Champions Trophy 2013 June 12, 2013

Time for Warner to learn the hard way

Cricket Australia cannot afford to be lenient on David Warner if it finds him guilty of attacking Joe Root.
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It doesn't matter whether the punch David Warner reportedly threw at Joe Root in a Birmingham bar missed, made glancing contact or struck flush on the chin. That Root has accepted an apology from Warner is of no real consequence either. All that matters is that Warner did something stupid. Again. Stupid and verbal is easy to forgive, stupid and violent is not. Unless further details emerge that show some justification for Warner's actions, it is difficult to find any reason for leniency.

Of course, there needs to be a caveat of sorts, for Warner is yet to face a Cricket Australia Code of Behaviour hearing, and only those who were present can really be sure of what transpired. But the reports that emerged throughout Wednesday do not paint him in a flattering light. Why should a man who thinks it is acceptable to throw a bar-room punch at an opponent continue to be given the privilege of playing for his country? What sort of example would that set for a society in which alcohol-fuelled violence is a growing problem?

At the very least, Warner should be stood down from the rest of the Champions Trophy. His Ashes role must also be seriously considered, and Cricket Australia is in the unenviable position of having to decide on the appropriate penalty. Is it overkill to send Warner home and leave him out of the Ashes? Perhaps. But maybe it's the only way he will get the idea, for messages seem to be as slow getting through to him as if they're delivered by sea-mail.

"An unprovoked physical attack on a member of the England team" is how an ECB statement described Warner's actions. It went on to say that an ECB investigation had found that Root (although not named in the statement) "was in no way responsible for nor retaliated to the attack". Root, Warner and other England and Australia players had been at the Walkabout pub in Birmingham when the incident occurred in the early hours of Sunday morning, following England's win over Australia at Edgbaston.

Details began to filter out on Wednesday; Root, it seemed, had been wearing a wig that he moved to his chin and used as a fake beard. Warner reportedly grabbed the wig before throwing a punch when Root asked for it back. The Sydney Morning Herald reported that Clint McKay stepped in to break things up. The "boys will be boys" attitude does not fly; throwing punches has no place in society or sport, save for the boxing ring. And after the year Warner has had, he is on very thin ice if not up to his neck in a freezing puddle already.

On the Test tour of India in February and March, Warner's fitness and skin-fold testing was unacceptable. That was one of the transgressions that led to the heavy-handed homework sackings, although Warner at least had handed his in and thus avoided a suspension. Last month, he was fined A$5750 for a lengthy Twitter spat with two journalists when he was unhappy with a photograph of him being used to illustrate a story on the seedy underbelly of the IPL.

"In hindsight, clearly I let my frustrations get the better of me," Warner had said after being fined over the Twitter row. Apologies begin to sound hollow when they are repeated time and again. Andrew Symonds found that out during his tumultuous career and Warner risks heading down the same path if he cannot control himself. Symonds was given plenty of chances, including after narrowly-avoided brawl with a Super-12s rugby player in Cape Town, and Cricket Australia learnt that indulging him was a mistake.

Warner should not assume they will make that error again, especially for a man whose form is poor and who is one of five openers in the Ashes squad. You'd think those odds would make a bloke desperate to impress. But Warner seems to believe he is indispensable to Australia. He appears to think he can play by his own rules. He's not, and he can't. And maybe he's about to learn that the hard way.

Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:01 GMT

    I find it interesting that Mr Coverdale cites Andrew Symonds in this article. He was a genuine talent - no question - but whose darker side was indulged, because of it, and eventually pushed this "indulgence" to breaking part because he thought he was immune. He should have been a great player, instead he was merely a great talent and thus in the end an unfulfilled one. Mr Coverdale sees the same indications with David Warner (and so do I). To avoid "Symonds II", I'd suggest dropping him both as a discipline and as a wake up call... I believe David Warner has a significant contribution to make, but this "larrikin" streak needs to be urgently curtailed... the analogy being that a prize stud needs first to be broken before it can reach its full potential on the racecourse... Incidentally I'm an England supporter, but I hate to see talent self-destruct whatever the nationality.

  • switchmitch on June 13, 2013, 11:54 GMT

    A bar room brawl needs to be forgotten as soon as the brawlers leave the bar. Just like the adage "Foes on the Cricket field and Friends off it". If Warner has to be punished for punching an opponent, all other players who were with these two should also be punished for entering into a "friendly - needly banter" about cricket...in a bar. This is not to say Warner was right in punching Joe's Root but why apply different yardsticks for physical and verbal brawls? The players had no reason to needle each other (as per published news), knowing fully well that they are opponents in a game, which has seen traditional rivalry between the two countries. If there have to be punishments, spread it to all the players who were involved.

