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News

Tendulkar favours no referrals but more technology

Sachin Tendulkar has admitted that he's not in favour of the umpire referrals system and prefers the on-field umpires to decide on lbw appeals without any assistance from technology

Cricinfo staff
26-Oct-2009
Umpire Mark Benson has a word with Daniel Vettori, New Zealand v West Indies, 1st Test, Dunedin, 4th day, December 14, 2008

Sachin Tendulkar: 'It is tough for the umpires to watch the no-balls and watch what's happening in the front"  •  Getty Images

Sachin Tendulkar has admitted that he's not in favour of the umpire referrals system and prefers technology - including Hot Spot for bat-pad catches - to be extended to all decisions except lbw appeals and where the batsman is bowled.
Tendulkar also suggested that the umpires in the middle be rotated in the same match, which would allow them time to rest, recharge and concentrate better.
His views echoed those of recently retired umpire Steve Bucknor and former Test umpire Peter Willey.
"I'm not particularly happy with the referrals because I'm not convinced of the angles (on television)," Tendulkar told India Today magazine. "I'm not convinced. I wasn't happy when we first went through it [on India's tour of Sri Lanka last year]."
The referrals system was first tried out during India's Sri Lanka tour and the innovation has since been used only on a trial basis though it will be re-introduced on a permanent basis from this month.
However, Tendulkar said he was in favour of increasing technology in cricket to reduce the load on the umpire, helping him to be more focused and therefore more accurate.
"It is tough for the umpires to watch the no-balls and watch what's happening in the front. For the basic line decisions you have to have a laser or something like that... the no-ball is like tennis (in which there is a beep during a let when the ball hits the net during a serve)... you can call it with a machine."
After the initial trials, the ICC had decided to include the Hot Spot to assist the third umpire. Tendulkar welcomed the innovation and added that cricket should capitalise on that aid.
"We are still using technology for close catches," Tendulkar said. "They should use the Hot Spot for the bat-pad decision so the main umpire has to only make the LBW calls. I'm quite happy with the Hot Spot because that establishes the contact.
"For the caught behind, the Hot Spot will come. Close in catches again the Hot Spot will come. You don't need a machine for the clean bowled, so the lbw decisions are all the umpire has to concentrate on."
Tendulkar understood the pressure on-field umpires face these days with every error - glaring or marginal - scrutnised and criticized by experts. He said a rotation system within the same game may help.
"Maybe we could have umpires doing a session each and so have three umpires for a game, so umpires do get time off also."