Australia v England, 1st Test, Brisbane November 25, 2013

Don't rein in aggression, say players

133

Australia's cricketers should not be reined in from the aggression they showed during the first Ashes Test and broadcasters have erred in exposing players to unnecessary sanctions from the ICC, their union chief Paul Marsh has said. Michael Clarke was fined for a comment to the England No. 11 James Anderson that was relayed by stump microphone during the closing moments of the first Ashes Test in Brisbane, drawing an apology from Channel Nine.

Clarke's words to Anderson included "get ready for a broken f***ing arm" as the Englishman delayed facing up to the man of the match Mitchell Johnson. This advice was no great departure from what is commonly said on the field, but Clarke was nonetheless sanctioned for his words due to their broadcast around Australia and the world.

Australia's aggressive posture throughout the Test helped to reap a 381-run victory over England, their first win in an Ashes Test match since December 2010. Marsh, chief executive of the Australian Cricketers Association, said he hoped Clarke's team would not be reined in by Cricket Australia for pursuing a brand of cricket that was aggressive in both word and deed.

"That's how we play our best cricket," Marsh told ESPNcricinfo. "To be aggressive on the field is what I think the Australian cricket team needs to do and I thought it was terrific that they did that. I think the majority of the Australian public were very buoyed by the way they played, the aggression they showed on the field, so I hope there's no attempt to rein them in.

"We all know there is a line, and not for one minute am I saying the players should cross that line, but I think there's nothing wrong with aggressive cricket, not just what you say but how you go about it. The fast bowling in this match was first-rate and the players showed they weren't going to take a backward step. The words of the English players would suggest they were more than comfortable with what was said out on the pitch."

Marsh said broadcasters risked their access to on-field audio if such instances were not stamped out. "The broadcasters of the game have a significant responsibility when they're using stump mic," Marsh said. "The players put a lot of trust in them that things that are said on the field remain on the field - most times they get that right.

"But it's still disappointing and not acceptable to us that these types of incidents make their way into viewers' living rooms, because the players agreed to have stump mics and the accessibility they give all the broadcasters around the world on the proviso that it is used responsibly. If, as it appears, Michael's copped a fine because of the audio that was heard in people's living rooms that shouldn't have been heard, then it's very disappointing."

Marsh has written to CA expressing his displeasure about the incident. "I've written to CA this morning and had a response from them around the issue," he said. "These things have happened a few times over the years and it's something the broadcasters have expressed remorse over historically, and they're remorseful again, but it doesn't really help Michael Clarke in this situation."

Nine's head of sport Steve Crawley has offered an apology to Clarke for allowing his chirping to reach audiences. "Clarke is an outstanding Australian cricket captain who's just led his team to a marvellous and historic win. He doesn't need or deserve that to be tarnished by our error and we of course apologise," said Crawley. "It's obviously a very rare and isolated error on our part, and we'll do our best to ensure it never happens again."

James Sutherland, the CA chief executive, did not defend Clarke, saying the captain needed to remain calm "even in the most highly charged situations".

"Whilst on-field banter and defence of a teammate is as old as the game itself, there can be a fine line between gamesmanship and a Code of Conduct breach," said Sutherland. "All players have a responsibility to manage their emotions even in the most highly charged situations. Michael agrees with this, has accepted the charge and is now entirely focused on the second Test in Adelaide."

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • whoster on November 25, 2013, 11:03 GMT

    Michael Clarke is a fine player and captain, and in general is a good ambassador for the game. What he said to Anderson did overstep the line. What was really stupid about Clarke's sledge was that the Last Rites were being administered to England at the time, and wholly unnecessary. When the Aussies perform as well as they did at Brisbane, they should allowed their cricket to do the talking. Clarke's been rightly fined for what he said, so let's close the matter and get on with the cricket.

    Mitchell Johnson was the matchwinner in Brisbane, and the way he conducted himself in the post-match interview showed the way to celebrate victory.

  • mukesh_LOVE.cricket on December 2, 2013, 17:52 GMT

    Why is there so much whining about a little bit of thrash talk , people should understand this is elite sports and not some data analysis job in front of a computer desk , and why single out Australia for that matter , everyone including kohli , anderson and even steyn does it , if someone can shut up and answer it with their game alone like dravid , vvs and sachin did , gr8 ! , but i dont see a big deal in a little bit of talking

  • JethroTell on November 30, 2013, 2:33 GMT

    I can understand that many people who have watched more sport than they have played thinking Clarke stepped over the line, but this is 2 of the best cricket playing nations playing an international test match. If the stump mikes were off then no one would even know what was said. Or if Clarke had of been a bit more sneeky with his comments like Anderson, and said them away from the stump mike, again no one would know. I think its great what Michael did and have no problem with any words spoken. If they punched Anderson (tempting) then that is stepping over the line, but as my mum taught me, sticks and stones can break your bones but words cannot ....

  • on November 27, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    If nine were truly remorseful over the incident they would pay Clarkes fine... did they offer this? No. So, it is hard to believe that there is any real truth or compassion in Crawleys comments, after all, controversial TV makes for good TV doesn't it?

  • rickyvoncanterbury on November 27, 2013, 6:47 GMT

    Fan1969 on (November 26, 2013, 10:56 GMT) "after a very long time" and to an Aussie it has been a very long time, but the Aussie cricket team have a habit of coming back much quicker than they go away.

  • on November 26, 2013, 12:20 GMT

    Paul Marsh is absolutely right! This first Ashes test has returned us to the memory of the glory days of REAL TEST CRICKET in the past! It provided youths who were watching and didn't know, why test is the best format of cricket, by far. It brought out every ingredient of the game that made it so intriguing in the past: the players genuine passion to win; the electric atmosphere for spectators; the long days of mental grind for the players; the sharpness of intellectual and tact needed to outwit and conquer; the required preciseness and accuracy in skill; and the on-field social culture which is not fit for audio; but which caused Michael Clarke's unfortunate betrayal via stump microphones! To be honest, I didn't see any overdone act on the field - it's part of the battle! The line is only crossed, when any two players try to forget that cricket is NOT A CONTACT SPORT. Hence, until we all knew about Trott's unfortunate situation, I think that even Warner's statement was overblown!

  • Fan1969 on November 26, 2013, 10:56 GMT

    Test cricket at its best has to include some sledging. As long as the sledge is not on family members, it spices up the contest. No harm in Clarke getting fined as what he said became public. Players will keep away from the mic while sledging!

    It is good to see Australia winning after a long gap.

    As an Indian, I would not conclude that Aus will win the Ashes. Everything that could go right for Australia happened. Johnson was at his best, Warner under pressure performed, Haddin played classic aussie WK rescue act (Gilchrist did it so often) and Clarke got a century.

    Tough times await.

    KP is unlikely to throw his wicket every time. He obliged twice in Brisbane. Cook, Bell, Prior and Root will fight it out. Anderson will hit back along with Broad.

    Australia need to still worry about batting. Watson, Bailey, Rogers and Smith looked out of sorts at times.

    Look forward to the next 4 tests. My prediction 2-2 DRAW after a very long time.

  • stormy16 on November 26, 2013, 10:44 GMT

    I don't get this - if what Clark said was ok then why the fuss about everyone hearing it. If everyone else hearing it is a problem then what Clark said was wrong. Not sure why we need to have a discussion about it.

    As for the Aussie aggression, there is a difference between being aggressive and ugly and also the Aussie aggression only appears when they are winning. Don't recall any of this aggression from the Aussies for the last few months.

