Pakistan v England, 3rd ODI, Dubai February 17, 2012

Pietersen faces up to DRS challenge

65

Kevin Pietersen has admitted he is facing the toughest challenge of his career as he adapts his game to cope with the Decision Review System.

Pietersen, 31, scored just 67 runs in six innings in the Test series and averaged only 11.16 as Pakistan defeated England 3-0. He fell lbw on three occasions. Each time the decision was sent to the third umpire for review and on two of those occasions Pietersen was given out when the ball-tracking technology showed the delivery would just have clipped the stumps. He has also made just three half-centuries in his last 36 ODI innings and, since the start of 2009, averages only 24.88 in 50-over cricket.

Pietersen feels that the introduction of the DRS has made life far harder for batsmen but insists that, despite the statistics, his confidence remains high and he feels in good form.

"In my career so far, this is the toughest I've ever found it," Pietersen said. "Because of the new DRS, there are definitely technical issues you have to look at in order to save yourself. Batters are not getting the benefit of the doubt any more.

"Umpires are giving a lot more lbws. It just has to be clipping and you're out. Two, three, four years ago you were never, ever out. I have had to change my game, but it's not just me. Left-arm spinners now are gold dust.

"It's been tough. But I'm not bothered, because it's not a case of me walking out to the middle and thinking 'where's my next run coming from?'

"Only a cricketer would understand this, but I actually feel in fantastic form. I might turn down a training session because I feel I'm playing fine. It's just when you're playing spin, and spin is bowled to you all day every single day, you just need to make one little mistake. You just need a little bit of luck to go your way, a dropped catch or an lbw decision that is referred. The wheel turns; in life, the wheel turns. I've been through this before. I'm not bothered at all."

Pietersen's insistence that he is out of fortune rather than form might surprise some onlookers. He has seemed to lack balance at the crease and paid the price for a failure to play straight. It is hard to avoid the conclusion that there is an element of denial in his suggestion that he has been a victim of circumstance.

Pietersen also justified his relatively cautious batting in the current ODI series. Pietersen was promoted to the opener's position in the understanding that he would help the side get off to a brisk start but, in two innings, he has faced 82 balls for his 40 runs. That is a strike-rate of 48.78. Pietersen reasons that, in such conditions, it is imperative that England keep wickets in hand and adopt a more measured approach.

"Whenever I've played for England in ODIs, we've always got off to a start like ten for two, 15 for one, 30 for three," Pietersen said. "In the subcontinent, against India, we kept getting bowled out.

"We were always a wicket down in the first three overs and I was always batting in the first 10 overs in that series. When you're two down in the first ten overs, all that happens in the middle when the spinners come on you is that you lose two wickets there, then you're four down, five down. You can easily go to six down or seven down.

"But if you start off with a solid platform, as I've tried to do over the last week or so, if you lose those two wickets in the middle overs, you've still got high-class batters and skilful players - whereas they're not as skilful down the bottom of the order."

Pietersen said he was relishing the challenge of opening the batting and expressed the hope that it was a permanent move.

"It's brilliant," he said. I'd like it to be permanent; Andy Flower wants it to be permanent; Alastair Cook wants it to be permanent. It's something that we're definitely looking to.

"You look at it and just think 'why can't I do it?' I've batted four in England; I've played in swinging conditions all around the world; I've been successful in Test match cricket against swinging balls. Why can't I do it in the one-day format at the top of the order? It's something that I'm looking forward to. It's a lovely little challenge; a nice one."

Before the World Cup there were suggestions in some quarters that Pietersen was thinking of retiring from ODI cricket. He reiterated that was not the case and stated that the ECB was happy to allow him to appear in the IPL. He did specify, however, that his motivation for playing in the IPL was not gaining experience ahead of the World T20 to be contested in Sri Lanka in September.

"I'm here playing for England," Pietersen said. "I love playing for England. England gives me the opportunities to sign with Delhi. Why would I give anything up? I'm totally committed to England. I'm not looking at the IPL as preparation for the World T20."

A fierce sand storm blew in Dubai throughout Friday, causing the Physical Disability game between Pakistan and England to be abandoned. While there are some concerns that a continuation of such weather could cause problems in Saturday's ODI, the enclosed nature of the stadium in Dubai Sports City should minimise any disruption. England reported no injury concerns, with Ravi Bopara, Jos Buttler and Tim Bresnan all now fit and available for selection.

