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Former India batsman and captain

The eternal battler

All top cricketers are united by their refusal to give up. Ricky Ponting had that quality in spades, and plenty besides

Rahul Dravid

November 30, 2012

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Ricky Ponting pulls during an innings that steadied a wobbly Australia, Australia v India, 2nd Test, Sydney, 1st day, January 3, 2012
Ponting had one of the best pull shots in the business © Getty Images
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Ricky Ponting's extraordinary career will be remembered for many reasons. The history books, though, will recognise him as the most successful cricketer to have ever played this game. Ricky leaves international cricket with a load of runs and a Bradmanesque record: 100 Test victories and three World Cups, two as captain. It is a statistic any cricketer from any age would die for.

He was one of the best batsmen in the game (with the greatest cracking pull shot I have ever seen), and among the finest fielders going (brilliant all-round, whether close in, at silly point, point, or in the slips). That apart, I will always think of Ricky as a competitor, a fighter who never gave up, and a guy with a side to his personality that was not often seen: an upright, conscientious man, one with a mature understanding of the big picture. It shows in the timing of his retirement, and I am glad that he will be able to finish off in style.

For a long time, we didn't know each other well, and I admit I was surprised when I saw this other side of him, but I am glad I did eventually. At the end of the 2008 Test series against Australia, when I was going through a rough patch, he took me aside and said, "Look, I've been following your batting through the series and I know you're struggling for runs, and people are after your blood, but I want to tell you, I still think you're playing well. Hang in there." Coming from someone who was seen as a tough guy, someone we Indians had had so many skirmishes with, this was a revelation. We didn't know each other well but he took the trouble to talk to me and offer those words of comfort.

Our bats often provided a topic of conversation - they came from the same manufacturer in Meerut. Once, I asked him to give me one of his bats, signed. He had to take it to Meerut to get a similar one made, but he said he would make sure I got it, and called and checked more than once to make sure it was delivered. Not quite the sort of behaviour most would associate with Ricky Ponting perhaps. In fact, if you ask me what he was like when I was batting, apart from the usual chatter, I can't remember being sledged by him either.

In his long career, Ricky grew to become a fine leader and statesman. Tactically he may not have been as celebrated a captain as the brilliant Mark Taylor, for instance, but he was very aware of his position in the sport and where and what he was.

It was a marked progress from his early days. I remember seeing him after we won the Kolkata Test of 1998, to go 2-0 up on Taylor's side in the series. He had clearly shown that he was one of Australia's most outstanding talents, but that night in Kolkata he was not in the best state, and I wondered if he was going to waste his gifts.

Later I grew to admire how he fronted up a lot about his own failures. He was honest with the media and also spoke freely about issues in world cricket that he had an opinion on.

Ricky had a complex relationship with India; love-hate even. He wasn't successful touring India, where he was frequently measured against Sachin. Maybe because of who he was and how direct he could appear to be in speech and action, somehow he didn't quite warm the hearts of Indians like Steve Waugh did. I don't know if he came to embrace India off the field. What I do know is that guys who played alongside him at Kolkata Knight Riders were effusive about his role as a mentor and leader. To the younger guys, his work ethic was astonishing, and he provided an example of professionalism, ever ready to get involved, both as friend and mentor.

The last few years must have been tough for Ricky, not merely because of the dip in his own form: he was also the last man standing from an Australian era of excellence and domination. He grew up amid greatness, in the line of players like Taylor, David Boon, Waugh, Shane Warne and Glenn McGrath. He played with the legends. When Australia began to slip, it must have been hard to come to terms with. He chose to fight through it and be the elder statesman in a young team.

 
 
That core of your nature, to find a way, never leaves you. Which is why retirement is difficult - because your nature doesn't allow you to give up the game. You end up battling yourself and it is a huge fight
 

I remember messaging him after Australia lost the Ashes to tell him to hang in there and take some time away from cricket to clear his mind. What he had said to me a while ago had helped me and I wanted to show my support. Us No. 3s must look out for each other, I guess!

The way he battled on in the last few years of his career is to be admired. A quality inherent in every top-flight cricketer is that they do not give up. You do not want to give up; you are successful because you will not back off. That is why you play; that is why Ricky Ponting played. He didn't carry surrender in his kit bag.

Throughout his career he answered the questions thrown at his batting, found his way around problems, found answers. That core of your nature, to find a way, never leaves you. Which is why retirement is difficult - because your nature doesn't allow you to give up the game. You end up battling yourself and it is a huge fight. It is frustrating, and I have been through some of it myself.