  • on June 13, 2013, 10:41 GMT

    @Dan Schmidt. This is a very good point - the IPL money seems to mean that Warner doesn't "ache" for the baggy green. Cricket perhaps needs to be able to take a leaf from other sports with multiple competitions - so that CA is able to ban David Warner (and other miscreants) from all competitions. So, following the rugby example, Dylan Hartley got red in the Aviva Premiership Final and missed a Lions tour. The cricket calendar perhaps doesn't lend itself to this in quite the same way, but you can bet that the Aus players in India in Feb (I think) would have been on best behavior if transgressions could have resulted in missing the IPL bounty.

  • RoJayao on June 13, 2013, 8:35 GMT

    @Andrew Simon Carr, spot on, it's a shame to see talent squandered because of poor character. I think the guy needs to be sent home, not for this incident alone, but for the poison he is clearly bringing to team culture. Unfortunately it doesn't appear he may be only one I'm afraid. That said, everyone should remember that R. Ponting was an equally big sod for quite a while early in his career. He had a look at himself after being dropped and came back a mature, if overly competitive for some weak kneed tastes, cricketer that dominated the worlds bowlers for a decade. Warner just needs to pull his bloody big head in!

  • CSKFan1 on June 13, 2013, 8:26 GMT

    I am really surprised that most are hell bent on sending Warner home. He is a genuine talent and needs some plain speaking especially since these are days of sports psychologists, motivators etc and they need to do their jobs too.

    CA had better get the entire team motivated and focussed which would help avoid these incidents. If you care to remember the not so distant past, Ponting had a similar problem and was handled well by CA and everyone knows where he ended.

    We need some mature heads who can guide all this energy to achieve the results that they want.

    Chandrasekhar India

  • on June 13, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    Australian cricket is in shambles and I think it is important to invest in people who are long term bets, like the 1987 team that won the world cup in India. The selectors had invested in long term bets like Steve Waugh, McDermott, Boon and Marsh . But crucial to all these people was the desire to succeed and the right attitude to the game. Warner has achieved too much success too soon in terms of recognition, money whatever . Of course you can blame the IPL for this, but there is a serious malaise if cricket is interpreted as a physical sport. It is not . I think cricket Australia should send out a strong signal and send Warner home. It does not matter if he is missed and something tells me , he wont be . Australia did better without him yesterday but more importantly Warner must learn a lesson he wont forget. Ricky Ponting was punished and became a stronger, better person. Maybe Warner needs to follow suit and learn the hard way. Ramanujam Sridhar

  • MrPud on June 13, 2013, 7:50 GMT

    He should be sent home immediately and have his CA contract cancelled. He has brought Australian cricket into disrepute and embarrassed all of us. Must suffer from "short man syndrome" after a few drinks. By all means play the game aggressively but it is only a game, after all. When in the bar with the opposition, you can learn just as much about them as when you compete.

  • badmanners on June 13, 2013, 5:38 GMT

    Well, if it's reasonable to suspend players for a game for not doing there homework, then throwing a punch at an opposition player, must be a better than even chance he gets sent home.

    What odds you give me Tommy? :-)

  • on June 13, 2013, 5:23 GMT

    If akhtar got sent home fir whacking Asif on the thigh, warner must go. U do not punch opposition players. This is what happens when u r the golden child of aus cricket and everything gets given to u, despite no runs to back u up. He'll play the ashes tho. Loved the article Brydon

  • on June 13, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Good article. In the past you could say drop someone and it costs them so much money the threat is real, but for Warner, he makes so much money in the IPL this isn't a concern. He has gotten away with too much for too long, and needs to learn how to ache for a baggy green. He doesn't respect it and must be bringing others down with him. The only cure is a period of time out of the test team to make some runs and come back when he's learnt something. He only averages 20-something away from home anyway. If he goes home, Michael Klinger is in England and would be a decent replacement. He would at least give everything for the baggy green.

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:01 GMT

    I find it interesting that Mr Coverdale cites Andrew Symonds in this article. He was a genuine talent - no question - but whose darker side was indulged, because of it, and eventually pushed this "indulgence" to breaking part because he thought he was immune. He should have been a great player, instead he was merely a great talent and thus in the end an unfulfilled one. Mr Coverdale sees the same indications with David Warner (and so do I). To avoid "Symonds II", I'd suggest dropping him both as a discipline and as a wake up call... I believe David Warner has a significant contribution to make, but this "larrikin" streak needs to be urgently curtailed... the analogy being that a prize stud needs first to be broken before it can reach its full potential on the racecourse... Incidentally I'm an England supporter, but I hate to see talent self-destruct whatever the nationality.