George Dobell is a senior correspondent at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • on February 18, 2012, 19:23 GMT

    @Ks Raghu there were too many marginal lbws in that series. that is the reason. Dravid would be not out with 25m rule.UNDERSTAND.

  • on February 18, 2012, 18:28 GMT

    I still find it puzzling Dhoni and so many Indian fans are against technology. Do they not recall the previous tour to Australia? All those absolute HOWLERS gave the Aussies a tie in that series. Anyway, I think rather get more decisions correct, and get rid of the howlers, DRS works and is working. India will be forced on board at some point .

  • golgo_85 on February 18, 2012, 13:59 GMT

    All these excuses just cause he's still not good playing off his back foot which exposes his lunging forward plans against a turning ball. How about practicing more and a lot less tweeting pointless rubbish?

  • abhi026 on February 18, 2012, 13:39 GMT

    I think there should be some changes in the drs rules.While checking the lbw decisions if the ball is just clipping the stumps means less than 50%of the ball clipping the stumps then the batsman should be given not out.Because of the fact that he has just one mistake to do to get out while bowler has so many chances to take wickets.If drs changes like this then it will be beneficial for both the batsmen and the bowlers.

  • on February 18, 2012, 10:00 GMT

    KP always used to plonk his leg miles down the track so that if he got hit it was very hard to give him LBW due to benefit of the doubt. Now that DRS gets rid of that he is screwed. He can't play off the back foot properly so he gets in a mess. Personaly I think DRS is a very good system and has created better cricket. Front foot bullies can't dominate like they did and bowlers attack the stumps more.

  • cricinme on February 18, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    Pakistan is gonna win the next three matches. No one can beat Pakistan in UAE. This is a fact well known

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:44 GMT

    KP is feeling the heat. But unlike the Indians he is not complaining against DRS.

    I recall the first ever DRS experiment - the old style one between India and SL. Dravid played well forward and was hit on the pad. Given Not Out. But the ball was seen to hit the middle of the middle stump upon referral and was adjudged out. Dravid was visibly disgusted. In the same innings Sachin was declared out caught in the leg slip. The ball contacted the glove but the contact was concealed from the umpire's view by the batsman's pads. But one of the cameras did spot it. Sachin was equally upset. These two incidents are the root cause of Indian players' dislike for DRS. In neither of the cases they can compain of any injustice.

    I also feel that the umpiring has improved after DRS.

  • BellCurve on February 18, 2012, 9:30 GMT

    When future generations look back at the batting averages of the Indian batsmen of this period they should remember that those averages are inflated, not only due to the well documented flat track advantage, but also due to the now aparent DRS advantage. We can only speculate how big the advantage is. In my estimation, taking all factors into consideration, the overall advantage in the period since 1 January 2010 could be more than 15%.

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:24 GMT

    KP is feeling the heat. But unlike the Indians he is not complaining against DRS.

    I recall the first ever DRS experiment - the old style one between India and SL. Dravid played well forward and was hit on the pad. Given Not Out. But the ball was seen to hit the middle of the middle stump upon referral and was adjudged out. Dravid was visibly disgusted. In the same innings Sachin was declared out caught in the leg slip. The ball contacted the glove but the contact was concealed from the umpire's view by the batsman's pads. But one of the cameras did spot it. Sachin was equally upset. These two incidents are the root cause of Indian players' dislike for DRS. In neither of the cases they can compain of any injustice.

    I also feel that the umpiring has improved after DRS.

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:03 GMT

    Why dont people understand DRS! DRS has been the sole reason for the resurgence of finger spin over the last 5 years. No longer can batsman prop forward with pad play. They have to use the bat. This in itself causes a problem, if you miss the ball and turn you're either LBW or caught at slip. International teams have caught on that you don't need to have a shane warne to be effective. Just find a spinner who can straighten it a little on most surfaces and you're in the game. Swann has destroyed lefties for this reason and left arm spinners do the same to right handers - straighten a bowl back onto the stumps and it's a time bomb for batsman who like to flick deliveries off middle. KP is just explaining this and not making excuses, he has work to do more than some players for the reasons above. Raina is another with problems dealing with spin under the new umpiring outlook - look at his 2 innings at the Oval last year and how Swann virtually rendered him shotless. Even Indians struggle!

  • on February 18, 2012, 19:23 GMT

    @Ks Raghu there were too many marginal lbws in that series. that is the reason. Dravid would be not out with 25m rule.UNDERSTAND.

