Jacques Kallis retires December 30, 2013

Benefactor, friend, family-man

While Jacques Kallis has a reputation of being aloof, of late there have been instances that showed glimpses of his other side
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Jacques Kallis was more than just a team-mate to some
Jacques Kallis was more than just a team-mate to some © Getty Images

Jacques Kallis had been an international cricketer for as many years as it takes others to go from birth to school leavers and reach the age where they get a drivers' licence and vote in the national election. After 18 years, it's no wonder he is pre-programmed to do certain things.

Taking a catch at slip is one of them, signing autographs is another. The latter was on display at a recent fan interaction. I was waiting to do an interview with Kallis and watched from the sidelines as supporters interacted with the legend. All of them were a blend of nerves and excitement. He remained cool and composed.

He signed a selection of memorabilia, he smiled for photographs, but he maintained distance. He rarely made eye contact and he did not engage in small talk. Most were so overawed to be in his presence that they shuffled past quickly, the way tourists do at a popular monument.

Once there was no one left, I stepped into the spot the supporters had occupied, notebook and pen in hand. Absentmindedly, Kallis picked up my pen and began to sign my book.

As was his routine, just after marking the first stroke, he looked up. When he realised I was not there for his signature, he stopped mid-way and gave me a sheepish grin. "Sorry, I've been doing this all day. I'm just on auto-pilot. Did you need something?"

The interview did not last long. Kallis' answers were concise but informative, so I learnt more from watching than I did from talking. What surprised me was that Kallis remained true to his reputation of being aloof, even though he had come out of his shell in recent years.

Since early 2012, four incidents stand out for the different facets of Kallis they revealed: from his generosity to his strong views, his humanity and his love of home. This is the Kallis I think I know.

****

January 2012.

South Africa were hosting a one-day series against Sri Lanka. The second match was in East London. At practice the day before, once everyone had left, Kallis remained behind. He was soon at the centre of a circle of six school boys.

They were the recipients of scholarships from his foundation and were meeting him for the first time. Naturally there were overwhelmed. Because of him, they were being educated at a leading school, Selborne College, something they would otherwise not be able to afford. Kallis hoped it would give them the best chance of either playing cricket professionally or receiving a good enough grounding to prosper in other areas. He was obviously interested in how they were getting on.

Even though it was one of the hottest days of the year, like any initial meeting, the ice still needed breaking. Kallis, being the oldest, had to do it. He had planned a question and answer session, and a net practice, but they needed prompted. "Okay, so you can ask me anything," he said. "Or is everyone too shy?"

Eventually, the questions rolled in, some about cricket, others about life. Kallis opened up, revealing things few journalists get to hear. He spoke about the quickest bowler he faced and the best spinner, why he thought sledging should still exist in the game, the thrills of the IPL and the changing nature of cricket. He left them with advice Mark Boucher confirmed two days ago neither he nor Kallis ever took themselves: "Stay away from the girls. Only cricket, and academics."

For the first time since I started covering cricket in 2007, Kallis became a human being to me. I saw his softer side and the joy he got from making a difference.

****

March 2012.

On a drizzly evening in Dunedin, after three days of the first Test between South Africa and New Zealand, Kallis was the man tasked with addressing the media. It was not a job he enjoyed, but because he was one of two centurions on the day, with the other being the captain, he had no choice.

The questions were routine. South Africa were comfortably ahead with a lead of 233 runs and seven wickers in hand and there wasn't too much to talk about, barring one thing which Kallis actually wanted to discuss.

In the penultimate over of the day, he convinced Jacques Rudolph, who eventually also went on to score a hundred, to review being given out lbw off Doug Bracewell and was proved correct because the ball had pitched outside leg stump. On being asked what prompted him to persuade Rudolph to use the technology, Kallis launched into a lengthy monologue about the DRS as a whole and made the startling claim that the overwhelming majority of players did not trust the predictive path.