  • switchmitch on June 13, 2013, 11:54 GMT

    A bar room brawl needs to be forgotten as soon as the brawlers leave the bar. Just like the adage "Foes on the Cricket field and Friends off it". If Warner has to be punished for punching an opponent, all other players who were with these two should also be punished for entering into a "friendly - needly banter" about cricket...in a bar. This is not to say Warner was right in punching Joe's Root but why apply different yardsticks for physical and verbal brawls? The players had no reason to needle each other (as per published news), knowing fully well that they are opponents in a game, which has seen traditional rivalry between the two countries. If there have to be punishments, spread it to all the players who were involved.

  • on June 13, 2013, 10:41 GMT

    @Dan Schmidt. This is a very good point - the IPL money seems to mean that Warner doesn't "ache" for the baggy green. Cricket perhaps needs to be able to take a leaf from other sports with multiple competitions - so that CA is able to ban David Warner (and other miscreants) from all competitions. So, following the rugby example, Dylan Hartley got red in the Aviva Premiership Final and missed a Lions tour. The cricket calendar perhaps doesn't lend itself to this in quite the same way, but you can bet that the Aus players in India in Feb (I think) would have been on best behavior if transgressions could have resulted in missing the IPL bounty.

  • RoJayao on June 13, 2013, 8:35 GMT

    @Andrew Simon Carr, spot on, it's a shame to see talent squandered because of poor character. I think the guy needs to be sent home, not for this incident alone, but for the poison he is clearly bringing to team culture. Unfortunately it doesn't appear he may be only one I'm afraid. That said, everyone should remember that R. Ponting was an equally big sod for quite a while early in his career. He had a look at himself after being dropped and came back a mature, if overly competitive for some weak kneed tastes, cricketer that dominated the worlds bowlers for a decade. Warner just needs to pull his bloody big head in!

  • CSKFan1 on June 13, 2013, 8:26 GMT

    I am really surprised that most are hell bent on sending Warner home. He is a genuine talent and needs some plain speaking especially since these are days of sports psychologists, motivators etc and they need to do their jobs too.

    CA had better get the entire team motivated and focussed which would help avoid these incidents. If you care to remember the not so distant past, Ponting had a similar problem and was handled well by CA and everyone knows where he ended.

    We need some mature heads who can guide all this energy to achieve the results that they want.

    Chandrasekhar India

  • on June 13, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    Australian cricket is in shambles and I think it is important to invest in people who are long term bets, like the 1987 team that won the world cup in India. The selectors had invested in long term bets like Steve Waugh, McDermott, Boon and Marsh . But crucial to all these people was the desire to succeed and the right attitude to the game. Warner has achieved too much success too soon in terms of recognition, money whatever . Of course you can blame the IPL for this, but there is a serious malaise if cricket is interpreted as a physical sport. It is not . I think cricket Australia should send out a strong signal and send Warner home. It does not matter if he is missed and something tells me , he wont be . Australia did better without him yesterday but more importantly Warner must learn a lesson he wont forget. Ricky Ponting was punished and became a stronger, better person. Maybe Warner needs to follow suit and learn the hard way. Ramanujam Sridhar

  • MrPud on June 13, 2013, 7:50 GMT

    He should be sent home immediately and have his CA contract cancelled. He has brought Australian cricket into disrepute and embarrassed all of us. Must suffer from "short man syndrome" after a few drinks. By all means play the game aggressively but it is only a game, after all. When in the bar with the opposition, you can learn just as much about them as when you compete.

  • badmanners on June 13, 2013, 5:38 GMT

    Well, if it's reasonable to suspend players for a game for not doing there homework, then throwing a punch at an opposition player, must be a better than even chance he gets sent home.

    What odds you give me Tommy? :-)

  • on June 13, 2013, 5:23 GMT

    If akhtar got sent home fir whacking Asif on the thigh, warner must go. U do not punch opposition players. This is what happens when u r the golden child of aus cricket and everything gets given to u, despite no runs to back u up. He'll play the ashes tho. Loved the article Brydon

  • on June 13, 2013, 3:40 GMT

    Good article. In the past you could say drop someone and it costs them so much money the threat is real, but for Warner, he makes so much money in the IPL this isn't a concern. He has gotten away with too much for too long, and needs to learn how to ache for a baggy green. He doesn't respect it and must be bringing others down with him. The only cure is a period of time out of the test team to make some runs and come back when he's learnt something. He only averages 20-something away from home anyway. If he goes home, Michael Klinger is in England and would be a decent replacement. He would at least give everything for the baggy green.