  • on February 18, 2012, 18:28 GMT

    I still find it puzzling Dhoni and so many Indian fans are against technology. Do they not recall the previous tour to Australia? All those absolute HOWLERS gave the Aussies a tie in that series. Anyway, I think rather get more decisions correct, and get rid of the howlers, DRS works and is working. India will be forced on board at some point .

  • golgo_85 on February 18, 2012, 13:59 GMT

    All these excuses just cause he's still not good playing off his back foot which exposes his lunging forward plans against a turning ball. How about practicing more and a lot less tweeting pointless rubbish?

  • abhi026 on February 18, 2012, 13:39 GMT

    I think there should be some changes in the drs rules.While checking the lbw decisions if the ball is just clipping the stumps means less than 50%of the ball clipping the stumps then the batsman should be given not out.Because of the fact that he has just one mistake to do to get out while bowler has so many chances to take wickets.If drs changes like this then it will be beneficial for both the batsmen and the bowlers.

  • on February 18, 2012, 10:00 GMT

    KP always used to plonk his leg miles down the track so that if he got hit it was very hard to give him LBW due to benefit of the doubt. Now that DRS gets rid of that he is screwed. He can't play off the back foot properly so he gets in a mess. Personaly I think DRS is a very good system and has created better cricket. Front foot bullies can't dominate like they did and bowlers attack the stumps more.

  • cricinme on February 18, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    Pakistan is gonna win the next three matches. No one can beat Pakistan in UAE. This is a fact well known

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:44 GMT

    KP is feeling the heat. But unlike the Indians he is not complaining against DRS.

    I recall the first ever DRS experiment - the old style one between India and SL. Dravid played well forward and was hit on the pad. Given Not Out. But the ball was seen to hit the middle of the middle stump upon referral and was adjudged out. Dravid was visibly disgusted. In the same innings Sachin was declared out caught in the leg slip. The ball contacted the glove but the contact was concealed from the umpire's view by the batsman's pads. But one of the cameras did spot it. Sachin was equally upset. These two incidents are the root cause of Indian players' dislike for DRS. In neither of the cases they can compain of any injustice.

    I also feel that the umpiring has improved after DRS.

  • BellCurve on February 18, 2012, 9:30 GMT

    When future generations look back at the batting averages of the Indian batsmen of this period they should remember that those averages are inflated, not only due to the well documented flat track advantage, but also due to the now aparent DRS advantage. We can only speculate how big the advantage is. In my estimation, taking all factors into consideration, the overall advantage in the period since 1 January 2010 could be more than 15%.

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:24 GMT

    KP is feeling the heat. But unlike the Indians he is not complaining against DRS.

    I recall the first ever DRS experiment - the old style one between India and SL. Dravid played well forward and was hit on the pad. Given Not Out. But the ball was seen to hit the middle of the middle stump upon referral and was adjudged out. Dravid was visibly disgusted. In the same innings Sachin was declared out caught in the leg slip. The ball contacted the glove but the contact was concealed from the umpire's view by the batsman's pads. But one of the cameras did spot it. Sachin was equally upset. These two incidents are the root cause of Indian players' dislike for DRS. In neither of the cases they can compain of any injustice.

    I also feel that the umpiring has improved after DRS.

  • on February 18, 2012, 9:03 GMT

    Why dont people understand DRS! DRS has been the sole reason for the resurgence of finger spin over the last 5 years. No longer can batsman prop forward with pad play. They have to use the bat. This in itself causes a problem, if you miss the ball and turn you're either LBW or caught at slip. International teams have caught on that you don't need to have a shane warne to be effective. Just find a spinner who can straighten it a little on most surfaces and you're in the game. Swann has destroyed lefties for this reason and left arm spinners do the same to right handers - straighten a bowl back onto the stumps and it's a time bomb for batsman who like to flick deliveries off middle. KP is just explaining this and not making excuses, he has work to do more than some players for the reasons above. Raina is another with problems dealing with spin under the new umpiring outlook - look at his 2 innings at the Oval last year and how Swann virtually rendered him shotless. Even Indians struggle!

  • on February 18, 2012, 8:59 GMT

    well said anik,i like kp,because his approach more likely resembles ponting.