    Aus appear to have this misconception that aggression is a prerequisite for winning. There have been a few teams after the last number one Aussie team but none of them have been aggressive or ugly. Just have a look at SA, the undisputed number one team with #1 batters and bowlers - don't see them being aggressive or angry while hammering all comers!

  • yoogi on November 26, 2013, 10:42 GMT

    The paying public should have access to everything and for that matter it is one thing to say, get ready to have your hand broken, and completely another thing to say the f word. what you dont want to say in front of your kid, dont say that to another player, especially opposition player. All matches are watched internationally, and ICC govern things with that mindset. It might be very normal for you guys, but these will be completely un-acceptable in Asia or parts of africa. So behave yourself

  • TheTwoWs on November 26, 2013, 9:57 GMT

    What a perfect start to the Ashes! This is coming from a Pak fan. I am neutral and currently drawn toward Australia as they are showing the heart to win. Cricket needs this injection of emotion, in a way it shows the players on the pitch really seriously want to win. I miss these one on one face offs between players such as Miandad and Lilly. I cant wait for the next match! Its been a while since I've felt this much anticipation, Is this not what its all about?

  • whoster on November 25, 2013, 11:03 GMT

    Michael Clarke is a fine player and captain, and in general is a good ambassador for the game. What he said to Anderson did overstep the line. What was really stupid about Clarke's sledge was that the Last Rites were being administered to England at the time, and wholly unnecessary. When the Aussies perform as well as they did at Brisbane, they should allowed their cricket to do the talking. Clarke's been rightly fined for what he said, so let's close the matter and get on with the cricket.

    Mitchell Johnson was the matchwinner in Brisbane, and the way he conducted himself in the post-match interview showed the way to celebrate victory.

  • mukesh_LOVE.cricket on December 2, 2013, 17:52 GMT

    Why is there so much whining about a little bit of thrash talk , people should understand this is elite sports and not some data analysis job in front of a computer desk , and why single out Australia for that matter , everyone including kohli , anderson and even steyn does it , if someone can shut up and answer it with their game alone like dravid , vvs and sachin did , gr8 ! , but i dont see a big deal in a little bit of talking

  • JethroTell on November 30, 2013, 2:33 GMT

    I can understand that many people who have watched more sport than they have played thinking Clarke stepped over the line, but this is 2 of the best cricket playing nations playing an international test match. If the stump mikes were off then no one would even know what was said. Or if Clarke had of been a bit more sneeky with his comments like Anderson, and said them away from the stump mike, again no one would know. I think its great what Michael did and have no problem with any words spoken. If they punched Anderson (tempting) then that is stepping over the line, but as my mum taught me, sticks and stones can break your bones but words cannot ....

  • on November 27, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    If nine were truly remorseful over the incident they would pay Clarkes fine... did they offer this? No. So, it is hard to believe that there is any real truth or compassion in Crawleys comments, after all, controversial TV makes for good TV doesn't it?

  • rickyvoncanterbury on November 27, 2013, 6:47 GMT

    Fan1969 on (November 26, 2013, 10:56 GMT) "after a very long time" and to an Aussie it has been a very long time, but the Aussie cricket team have a habit of coming back much quicker than they go away.

  • on November 26, 2013, 12:20 GMT

    Paul Marsh is absolutely right! This first Ashes test has returned us to the memory of the glory days of REAL TEST CRICKET in the past! It provided youths who were watching and didn't know, why test is the best format of cricket, by far. It brought out every ingredient of the game that made it so intriguing in the past: the players genuine passion to win; the electric atmosphere for spectators; the long days of mental grind for the players; the sharpness of intellectual and tact needed to outwit and conquer; the required preciseness and accuracy in skill; and the on-field social culture which is not fit for audio; but which caused Michael Clarke's unfortunate betrayal via stump microphones! To be honest, I didn't see any overdone act on the field - it's part of the battle! The line is only crossed, when any two players try to forget that cricket is NOT A CONTACT SPORT. Hence, until we all knew about Trott's unfortunate situation, I think that even Warner's statement was overblown!

  • Fan1969 on November 26, 2013, 10:56 GMT

    Test cricket at its best has to include some sledging. As long as the sledge is not on family members, it spices up the contest. No harm in Clarke getting fined as what he said became public. Players will keep away from the mic while sledging!

    It is good to see Australia winning after a long gap.

    As an Indian, I would not conclude that Aus will win the Ashes. Everything that could go right for Australia happened. Johnson was at his best, Warner under pressure performed, Haddin played classic aussie WK rescue act (Gilchrist did it so often) and Clarke got a century.

    Tough times await.

    KP is unlikely to throw his wicket every time. He obliged twice in Brisbane. Cook, Bell, Prior and Root will fight it out. Anderson will hit back along with Broad.

    Australia need to still worry about batting. Watson, Bailey, Rogers and Smith looked out of sorts at times.

    Look forward to the next 4 tests. My prediction 2-2 DRAW after a very long time.

  • stormy16 on November 26, 2013, 10:44 GMT

    I don't get this - if what Clark said was ok then why the fuss about everyone hearing it. If everyone else hearing it is a problem then what Clark said was wrong. Not sure why we need to have a discussion about it.

    As for the Aussie aggression, there is a difference between being aggressive and ugly and also the Aussie aggression only appears when they are winning. Don't recall any of this aggression from the Aussies for the last few months.

    Aus appear to have this misconception that aggression is a prerequisite for winning. There have been a few teams after the last number one Aussie team but none of them have been aggressive or ugly. Just have a look at SA, the undisputed number one team with #1 batters and bowlers - don't see them being aggressive or angry while hammering all comers!

  • yoogi on November 26, 2013, 10:42 GMT

    The paying public should have access to everything and for that matter it is one thing to say, get ready to have your hand broken, and completely another thing to say the f word. what you dont want to say in front of your kid, dont say that to another player, especially opposition player. All matches are watched internationally, and ICC govern things with that mindset. It might be very normal for you guys, but these will be completely un-acceptable in Asia or parts of africa. So behave yourself

  • TheTwoWs on November 26, 2013, 9:57 GMT

    What a perfect start to the Ashes! This is coming from a Pak fan. I am neutral and currently drawn toward Australia as they are showing the heart to win. Cricket needs this injection of emotion, in a way it shows the players on the pitch really seriously want to win. I miss these one on one face offs between players such as Miandad and Lilly. I cant wait for the next match! Its been a while since I've felt this much anticipation, Is this not what its all about?

  • zoot364 on November 26, 2013, 9:54 GMT

    @ Sure - but that doesn't make it right. And why do professional tennis players and golfers not feel the need to hurl abuse at each other? I'd say turn up the stump mic and see what the public thinks. In these days of microscopic video analysis I don't see why that same principle shouldn't be extended to the sounds of the game.

  • abiindia on November 26, 2013, 9:47 GMT

    bad charectors should be punished even if spotsmen or politician or even a public. they are all human, human shoud learn the behaviours and manners.

  • First_Drop on November 26, 2013, 9:31 GMT

    @jw76 - hate to burst your bubble, but I believe the great Windies side of the 80's was into the same sledging you criticise. The South Africans are pretty good at it as well. Presumably, you do not watch football, ice-hockey, rugby or many other sports for the same reason?

  • jw76 on November 26, 2013, 9:15 GMT

    Cricket was never meant to be a sport where dangerous bowling puts a batsman at risk of serious injury, or where players abuse each other in a way that would never be acceptable in any other area of life. I have never supported Australia because they have violated these standards for years, and England have also lost most of my support over the past few years because of their apparent determination to match the Australians for sledging.