He spoke with conviction and confidence to make plain his doubts about the DRS. "How accurate it is, I don't know... We are getting that right to a degree but I am not convinced how accurate it really is. I don't think there are any guys that are 100% sure that the thing is as accurate as they want to make it out to be. They keep saying it, but I'm not so sure and I think 99% of cricketers will say that."

Kallis' speech was met with a stunned silence. Even those who had covered his career from its beginnings agreed that it was the strongest sentiment Kallis had expressed. He was known as a man who just got on with things but that day he showed he also thought deeply about them, could be bothered by them and was willing to say so.

****

July 2012.

Mark Boucher suffered a horrific eye injury in South Africa's first practice match on their tour of England. Because Boucher had planned to retire after the final match of the series, it seemed his career was over.

Word filtered through that he had spent the night in a lot of pain and was awaiting surgery. Kallis had been at his side through most of it; he did not arrive with the rest of team at the ground on the second day and did not bat, because he was with Boucher.

Midway through the day, Graeme Smith called an impromptu press conference to issue Boucher's retirement statement. Kallis was with him.

I was standing directly opposite Kallis. As Smith read from a piece of paper, his voice shaking as much as the hand that held it, I looked at Kallis. He had his hands behind his back and he was focused on a point on the horizon. His eyes had glazed over but if there were tears hidden in them, he was not going to let them spill. He looked as though he was trying to be strong but he was obviously hurting.

Few would have thought they'd see weakness and Kallis side by side, but there they were. I felt for him then. At the same time, I was proud of his devotion. With a friend like him, who could go wrong?

****

October 2013.

Kallis had not been in the public eye for at least six months. After the IPL, he withdrew himself from the Champions Trophy squad on the eve on its announcement, for personal reasons. He wanted to get away from the game.

Shortly before South Africa's tour of the UAE, he recommitted to South Africa's one-day squad. It seemed his career, although in its latter stages, had some time left, especially after he spoke before the first Test in Abu Dhabi.

Kallis took the podium looking refreshed. He explained it as being the result of a much-needed break, calling it the "best thing I could have done", and filling us in on how he had spent his time. He had played a lot of golf, including the Dunhill Links Championship, he had gone to braais, he had spent time at home with his friends. In other words, he did all the things someone who is not an international sportsmen does and he enjoyed it.

Home has different meanings and holds different importance for various people. Some want to escape it, in search of adventure. Others crave home, because they enjoy its comforts. With all the time Kallis spent on the road, all the Christmases and birthdays missed, all the normal-people things he never got to do, he fell into the latter category.

When he spoke of his life in Cape Town then, even though he had only just left it, he seemed to miss it. We should have known then life outside of cricket was calling Kallis.

He answered the call on Christmas eve. Kallis called Boucher to say he'd made his decision to retire and Boucher was not surprised. He knew as soon as Kallis began questioning his enthusiasm, the time was right.

****

No one saw or heard from Kallis throughout his final Test, because he asked for privacy. His guard was back up. He seemed the single-focused person he was always painted as. But the last two years, especially, have shown there is much more to him.

Kallis' reservation, Boucher explained, is a product of his childhood. Losing his mother at a young age is what Boucher said made Kallis' early years "not exactly perfect or like other children's, especially mine". Kallis formed close bonds with his father and sister. The former passed away ten years ago, so it was up to Kallis to give the latter away at her wedding last week.

Moments like that are what those who know Kallis say he lives for. Now that he has retired from Test cricket, he will be able to enjoy many more of them. And he deserves exactly that.

Firdose Moonda is ESPNcricinfo's South Africa correspondent

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Fogu on December 30, 2013, 19:15 GMT

    Great article with an insight in to a great cricketer. Kallis was a great ambassador of cricket. If there is anyone you want to represent cricket it is Kallis. A gentleman. We have been blessed to see some genuinely great people play cricket in our generation. From Kallis, to Dravid, to Inzy. All great. in the current bunch of cricketers, Amla comes to mind as someone who will follow these great men. Wishing you peace in your retirement from test cricket, Jacques.