With all top-class players, what starts to go, I think, is not the runs, but the inevitability of being able to score those runs, the assurance of performance. When we went to Australia in 2003-04, there was an inevitability to Ponting scoring runs, and sure enough, he got two double-centuries in the series. It was understood that this guy was going to make us pay.

By the time we played him in 2012, that inevitability had gone, that sense of the expected. It's not that they can't score or that they won't, but the certainty in their batting goes. You know you can fight for some time, like Ricky did, because you don't want to let other people down, but I think he did realise in the end that he doesn't want to play sport like that. Cricket will be the poorer without him but retirements are like the runs made by the great players - inevitable.

You will miss it for a bit, Ricky, but there's a plus side. Like we always believed, the commentary box is a much, much easier place to be.

Rahul Dravid scored over 23,000 international runs for India between 1996 and 2012

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Posted by   on (December 2, 2012, 14:33 GMT)

Loved the play around the prospect of "inevitability". thats about it...thats the result of Karma and the might of time....nice one Rahul....and yes, respect for Ricky ponting for the way he played his cricket...

Posted by HarishVS on (December 2, 2012, 2:44 GMT)

I remember Ponting for his pulls and hooks more than anything else. He would absolutely murder any pace bowler anywhere in the world even for a slight error in line or length. I think his competitiveness would go overboard sometimes that he wanted to win at any cost fair or unfair and he would not care for the sentiments of his opposition. One example is that infamous Sydney Test in 2008 and if one looks back many more such 'Ponting Tests' cannot be ruled out of one's memories. But this apart he will be remembered as one of the greatest No.3 batsmen of his era and the best captain. I still remember his fielding and the catches he has taken. I dont think there will be one more Ponting walking into Australia in any near future. Dravid has written beautifully with 100% true facts about Ponting that makes proud of both of these legends.

Posted by   on (December 2, 2012, 2:21 GMT)

i m sooo pleased to read the article of The Wall, who have written words for the great player of his great era. sure Rahul and ponting both are great players, may Allah give me good future tooo.

Posted by   on (December 2, 2012, 0:06 GMT)

very well written - thoroughly enjoyed reading it. Thank you.

Posted by   on (December 1, 2012, 23:41 GMT)

thank you Vic Nicholas! and as for me, i feel emotional already that ponting is going. i mean i dont know why we indians are emotional when it comes to letting go of anyone. i wonder how aussies take it easy when one of the greatest ever batsman is leaving the scene. if it was india, the media and fans would be full of emotion! Hail the master, big cheer for him one more time as he would come back in the 2nd innings...and thank you australia for giving birth to this world beater!

Posted by KHegde on (December 1, 2012, 23:02 GMT)

Probably the most balanced tribute I have read in a long time. Why am I not surprised it comes from Dravid?

My favourite bit: "You will miss it for a bit, Ricky, but there's a plus side. Like we always believed, the commentary box is a much, much easier place to be" - there you go Shastri and co; deal with that one.

Posted by   on (December 1, 2012, 19:40 GMT)

I remembered Ricky ponting from the 1996 world cup. when I started watching cricket seriously. I really liked his batting especially his pull and hooks. with french cut.

Posted by shayad on (December 1, 2012, 19:36 GMT)

those school days 96' Dravid Lara & Ponting (i m indian but i always want ponting will cross tendulkar but......... its ok) my team;s only 1 player left kallis The Wall welcome to next pitch.

Posted by   on (December 1, 2012, 18:42 GMT)

excellent article by dravid...made a pleasurable read...he is making his mark as a writer for sure. a few words about Ponting..he has been one of the top 4 batsman during his time along with Sachin Lara, Kallis. and he was the most aggressive of the lot..with all the shots in the book..straight drives cuts pulls,hook..at his best he was the most attractive to watch along with Brian Lara.He has played some masterpieces in his career-2 double 100s v india in 2003 ,a back to the wall 156 v Eng in 2005 to draw manchester test,100no v SA in SA in a 4th inngs winning chase, 197 v pak at WACA 1999 v wasim.shoiab,waqar after 3 test ducks..& he was a big occasion player (unlike tendulkar-my only criticism of sachin)-3 World cup win..a big 140+ no in 203 final which dented India..more often than not he scored big in crunch game situations..which sachin for a player of his class fell constantly short of achieving in his otherwise great career...Ricky -thanks for the entertainment..will miss u

Posted by vpk23 on (December 1, 2012, 17:50 GMT)

Typical of a No.3; Controlled writing.! Hope he can get across to the young & aspriring No.3's in India or elsewhere to follow in his & Ricky's footsteps. 'RR' familar!?

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