  • TonOfTons on February 18, 2012, 8:52 GMT

    Somewhere along the way, ICC seems have lost the meaning of "Common Sense" when it comes to DRS. DRS can be fixed and made useful in a very simple way. Use DRS to eliminate poor decisions like inside edges on LBW, ball pitching outside leg stump (no prediction involved) for lbw, clear edges not given as out (using hotspot). If DRS is used to eliminate these kind of bad decisions, then the game of cricket would be the winner as a whole and you would widespread acceptance of the system. It is like using technology for run outs. You do not see anyone complaining about it because it is foolproof and makes the game better. The solution is very simple, eliminate the predictive nature of hawkeye in making decisions. Use the ball tracking technology without the predictive part. Use hotspots ot regular cameras to identify edges. When in doubt or replays are inconclusive, the decision made on field stands. Really simple stuff but somehow ICC seems to be missing it.

  • topeleven on February 18, 2012, 8:35 GMT

    There is no praise for honesty in this world. What KP said is about his change in game and he never accused DRS. People don't read the article by its meaning just they are reading who said it.No body questioned India when he whole team is against DRS. Had it been any indian player everybody would have agreed it. stupid comments against KP. Regarding his form its true he had not lived upto his potential. By this time he should have reached 5000 runs but it didn't. He has to use his feet and height and should learn to play inside out shots against spinners....

  • WellOfcours on February 18, 2012, 8:30 GMT

    So Mr. Pietersen, your point is you shouldn't be given out when the Hawk-Eye accurately suggests that you are plumb? We are sorry. Your old good days (without DRS) are gone. At the moment nothing could be done as my 12yr old nephew could handle spinners better than you do. You can hope for 2 things:

    (1) Eng Vs Ind test series (no DRS) while Indian spinners have gone Harbhajan. (awflly out of form) and you get the benefit of doubt every time you are rapped on the pad.

    (2) Mr. Vaughn invents some kind of Vaseline which you could apply on the pads to dodge LBW's. :P

  • OttawaRocks on February 18, 2012, 8:21 GMT

    Well I've said it a thousand times, if you want DRS to be accepted by BCCI, you'll have to see it administered the North American way. What does that mean? It means that whenever a team has a doubt about a play they get to see the replay FIRST then decide whether they will refer the play. In practice, only those in the clubhouse (i.e. the coaches, trainers and players off the field) will have sufficient time to evaluate the situation. They then signal the players on the field who refer the play to the umpire. The advantage of this method is that the DRS is ONLY used if the referring team is almost dead right. So DRS reviews are almost never used up on a guess (which is what currently happens). And if this reassurance can be made the BCCI will accept the system. Right now the BCCI does not accept the existing system because deciding when to use the DRS seems to be an art in the best of cases but more like lottery in the worst of cases.

  • yorkslanka on February 18, 2012, 8:20 GMT

    DRS must be made mandatory in all matches. If the Indians don't want it then their opposition should be allowed o use it in the matches against them, I am sure that will soon change their mind...the only change I would like to see is the rule about percentages of the ball hitting the stumps.this should be clearer in that any part of the ball hitting the tump should be classed as out, this would remove confusion of the system ...I can't see hw people don't want the CORRECT decisions being given because of using DRS...

  • jonesy2 on February 18, 2012, 8:14 GMT

    how is pieterson even still playing. if he played for a decent cricket nation he wouldnt be i guess. same goes for a lot of england players

  • chapathishot on February 18, 2012, 8:12 GMT

    KP has a point here when the ball clips the stumps and the umpire gives the batsman out it is out even after the DRS.If the umpire has given him not out and PAK gone for a review he should have been not out.So with out change in the other things he is out because the human element has given it out in 50% of his innings and should have been not out if the decision of umpire was reverse .So how the technology has changed the situation ,I would like to know the view of DRS supporters

  • byka on February 18, 2012, 7:51 GMT

    Hahaha Looks like England and especially KP is feeling the pinch of DRS. DRS will be most detrimental to the batsmen who are not strong to play against spin as you would use your front leg most commonly to protect your stumps when you face a doosra etc(a skill and taked time to mastered) Now Nasser Hussain has already started crying that averages of Indian Batsmen will be high as they are not using DRS(i can see him opposing DRS as it is not followed by all countires) First DRS takes the excitement out of game, of course sport needs some excitement at the end of the day. Being a cricket fan i want things happening out in the field to be simple so that the game is run smooth with minimal interuptions.

    I totally agree with M S Dhoni about the 5balls a over incident happened in the recent match. If that can't be picked up by technology how can we trust it for LBWs. Lets just forget about DRS, get the good old game controlled by two respected men on the field and Enjoy the cricket

  • on February 18, 2012, 7:39 GMT

    Well Played IMRAN FARHAT Keep it up Wish you all the Best

  • on February 18, 2012, 7:18 GMT

    how funny...ur getting out and ur complaining sumthing that accurately tells that ur out....