  • on November 26, 2013, 9:13 GMT

    Clark is one of my favorite players of this era... i feel sorry for him...

  • First_Drop on November 26, 2013, 9:10 GMT

    By the way, has nobody seen yesterdays report that Jimmy Anderson sparked Michael Clarke's commenst after threatening to punch George Bailey in the face? If so, why is the debate still focussed on Clarke?

  • cricketcritic on November 26, 2013, 9:07 GMT

    It's not tiddlywinks and most of the stuff I've heard I can accept. That said the common thread in the really unseemly sledging incidents over the years has been Australia. They regularly take it too far, and the post match retorts from the players only demonstrates that they're in denial or simply have very low standards about what is acceptable. This week Clarke and Warner's post match statements showed no remorse, grace or dignity.

    I really wish the media would stop asking Warner for his views, he simply can't help himself and really isn't a very bright human being. I'm all for a competitive game with a few verbals but I believe it is about time Cricket Australia showed some moral courage and tackled the behaviour of its players because for many years they haven't covered themselves in glory. A good start would be to acknowledge that what's acceptable to the Australian cricket team may not be accpetable to the rest of the world.

  • club_player on November 26, 2013, 8:50 GMT

    The paying public should have access to everything available, as usual those in authority treat us badly. Separately why has Clarke been fined purely because what he said became common knowledge, if that behaviour is accepted in private then the umpires & match referees are failing in their tasks. Sledging shouldn't be stopped, it can be funny & add to the spectacle but personal abuse or threats should be penalised immediately, perhaps fielders or bowlers should be yellow carded & sent off the field for ten minutes afrter a warning. If racism is no longer accepted why should abuse & threats.

  • venkatesh018 on November 26, 2013, 8:08 GMT

    All this talk of Aggro is building up and I have a sneaking feeling that the Aussies are about to be brought down to earth with a thud at the Adelaide Oval where the pitch will suit England perfectly.

  • on November 26, 2013, 7:52 GMT

    I wonder if there were stump microphones around during the body line series what comments would have been picked up then? I never played in a sporting team that didn't swear or get didn't get aggressive at times and I never will. This incident is like Broad's not walking incident, the only people interested in making a big deal about this are the idealistic purists and those trying to build up the media hype.

  • SwingandSeam on November 26, 2013, 7:45 GMT

    What sort of example are these highly paid sports stars setting for kids learning how to play the game. They will see this behaviour as being o.k just because the captain of Australia thinks it is a legitimate tactic to win a game of cricket. Also, the umpires would have been in earshot and could easily put a stop to it, but clearly chose not to. Verbal intimidation has no place on any sports field and the sooner the authorities stamp it out, the better.

  • Fast_Track_Bully on November 26, 2013, 7:16 GMT

    ICC must consider it seriously to avoid more like these in the field. Players are there for the cricket match not any street fight. One match suspension was required as a precaution.

  • Newlandsfaithful on November 26, 2013, 7:03 GMT

    Cricket players are entertainers, nothing more. As such maybe the rules of the entertainment media should apply to their conduct. If Australia want to condone Clarke's conduct, then maybe their performances should have an age restriction on them so that children could be prohibited from watching this brand of cricket.

  • on November 26, 2013, 6:55 GMT

    It's always good to hear from the field. Keep a Mic for the umpires as well. So we will hear what they say (no ball, wide, warnings to the players). We do not expect bad things from the cricketers .

    It's really boring to assume what's being discussed by the captains and umpires at times. Broadcast everything, people have the right to know what's "part of the game"

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on November 26, 2013, 6:42 GMT

    Since when bad-mouthing and foul-mouthing is being seen as aggressive? Think of it, would you be called aggressive if you foul-mouth your partner? You will be called a timid-bloke; a loser. As somebody rightly said, the real captivating aggression was Johnson's bowling, Johnson's batting, Haddin's batting, Clarke's batting, Cook's defiance and Warner's batting

  • charlesford on November 26, 2013, 6:37 GMT

    @cricmatters - yeah i was watching it my kids - and that wasn't a great moment. It would be nice if ch 9 would ease up on its promos for A Current Affair which are always full of horrible, bloody stories told in the most frightening (for kids) way... I always try and mute them but not always quick enough

  • GJBonnor on November 26, 2013, 6:29 GMT

    Stump mics should be aired all the time. The public has a right to know what is said on the field. Why should these players earning millions be allowed to act like that?

  • borninthetimeofSRT on November 26, 2013, 6:24 GMT

    LET'S ENJOY BREATHING IN THE VACUUM: From much that I have been following on Ashes through Cricinfo and Sydney Morning Herald, I feel that the era of greatness in cricket is over and now we have a bunch of whining school boys complaining about who said what and who threatened to punch and break arms and what not. This is a shame for the game of cricket and the era of Greats and Legends in Cricket is over. It is now a colony level club sport, so it seems. And it is even more disappointing to see captains getting involved in these verbals. Clarke was out of sorts and then he went ahead to explain that 'both teams wanted to win badly.' May be as per him, without verbals no team wants to win badly, it is just another day in office. Cricket will miss the likes of Sachin, Warne, McGrath, Dravid, Hayden, Gilchrist, Laxman, Lara, Waugh. But now we have a vacuum and we must breathe!

  • Samee0324 on November 26, 2013, 5:52 GMT

    I think it happens in every game where two rivals play against each other. In ashes or in PAK vs IND series, you can expect these comments. the only thing is Clark is been caught. OHH Clark... Next time, please check where you are standing :)

  • BackStreetBowler on November 26, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    If you wanna be verbally aggressive, go join politics. Cricket is not for you.

    The real aggression in the match was Johnson's bowling and Clarke's & Warner's batting in the 2nd innings. That's the kind of aggression I would like to see. The one where the bat and the ball do the talking, not the players.

  • INDSlider on November 26, 2013, 5:47 GMT

    This is just a simple thing that doesn't deserve a fine.

  • Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on November 26, 2013, 5:32 GMT

    Aggression shouldn't mean foul-mouthing each other. When bowler looks you in the eye, look back or look away and whenever he gives you his mouthful, answer him with double the ferocity with the bat. The bowlers will learn not to mess with you again. Players behaving like rowdies in the name of aggression. Shame! I don't support sledging of such indecent levels. Kids all over the world of different backgrounds are watching you all, not just Aussie and British kids. As true ambassadors, you must be able to appeal to all those little kids across the globe. Remember that next time, when you use foul language and resort to intimidating postures on the field.

  • bolthaa on November 26, 2013, 5:32 GMT

    What is amazing is the procedure followed by ICC officials. These kind of sledges happen during any day of cricket. But only few make their way to get some one punished. Point here is ICC punished Aussie captain just because the sledge was aired. If not, Clarke would have escaped. So media actually did right thing in airing this. The only things which any powerful person/organization fears are money and the power of the public. I WOULD SAY WELL DONE CHANNEL NINE.

  • cricmatters on November 26, 2013, 5:17 GMT

    I was watching the match live with my 10 yo and saw him gasp. He said Dad, I just heard Micheal Clarke say the F word. It was very naive of channel nine to broadcast it live. All radio stations in Australia have a 10 second buffer to cut out any profanity on air. For those who were watching, the second instance when Micheal Clarke went up to Anderson and said something with his index finger pointing rudely at his face was very disconcerting to watch. I was enjoying the Australian dominance and the game till then, however the last few minutes ruined the moment, the final celebrations of a fine victory and a great come back by the Australian team. Do us all a favour skip, watch your body language and let your bat do the talking.