  • fanofcricket123 on December 30, 2013, 16:52 GMT

    Kallis, Rahul and Ricky. Their careers almost started and ended around the same time with almost equal number of Test matches and similar Test runs. It is safe to say that Kallis is the greatest cricketing all rounder of our generation, Ricky, the most successful captain of his era and Rahul, the greatest No.3 in a long time considering his prowess against pace and spin in all conditions. There is one common theme among all these 3 cricketers - great slip catchers. While, Ricky will always be the better all-round fielder, Kallis is most definitely the safest pair of hands and Rahul, the better catcher off spinners, especially in subcontinental wickets because of its uneven bounce.

    In the current generation, the youngsters who could be potential replacements in respective categories are Virat Kohli (Ricky), Faf Du Plessis (Rahul) and Ben Stokes (Kallis). This observation is made with limited sample size and based on potential shown thus far. Incredible hardwork lies in between.

  • GrindAR on January 3, 2014, 23:22 GMT

    A consistent all rounder Cricket had so far. The player of his caliber said good-bye in a simplest possible manner-Done only by him so far. Heart filled wishes for his best personal life achievements. He earned it, and showed no glimpse of weaknesses in techniques in his last match. Nobody can be a better ambassador of sport than Kallis.

  • Cricketfan23 on January 1, 2014, 6:34 GMT

    @soaf you are talking about role reversal between Sachin & Kallis, Sachin has 5 test 100s in SAF. The first 100 came when he wasn't even 20 & the last one came when he was 37. He has dominated all your SAF fast bowlers from Donald to Steyn. And just check Kallis's record against SL in SL or against Warne and you will get your answer. It was Donald who said that Sachin was the best batsman that he ever bowled to. I have never heard any other bowler say that about Kallis. I respect Kallis for being a great all-rounder but don't try to belittle Sachin just because you don't like him.

  • zarasochozarasamjho on January 1, 2014, 1:37 GMT

    All time great all-rounder!

  • Big_Chikka on December 31, 2013, 19:21 GMT

    mind blowing player, professional, spirited......could go on an on........PERFORMER at the highest levels, honestly saddened to think will never see him bat again......good luck for the next phase JK

  • sysubrceq0 on December 31, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    @soaf - playing in Indian roads is so easy - ask Ricky his average 20 that to because at last he made a 100 in his last tour otherwise an avg of 12 in indian roads aginst indian mediocre bowling. Kallis Avg in SL is 35 and in Eng also 35, where sachin scored well in all those places including SA & AUS. Kallis is a good batsman and good supporting bowler. More like a batting allrounder, no team in the world would like to have a Kallis as bowler only except India because of poor indian fast bowling. For me Kallis is Great batsman with great fitness and good supporting bowler and excellent fielder.

  • on December 31, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    mind blowing article....many unknowns are unfolded about Kallis. Kallis is simply the greatest of all in terms of human qualities or cricketing star. Cricket will miss you and obviously me too.

  • rakeshjn on December 31, 2013, 10:33 GMT

    I simply wish to have the dedication to life that Kallis had for his cricket ! Great Player ! Great Human Being ! I hope he continues as a cricket administrator helping SA cricket produce another Kallis like player..Though India lost, I am sure that every Indian fan will agree that this match belonged to Kallis and the result was too the perfect one..But India will be back ! Steyn's superb performance will not be forgotten or forgiven :)

  • on December 31, 2013, 8:41 GMT

    The fact that Tendulkar is mentioned every time Bradman, Lara, Viv, Ponting, Dravid or Kallis are discussed speaks volumes about what that man has achieved in cricket.

    Whether you like it or not, Sachin did become a massive icon of the sport. And like Brian Lara mentioned at the Lords, "There have been boxers with a better statistical records than Mohammad Ali, and there have been basketball players with better records than Michael Jordan - but when you think of boxing or basketball, you immediately think of those two. The same is true for Sachin, who unarguably has had the greatest cricketing career of all-time."

    Don't believe me? Look up the video on YouTubee.

