Better than Lara and Ponting, Gavaskar and Border, and The Don

A selection of tributes on Sachin Tendulkar's double-century

Cricinfo staff

February 24, 2010

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Sachin Tendulkar is congratulated by MS Dhoni after rewriting the record books, 2nd ODI, Gwalior, February 24, 2010
Aamer Sohail: "If you ask Saeed Anwar, he would say he's happy that Tendulkar broke his record" © Associated Press
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"Better than Brian Lara and Ricky Ponting, the other two great players of my era. Better than Sir Viv Richards, Sunil Gavaskar and Allan Border. And I would even say better than Sir Don Bradman himself."
Nasser Hussain runs out of comparables for Tendulkar

"Nobody else does deserve to get there. It's only Sachin who deserves to scale that peak. 200 is a big score in one-day cricket. It's not easy to get there. It took him 20 long years to get there. He has come a long way. It's Sachin's greatness. Records are meant to be broken. I heard somebody [Charles Coventry] equalled my record sometime ago. But I did not know him. It's great that my friend from Mumbai Sachin broke it. I am very happy for him."
Saeed Anwar may have been pushed down the special list, but he's full of praise for the incumbent

"He should aim for more. Maybe a Test innings of 450 or an ODI knock of 250. And then he himself wants to win next year's World Cup. There is a little boy in Tendulkar who wants to keep playing. That spirit keeps him going. It's absolutely incredible how he keeps going."
Keeping with the Mumbai ways, Sunil Gavaskar is not yet sated

"Come on Sachin my friend get your 200. World record to please! You deserve it… Nervous for my good friend Sachin everything crossed for you mate… Glad I'm not bowling to him today ha ha ha."
Tendulkar's old pal Shane Warne tweets his excitement as he nears the double-century

"I thought the way he celebrated when he reached his 200 epitomised the man's persona. There was no running laps around the field, no aggressive gestures, nothing over-the-top. He did what he always does, raised both his arms, closed his eyes for a moment and quietly acknowledged that it had been done."
Anil Kumble applauds a long-time team-mate

I was very proud to have held the record for a little while but there could be no better man in the history of the game to break through the 200 barrier. Zimbabwe versus Bangladesh ... India versus South Africa. Not quite in the same bracket, are they?"
Charles Coventry downplays his own achievement in scoring 194* against Bangladesh, and joins in the applause

"The unbeaten 200 that Sachin made at Gwalior is a benchmark for others to follow. Now, there will be lot of players who believe that they can also make 200 in an one-day international. We will wait and see."
VVS Laxman tells DNA that it was a path breaking innings

"He has always respected the game and is dedicated to it. But I think this is not enough for him. He is hungry and I am sure he will keep creating new records. He is a dedicated student of the game and is still keen to learn things."
Ramakant Achrekar, Tendulkar's childhood coach

"I think if you ask Saeed Anwar, he would say he's happy that Tendulkar broke his record. The reason for his success is that he has a great respect for the game."
Aamer Sohail, Saeed Anwar's good friend and opening partner, pays a fitting tribute to the new record-holder

"He has got so much class. His greatest strength is the longevity, to be able to be so successful at a young age and to still be doing the same thing 20 years on. We're blessed to still have such a great player playing this game."
Michael Clarke didn't watch the innings, but plans to catch the highlights

"If any person deserved to do better than me it was Tendulkar. I am happy for him, there are no real regrets."
Saeed Anwar, whose 194 was the previous highest ODI score.

"It shows his mental and physical toughness. He's a player who does not throw away his wicket once he's set. He always places a huge price on his wicket."
Dilip Vengsarkar salutes the attributes that such a knock needs

"Sachin - the greatest ever player ever - without any doubt… I salute Sachin... World's greatest sportsman. We can see him only rise. (He is an) inspiration to us all. He is the best."
IPL Commissioner Lalit Modi waxes beyond eloquent, on his twitter page

"What an innings it was. He had come close to achieving it twice. I always felt that Tendulkar and Sanath Jayasuriya are capable of doing that."
Kumar Sangakkara has not forgotten Tendulkar's recent dazzling form

"He is my favourite player. I had said that one day he would go on to break all batting records and now you see him scoring runs and runs."
Javed Miandad kinda saw it coming

"Whatever record is seen to be impossible to achieve, he makes it possible. That's all I can say. It seems as he's getting older, he is becoming more and more mature. No wonder Sir Donald Bradman saw himself in the way Sachin bats."
The king of parsimony, Bapu Nadkarni, does not stint on his praise

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

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