  • Antomann on February 18, 2012, 6:32 GMT

    Having just watched a lot of Aus v India without DRS, I have to say it was refreshing, leaving it up to the umpires. Sure they made mistakes, but so what? After the first Test, when all the media complained about it, everyone just got on with it and forgot that DRS even existed. It was great. I never thought I would say this, but get rid of DRS, it complicates things too much.

  • mgardizi on February 18, 2012, 5:19 GMT

    I would recommend that if Misbah wins the toss. He needs to change the batting order. Bring Afridi (1) Farhat (2) and Hafiz (3). Because Afridi can really make 40 to 50 during the 5 power play hours.

  • jmcilhinney on February 18, 2012, 4:57 GMT

    Man, people make some stupid comments. All KP said was that DRS has made it more difficult for batsmen because umpires are more likely to give batsmen out LBW. At no point did he say that DRS was bad. At no point did he say that DRS shouldn't be used. Why are all these people making comments like he did? Why do people keep making things up just so that they can have a whinge? KP specifcally said "I have had to change my game, but it's not just me" so where is he implying that DRS is not fair or that he is special or any of the other rubbish that people have posted that just isn;t true?

  • csowmi7 on February 18, 2012, 4:51 GMT

    there is no point in blaming drs. Batsman should learn to play the ball with the bat not the pads. you have been in terrible form kp. Dont make excuses.

  • shamlaatu on February 18, 2012, 4:49 GMT

    If we are to go by tech then we gotta go all guns and define the rules of lbw WITHOUT having the ground umpire's call to do ANYTHING with it. If half or more part of the ball is hitting leg stump, off stump, or bails, IT'S OUT, if not its NOT OUT no matter what the ground umpire says. Same goes with point of impact. If half or more part of the ball has hit the pad in line of stumps, IT'S HIT IN LINE, if not its hit ourside the line no matter what ground umpire thinks. And same goes when the ball pitches on leg stump, if half of it is withing the leg stump line it's in line, if not, it has pitched outside the leg no matter what the field umpire thinks.

  • H-Shakil on February 18, 2012, 4:47 GMT

    Brilliant advise Beige_and_blue..... u can be gr8 coach mate :D

  • HaoZaat on February 18, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    Sure, batsman should get benefit of doubt. But when the Hawk-Eye shows there is no doubt, what is KP's point? Ball clipping the bail is good enough to dislodge it. Hawk-Eye is a great leveler. Besides, KP should know, same rules apply to all batsman. Why is he so special?

  • on February 18, 2012, 4:37 GMT

    few months earlier same Pietersen made a fuss out of India's decision to not to use DRS for England tour. Now why he is feeling other way? :)

  • PACERONE on February 18, 2012, 4:28 GMT

    He is used to just sticking his foot down the wicket and was always given the benefit. no one worried about the poor bowlers.Now that it has changed he is still not able to put bat to ball while playing a simple defensive stroke.Maybe they should check his eyes.he is always trying to play to leg.He might make runs when catches are not taken.Opening the innings will not hide him from the spinners...they are opening the bowling now.No more walking down the wicket to fast bowlers.

  • nauman421 on February 18, 2012, 4:24 GMT

    So what KP wants to say that he has been scoring in the past in spite of being out at many occasions and escaping coz of no DRS.....really?

  • Ozcricketwriter on February 18, 2012, 4:10 GMT

    Wow his comments sound like he is about to be dropped. Reminds me of one Brad Haddin admitting he was out of form just before he was dropped. I imagine Pieterson doesn't have much longer unless he produces something special.

  • Beige_and_blue on February 18, 2012, 3:56 GMT

    Simple solution, KP; if you don't want to be out lbw, hit the ball with the bat.

  • Alexk400 on February 18, 2012, 3:56 GMT

    I will make a change in rule that if ball hits any part of middle stump player is out. That way we know even with resolution of Hawk eye player will be dead out.

  • short_cover on February 18, 2012, 3:15 GMT

    It appears as though umpires are giving more LBW decisions in favor of fielding side while they have reviews available. Once the reviews are exhausted, the decisions are going the batsman's way.................

  • on February 18, 2012, 3:14 GMT

    KP, do it today.. Score 150 off 100 balls..!

  • on February 18, 2012, 3:04 GMT

    Kevin put bat to ball. please don't blame DRS for your low scores. its out if its out. that's justice/ even before UDRS umpires gave out lbw's on the front foot

  • dsig3 on February 18, 2012, 2:56 GMT

    Why should batsmen get the benefit of the doubt? Its not in any rule book. For the first time in the history of cricket you have a fair umpiring system that is not naturally weighted to batsmen.

