"Every time you walk out, there's pressure and you want to do your best but it's probably more of an audition than previous tours," Matthew Wade said when asked about fringe players making a final push for Australia's T20 World Cup squad. Here's a recap of some of those needing to impress the selectors over the five matches against Bangladesh.

Josh Philippe
It's still early days for Philippe, but after passing 40 twice in his first three innings against New Zealand earlier this year, it has been more of a struggle with scores of 13, 2, 1, 13 and 0. In the West Indies, he battled to adapt to the slower surfaces compared to how the ball largely comes onto the bat in the Big Bash League. He was also used in the middle order as Australia assessed their options, but it felt like another square-peg, round-hole situation. In his favour, there will need to be another wicketkeeper in the World Cup squad and he could well travel as a utility player although it feels next year's tournament in Australia could really be his time to shine.

Ben McDermott
A stop-start international career has yet to get off the ground with his T20I strike rate still at under a run-a-ball. Like many, he is more comfortable in the top order but was used at No. 6 in the two matches he played against West Indies with scores of 2 and 7 before he picked up a quad injury. He then suffered another injury scare when he crashed through the boundary boards during the second ODI but has recovered to be available for this series and could have a chance to open in place of the absent Aaron Finch. Like Philippe, he could provide a back-up wicketkeeping option in a World Cup squad.

Moises Henriques
Henriques earned his recall against India last year on the back of strong returns for the Sydney Sixers in the BBL, but against West Indies couldn't make the most of his starts with four scores between 16 and 33. At times he also struggled to up the tempo with that 33 taking 29 balls in the third match. His leadership qualities and experience are valued around the squad but he may need a substantial score in this series to stay in contention. It has been surprising not to see him used with the ball.

Ashton Turner
Having toured New Zealand without playing before returning home early for the birth of his child, he was a late addition to these two trips after a number of players withdrew having not been part of the original enlarged squad. However, it was still odd, given the middle-order role he plays in the BBL for Perth Scorchers, not to see him selected in the T20I side from the start. When he did get included midway through he made 24 and 6. It feels as though he needs a longer run this series to make a judgement. His offspin adds a useful extra string to the bow.

Dan Christian
It was a feel-good story when Christian was recalled to this squad amid the mass withdrawals after becoming a globe-trotting T20 star. The jury remains out whether the tale continues all the way to the World Cup. He had the perfect chance to finish a game in the first match against West Indies but became part of Australia's hectic collapse. However, his unbeaten 22 off 14 balls in the fourth match gave a glimpse of what he can do when the innings had threatened to come off the rails. Australia won by four runs. He was only given five overs across four matches, the last of which went for 23.

Andrew Tye
Tye is Australia's fourth-leading wicket-taker in T20Is but has not had much opportunity since returning from an elbow injury. He played two matches against India last year, toured New Zealand without getting a game and then was finally brought in for the final match against West Indies last month. He stood up pretty well to a strong batting performance that threatened to storm over 200 before Tye's three wickets pulled them back. He is likely to be jostling for one of the back-up pace bowling positions.

Jason Behrendorff
The Perth Scorchers left-armer had two outings against West Indies with mixed results. He did not take a wicket in either game, but bowled a couple of good overs in Australia's only victory and showed a few of the slower-ball variations he has been working to add to his white-ball game. In the last match, he was taken to by Evin Lewis when he was asked to bowl three overs inside the powerplay that went for 46 and included consecutive no-balls.

Andrew McGlashan is a deputy editor at ESPNcricinfo