  • Sanj747 on June 13, 2013, 3:07 GMT

    Brydon spot on. Hard to understand why Warner gets protected so much.

  • Chris_P on June 13, 2013, 2:58 GMT

    @landl47. Well said and totally agree. I cannot believe the way people put up arguments that because a person is a sportsman etc he has some reason not to expect repercussions.. Put it this way, if you were the person that got knocked out by a punch from a famous person would you just say, "it's fine, he is under the spotlight, he can thump me any time he wants?. Yeah right, these are the people who would scream the loudest if it happened to them. I am at a loss at how some of these people cope in the real world.

  • Big_Maxy_Walker on June 13, 2013, 2:15 GMT

    Warnie never physically attacked anyone. Anything he did was his personal life. The authorities should never have got so politically correct and made Ponting captain instead of Warne. Everywhere Warne has been captain, IPL, county, Australia, Shield he has proved to be a superior tactician, a winner, universally respected etc etc. If only Warne was captain in 2005 Ashes and Mike Hussey was picked. Ponting was never captain material for me. But at least he has proved to be a better man manager than Michael Clarke. As for Warner, I would send him home, maybe humbling him will force Dave to grow up. He is 26 not 18. For a replacement for the Ashes I would look at a middle order specialist like Steve Smith or George Bailey. Watson, Rogers, Khawaja, Smith, Clarke, Bailey, Haddin, Pattinson, Harris, Lyon, Bird.

  • regofpicton on June 13, 2013, 1:34 GMT

    Cricket generally seems to be getting more agressive. Short-pitched bowling especially at batsmen without helmets. Crude "send-offs", some of crudest after catches that were not taken! Even a bowler head-butting a batsman who WAS wearing a helmet!! [ And remarkably a local (NZ) radio sports "journalist" called for more of that last one, not less]. But an international player punching another in a bar? That does seem to notch it up a bit far even for most modern tastes.

  • Moppa on June 13, 2013, 1:21 GMT

    As usual, @landl47, spot on. What do you think on an appropriate punishment. Rest of CT seems a no-brainer. Perhaps stand him down for the first Ashes Test and keep Doolan in England as batting cover, and then reassess? In that case, top six for Trent Bridge, Clarke's back pending has to be: Cowan, Rogers, Hughes, Khawaja, Clarke, Watson or Cowan, Watson, Rogers, Hughes, Clarke, Khawaja.

  • alstar2281 on June 13, 2013, 0:20 GMT

    Warner needs to be sent home & excluded from the Ashes. I feel it is the only way to get through to him & other players who transgress. They are in this position as the play cricket & play it well. The game givith & so take the game away. The Ashes is the ultimate tour for an Australian cricketer, thus the ultimate message can be sent to Warner & the others who continue to flaunt their privlidge. A monetary fine is not a punishment, nor a one game suspension with all the talk of rotations. It's time for CA to stand up and get the standards of the Australian team back to where they belong. Once this happens I believe the level of play will follow.

  • Cricket_Froth on June 12, 2013, 23:23 GMT

    I eagerly anticipate the findings of CA's "Code of Behaviour" hearing. Whether it was misguided or not in the circumstances, Australia's leadership established the disciplinary standards in India earlier this year when a group were stood down for a Test and publicly shamed for not submitting a piece of written work. The proportion of this latest Warner incident is worse in the sense that it is both violent and senseless - given that it occurred a 2am in a bar after Warner scored naught and Australia lost the match to its rival on this tour of epic importance. It appears that this man's arrogance and sense of self importance is out of control. I have often found myself deeply frustrated at the popular defence of his cricketing failures - "play your natural game, swing hard, don't adjust your approach". Is it any wonder that this man now thinks he is indispensable when selfish batting and bad shots are repeatedly defended on this basis? He's no Test standard opener, that is for sure.

  • JimmyDee on June 12, 2013, 23:03 GMT

    Warner must not play in England at all. Each time he comes out, the crowds and players will get into his head and he will bite every single time...no mistake. He has proved he has no where near the correct temperament to deal with this on the field, let alone in a pub! Right now he is unstable, out of form and throwing punches! To include him for the Ashes in England is to reward him and endorse his behavior. Grow a set, CA, and set a precedence for all players now and in the future, that this is not acceptable!

