ICC annual conference

Runner rule was being abused, says ICC

ESPNcricinfo staff

June 30, 2011

Comments: 53 | Text size: A | A

Angelo Mathews and his runner Chamara Kapugedera guide Sri Lanka through the final stages, India v Sri Lanka, 2nd ODI, Nagpur, December 18, 2009
Not to be seen again in international cricket © AFP
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The ICC has explained its decision to do away with runners in international cricket by saying there had been widespread abuse of the rule that allowed batsmen to ask for runners in the event of an injury. The runner rule has been in operation for more than a century, appearing in the MCC's Laws of Cricket as far back as 1884 and perhaps even before then, but the ICC decided to repeal it on the recommendation of its Cricket Committee in May this year.

"It's been considered by the cricket committee... and there has been a strong feeling that runners were used not in the right spirit," ICC chief Haroon Lorgat said in Hong Kong on Thursday at the conclusion of the the five-day annual conference. "It's quite a difficult one for umpires to determine whether there has been a real injury to batsmen or whether it was a tactical use of runners."

The move was also an attempt to redress disparity between batsmen and bowlers Lorgat said. "If a bowler gets injured you can't continue bowling for the rest of the day and the feeling was that it would be better to not allow the use of runners because there has been abuse in the past."

In the 2009 Champions Trophy, Andrew Strauss refused to allow his South African counterpart Graeme Smith a runner after Smith had requested one due to cramps. Strauss said cramps were a side-effect of a long innings while Smith claimed runners had been granted for that reason in the past, pointing to an inconsistency in the rule's implementation.

Among other changes decided on by the ICC at the annual conference were the use of new balls from each end in ODIs, batting and bowling Powerplays to be taken between overs 16 and 40, and bowlers being allowed to run out non-strikers backing up unfairly.

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by   on (July 2, 2011, 16:25 GMT)

Its time to ban ICC and give the governing of the game back to the MCC as it was for decades.

Posted by   on (July 2, 2011, 4:00 GMT)

do away with the ICC they are the same as the WICBC dictators and are not allowed Delete them

Posted by S.N.Singh on (July 2, 2011, 1:36 GMT)

THE DECISION TO CHANGE THE RULES FOR A RUNNER IS NOT A GOOD ONE. A PLAYER CAN GET CRAMP AT ANY TIME. THIS IS BEYOND THE PLAYERS HEALTH. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO RUN TO GET A CRAMP, YOU CAN SLEEP AND GET A CRAMP AND RUNNING TAKE OUT A LOT OF SALT FROM YOUR BODY,THIS CAUSES CRAMP ALSO A LOT. THIS IS A NORMAL SITUATION AND SHOULD BE TAKEN IN CONSIDERATION, ESPECIALLY THE OLDER PLAYERS. S.N.SINGH U.S.A.

Posted by itisme on (July 1, 2011, 21:37 GMT)

@donda: a batsman will get a ball on his toes ONLY if he does not know how to tackle a yorker. If he is allowed to continue playing with the help of a runner then it is very unfair to the bowler who bowled the perfect yorker. you should be puting bat to ball not your leg or foot to block he stumps.

Posted by yorkshire-86 on (July 1, 2011, 19:53 GMT)

Cricket is the ONLY team sport in the ENTIRE world that does not allow full substitutes in any form. Take football for instance - if a man gets injured you can sub him off and his replacement can pass, shoot, tackle.. in fact do anything the striken man can do. If your team is losing you can haul off a defender and bring on another forward - the defender does not have to 'feign' injury. In cricket runners can only run, sub fielders can only field - they should relly be allowed to bat and bowl. The ruling made against runners is DANGEROUS medically, and potentially DEADLY in extreme conditions. If a footballer pulls his ham he does not have to 'soldier on' or walk off and force his team to 'play with ten', he gets subbed off for a fit man and allows the game to continue with 11 fit athletes against 11 fit athletes, the way it is meant to be. The ressurection of mankads is a good rule though, on more then one occasion I, as a bowler, have been tempted to beam the charging non-striker!

Posted by   on (July 1, 2011, 13:44 GMT)

Very good decision at last from the ICC to do away with the runners. Many players in the recent past are seen wearing bandage on their fingers (whether they carry an injury or not) which is a clear advantage for them while fielding. ICC should immediately look into this and empower the on-field umpires to order such players off the field.

Posted by   on (July 1, 2011, 10:41 GMT)

Saeed Anwar used Shahid Afridi as a runner during his epic 194 @ Independence Cup in 1997. Afridi joined Anwar when he had barely crossed 50 ... Later Anwar went on to hit three consecutive sweep-slog sixes to Kumble in spite of 'suffering from cramps'

Honestly Anwar should thank Tendulkar (Indian Captain) for his graciousness & allowing him a runner ....

Posted by yankeecricketfan on (July 1, 2011, 10:14 GMT)

sorry typo -- should be 21st century

Posted by yankeecricketfan on (July 1, 2011, 9:50 GMT)

I totally agree with this ruling -- about time cricket moved to the 22nd century. Running between the wickets is how you score runs, if a batsmen cannot run, he should retire! Also watching on TV, which is the majority of us, it becomes so confusing when theres a runner.

Posted by saurab2 on (July 1, 2011, 8:43 GMT)

Anubhav@ i dont know how much you follow cricket. But with Sehwag, you do not require runner, as he himself hardly runs so whats the use of runner. With Sachin, he doesnt like using a runner. Remember even when he scored his 200th run, he did it himself. With Yuvraj, he is one of the fastest runner in the team so why will he rely on others.. There are different players whose requirements are different. May be when a batsman is hurt/ injured, he should be allowed back with a runner only after all the fit players in the team have batted already. However, over the period of time i think all rules should be made more consistent, not on the whims and fancies of the captains so that there can be more of GS and AS

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