  • Fogu on December 30, 2013, 19:15 GMT

    Great article with an insight in to a great cricketer. Kallis was a great ambassador of cricket. If there is anyone you want to represent cricket it is Kallis. A gentleman. We have been blessed to see some genuinely great people play cricket in our generation. From Kallis, to Dravid, to Inzy. All great. in the current bunch of cricketers, Amla comes to mind as someone who will follow these great men. Wishing you peace in your retirement from test cricket, Jacques.

  • fanofcricket123 on December 30, 2013, 16:52 GMT

    Kallis, Rahul and Ricky. Their careers almost started and ended around the same time with almost equal number of Test matches and similar Test runs. It is safe to say that Kallis is the greatest cricketing all rounder of our generation, Ricky, the most successful captain of his era and Rahul, the greatest No.3 in a long time considering his prowess against pace and spin in all conditions. There is one common theme among all these 3 cricketers - great slip catchers. While, Ricky will always be the better all-round fielder, Kallis is most definitely the safest pair of hands and Rahul, the better catcher off spinners, especially in subcontinental wickets because of its uneven bounce.

    In the current generation, the youngsters who could be potential replacements in respective categories are Virat Kohli (Ricky), Faf Du Plessis (Rahul) and Ben Stokes (Kallis). This observation is made with limited sample size and based on potential shown thus far. Incredible hardwork lies in between.

  • GrindAR on January 3, 2014, 23:22 GMT

    A consistent all rounder Cricket had so far. The player of his caliber said good-bye in a simplest possible manner-Done only by him so far. Heart filled wishes for his best personal life achievements. He earned it, and showed no glimpse of weaknesses in techniques in his last match. Nobody can be a better ambassador of sport than Kallis.

  • Cricketfan23 on January 1, 2014, 6:34 GMT

    @soaf you are talking about role reversal between Sachin & Kallis, Sachin has 5 test 100s in SAF. The first 100 came when he wasn't even 20 & the last one came when he was 37. He has dominated all your SAF fast bowlers from Donald to Steyn. And just check Kallis's record against SL in SL or against Warne and you will get your answer. It was Donald who said that Sachin was the best batsman that he ever bowled to. I have never heard any other bowler say that about Kallis. I respect Kallis for being a great all-rounder but don't try to belittle Sachin just because you don't like him.

  • zarasochozarasamjho on January 1, 2014, 1:37 GMT

    All time great all-rounder!

  • Big_Chikka on December 31, 2013, 19:21 GMT

    mind blowing player, professional, spirited......could go on an on........PERFORMER at the highest levels, honestly saddened to think will never see him bat again......good luck for the next phase JK

  • sysubrceq0 on December 31, 2013, 19:04 GMT

    @soaf - playing in Indian roads is so easy - ask Ricky his average 20 that to because at last he made a 100 in his last tour otherwise an avg of 12 in indian roads aginst indian mediocre bowling. Kallis Avg in SL is 35 and in Eng also 35, where sachin scored well in all those places including SA & AUS. Kallis is a good batsman and good supporting bowler. More like a batting allrounder, no team in the world would like to have a Kallis as bowler only except India because of poor indian fast bowling. For me Kallis is Great batsman with great fitness and good supporting bowler and excellent fielder.

  • on December 31, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    mind blowing article....many unknowns are unfolded about Kallis. Kallis is simply the greatest of all in terms of human qualities or cricketing star. Cricket will miss you and obviously me too.

  • rakeshjn on December 31, 2013, 10:33 GMT

    I simply wish to have the dedication to life that Kallis had for his cricket ! Great Player ! Great Human Being ! I hope he continues as a cricket administrator helping SA cricket produce another Kallis like player..Though India lost, I am sure that every Indian fan will agree that this match belonged to Kallis and the result was too the perfect one..But India will be back ! Steyn's superb performance will not be forgotten or forgiven :)

  • on December 31, 2013, 8:41 GMT

    The fact that Tendulkar is mentioned every time Bradman, Lara, Viv, Ponting, Dravid or Kallis are discussed speaks volumes about what that man has achieved in cricket.