  • davent on June 12, 2013, 22:08 GMT

    Wasn't there a problem between I am Both am and Chappell some time ago? Also recall that Rod Hogg. Took a shot at beefy once to, Ponting rocked up with a black eye once, I'm sure the only thing Warner has done, is doing the same thing in an era that has new media devices, and a politicly correct media society, that analizes every minute of anyone with a hint of a media profile.

  • mikey76 on June 12, 2013, 21:44 GMT

    Australia really are getting desperate now, trying to take out one of the most promising batsmen in England! Whats next? A baseball bat around Pietersen's dodgy knee? Clouting a hammer over Graeme Swann's spinning finger? To think of the shambles of touring teams to Australia in the 90's, this shower of reprebates paints ours in a pretty good light. It makes David Gower flying around in a tiger moth look pretty tame. I would have liked to have seen the outcome if he'd have tried it on Rocky Flintoff!

  • yenjvoy1 on June 12, 2013, 21:19 GMT

    Were you there, landl47? If not, I fail to see how you know so much about who did or did not do what. As an outsider, learning of this from inflated 3rd party accounts, all I can see is media and fan overreaction to a minor dust up between two grown up men in a recreational area outside of work. I have personally seen Warner from 5 paces at a bar, all night, being nothing but pleasant and fun. He is not an angry drunk. From the SMH account, Root was joking around with a wig, Warner snatched it away, Root tried to get it back and Warner reacted. Sounds like a typical misunderstanding between 2 guys who don't know each other well at all. They resolved it in the end and Warner picked up a drinks tab. What's the big deal here? Can your sanctimonious overreaction. How much a guy makes should have nothing to do with how he must behave. He gets paid for his talent, not for behaving like a poster child. He's going through a bad patch of form and everyone's piling on. Back off please.

  • Biggus on June 12, 2013, 21:07 GMT

    Have we all forgotten how David Hookes died? One punch can kill, and Warner should consider himself lucky he missed. Anything could have happened if he had.

  • TheCricketEmpireStrikesBack on June 12, 2013, 20:38 GMT

    Under normal circumstances the punishment should fit the crime and despite all the appalling and predictable moralising there seems to be very little to this incident especially compared with previous examples of this type of behaviour (Botham, Symonds and many, many others). However Warner is at a crossroads and it is time for some tough love from CA. Send him packing back to Aus to cool his heels and hopefully learn.

    On a completely different topic, I have liked the prospect of a Watto/Rogers opening pair for some time.

  • landl47 on June 12, 2013, 20:36 GMT

    It's hard to believe that people like coldcoffee123 and yenjvoy1 live in the same world as I do. This was not, as yenjvoy1 puts it, two guys getting into it in a bar. This was one man attacking someone else for no reason. Cricketers are not, as coldcoffee123 puts it, living a life that resembles a prisoner. These are extremely well-paid athletes who live the kind of life most of us can only dream about.

    Being a public figure carries responsibilities. One of them is not to bring your team and your country into disrepute. Cricketers know this. If they behave badly, they face consequences. If they behave badly repeatedly, the consequences get more severe.

    From the sound of it, only prompt action by Clint McKay (and good on him) saved Warner from really getting into serious trouble. If he'd injured Root, that might have been it for his career. As it is, he needs help and quickly.

  • Charlie101 on June 12, 2013, 20:05 GMT

    @ Steve Bank - great comment from the papers .Have been crying with laughter

    I see Warner as a very fine combative cricketer but he always seems to be trying to pick a fight / argument . I watched an IPL game where he nearly ran out a player with a great throw - fantastic cricket and then he spoiled it with some verbals which were not needed at all . Whilst you would hate to reduce his competitive nature he needs to rein his neck in or he will become a liability .

  • Biggus on June 12, 2013, 20:03 GMT

    @Aditya Anchuri-Whether or not Warner comes back after this is irrelevant, as is the fact that he didn't connect with any great force. He plainly meant to slug Joe Root in a serious manner and it's an infraction that can't be ignored. People all over the world die as a result of one punch on a regular basis, as the tragic death of cricketer David Hookes a few years ago shows. Had Warner connected and Joe Root had fallen and hit his head on the corner of the bar or a table we could have had a death on our hands and it would have been far too late for Warner to have said, "Oh, I didn't think that would happen" after the fact. I can't for the life of me understand why so many Indians are posting in favour of Warner and calling for leniency. I'm an Aussie and all other thoughtful Australians can see where this might have ended up but for Warner missing his mark. To do anything short of sending him home AND dropping him from the Ashes squad is sending the wrong message and inviting trouble.