  • donda on February 18, 2012, 2:10 GMT

    Pieterson always plays cross the line and he was big success because he has long legs and used to not get out LBWs but with DRS batsmen like him are in danger.

    With DRS and especially on spin wickets only technically best batsmen can bat. Pieterson is not technically sound.

    DRS is so much harsh on batsmen and test cricket is in danger of losing it's charm if teams score 99 and still wins the test.

    DRS has to change somewhat to give some benefit out doubt to batsmen.

    On the other hand, ICC should allow bowlers to bowl 3 bouncers per over in test cricket too. To save the real test cricket.

  • on February 18, 2012, 1:38 GMT

    comeon kp!!! u are a better batsmen!!!!! u can do it!!!!!!

  • TATTUs on February 18, 2012, 1:27 GMT

    phhhhrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr..........SO now the English are making it sound like malcom marshal + ambrose combined having the qualities of left arm spinner as an added benefit!

    C'mon get on with the game.

  • jmcilhinney on February 18, 2012, 0:35 GMT

    I can only think of two reasons that England would promote KP to the top of the order and neither of them is so that they don't lose early wickets. If that was their concern then I would think that Trott would be the one to be promoted. The obvious reason is because he is an attacking batsman and he should be able to hit over the top in the early overs to take advantage of the field restrictions. The other possibility, and it's not really a nice one, is that they moved him up purely to help him find form. Maybe they thought that he'd get a chance to play himself in against pace so he'd be more ready to face spin but to move Kieswetter down the order without feeling that his replacement will genuinely do a better job doesn't seem right.

  • TRAM on February 18, 2012, 0:31 GMT

    Since there IS a percentage of inefficiency in the "extrapolation curve" of the DRS systems, a ball simply clicking the stumps should NOT be enough proof. The whole ball should be within the stump outer lines to trust the DRS. period. And Yes, agreed, umpires are now thriving under DRS and safely giving everything out. I want to see how umpires will behave if the rule is changed to: "If an umpire's decision is proven wrong thrice via DRS challenge within an year, he shall be fired".

  • jmcilhinney on February 18, 2012, 0:30 GMT

    DRS has definitely made a difference. If it has emboldened umpires to give batsmen out on close LBWs where before they would have erred on the side of caution then I think that's great. KP, like all batsmen, needs to recognise this fact and adjust. I think it may have taken a while but I think that he does recognise the fact, but he is yet to get the adjustment right. I will say that I wouldn't mind if teams didn't lose a referral when it comes back umpire's call though.

  • on February 18, 2012, 0:29 GMT

    kp should just focus on tests and give other youngsters a chance for odis

  • on February 18, 2012, 0:19 GMT

    Aleem Dar started giving lbws on the front foot for spinners as far back as 2004-5 (Herschelle Gibbs lbw to Ashley Giles in test at Johannesburg, which played a big part in England winning a brilliant test match on the last day), DRS has just made them SLIGHTLY more trigger happy. KP is using this as a bad excuse for his inability to play a forward defensive with a straight bat!!

  • jmcilhinney on February 17, 2012, 23:52 GMT

    I think some commenters are being a bit unfair here. I don't see how KP is actually complaining about DRS. He's just saying that DRS has made life harder for batsmen, which is true. He's not saying that DRS is bad because it has made life harder for batsmen. KP has said outright that he tries to get well forward to rdeucde the chance of being given out LBW but, as he has also said, umpires seem much more prepared to give a batsman out where, in the past, they may have given him the benefit of the doubt. KP is merely stating facts, not complaining or offering excuses. He recognises that he has to improve his game to deal with that. As for his saying he feels in good form, who knows whether that is really how he feels or just what he's telling the media. Does any sportsman ever admit to the media that they're in poor form? At best it's "I haven't performed well but I'm working hard in practice and I'm sure a change is just around the corner".

  • Ozzbozz on February 17, 2012, 23:42 GMT

    Only a half admission there. As Boycott amd Aggers discussed the other day on TMS, if he actually comes out and admits he has a problem with left arm spinners then maybe he could deal with his technique against them. But if he keeps sticking his head in the sand regarding this issue he'll never get over it. Also when he first arrives at the crease why he keeps dancing about on the wicket I'll never know, it's like he has ants in his pants. Kevin you don't need to score right from the get go, you are allowed dot balls.