    Whether you like it or not, Sachin did become a massive icon of the sport. And like Brian Lara mentioned at the Lords, "There have been boxers with a better statistical records than Mohammad Ali, and there have been basketball players with better records than Michael Jordan - but when you think of boxing or basketball, you immediately think of those two. The same is true for Sachin, who unarguably has had the greatest cricketing career of all-time."

    Don't believe me? Look up the video on YouTubee.

  • legfinedeep on December 31, 2013, 6:51 GMT

    Thank you for the memories, King Kallis. While others who were more flamboyant (and not necessarily more talented than you) stole the limelight, he quietly went about his business, becoming a legend without anyone even noticing. Maybe if he lived in a country where cricket was a religion he would have become a God, but I think it is just as well because a man of his no-nonsense humility would not have wanted that. He could easily have stayed on to chase records. His face is not plastered across TV screens and magazines endorsing every product that comes his way. He is just a quiet but brilliant master of the game of cricket. The only thing I found disappointing about him was the timing of his retirement. The suddenness of it. No opportunity for fanfare, for a final Test in front of his adoring Newlands faithful. Kingsmead should never ever be given a Test again after the apathetic crowds especially on Day 4 with a legend heading to a 100 and the turnout was still so poor.

  • KiwiRocker- on December 31, 2013, 5:28 GMT

    am not South African.I actually enjoy seeing South Africa lose due to Spring Boks (South African Rugby team) and All Blacks (NZ Rugby team) rivarly. However, it all changes for me when it comes to Kallis. I am his fan...I have written so many comments on CricInfo that J.Kallis should be rated higher.Offcourse, India's own 'God 'retired few months back and a comment was made again and again that Tendulya carried a weight of nation for 24 years.I respect that and agree that it is a huge achivement for a sportsman. Based on the same logic, can anyone imagine the workload of J Kallis who batted as good as any God and also managed to take 200 catches and 290 wickets? What a cricketer a..My best memory about J Kallis is his professional and humble attitude. He never foul mouthed anyone. He was never involved in any ball tampering dramas. He simply did his job with bat or ball in hand. Gary Sobers, Imran Khan( he was also a captain) and J Kallis were three best crickters ever.Thank you JK

  • on December 31, 2013, 4:05 GMT

    @hulk777 agree we shouldn't compare players, but its hard not to because we all have our favorites and arguments to support them. Don't know the bowling and catching stats of SA v Aus and Ind v Aus to add to those batting stats, but for me that is the main reason you can't compare JK and Sachin. JK was a colossus in a whole other discipline as well as being a colossus batsman. Don't get me wrong love Sachin and loved watching him destroy Aus but for me it's The quiet understated ultimate pro Jacques Kallis.

    @ Cricketfan23 I hear your argument about MOM awards, but also consider this if SA was always so good how good wiuld you have to be to stand out in a team like that? We all have lost some great players this year. Hope the youngsters can step up and become the new hero's.

  • soaf on December 31, 2013, 2:48 GMT

    @Cricketfan23:mate if there is a role reversal occur b/w sachin and kallis careers and assume they both swap their respective countries then survival in int'l cricket becomes difficult for sachin forget about performing.coz batting is a challenge in SAF from ball 1.on the other hand kallis would have broken every single record in the book by playing on these indian roads where we see substandard batsmen are making doubles and triples.so dont respect the true legend of kallis by comparing him with fake gods coz if such a comparison even somehow exist then it would be a mismatch of gigantic proportions.

  • on December 31, 2013, 1:44 GMT

    There have been good players; there were great players and then there was Kallis. This man was performance personified. He always delivered. Never a unkind word about anybody, just going about his job - i.e., blasting the opposing bowlers to all corners of the field and then taking their batting apart. His wicket tally would put many a specialist bowler to shame; and in batting he was SA'a WALL. How can we expect to see another like him? No wonder his countrymen call him "King Kalls". He truly ranks among cricket's royalty - a legend for all ages.

  • on December 30, 2013, 22:09 GMT

    I've a lot of respect for sportsmen like Mr. Kallis. He's an embodiment of sportsmanship, teamwork and has been such an inspirational icon over the years. Remarkable player and human being!