  • Marcio on November 26, 2013, 4:54 GMT

    @mbabu73, Clarke has always been a good role model. But he's only human. Why pick out some minor incident like that and attempt to suggest that it defines him as a person? Who walks these days anyway?

    What these incidents do is tell us about the people judging them. The general level of hatred by those condemning and judging the incidents is far worse than anything on the field. We soon learn who it is that the poster has it in for, because they do exactly what you have done here: take things out of context, or simply ignore the other side of the story.

  • on November 26, 2013, 4:52 GMT

    It seems that everyone is supporting the foul mouthed incidents happening on-field. Even CA s finding fault with the broadcaster and not the players using obscene language. If such things are encouraged then why does the ICC code of breach does not allow such things on-field?? If Clarke's words receives wide range of support then why s he fined by ICC??? One's errors cannot be justified by others errors. I dont know how these players are talking about the sportsmanship and spirit of the game when they cannt follow the codes of ethics of the game..

  • ReverseSweepIndia on November 26, 2013, 4:38 GMT

    This was a ZERO issue if not for broadcasters. Things worse than this happen on field and players speaks a lot of things. Players just need to watch out for their body language because that is observed by everybody. Things like what Dhawan did was very bad and as an Indian as much I like him, I felt shame with his that action.

  • on November 26, 2013, 4:38 GMT

    @Mbabu73 sorry mate I have no idea what you are trying to say, no matter how much I reword it. I personally have no problem with Clarke saying what he did, those that don't realise this stuff goes on are either naive or new to the game. I've heard worse than this in my own club games. It anything, blame whoever controls the stump mic as I do agree that it should not have been broadcast and is an amateur mistake.

  • Thyagu5432 on November 26, 2013, 4:20 GMT

    As long as nobody finds out it is OK to murder or commit any heinous crime! What a stupid logic? What Clarke or for that anybody says on field will not become wrong only when it gets broadcast to the world. They are wrong no matter what. Aussies, it appears, are back to playing cricket without actually doing so. Gentleman's game is now being played by ruffians.

  • MinusZero on November 26, 2013, 4:13 GMT

    I am so sick of the sledging. Its time for them to grow up.

  • sridharsamu on November 26, 2013, 4:06 GMT

    Don't reign in aggression, say the players! What nonsense. Are the players there to talk or play? Only weak teams and players unsure of whether they can actually play would exhibit such unprofessional behavior. And this Marsh guy is blaming Channel 9 for allowing people to hear what was actually said. In my opinion, we should be able to hear the whole "sledging" and then we will know which players are worth respecting and which are worth condemning. Shame on the players who do not play the game as it should be played - with bat and ball!

  • MiddleStump on November 26, 2013, 3:31 GMT

    This article is way off the mark. There is a lot of difference between aggression and indecent behaviour through the use of expletives. It is ridiculous to state that "Australia's aggressive posture throughout the Test helped to reap a 381-run victory over England". No test match has ever been won by posturing. Australia won because they were better in all aspects of the game than England. By avoiding such indecent behaviour on the field, they could have shown some class in their victory. Sadly they missed the opportunity. The often repeated phrase 'it happens all the time' is a poor excuse. The ICC must come down heavily every time this happens. No exceptions.

  • on November 26, 2013, 3:25 GMT

    Sport is the only things that bridges the difference between societies But cricket played by Australia is utterly disappointing. if they want to use words and speak on the pitch against their opponents then they would rather commentate. or play another sport.

    Cricket is a mind game a tactical game. A passion Aggression is fine if it comes in form of a ball hitting the bat or a bat hitting a ball. Everything else affects this perfect gentleman's game

  • on November 26, 2013, 3:00 GMT

    It's a tough decision to make for the officials. What is branded as "aggressive cricket" maybe utterly unacceptable to the England players - so I think it's not wrong to fine Clarke at this point. The Ashes in Australia will always have a more aggressive edge, and that is how it goes, that is the meaning of Home and Away tests - England play their cricket in a more genial manner generally, and Australia in a somewhat brash way - that's just variety - just like pitches are vastly different in Delhi and Perth.

  • RaviNarla on November 26, 2013, 2:56 GMT

    Sledging by no means is aggression. They are just trying to get under the skin of the batsman.A great bowler or batsman is one who speaks with his ball or bat not with his mouth.Same applies for a team

  • binojpeter on November 26, 2013, 2:11 GMT

    It is rare somebody gets fined for sledging. I guess that Clarke got fined because he dropped the "F"-word in his sentence and it was caught by stump mic. I think current Australian captain needs to learn a trick or two from the former Australian captain Steve Waugh about how to do sledging. Steve Waugh always make sure that when he sledges, only the person who gets sledged will hear about it. Also you don't need to bring in obscene words when you sledge.

  • neil99 on November 26, 2013, 2:00 GMT

    How has being aggressive on the field resorted to hurling foul mouthed abuse at the opposition? All all teams now engage in this activity, to some extent, above all this is a trait nurtured by the Austrlian cricket team - uncouth, ungracious and undignifed.

    Real sportmen would let the bat and ball do the talking alone.

  • wellrounded87 on November 26, 2013, 1:49 GMT

    So Clarke's sledge (no actual threat just a bit of banter to create fear of Johnsons bouncer) is over the line. But Anderson threatening to punch Bailey in the head is perfectly acceptable?

    Please explain?

    Much worse things were said by both teams on the field over the 4 days but because this one happened to be picked up by the stump mic and played on the broadcast it's crossing the line. How proposterous and asanine.

  • class9ryan on November 26, 2013, 1:39 GMT

    Clarke was right in exchanging the few words but his words CROSSSED THE LINE. Aggression in one thing and it should not be combined or mixed with any type of wrong language.

  • mikeindex on November 26, 2013, 0:48 GMT

    So this is what cricket is these days. Funny, considering how much responsibility the infield umpires have had taken out of their hands, that they still can't be expected to exercise any control over what's said in their hearing. Any chance CI could break with precedent and publish this despite the three-syllable words?

  • on November 26, 2013, 0:23 GMT

    I cannot believe all these people supporting what Clarke said!!! and saying he is a great ambassador of the sport. They call cricket a gentleman's sport and is this how they are supposed to behave and talk to fellow cricketers. Unbelievable!!! You should be able to win matches without talking crap to other players.

  • on November 26, 2013, 0:08 GMT

    I think all sledging should be aired...

  • on November 25, 2013, 23:41 GMT

    Disappointed and saddened about Clarke. He was my breath of fresh air in todays cricket; a gentleman, a scholar whose skills as captain is brilliant, as a tactician and leader. I trust this was a one off for Clarke and an aberration that will not be repeated. May Australia regain the Ashes.

  • on November 25, 2013, 23:30 GMT

    Michael Clarke has got completely stitched up in this whole instance. At no point has he said anything personal towards James Anderson. He has not commented on his character, appearance, ability, family or anything about him at all. He has told Anderson where the ball is coming that is it. Seems to me, if the word hadn't been in there nothing would have happened which is very sad and one profanity in the middle of the GABBA does not warrant any fine or punishment

  • Mitty2 on November 25, 2013, 23:22 GMT

    @briscricfan, great comment. However that grin of his was more sarcastic - he was bagging Root because after every bouncer Root was grinning. He did it to Root an it cracked both Haddin and Clarke up. After he doing it he turned back to his art looking as mad as ever. Ah there's nothing better than good Mitchell Johnson.

