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Run out on debut, and cricketing families

The cheapest five-fors, no five-fors, record stands by women, a cricketer nicknamed Oswald, and more

Steven Lynch

June 8, 2010

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Steve Waugh bowls
Steve Waugh: 195 wickets from 325 ODIs with no five-fors © Getty Images
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Has anyone been run out twice in the match on his Test debut? asked Brian Carter from Ipswich
The only man to suffer this fate is the former Australian captain Jack Ryder, who was run out in both innings of his debut Test against England in Sydney in 1920-21. Ryder's biographer Marc Fiddian offered a possible explanation: "There have been suggestions that because Ryder played off the front foot and had a long reach he tended to give the impression that he was setting off for a single when he was only completing a stroke." (That said, Ryder was only run out 15 times in 235 other first-class innings.) There have been 23 further instances of a batsman being run out in both innings of a Test: it happened to the Australian pair of Ian Healy and Mark Taylor twice.

What's the record partnership in a women's international match? asked Debbie Saker from Sheffield
The Australian pair of Lindsay Reeler (who scored 110*) and Denise Annetts (193, a record score at the time for women's Tests) put on 309 for the third wicket against England at Collingham in 1987. The highest in women's one-day internationals is 268, by the England openers Sarah Taylor (129) and Caroline Atkins (145) against South Africa at Lord's in 2008.

I spotted that Daniel Vettori once took 5 for 7 in a one-day international. Is this the cheapest five-for in an ODI? asked Arpit Mishra from India
Those fine figures by Daniel Vettori came against Bangladesh in Queenstown on New Year's Eve, 2007. But there have been two cheaper five-fors in ODI history: Courtney Walsh took 5 for 1 for West Indies against Sri Lanka in Sharjah in 1986-87, and Sunil Joshi 5 for 6 for India v South Africa in Nairobi in 1999-2000. The Test record is 5 for 2, by the Australian left-armer Ernie Toshack against India in Brisbane in 1947-48, while Jermaine Lawson took 6 for 3 for West Indies v Bangladesh in Dhaka in 2002-03.

Who has taken the most wickets in Tests without ever taking five in an innings? And what's the record in ODIs? asked Paul Rankin from Sutton
The Test record is 87 wickets without a five-for, by the England fast bowler Mike Hendrick in 30 matches between 1974 and 1981. Hendrick, who had a reputation for bowling slightly short of a length - so that when he beat the batsmen he usually beat the stumps too - took four wickets in an innings five times, with a best return of 4 for 28 against India at Edgbaston in 1974. Not far behind him is Mashrafe Mortaza, of Bangladesh, who has so far taken 78 wickets in 36 Tests with a best return of 4 for 60 against England in Chittagong in 2003-04. The leader in one-day internationals is Steve Waugh, who took 195 wickets in 325 matches for Australia with a best return of 4 for 33 against Sri Lanka in Sydney in 1987-88. He's just ahead of Carl Hooper of West Indies, who took 193 wickets in 227 matches with a best of 4 for 34 against Pakistan at Karachi in 1991-92.

A question of genes: have there been any instances where a grandfather, father and son have been Test cricketers? asked Anirudh
There have been two sets of three-generation Test cricketers so far. The first were the Headleys: George and his son Ron played for West Indies, while Ron's son Dean Headley played 15 Tests for England in the 1990s. They were joined in May 2005 when Bazid Khan played his only Test so far for Pakistan: his father Majid Khan won 63 caps for Pakistan, and Majid's father Jahangir Khan played for India in the 1930s, before Partition. There have been a few cases of skipping a generation - Vic Richardson and his grandsons, the Chappell brothers, played for Australia, while Maurice and Chris Tremlett both played Tests for England (but Maurice's son Tim - Chris's father - never quite managed it during a long career for Hampshire).

Which Test cricketer is nicknamed Oswald? asked Nachiketa Guha via Facebook
This is a nickname sometimes given to the Australian fast bowler Brett Lee. The story goes that Steve Waugh was reading out the teamsheet for a one-day international in about 2000. Brett's brother Shane Lee was also playing, as was Ian Harvey. Waugh got to their section of the batting order, which read Lee, Harvey, Lee - but after being reminded of the man who shot US president Kennedy, Waugh actually said "Lee, Harvey, Oswald". Brett Lee's more usual nickname is "Bing", after an Australian chain of electrical shops called Bing Lee.

Steven Lynch is the editor of the Cricinfo Guide to International Cricket. If you want to ask Steven a question, use our feedback form. The most interesting questions will be answered here each week. Ask Steven is now on Facebook

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Steven Lynch Steven Lynch won the Wisden Cricket Monthly Christmas Quiz three years running before the then-editor said "I can't let you win it again, but would you like a job?" That lasted for 15 years, before he moved across to the Wisden website when that was set up in 2000. Following the merger of the two sites early in 2003 he was appointed as the global editor of Wisden Cricinfo. In June 2005 he became the deputy editor of Wisden Cricketers' Almanack. He continues to contribute the popular weekly "Ask Steven" question-and-answer column on ESPNcricinfo, and edits the Wisden Guide to International Cricket.

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