  • hst84 on December 30, 2013, 19:51 GMT

    great article ma'am !! Nice to hear about Sir Jacques life's insights from a writer like you.. Sir Kallis has been an inspiration for many especially for me, hope he goes on with the same vigor and passion for his country in his future years !!

  • InsideHedge on December 30, 2013, 19:46 GMT

    @fanofcricket123: Maybe you should call yourself "FanOfDravid". Best catcher off spinners? It's a pity we don't have statistics for dropped catches, you'll find Dravid dropped far too many catches. He also wasn't the best #3 batsman in the world, you need to take your rose tinted glasses off for Ponting wins that hands down. And that's only in this generation, there was a certain Viv Richards that batted at #3 not so long ago.

    Finally, for "Gentleman Cricketers", Dravid leaves a lot to be desired, he's not the angel that ppl like you and the media claim. His tenure as captain, siding, supporting and implementing Greg Chappell's outrageous disharmony tactics leaves a stain on Dravid's legacy. It's also no coincidence that he was performing media work practically the day after he retired. This isn't a man that was pushed out as he likes his sympathizers to claim.

  • hst84 on December 30, 2013, 19:34 GMT

    you'll always remain in our hearts Sir !! You've given SA a solid platform of success, consistency, devotion and mettle in the most strenuous of situations and hope you go on with the 2015 World Cup and play like you always do for SA !! Will definitely miss you in the Test arena !!!

  • Cricketfan23 on December 30, 2013, 19:19 GMT

    @soaf Kallis has more test MOM awards because he was part of a team that always had strong attacks so he was a part of a winning team more often. Sachin played great knocks but was let down by a poor attack so most of his knocks went in vain because bowlers win you test matches. Sachin has most MOM awards in ODIs because batsmen win you the ODIs. And lets face it, Sachin could single handedly win you ODIs and Kallis couldn't.

  • hulk777 on December 30, 2013, 18:26 GMT

    Statistics are all used to support our argument, it does not reflect the true capability. If I compare statistics of Kallis and Sachin playing against Australia in AUS where both are playing away from home and playing against a similar attack this is what I see Sachin (Runs-1809,Ave-53.2), Kallis(Runs-1254,Ave-48.23). Now will you agree sachin is better? Lets not compare anyone, each one is good and done well for their team.

  • on December 30, 2013, 17:22 GMT

    I and many experts rate kallis "one of the greatest" cricketer of all time, i know that sachin, lara, ponting are more flamboynt than kallis, but as a cricketer he is more useful to his team. he has 292 wickets also. and a record 21 man of the match awards in test matches. a true legend, we will miss you kaliis, my all time top 5 ranking is: 1) Bradman the greatest, 2) Kallis and Sobers, 3) Tendulkar and Murli, 4) Lara and Warne, 5)Viv Richard, Imran, Wasim, Ponting ,MacGrath

  • on December 30, 2013, 16:49 GMT

    In this age of hype and hyperbole, few great cricketers escape it and among them Kallis is the greatest, being a very private person whose work ethic and performance spoke more than anything. Nowadays when upstarts (especially Indian,Pakistani and Bangladeshi cricketers) behave as it they own the world after a few good performances, gentlemen cricketers like Kallis and Rahul Dravid lend balance to the game and uphold the true spirit of cricket. Hope Cricket will see more of the ilk of Kallis and Dravid.

  • Robster1 on December 30, 2013, 16:00 GMT

    The more one hears of this most private of men, the more one likes Kallis and respects him. In this age of media saturation, how very refreshing it has been to have a true legend who never sought the limelight.

  • Dougie25 on December 30, 2013, 15:59 GMT

    He will thoroughly be missed.

  • aks1987 on December 30, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Nice read. Well written and obviously Kallis is a great player. Grew up watching him bat.

  • ToTellUTheTruth on December 30, 2013, 15:37 GMT

    2013 is not a good year for die hard cricket fans. Jacques..thank you. Please continue playing IPL, so we Indian fans can still see you on the field.