  • Bishop on November 25, 2013, 23:04 GMT

    I think it was a totally unnecessary comment in the context of the match, but then I've never liked sledging (unless it is funny banter). While I enjoy watching hard, aggressive cricket, I think that the players' actions should be doing all the talking.

    On a side note, CA and the ECB are employers, and as such they have a legal responsibility to reduce the psychological risk to their employees (players) from bullying and harassment. Particularly with what is happening at the moment with Jonathon Trott, and also the admission that Mitchell Johnson has in the past sought counseling over crowd treatment of him. If this sort of comment was made in most other workplaces, there would most certainly be repercussions. Rightly or wrongly I think sledging will eventually have to go.

    So please, players from both sides - don't reign in your aggression, but maybe keep your mouths shut.

  • Cobra0077 on November 25, 2013, 22:52 GMT

    "Michael Clarke is a fine player and captain, and in general is a good ambassador"

    One cannot behave like what Clarke did (not only sledging, but, pointing a finger at the opponent) especially a captain and be called an ambassador. Too bad the umpires had no control of the match & let things get out of hand. These umpire's should have been fined & TV be praised for bringing out the truth, actually exposing the rude behavior. Players should just shut up & lat their play do the talking, if they are good enough.

  • Cobra0077 on November 25, 2013, 22:44 GMT

    I like fierce competition, but, sledging is not the way to go. Just shut up & may the best man win. Where are the umpires during all this time & how do they allow this. They should be in control of the match.

  • on November 25, 2013, 22:38 GMT

    They ALL do it. Clarke has nothing to apologise for. Neither does Warner. I'm sorry about Trott but the sledging his nothing to do with his condition. He should never have been selected. The ECB needs to look at their role in allowing this to happen. Take the mikes off the field and leave the players alone to get on with it.

  • Sal76 on November 25, 2013, 22:35 GMT

    WOW!!! I am appalled at the extent of the hypocrisy in the comments and more so in the stand taken by Mr. Paul Marsh. First of all, an ambassador of the game of cricket should first and foremost uphold the spirit of the game. Disrespecting your opponents, especially when they are down, is completely contrary to such spirit. So Mr. Clarke, no you are not a fine cricketer. You are just a talented cricketer who needs to be grounded in the "spirit of the sport".

  • Speng on November 25, 2013, 22:11 GMT

    So in a "gentleman's game" the broadcasters are at fault for the captain's swearing being broadcast? Even in the NBA players are fined for cursing on TV - even when only lip readable. The broadcaster should apologize only for allowing the profanity to get past their "bleepers" but it's the players' responsibility to act professionally in public. Stump mic or no stump mic the umpires should be fining players for much of the nastiness that we routinely hear and see on the pitch. It's fine to chirp at the other guy but you don't have to be profane.

  • Macker60 on November 25, 2013, 21:55 GMT

    Now that most of the truth is out who's the bad guy, The that threaten to punch someone or the one that threaten to break an arm with classic bowling. Both are wrong, but one was defending his team something that has been missing for a long time.

  • on November 25, 2013, 21:19 GMT

    Before the broadcaster should apologise its michael clarke should do it for using a absuing language on the filed. This what the australians are doing all them and get away with it. They should be penalised heavily.

  • sherlockoz on November 25, 2013, 21:12 GMT

    I think we are losing the point here a little. I was at an under 10 cricket game last friday night and was quite appalled at the 'sledging' from 8 & 9 year olds!! Is it any wonder when they see their heros behaving like they do on television, is that what we really want from our elite sports people? Frankly I see little difference between this and gang behaviour, bravery in numbers.

  • AjaySridharan on November 25, 2013, 20:40 GMT

    24 years and not a word of sledging! Where is this "line" you are referring to Mr.Marsh? I liked the aggressive bowling, targeting batsmen's weakness without any sympathy. That's where I draw the line. Words are just a waste of energy.

  • mbabu73 on November 25, 2013, 18:46 GMT

    @whoster --- It is difficult to accept Clarke as ambassdor and will stand for right things. Remember Syndey 2008, when he got out caught rahul in the slip of kumble, he was standing. Anybody in the world can blame stuard broad not clarke. Both and gamemanship are opposite world. But i like Australia aggression in this match. Dont rein in aggression.

  • warneneverchuck on November 25, 2013, 18:32 GMT

    Where was this aggression during last two ashes and india tour. Such an unprofessional behaviour by ordinary cricketers

  • CodandChips on November 25, 2013, 17:34 GMT

    It's ridiculous punishing Clarke. What he did was harmless.

    Nothing wrong with fight and passion in the ashes.

  • on November 25, 2013, 17:17 GMT

    Jeepers guys! Has anyone actually looked at the context of the sledge? Bailey was chirping to Anderson : "Do you want to get a broken arm or hand mate?" This is a classic and funny sledge, but Anderson has overreacted, perhaps because Bailey was a debutant, by saying he wanted to punch Bailey's head in. As a captain whose prime responsibility is to motivate his players and then to win the game, why wouldn't Clarke step up and tell him in no uncertain terms to face the next ball? This is such a non issue that it beggars belief that a fine captain has been impugned in such a way by armchair critics ignorant of how intense the battle is. More of the same, thank you Skipper!

  • woody3 on November 25, 2013, 16:41 GMT

    I believe aggression is part of the game. Trotts problems have nothing to do with people saying nasty things its nothing so trivial. I would guess its performance anxiety, expectation, his personal identity as a good cricketer and fear of public failiure that haunt him not some drivel spouted by a malignant gnome. Compared to Rugby its a tea party with fluffy cupcakes in terms of aggression and real danger but the exposure of failiure is greater than any other team sport and that is where I believe fear comes into cricket.

  • Ben2014 on November 25, 2013, 14:58 GMT

    Both Alastair Cook and Mike Clarke have been excellent captains and men of integrity, Clarke being a bit, only a bit, aggressive. Having said that, these things go on all the time on the field. No audience hears them except this one. It was an accident that Channel Nine had to broadcast it. The ICC had no choice but to issue this fine. I think we the fans should understand that this is an accident by Channel Nine and Clarke has to face the consequence which is not wrong (not right either). Our image of Clarke should not change.

  • FreddyForPrimeMinister on November 25, 2013, 14:54 GMT

    For what it's worth, Australia's aggression with the ball was admirable and I have no problem with such sledging as calling Root a "pretty boy". Clarke's actions and words were way beyond the limit however and he and the disreputable union chief, Paul Marsh have brought Australian cricket and more importantly their cultural and sporting history into serious disrepute. Disgraceful.

  • page8383 on November 25, 2013, 14:39 GMT

    This happens all the time in every game with all sides - You are naive to think that it doesn't - The mic just happened to pick this one up.

    They're just words and like Cook said "on the pitch is fine". It's elite, professional sport and if you can't handle it and walk off the field and shake your opponents hand then you shouldn't be there.

    I notice the England players aren't complaining at all, just a few people who don't understand the nature of cricket and just how competitive it is at this level.

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:39 GMT

    Gentleman game has gone to DOGS. Why such silly words a CAPTAIN using. Slowly but steadily we are slipping and becoming norms-really surprising? Hope sanity prevail Mehtass

  • brisCricFan on November 25, 2013, 14:33 GMT

    The aggression has to stay, otherwise stand there and bowl underarm off two steps. These guys are playing for their countries. They get fired up and thrive on the moment.