  • mk4444 on June 12, 2013, 19:45 GMT

    Difference is of course that Warne and Ponting were great players. Warner isn't. He is a T20 slogger who has been promoted to the Test side out of desperation. He gets talked up as something special but his averages are very poor. His ODI average is less than 30 and his strike rate is 4 more than Trotts

  • on June 12, 2013, 19:34 GMT

    Look, I know people are getting angry about this, but Warner will be a better player for this and will definitely bounce back. Ricky Ponting went through similar problems at the start of his career, and then went on to become a captain of Australia. Shane Warne had his issues, but nothing stopped him from being a great cricketer, and let's not get started on Andrew Symonds. The point is, people make mistakes but they eventually learn from them.

  • on June 12, 2013, 19:10 GMT

    Couldn't agree more. Get rid.

  • mk4444 on June 12, 2013, 19:02 GMT

    Of course it was a professional sport. It's been professional since 1962

  • muzika_tchaikovskogo on June 12, 2013, 18:45 GMT

    @yenjvoy1: just the fact that something similar happened in the past is no excuse for condoning such behaviour. The Botham-Chappel spat happened in an age when cricket was not yet a professional sport. Besides, if alcohol fuelled violence is a growing menace in Australia, there's all the more reason to clamp down on such incidence with an iron fist.

  • Matt. on June 12, 2013, 18:33 GMT

    Its bad enough being embarrassed on the field these days, but this as well!! He should be sent home for the summer in my opinion. It will make him a better person and cricketer in the long run, and set an example for all the young up and coming Australian cricketers (apparently homeworkgate wasn't enough). Going to the pub for a few beers is fine, but after a loss a professional would want to be up early the next morning working on their game. No wonder his form is suffering so badly.

  • whoster on June 12, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    The incident itself isn't massive, but when added to his other misdemeaners this year, the ACB has to throw the book at him. If he was averaging 50-odd, and a cert for the Aussie side, then he could get away with being a bit of a maverick. The fact that his Test performances have been no more than adequate makes his behaviour particularly stupid. After failing fitness levels and being embarrassing on Twitter, and as a batsman with plenty to prove, Warner has absolutely no excuse for stepping out of line again - however major or minor this incident was. This is the third occasion this year that Warner has got into trouble, and it looks like the only way he'll learn is from a shocking punishment such as being dumped for the Ashes. If that happens, the slate will be wiped clean. It would be a tough punishment, but then we'll see how much desire he has to get back in the side. Whether or not he makes the Ashes, the Aussies have got a fight on their hands to avoid a thrashing.

  • AmitNair on June 12, 2013, 18:25 GMT

    Well said Brydon, truly! Acts of violence (however mild) from a person representing his country in the "gentlemen's game" is totally unacceptable! There are millions who watch international cricketers...they should set examples by displaying exemplary behaviour! Lets hope Warner learns from this and rectifies.

  • Narkovian on June 12, 2013, 17:45 GMT

    Seriously though ( see my previous comment re Hughes and Warner). AUS could do reasonably well in Tests. Use Rogers, Haddin and Bailey. At least Bailey seems to care about playing for his country and no doubt would do an honest job.

  • thekaz on June 12, 2013, 17:21 GMT

    Cricket Australia really needs to make an example of Warner here, physicality with anyone let alone a member of an opposing team is a complete joke, and should be dealt with accordingly. Also would like to make the point, what must have been going on in his head to knowingly try to punch the youngest and easiest target of the opposition team.? The bar owner in a TV interview said he didn't believe he was extremely intoxicated, so he clearly had a clear mind and made the decision to throw a punch knowingly. You could argue he would have more of a defense if he was extremely drunk as he could say he was not in control of himself, but he clearly knew exactly what he was doing.

  • on June 12, 2013, 17:16 GMT

    I doubt what Warner did was a huge deal physically - anecdotal reports suggest the whole thing was rather insubstantial - but again, it does highlight problem in Warner's temperament both on and off the field.

    I saw a great comment on the Australian paper's website from an Aussie fan: "If this is true, Joe Root is the first thing Warner has hit since Xmas".

    Gotta admire that Aussie sense of humour.