  • on February 17, 2012, 23:25 GMT

    LBWs aren't given out (or shouldn't) when the prediction is to just clip the stumps. For a not out to be overturned the prediction has to show most of the ball is hitting. That gives a margin of error of around 1 inch, should be plenty with good technology.

  • Drew2 on February 17, 2012, 23:24 GMT

    @ZNiazi Well put. It's a lot more simple than people make it. It's the same for both sides and therefore completely fair. Batsman have had it easy over the last 30 years with better pitches, better technology in body protection, restriction of short pitch bowling and inflated averages against sub par opposition. Tendulkar, Ponting, Lara Kallis etc have had huge advantages over batsman upto the 70s. DRS is an fair system that makes batsman more accountable against bowling that would have hit the stumps. It's no surprise that certain batsman oppose it. It shouldn't be up to them whether it is used or not. For that to be allowed to happen is unprofessional and discredits the sport. There are so-called elite batsman who bat for themselves a bit too much. These are the players who are hurt most by DRS.

  • whyowhy on February 17, 2012, 23:20 GMT

    Get real KP, giving batsman the benefit of the doubt is a misnomer in cricket.... Batsman get enough protection and most of all have a bat to use not to hide beind their pads......learn to play straight and stop complaining, thank everyone for the many times you probably should have been given out and scored before DRS - your records might have been a lot worse.......

  • cricket_vijay on February 17, 2012, 22:54 GMT

    DRS makes sense only with LBW kept out.

  • heathrf1974 on February 17, 2012, 22:53 GMT

    DRS is fine, batting technique is now under scrutiny which has happened for the last fifteen years.

  • on February 17, 2012, 22:34 GMT

    Is DRS really a benefit of detriment to the game? Maybe I was wrong all along, maybe it has given umpires more courage to give LBW decisions that are clipping off stump and DRS proves they are right and that will boost their confidence even more. With Pieterson saying this about DRS, will it be that the players will ever be happy? But its the same old thing in life, no one will ever be happy whatever happens and the poor old umpire ends up being the victim as usual. "Shakes Head."

  • on February 17, 2012, 21:56 GMT

    A bad workman blames his tools.. I have no doubt KP is a good player, but saying its because of DRS or a few changes... No I think he needs to look at why he is personally havin g a slump and cant play against spin anymore.

    I hate seeing excuses like this when it clearly is not the DRS's fault.

  • JG2704 on February 17, 2012, 21:26 GMT

    re DRS , I'd say it's definitely something which bowlers are happiers with. With batsmen of the present era it is a tough learning curve - esp those who were well into their career when it all started as they've learnt to play a certain way. In the future I guess there will be different techniques taught especially re padwork. It would be interesting to see how many results we get in test matches from now on compared to previous years. My guess is that there will be much fewer draws. Also , the DRS LBW cases which went against KP were all proven to be hitting the stumps even if only by the smallest margins so although he could maybe consider himself unlucky at times they were all correct decs.These batsmen have to learn new techniques to minimise padwork etc and to me that makes for a more exciting game. How many wickets would Warne and Murali have got in todays game?

  • kkr54 on February 17, 2012, 21:24 GMT

    It is a game to be played with Bat. Pad is a protective gear. If any ball hits the pad in line with the stumps it should be given out. That will make things clear. In any case the dice is loaded against the bowlers so it will be fair. Only the height should be left to the descretion of the Umpire.

  • ZNiazi on February 17, 2012, 21:07 GMT

    Funny that if the just clips ANY stump the batsman is out BOWLED, so what if the leg ar any part of the body gets in the way... Out is OUT...simple...CHEERS

  • kumarcoolbuddy on February 17, 2012, 20:50 GMT

    Now KP understands the pain of using DRS since he has become the victim. Even AUS said sometimes back that DRS is not consistent.

  • Sports4Youth on February 17, 2012, 20:46 GMT

    Kevin Petersen is a better player than what we have seen in this series so far. One thing good for kevin is that this series is comming to an end. No point in blaming Kevin for not picking Ajmal's Doosras. Even the SL and the Indian batting line-ups failed to do that including Tendulkar. I mention this becouse SL and Indians are the best in playing spin, specially SRT. But now this ordeal will be over soon. In the SL series and in the India series there will be no Ajmal (or anything like him). Presently Pakistan have the best spin attack in the world. They have the best variety in spin. It will not be so bad hereafter. Soon we will see a very different Kevin Petersen. After all he had successfully handled Murali and Warne and many other spinners.