    I was at the ground for every ball bowled and witnessed Broad and Anderson exchange words with Watson after his dismissal as well as several others. I saw Mitch go down the wicket several times and chirped a bit, but the image that played on the big replay screens left the best memory for me of the overall spirit of this game - as Mitch turned away after sending a searing bouncer at Joe Root, and then some advice on playing it, his face split ear to ear in a grin as he walked back to his mark.

    On the morning of day 2 I happened to pass Mitchell Johnson as he was leaving the hotel and said to him, 'give them hell today' and he turned and said, 'Oh I will' The aggression was already there just waiting to be unleashed and unleash he did.

  • Blakey on November 25, 2013, 14:18 GMT

    Clarke's comments were made in the process of telling Anderson to get on with the game and stop wasting time. Something he wouldn't have had to do if the umpires had done their job. Anderson was looking for any way he could find to delay the game and hope for rain. He should have been fined for deliberate time wasting!

  • on November 25, 2013, 14:02 GMT

    Michael Clarke is the Australian captain. He has let his team down, his country down, the great sport down, his many fans down - and he has let himself down. Long after he hangs up his cricketing gloves and puts his bat in storage people will remember not only his many fine innings but sadly also his poor conduct on the field.

  • 2.14istherunrate on November 25, 2013, 13:36 GMT

    Cricket is a game of many facets and modes. I would not want to anaesthetise it or make it less of a spectacle. It has to be hard and slightly risky to engage our interest. Fast bowling is part and parcel of it and a brilliant spectacle particular when there are batsmen who really play it well. It ceases to be entertainment though if the surface is dodgey. Similarly with aggression etc. It is basically a civilised sport and people mercifully do not get beaten up or have knives stuck into them watching. With verbals there is ,I think, a line which can be crossed easily by players forgetting where they are and who they are. Clarke's comments crossed it ,I think. Almost the line is a humour one. Can one see the funny side of? Is it done with love or hate? Is there a grin underneath or is it just dark inside the agent's head. Brisbane was not all dark and gladly there was room for Pietersen to shake Clarke and Warner's hand in appreciation of them. You have to have the balance.

  • Basingrad on November 25, 2013, 13:34 GMT

    Sometimes it depends who it is...as pauldk said, Anderson is the most vocal sledger in the English team, possibly the English game, and is frequently chastised by the press when he goes way over the top with it in his rare county appearances. I'm English, but as far as I'm concerned he, above everyone else, is fair game and Clarke is unfortunate to be taking the rap.

  • geoffboyc on November 25, 2013, 13:19 GMT

    Aussie fast bowling legend Ray Lindwall once told Jim Laker back in the fifties that if he couldn't bowl out a number 9 without using a bouncer then he shouldn't be playing test cricket for Australia; but that was before helmets and all the other body armour that bowlers feel have evened up the contest.

  • tamperbay on November 25, 2013, 12:27 GMT

    I didn't like the sledging at all, and I'm sure both teams were guilty with some players - Warner, Mitch, Anderson, Broad - much more guilty than others. These guys fall in my opinion. Other players I imagine were not instigators but reacted to abuse - Root and Bailey.

    But the most ridiculous sledge in the game I think was Broad sending off Warner. Warner had just smashed it all over the park to score a run-a-ball 100, then tonked Broad clean over his head into the sight screen. Then when he nicks it behind Broad sees fit to sledge him. Now thats what I call pathetic.

    I did notice the ball start swinging conventionally a couple of times after the 60th over. Warner pointed this out, and this seem strange to me too.

  • opto_pus on November 25, 2013, 11:35 GMT

    Test cricket without 3 bouncers an over is too boring I say bring back to bouncers at least 3 an over so 50% of the time the bouncers are in operation.

  • amfas on November 25, 2013, 11:34 GMT

    One incident picked up on the fourth day by the stump microphone and the cricketing community worldwide goes into a tailspin. I would love to have been a "Fly on the Stump Microphones" and heard all the chirps from the time the umpires signalled let's play on day one right up until the end of the game. Maybe James was getting a little payback from something said earlier. Chill people.......

  • First_Drop on November 25, 2013, 11:30 GMT

    By all accounts, stuff like Clarke's comments are made on the field not frequently. The only difference is Clarke's comments were heard on the stump mic. Most of us would prefer this stuff didn't happen, but it does and England do it (presumably) just as much as Australia et al. End of story, no?

  • itsthewayuplay on November 25, 2013, 11:30 GMT

    Very sad indeed when someone in a senior position doesn't understand the difference between physical intimidation and aggression, and playing hard but fair cricket. It seems the Australian players lack requisite cricketing ability to beat England on skills alone. Sledging, mental disintegration, mind games or whatever you want call it is part of the Australian way of playing cricket but it's not the English way and so I don't think England will win a war of words with them. The best way to silence the Aussies is for England to win to win the next 4 tests and teach them there's no substitute for cricketing skills.

  • John-Price on November 25, 2013, 11:25 GMT

    It is impossible to have any sympathy for England - they are just reaping what they have sowed. However, the damage that these two teams are doing to cricket should not be ignored. It my view it is big a problem as match fixing and should be stopped in its tracks. Golf and tennis are more popular games than crciket and are conducted without rancor.

    A law is needed with which makes it illegal to make any comment with the apparent intention of disconcerting an opponent. Then there should be a system of first warning, yellow card and dismissal - all directed at the captain - if he cannot control his team, he should be removed from the action. Stump mics should be turned up and the problem would just disappear, never to return.

  • pauldk on November 25, 2013, 11:18 GMT

    I actually think it was a pretty good advice from Clarke to Anderson, the worst sledger in the English team. I don't know what Anderson said to Bailey, the debutant in the team, but for sure it wasn't a dinner invitation, and Mitch about to bowl could hardly misinterpret the body language on the pitch from the start of his run up. Would you really like to see him extra fired up the way he was bowling? Then a broken arm or finger could really happen.

  • First_Drop on November 25, 2013, 11:15 GMT

    @Rahim_A: Been watchign cricket a long time and I can't remember a time when tailenders were treated differently by fast bowlers...

  • on November 25, 2013, 11:10 GMT

    I am sure England surely take the revenge for this incident not by word but by defeating australlia next 4 matches..England surely win the series by 4-1.. That will be great slap to Micheal clarke and to his team mates..

  • muzika_tchaikovskogo on November 25, 2013, 11:00 GMT

    Pathetic posturing from Paul Marsh. Does he realise that Clarke is not just an Australian player, but also a role model whom thousands of kids will emulate? Is this the example he wants his players to set for the younger generation to folow?

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:58 GMT

    It is very sad that Steve Crawley felt it necessary to apologise to Clarke for letting the viewers hear what he said. What sort of logic is that? Clarke was the one who said it. The people who argue that English players may, or may not, have said similar things in previous Ashes series - isn't that the argument of the playground - he said it first so somehow it's ok. Tendulkar has just retired from cricket amidst much adulation. Don't remember ever seeing him muttering obscenities at the opposition. I am sure he will long be remembered for his cricketing achievements and his ability to remain a gentleman in a world that seems to demand more and more aggression. Does it really require sledging to make a game exciting? I think not.

  • Rahim_A on November 25, 2013, 10:57 GMT

    @YorkshirePudding - what are you on about. Umpires regularly step in between players and stop things from getting overheated but this is the first time I can recall a player being fined under these circumstances. And I think Jimmy Anderson should concentrate on trying to hit the ball rather than someone's head. Fast bowling has always been about intimidating batsmen but there used to be a code of not targeting tail enders. However since the introduction of protective hear this has all changed. I'm not sure which side started making tail enders fair game so hopefully someone can help me out on this.

