April 17, 2014, 22:11 GMT

    This is a great shame for Jonathan - though I tended to think he was initially in denial of the seriousness of the condition. He put added pressure on himself by claiming it was only burnout and he would be ready to resume against Scotland in May. Sadly this is often the case when people are desperate not to give in to such an illness or to let people (family and colleagues) down. The press I read has (including George here) have been very sympathetic and responsible about his situation. It is sad that others obviously haven't. Photographers at his daughters school is unforgivable.Publishing their names and e mails might be a good way of letting them know how it feels! Best wishes Jonathan; and if it is a life out of cricket then there are many things beyond the game equally fulfilling. Sometimes we all (including readers and followers) need to put sport into perspective.

  • Pipthebear on April 17, 2014, 22:21 GMT

    Lets hope that Trotty comes back after a short break and can win this battle. Only he knows what he's going through but it clearly is an issue which he needs to resolve. Hopefully he will back for the second half of the summer and that this isn't the last we see of this fine cricketer.

  • CricketingStargazer on April 17, 2014, 22:32 GMT

    This is very sad. And the public has not been very sympathetic to him at times. There is more to life than destroying yourself for sport.