  • Rahulbose on February 17, 2012, 20:46 GMT

    Well he has never batted well in Sub-continent against the spinners. So DRS problems are just a nice excuse .

  • bigwonder on February 17, 2012, 20:36 GMT

    Ahah, so England batsmen has finally admitted that he was able to get way due to lack of DRS.One more reason for ECB to oppose DRS.

  • on February 17, 2012, 20:30 GMT

    I think Kevin need rest Bopara needs more chance he deserves.

  • on February 17, 2012, 19:44 GMT

    To avoid DRS, batsman only need to improve his technical skills. Its simple as that

  • Dannymania on February 17, 2012, 19:35 GMT

    Its all working out for England well now isnt it?Pakistan are definitely a tough team but it looks like its quite easy at times to get to them.The Pakistani captain just has to make sure that he makes the changes that are necessary at times.Persistence is Misbah's game.but players who dont perform should be dropped immediately.Now,pakistan have the talent to replace people like umar gul,who has obviously forgotten the art of a reverse swinging yorker.Umar Gul is the only player that i'ld want OUT of the team for the next ODI.Riaz looks fit,fast and yearning to play cricket.He should be given ample opportunities against these teams.

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  • Dannymania on February 17, 2012, 19:35 GMT

    Its all working out for England well now isnt it?Pakistan are definitely a tough team but it looks like its quite easy at times to get to them.The Pakistani captain just has to make sure that he makes the changes that are necessary at times.Persistence is Misbah's game.but players who dont perform should be dropped immediately.Now,pakistan have the talent to replace people like umar gul,who has obviously forgotten the art of a reverse swinging yorker.Umar Gul is the only player that i'ld want OUT of the team for the next ODI.Riaz looks fit,fast and yearning to play cricket.He should be given ample opportunities against these teams.

  • on February 17, 2012, 19:44 GMT

    To avoid DRS, batsman only need to improve his technical skills. Its simple as that

  • on February 17, 2012, 20:30 GMT

    I think Kevin need rest Bopara needs more chance he deserves.

  • bigwonder on February 17, 2012, 20:36 GMT

    Ahah, so England batsmen has finally admitted that he was able to get way due to lack of DRS.One more reason for ECB to oppose DRS.

  • Rahulbose on February 17, 2012, 20:46 GMT

    Well he has never batted well in Sub-continent against the spinners. So DRS problems are just a nice excuse .

  • Sports4Youth on February 17, 2012, 20:46 GMT

    Kevin Petersen is a better player than what we have seen in this series so far. One thing good for kevin is that this series is comming to an end. No point in blaming Kevin for not picking Ajmal's Doosras. Even the SL and the Indian batting line-ups failed to do that including Tendulkar. I mention this becouse SL and Indians are the best in playing spin, specially SRT. But now this ordeal will be over soon. In the SL series and in the India series there will be no Ajmal (or anything like him). Presently Pakistan have the best spin attack in the world. They have the best variety in spin. It will not be so bad hereafter. Soon we will see a very different Kevin Petersen. After all he had successfully handled Murali and Warne and many other spinners.

  • kumarcoolbuddy on February 17, 2012, 20:50 GMT

    Now KP understands the pain of using DRS since he has become the victim. Even AUS said sometimes back that DRS is not consistent.

  • ZNiazi on February 17, 2012, 21:07 GMT

    Funny that if the just clips ANY stump the batsman is out BOWLED, so what if the leg ar any part of the body gets in the way... Out is OUT...simple...CHEERS

  • kkr54 on February 17, 2012, 21:24 GMT

    It is a game to be played with Bat. Pad is a protective gear. If any ball hits the pad in line with the stumps it should be given out. That will make things clear. In any case the dice is loaded against the bowlers so it will be fair. Only the height should be left to the descretion of the Umpire.

  • JG2704 on February 17, 2012, 21:26 GMT

    re DRS , I'd say it's definitely something which bowlers are happiers with. With batsmen of the present era it is a tough learning curve - esp those who were well into their career when it all started as they've learnt to play a certain way. In the future I guess there will be different techniques taught especially re padwork. It would be interesting to see how many results we get in test matches from now on compared to previous years. My guess is that there will be much fewer draws. Also , the DRS LBW cases which went against KP were all proven to be hitting the stumps even if only by the smallest margins so although he could maybe consider himself unlucky at times they were all correct decs.These batsmen have to learn new techniques to minimise padwork etc and to me that makes for a more exciting game. How many wickets would Warne and Murali have got in todays game?