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:43 GMT

    All the opinions about whether clarke should have been or not aside i cant believe people are blaming broacasters.the mic is supposed to be there for snick detection and players know that.how the broadcaster were supposed to know what clarke would say next?? thats stupid.dont know whose fault was in the fight.

  • njr1330 on November 25, 2013, 10:35 GMT

    Batting in a club game, some years ago, I was given a right 'working over' by their Pro, who eventually hit me, requiring a trip to hospital and 7 stitches. Neither bowler nor fielders said a single word. Was I angry? No, that was just hostile, high-class fast bowling, and sometimes you will get hit. That was the only time in 30 years. I played the next week, without problem. Had a fielder said 'He's going to give you some stitches!' and he had; I would have abandoned the game, and called the police. It's perfectly possible to be aggressive and hostile, without being a foul-mouthed.

  • cricsans on November 25, 2013, 10:32 GMT

    "Even the most highly charged situations". When the opposition is nine down, one wicket away from a massive innings defeat...

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:31 GMT

    It is very surprising how Michael Clarke can get away with just a fine for such an offense. I believe as per ICC intimidation using threat of violence during the game is in direct violation of the spirit of cricket and should have entailed a ban of at least 2 ODIs. It seems that for Australians there is a different set of rules. Also not to forget Clarke had no business abusing Anderson.

  • Craptastic on November 25, 2013, 10:31 GMT

    @johnnycash - couldn't agree more. Might make them all shut up and behave. Seriously the abuse everyone dishes out to everyone else on the field is awful nowadays - even mark taylor said on air he couldn't get his head around it.

    Don't know what Anderson's problem was, he's been sledging for years @vswami - absolutely correct

  • Gauss on November 25, 2013, 10:24 GMT

    Um, what threat? It was a warning of the realistic possibility of impending physical harm. How is that against the law, Sir_Francis? Anyway, Jimmy took the advice and bottled it soon after, so no harm done.

  • kunderan on November 25, 2013, 10:23 GMT

    That's Great! Marsh is equating aggression with using such despicable sledging and comments.

    No team was more aggressive than the Windies at their best, particularly against these same Aussies. They had to put up with all kinds of comments from players and the crowd, but showed their aggression in their cricket by thrashing the Aussies. Not by trying to sledge tailend batsmen

  • Cricinbest on November 25, 2013, 10:23 GMT

    First and foremost Cricket is GENTLEMEN'S GAME. ICC should take immediate actions to restore this state to protect the Game of Pure Cricket.

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:15 GMT

    Please don't reign in the aggression. It is the first time in a few years that I was literally rubbing my hands in glee especially when Mitch was making the English smell the ball. If Mitch supported by the other Aussie bowlers can produce the same aggression throughout the series we will win comfortably!

  • satishchandar on November 25, 2013, 10:15 GMT

    I don't understand why Clarke is fined. It is the fault of the micro phon operator to turn it on that time. Can English players or any other player swear they never use offensive language to sledge other players? Why single out Clarke for punishment just because micro phone was turned on?

    If ICC is seriously concerned about thee offensive language, keep the microphone turned ON always.

  • YorkshirePudding on November 25, 2013, 10:13 GMT

    I suspect Clarke would have been charged regardless of the comments being broadcast as the Umpires had to step in so would have been in the match report.

    While I have no problems with seldging or intimidation on the field when it comes to threatening Physical harm to a player, that is too much.

  • StaalBurgher on November 25, 2013, 10:13 GMT

    It is because the broadcasters are so lily-livered. They need to harden up.

  • BRUTALANALYST on November 25, 2013, 10:12 GMT

    They should and will be even more aggressive it's good for the game imo, in recent yrs sides have become way to friendly especially due to fact many play together in domestic T20 around the globe. TEST cricket has always been hard Lille used to say he wanted to see blood on the pitch recent Test cricket has become sterile we need more fast bowlers and more tough cricket and sledging to bring the excitement back say what you like but this had always been part of the game, Imagine Boycott and co facing Lille and Thommo no helmets with crowd screaming KILL KILL KILL this is nothing the game is softer than it's ever been !

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:10 GMT

    @Barry Glynn. are you serious? are you that naïve to think that no Englishman has said anything similar during this ashes or the previous ashes series. get your head out of the clouds, n stop thinking England are on the moral high ground with this... pathetic thinking!!! Im sure much much worse than this has been said!

  • on November 25, 2013, 10:09 GMT

    About time Anderson got a bit of his own medicine back.

  • jackiethepen on November 25, 2013, 10:08 GMT

    It isn't the broadcasters who are to blame, it is Clarke. And it is time to realise that there is huge difference between the aggressive bowling of Johnson and the use of swearing and abuse in a game. Time to make sure everyone really knows the difference before cricket becomes tarnished. But let's get this straight if footballers threaten that kind of violence to each other they get sent off. For once cricket has put itself in the bracket of the most uncouth sport in the world. And no it isn't acceptable to threaten to break somebody's arm or hand. That is not a metaphor. Clarke has just given himself a reputation he'll carry for the rest of his career.

  • DylanBrah on November 25, 2013, 10:04 GMT

    It's about winning games and if this helps win games then keep doing it... as Clarkey said in the press conference... guys like Johnson, Watto, and Warner thrive on banter and sledging. There is always a line you don't cross... but I don't think what Clarke said to Anderson was crossing the line.

  • SurlyCynic on November 25, 2013, 10:02 GMT

    Look at Warne's tweets about what Anderson said to a debutant (Bailey), when Clarke then responded everyone focused on Clarke's comments. England can dish it out but can't take it, judging by comments on here.

  • haqster499 on November 25, 2013, 9:59 GMT

    What a rubbish comment attacking the broadcasters. The players know the mics are on!!! Classic example of how good teams play -- West Indies of the 70s/80s let the cricket do the talking that is why they were respected and had a fan base around the world.

    Australia have regressed to the old form of abuse and sledging. It might give them the ashes, but my respect for them has severely diminished....

  • Tova on November 25, 2013, 9:58 GMT

    There are a lot of very deluded people here thinking that what Clarke said is never said on a cricket field. I am positive that the English give as good as they get on the field but aren't unfortunate enough to have it heard. It has happened as long as cricket has been played and will continue for as long as cricket is played. I haven't heard any of the English or Australian players have an issue with it so you all need to get over it... Most of the people commenting here have obviously not played much competitive sport. Move on

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:55 GMT

    What a great sense of logic here.. broadcasters should be sensible and responsible in broadcasting while the players are encouraged to be " aggressive"... Sensible going Marsh..

  • Shrikar_11 on November 25, 2013, 9:47 GMT

    I'm not condoning physical violence, but I love hearing players sledge, it adds another dimension to the game and it kind of puts you "in" the game. Also, I think its pretty ridiculous that Clarke got fined because he was the only person who was heard and even more ridiculous that its labeled as the broadcaster's fault. Kind of like, do what you want as long as we don't know about it.. cricket is far too regulated in my opinion and it seems to be because the boards and the ICC are insecure about the relevance of their existence.