  • Shishank_Dahiya on December 30, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    cricinfo will live forever just on the basis of articles like these. super article. Kallis will always be missed. He is a legend. Period.

  • soaf on December 30, 2013, 15:07 GMT

    kallis is easily the greatest player the world has ever seen and arguably the best all rounder as well.sobers also comes into context but he played in the era when cricket really revolved around few countries and didnt have the same exposure as it is enjoying now(BTW sobers vs kallis is huge debate).the all time MOM winners list showed the impact of kallis in teams win and really puts an end to sacihin vs kallis debate.sachin is one of the greats of his era but jacque is the greatest ever.in the all time MOM winners list he is in the company of greats like warne marshall and akram and who knows could be easily ahead of these legends because of his ability with both ball and bat.

  • on December 30, 2013, 14:45 GMT

    Great player and person - who will always be under rated. Even when he scored 115 in the last Test lot of people questioned the pace at which he scored. But the stats are simply too strong

  • on December 30, 2013, 14:45 GMT

    Great player and person - who will always be under rated. Even when he scored 115 in the last Test lot of people questioned the pace at which he scored. But the stats are simply too strong

  • soaf on December 30, 2013, 15:07 GMT

    kallis is easily the greatest player the world has ever seen and arguably the best all rounder as well.sobers also comes into context but he played in the era when cricket really revolved around few countries and didnt have the same exposure as it is enjoying now(BTW sobers vs kallis is huge debate).the all time MOM winners list showed the impact of kallis in teams win and really puts an end to sacihin vs kallis debate.sachin is one of the greats of his era but jacque is the greatest ever.in the all time MOM winners list he is in the company of greats like warne marshall and akram and who knows could be easily ahead of these legends because of his ability with both ball and bat.

  • Shishank_Dahiya on December 30, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    cricinfo will live forever just on the basis of articles like these. super article. Kallis will always be missed. He is a legend. Period.

  • ToTellUTheTruth on December 30, 2013, 15:37 GMT

    2013 is not a good year for die hard cricket fans. Jacques..thank you. Please continue playing IPL, so we Indian fans can still see you on the field.

  • aks1987 on December 30, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Nice read. Well written and obviously Kallis is a great player. Grew up watching him bat.

  • Dougie25 on December 30, 2013, 15:59 GMT

    He will thoroughly be missed.

  • Robster1 on December 30, 2013, 16:00 GMT

    The more one hears of this most private of men, the more one likes Kallis and respects him. In this age of media saturation, how very refreshing it has been to have a true legend who never sought the limelight.

  • on December 30, 2013, 16:49 GMT

    In this age of hype and hyperbole, few great cricketers escape it and among them Kallis is the greatest, being a very private person whose work ethic and performance spoke more than anything. Nowadays when upstarts (especially Indian,Pakistani and Bangladeshi cricketers) behave as it they own the world after a few good performances, gentlemen cricketers like Kallis and Rahul Dravid lend balance to the game and uphold the true spirit of cricket. Hope Cricket will see more of the ilk of Kallis and Dravid.

  • on December 30, 2013, 17:22 GMT

    I and many experts rate kallis "one of the greatest" cricketer of all time, i know that sachin, lara, ponting are more flamboynt than kallis, but as a cricketer he is more useful to his team. he has 292 wickets also. and a record 21 man of the match awards in test matches. a true legend, we will miss you kaliis, my all time top 5 ranking is: 1) Bradman the greatest, 2) Kallis and Sobers, 3) Tendulkar and Murli, 4) Lara and Warne, 5)Viv Richard, Imran, Wasim, Ponting ,MacGrath

  • hulk777 on December 30, 2013, 18:26 GMT

    Statistics are all used to support our argument, it does not reflect the true capability. If I compare statistics of Kallis and Sachin playing against Australia in AUS where both are playing away from home and playing against a similar attack this is what I see Sachin (Runs-1809,Ave-53.2), Kallis(Runs-1254,Ave-48.23). Now will you agree sachin is better? Lets not compare anyone, each one is good and done well for their team.