  • yenjvoy1 on June 12, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    Seriously to read some of the reporting on this you'd think this is the first time a cricketer lost it in a bar or the first time Australia v Engalnd spilled out into a barroom brawl. What about Botham v Chappell? Why have behavior standards changed so much? Leave him alone. Two guys got into it in a bar, and an apology was tendered and accepted. Leave him alone.

  • PratUSA on June 12, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    After the final of World Twenty20 2010 at Kensington Oval in Barbados, there was music and party going on. Some of the Australian players including Captain Michael Clarke and Warner were there. While most were just having good time, I noticed Warner was standing by himself in a corner. I asked him if I could take a picture of him and he said no. I felt that here is a guy who is probably just not happy with the defeat (against England) and reflecting on the game. I was impressed. It is a shame to see that he might be on same path that Symonds and Ryder have been on. I was all for CA's punishment for his twitter outburst and now support much harsher lesson. It will be sad to lose him as a cricketer and he clearly needs to be given a tough pill to swallow now before it's too late.

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:51 GMT

    What sort of example would that set for a society in which alcohol-fuelled violence is a growing problem?

    That nailed it..anything other than suspending him will turn Australian cricket into laughing matter specially when they were so severe for homework-gate which was surely an over-reaction. Comparing him to Symonds or Flintoff is wrong because as far as i remember they made a fool out of themselves but did not try to assault or harm anyone. Cricketers are treated as ambassadors for their countries & even if that is not the case then there is no excuse for such behavior considering the amount professional cricketers make.Eg.If a IT professional beats up his colleague he would be GIVEN THE BOOT no questions asked & that is exactly what Warner deserves.

  • Nutcutlet on June 12, 2013, 16:36 GMT

    David Warner is building up an unenviable reputation for himself. Rather than pronounce on what should or should not be his penalty for this aggressive, anti-social behaviour (and yes, Brydon. you're right; it doesn't matter whether the punch landed or not), what does occur to me is that he needs some counselling to get into his (supply your own adjective) head that he cannot behave as if he was still a bully in the school playground feeling like throwing his weight around, probably because he's out-of-sorts with himself. Whatever CA comes up with will be well thought out, but it cannot -- must not -- happen again, or that's the last we'll see of Dave Warner on a cricket field for good while. As it is, a suspension of some sort may well be coming his way, besides that for the CT match v NZ.

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:17 GMT

    The problem with Warner is this. He is 26 years old and doesn't have to work a day in his life again if he doesn't care to. He is a multi millionaire and doesn't need to behave like he needs an ACB pay cheaque. He knows it and they know it too. Youth and wealth have never been great bed fellows. Throw him into a team where he is the wealthiest player allows feelings of superiority and entitlement and room to exercise that sense of entitlement. Such entitlement needs to be exorcised. A perfect case of money shaping the man during an age where money also makes the players appear better than they are. In this great age where players receive so much, much more has to be demanded of them. I would send him home. A fine will mean nothing to him but missing an ashes tour will. He and others must be made to know that without national representation they are nothing other than a hand for hire. Send him home.

  • king78787 on June 12, 2013, 16:01 GMT

    Completely agree. Warner is not actually what Australia needs anyway. He is completely overrated in tests at least because he has no patience. He NEVER leaves or plays a defensive shot and once he's in he holes out to the deep. Australia need another Cowan as Watson, Haddin are all the hitters a team needs.

  • on June 12, 2013, 15:49 GMT

    Tabloid pun of the day: The Bearded Blunder.

  • coldcoffee123 on June 12, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    When there is so much scrutiny and restrictions on players' activities and movement, it gets suffocating. Then, things like this happen. Let the players' be free to express their opinion and let them live a life that does not resemble that of a prisoner.

  • Chris_P on June 12, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    Well said Brydan. If true, the sooner he is out of England the better. We, as a society, deserve better than this sort of behaviour. He has not only shamed his country, but also this great game. Because he is a high profile sportsman doesn't mean he should have leniency. On your bike Davey, go back to your usual hole.

  • cricket-india on June 12, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    when warner was warned and fined for his tweets against the journos recently, i contended it was harsh...we apply ridiculously high standards of performance and behavior to cricketers, who are already under immense pressure and always under the limelight, even as we conveniently gloss over how we hardly behave as paragons of virtue in similar situations (road rage, family spates, etc). but now i guess warner needs to be deatl with more firmly. cricket asutralia has had a history of condoning (and even elevating, albeit later) offenders suc as ponting and symonds; time to clean up, guys.