  • Bamber on November 25, 2013, 9:44 GMT

    Sorry but Marsh and Clarke are bad for professional sport. Look up 'Sportsmanship' in the dictionary and you'll find this isn't it... Parents use sport and sportsmen as aspirational examples; is this really how we want to encourage future generations?? In any other game Clarke would have been yellow, if not red- carded. The fact that Marsh can't see this clearly demonstrates he's in the wrong job and the same could be said for Clarke. The fact that Channel 9 has apologised just defies belief. Australia is embarrassing itself in front of a worldwide audience here - the Courier Mail, physical threats from the Captain and as for the Warner's comments..... Get a grip OZ.

  • AamirKhan-SuperStar on November 25, 2013, 9:43 GMT

    No doubts now why the English having stress related issues

  • 158notout on November 25, 2013, 9:41 GMT

    Even as an England fan it was great to watch Australia's performance in this match. absolute class. great to see MJ at his best, I have seen him bowl well many times but never against England. The best I can hope for now is that it might be 2-1 to Aus or at best 2-2 going into the last test, however I think it will be all over by then. However, I have always had a lot of time for Clarke as a captain and as a player but really i think these comments crossed the line and I think he is lucky with a lenient fine. I have no problem with him saying the f word or saying whatever he likes about Jimmy or whoever but as soon as you threaten serious injury for me thats the limit. I hope Clarke shows his aggression and fight throughout the rest of the series with the bat and with his captaincy and fielding, not with sledges like this.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:39 GMT

    If I was Anderson I would have suggested to Clarke we "discussed" the issue on our own after the game. Then you would see how tough he was then. Pathetic example set by the captain of the side. But I'm not surprised.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:31 GMT

    I think players should maintain certain amount decency in their comments and outbursts and ICC timely action on Clarke is fully justified; lucky Warner did escape possibly because it happened outside the cricket arena .. Public expression of harming players' health, in any sport, is totally unprofessional....

  • johnnycash on November 25, 2013, 9:31 GMT

    I for one would pay to have the stump mics on all the time. Maybe there could be a different channel they we have to pay for that has all the mics on and loud - over 18's obviously! I'm not sure what was said earlier between Bailey and Anderson, but it wasn't invitations to dinner. 'You give as good as you get' seems to be the addict, and rightly so. Everyone will have noticed that the biggest send-offs after taking wickets in that second innings were for Prior and Anderson. No prizes for guessing the biggest sledgers in the England team.

  • willsrustynuts on November 25, 2013, 9:30 GMT

    I saw Freddie Flintoff on telly last week saying he has nothing to do with cricket as it is boring (so disregard anything you read from him on the sport). For once he was right.

    Bullying, Not-Spot, Whinging and Whining - I am turning the TV off and waiting for the summer to start so I can go and watch a real game of sport at the village green.

  • Yevghenny on November 25, 2013, 9:28 GMT

    so if Johnson had actually broken something, would clarke and co have stood around high fiving?

  • atpoint on November 25, 2013, 9:26 GMT

    All of this should have been left on the field. Both teams have their say on the field at times and should rightly be peeved that Ch 9 has intruded too far.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:23 GMT

    Gentlemen, Cricket is a Gentleman's game, don't forget that. Lets maintain it for the rest of the Games.

  • willsrustynuts on November 25, 2013, 9:20 GMT

    These broadcasters huh? They caught Lehman's diatribe to the Sri Lankans at Adelaide and now Clarke. When will it end? Broadcasters bringing the game into disrepute, using language set to offend. Oh, no, wait a minute it is the coach and captain that are offensive.

    I wont let my kids watch this and that should be enough for the adults running this show to want to sort this out now.

  • northumbriannomad on November 25, 2013, 9:17 GMT

    "That's how we play our best cricket."

    Well, then, get out into the schools and teach the kids how it's done. They are the future, after all.

  • Pathiyal on November 25, 2013, 9:17 GMT

    surprised with the way when a captain is directly involved in dirty works on the field. certainly a good captain, but these are the bad things

  • ste13 on November 25, 2013, 9:16 GMT

    Fully agree. It is English plot to draw attention away from their slump in form.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:14 GMT

    What Clarke said was not wrong ; but what the common folk heard was wrong -- classy CA .

  • Sir_Francis on November 25, 2013, 9:13 GMT

    My understanding, in Australia at least, that threatening bodily harm on another person is illegal. Actually a serious crime.

    There is sporting aggression and there is thuggish hooligan behaviour.

    It's sad to think that S. Waugh's ethos of mental disintegration has come to the fore. Instead of skill we bully the opposition to win. And if Warner is not ashamed of himself for what he publically stated about Trott then he's not a human being.

  • o-bomb on November 25, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    So Paul Marsh is disappointed that the (clearly unacceptable) comment was broadcast, but not that it was said. That's like a thief saying he's sorry he was caught, rather than sorry he did something wrong. Channel 9 even seems to have accepted responsibility, which is baffling and utterly disrespectful. If they can't accept that what Clarke said was wrong then what hope is there for the future of the game and having respect for your opponents? At least James Sutherland seems to have accepted that Clarke has crossed the line here.

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:58 GMT

    A bit harsh on Michael Clarke when it is the broadcaster's fault. I hope Channel 9 chips in with his fine. They are of course the big winners in this story- a bit of controversy is always good for promoting the series

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:53 GMT

    "That's how we play our best cricket" Is that because your - ahem - cricket alone is not enough?

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:53 GMT

    "That's how we play our best cricket" Is that because your - ahem - cricket alone is not enough?

  • on November 25, 2013, 8:58 GMT

    A bit harsh on Michael Clarke when it is the broadcaster's fault. I hope Channel 9 chips in with his fine. They are of course the big winners in this story- a bit of controversy is always good for promoting the series

  • o-bomb on November 25, 2013, 9:00 GMT

    So Paul Marsh is disappointed that the (clearly unacceptable) comment was broadcast, but not that it was said. That's like a thief saying he's sorry he was caught, rather than sorry he did something wrong. Channel 9 even seems to have accepted responsibility, which is baffling and utterly disrespectful. If they can't accept that what Clarke said was wrong then what hope is there for the future of the game and having respect for your opponents? At least James Sutherland seems to have accepted that Clarke has crossed the line here.

  • Sir_Francis on November 25, 2013, 9:13 GMT

    My understanding, in Australia at least, that threatening bodily harm on another person is illegal. Actually a serious crime.

    There is sporting aggression and there is thuggish hooligan behaviour.

    It's sad to think that S. Waugh's ethos of mental disintegration has come to the fore. Instead of skill we bully the opposition to win. And if Warner is not ashamed of himself for what he publically stated about Trott then he's not a human being.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:14 GMT

    What Clarke said was not wrong ; but what the common folk heard was wrong -- classy CA .

  • ste13 on November 25, 2013, 9:16 GMT

    Fully agree. It is English plot to draw attention away from their slump in form.

  • Pathiyal on November 25, 2013, 9:17 GMT

    surprised with the way when a captain is directly involved in dirty works on the field. certainly a good captain, but these are the bad things

  • northumbriannomad on November 25, 2013, 9:17 GMT

    "That's how we play our best cricket."

    Well, then, get out into the schools and teach the kids how it's done. They are the future, after all.

  • willsrustynuts on November 25, 2013, 9:20 GMT

    These broadcasters huh? They caught Lehman's diatribe to the Sri Lankans at Adelaide and now Clarke. When will it end? Broadcasters bringing the game into disrepute, using language set to offend. Oh, no, wait a minute it is the coach and captain that are offensive.

    I wont let my kids watch this and that should be enough for the adults running this show to want to sort this out now.

  • on November 25, 2013, 9:23 GMT

    Gentlemen, Cricket is a Gentleman's game, don't forget that. Lets maintain it for the rest of the Games.