Australia in Sri Lanka 2011

Hawk-Eye in, Hot Spot out for Sri Lanka series

Daniel Brettig

August 10, 2011

Comments: 26 | Text size: A | A

Michael Clarke requests a referral, South Africa v Australia, 3rd Test, 4th day, Cape Town, March 22, 2009
Players will be able to appeal against lbw decisions during the Tests and ODIs in Sri Lanka © AFP
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Technology's place in reviewing the decisions of umpires became murkier still as it was confirmed Sri Lanka's limited-overs and Test series against Australia will employ a version of the DRS that utilises Hawk-Eye technology but not Hot Spot.

This arrangement, brought about by a combination of the two boards' acceptance of ball-tracking technology and the unavailability of Hot Spot cameras for the series in Sri Lanka, is almost completely the inverse of the configuration used by England and India in their concurrent Test series.

India's acceptance of Hot Spot but not ball-tracking or pitch-mapping has meant that lbw appeals cannot be referred during the series, while caught behinds and close catches are more thoroughly scrutinised.

The Sri Lankan board's position on the use of technology in the series has been fluid, pending costs and hardware availability, and the final implementation of the system means that lbw decisions will be the most keenly observed.

Final confirmation of the use of one technology but not the other arrived after the match referee Javagal Srinath's pre-series meeting with the two captains, Tillakaratne Dilshan and Michael Clarke. Srinath will preside over the limited-overs matches, in which each team is granted one unsuccessful decision review per innings, before Chris Broad takes over for the Tests, where two unsuccessful reviews per innings are permitted.

The DRS and its inconsistent use by various countries will continue during the Australian summer. New Zealand are scheduled to play two Tests against the hosts and will agree to the employment of all available technology for the series, before India's arrival will mean the removal of lbw reviews and ball-tracking.

Elsewhere the one-off Test between Zimbabwe and Bangladesh in Harare did not employ the DRS for reasons of cost, a problem that will persist so long as the technology is funded by broadcasters and host boards without recourse to a central fund or sponsorship.

Daniel Brettig is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by Sri1967 on (August 12, 2011, 15:25 GMT)

Sri Lanka has always supported the games governing body's decisions. They were the first to accept UDRS. Hats off to you SL & AUS for accepting UDRS to get more fair decisions.

Posted by Dashgar on (August 12, 2011, 2:08 GMT)

I really hope this UDRS will be gone soon, it creates so much more trouble than it's worth, and when it's not there like in the recent Zim vs Bang test there were no problems at all.

Posted by   on (August 12, 2011, 2:07 GMT)

@jonesy2, your comment lacks sufficient reason to justify its own claims. To call the hot Spot "completely inaccurate and unreliable" constitutes a severe lack of critical thinking ability. Simply because a sound registers in a small percentage of incidents where no spot is visible hardly goes a far enough distance for the system to be rendered as you deduce. It simply shows that there is no perfect system, and that this is the closest one could possibly get at this point to a robust system that can be used to reduce bad decisions. If it is "completely inaccurate and unreliable" as you claim, then compared to what would it be completely inaccurate and unreliable? If you have a better idea, let's see it. If not, then you are not providing a solution, and therefore should have offered your silence on the matter.

Posted by   on (August 11, 2011, 17:57 GMT)

I hate to say it, but I agree with India. The only time an LBW should be reviewed is when a batsman has hit it, which hotspot reveals. Speculative reviews by batsman in the hope that the ball is missing the stumps really do undermine the on field umpires and are a blight on the modern game. And if an umpire misses an obviously plumb LBW, I don't think you need hawkeye to see that.

Posted by VEXXZ on (August 11, 2011, 10:27 GMT)

Some CAMERAS cannot be used for some games and some Countries . You must have a POLICY across the board .When the West Indies were going STRONG with the Fast Bowlers All every one came together and took away their strength by interducing the 2 bouncer rule per over . ICC, lets have DSR across the board once and for all . PERIOD.

Posted by jonesy2 on (August 11, 2011, 8:42 GMT)

good, hot spot is completely inaccurate and unreliable, eg ian bell being out catch behind in the ashes but surviving, thats just one example.

Posted by nssmac on (August 11, 2011, 8:07 GMT)

Once again 2 views about DRS, I think ICC should be strict enough to implement the rules if they have too. I Just don't understand why BCCI is completely against of using the system. Sri Lanka should be appreciated for the supporting the system. I just give fair decisions to both the playing teams. May God Give Brains for the teams against using the Complete UDRS systems.

Posted by mensan on (August 11, 2011, 8:04 GMT)

Australia must insist use of full UDRS for India home series later this year. If India refuses, they should cancel their tour and invite Pakistan instead.

Posted by   on (August 11, 2011, 7:45 GMT)

Techincally , It isn't the same form of Cricket played all over thw World !

Posted by   on (August 11, 2011, 7:41 GMT)

I hate to say it, but I agree with India. The only time an LBW should be reviewed is when a batsman has hit it, which hotspot reveals. Speculative reviews by batsman in the hope that the ball is missing the stumps really do undermine the on field umpires and are a blight on the modern game. And if an umpire misses an obviously plumb LBW, I don't think you need hawkeye to see that.

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Daniel Brettig Assistant editor Daniel Brettig had been a journalist for eight years when he joined ESPNcricinfo, but his fascination with cricket dates back to the early 1990s, when his dad helped him sneak into the family lounge room to watch the end of day-night World Series matches well past bedtime. Unapologetically passionate about indie music and the South Australian Redbacks, Daniel's chief cricketing achievement was to dismiss Wisden Almanack editor Lawrence Booth in the 2010 Ashes press match in Perth - a rare Australian victory that summer.
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