  • cricket-india on June 12, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    when warner was warned and fined for his tweets against the journos recently, i contended it was harsh...we apply ridiculously high standards of performance and behavior to cricketers, who are already under immense pressure and always under the limelight, even as we conveniently gloss over how we hardly behave as paragons of virtue in similar situations (road rage, family spates, etc). but now i guess warner needs to be deatl with more firmly. cricket asutralia has had a history of condoning (and even elevating, albeit later) offenders suc as ponting and symonds; time to clean up, guys.

  • Chris_P on June 12, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    Well said Brydan. If true, the sooner he is out of England the better. We, as a society, deserve better than this sort of behaviour. He has not only shamed his country, but also this great game. Because he is a high profile sportsman doesn't mean he should have leniency. On your bike Davey, go back to your usual hole.

  • coldcoffee123 on June 12, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    When there is so much scrutiny and restrictions on players' activities and movement, it gets suffocating. Then, things like this happen. Let the players' be free to express their opinion and let them live a life that does not resemble that of a prisoner.

  • on June 12, 2013, 15:49 GMT

    Tabloid pun of the day: The Bearded Blunder.

  • king78787 on June 12, 2013, 16:01 GMT

    Completely agree. Warner is not actually what Australia needs anyway. He is completely overrated in tests at least because he has no patience. He NEVER leaves or plays a defensive shot and once he's in he holes out to the deep. Australia need another Cowan as Watson, Haddin are all the hitters a team needs.

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:17 GMT

    The problem with Warner is this. He is 26 years old and doesn't have to work a day in his life again if he doesn't care to. He is a multi millionaire and doesn't need to behave like he needs an ACB pay cheaque. He knows it and they know it too. Youth and wealth have never been great bed fellows. Throw him into a team where he is the wealthiest player allows feelings of superiority and entitlement and room to exercise that sense of entitlement. Such entitlement needs to be exorcised. A perfect case of money shaping the man during an age where money also makes the players appear better than they are. In this great age where players receive so much, much more has to be demanded of them. I would send him home. A fine will mean nothing to him but missing an ashes tour will. He and others must be made to know that without national representation they are nothing other than a hand for hire. Send him home.

  • Nutcutlet on June 12, 2013, 16:36 GMT

    David Warner is building up an unenviable reputation for himself. Rather than pronounce on what should or should not be his penalty for this aggressive, anti-social behaviour (and yes, Brydon. you're right; it doesn't matter whether the punch landed or not), what does occur to me is that he needs some counselling to get into his (supply your own adjective) head that he cannot behave as if he was still a bully in the school playground feeling like throwing his weight around, probably because he's out-of-sorts with himself. Whatever CA comes up with will be well thought out, but it cannot -- must not -- happen again, or that's the last we'll see of Dave Warner on a cricket field for good while. As it is, a suspension of some sort may well be coming his way, besides that for the CT match v NZ.

  • on June 12, 2013, 16:51 GMT

    What sort of example would that set for a society in which alcohol-fuelled violence is a growing problem?

    That nailed it..anything other than suspending him will turn Australian cricket into laughing matter specially when they were so severe for homework-gate which was surely an over-reaction. Comparing him to Symonds or Flintoff is wrong because as far as i remember they made a fool out of themselves but did not try to assault or harm anyone. Cricketers are treated as ambassadors for their countries & even if that is not the case then there is no excuse for such behavior considering the amount professional cricketers make.Eg.If a IT professional beats up his colleague he would be GIVEN THE BOOT no questions asked & that is exactly what Warner deserves.

  • PratUSA on June 12, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    After the final of World Twenty20 2010 at Kensington Oval in Barbados, there was music and party going on. Some of the Australian players including Captain Michael Clarke and Warner were there. While most were just having good time, I noticed Warner was standing by himself in a corner. I asked him if I could take a picture of him and he said no. I felt that here is a guy who is probably just not happy with the defeat (against England) and reflecting on the game. I was impressed. It is a shame to see that he might be on same path that Symonds and Ryder have been on. I was all for CA's punishment for his twitter outburst and now support much harsher lesson. It will be sad to lose him as a cricketer and he clearly needs to be given a tough pill to swallow now before it's too late.

  • yenjvoy1 on June 12, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    Seriously to read some of the reporting on this you'd think this is the first time a cricketer lost it in a bar or the first time Australia v Engalnd spilled out into a barroom brawl. What about Botham v Chappell? Why have behavior standards changed so much? Leave him alone. Two guys got into it in a bar, and an apology was tendered and accepted. Leave him alone.