Bangladesh v Australia, World T20, Group 2, Mirpur April 1, 2014

Late win can't hide Australia's shortcomings

The sight of Aaron Finch and David Warner marauding their way to a 98-run opening stand hint at what might have been for Australia, but the selection against Bangladesh highlighted their issues
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Australia's first win at the World T20, a tournament they entered as one of the favourites, only increased the sense of disappointment. Cricket Australia has been beguiled by the shortest format, giving the Big Bash League a prime slot at the heart of the season, while Australians are the most in-demand of foreigners invited to partake in IPL ambrosia. Yet success in this tournament remains elusive.

Beating Bangladesh at least prevented Australia from being bracketed alongside UAE as the only winless teams in the entire competition. After the conquests of recent months, and the burgeoning optimism of the Darren Lehmann era, this was the smallest of beer.

Even in this match, comfortably won as it was, there were signs that Australia's T20 cricket has some way to go before anyone will back them heavily again. The next global tournament is on the subcontinent once more, in India in two years' time, and the deficiencies batting against spin that were liberally riffed upon in that country this time last year will face insistent probing.

The sight of Aaron Finch and David Warner marauding their way to a 98-run opening stand - after previous associations worth 4, 33 and 13 - hinted at what might have been this time around. Such a platform could perhaps have been the difference in narrow but ultimately decisive defeats to Pakistan and West Indies. Both batted with the sort of freedom and aggression that characterised a summer of brutality during the Ashes and subsequent limited-overs larks.

Ah, but that was only against England, you might say, not even as good as the Dutch, on the evidence of their last game. And this domination was only against the more modest spin resources of Bangladesh, rather than Saeed Ajmal, Sunil Narine or R Ashwin, and in a dead game, too. Nevertheless, it gave Finch pause to reflect.

"I think myself and Davey have both been very disappointing in this tournament as a partnership," he said. "What makes it even more disappointing is that it took until the final game to have a big partnership, and to be out of the tournament already. To not be able to progress and then provide a good start for the side was very disappointing and something that is frustrating. We've both come here with high expectations of each other and ourselves. I don't think we played particularly well in the first three games and in such a short format you have to rely on your openers heavily and we didn't do that. So we take a lot of responsibility."

Finch and Glenn Maxwell were Australia's only significant contributors with the bat but there were problems elsewhere. Unusually lackadaisical in the field - an aspect of the game so central to the Lehmann revival - there were further discrepancies against Bangladesh, such as Doug Bollinger's defeatist flop at fine leg in a failed attempt to prevent four. Brad Haddin, having put in an unstinting shift since November, at least had an excuse for a tired miss off Dan Christian's slow bouncer.

With the ball, only Nathan Coulter-Nile enhanced his reputation and he was the pick of the attack against Bangladesh, who were allowed to make their highest score in seven innings at this tournament. The decision not to field a specialist spinner, although justified by Finch, was suggestive that Australia were unwilling or unable to properly adapt to the conditions. Brad Hogg played just one game, while James Muirhead was also given limited opportunities, drawing criticism from Shane Warne in his TV commentary role.

"I think the selection they've got wrong," Warne said. "I know their strength is fast bowling but in these conditions we've seen the wicket turn. Brad Hogg is a pretty experienced bowler, he didn't bowl as well as he would have liked. Young Muirhead, he's going to bowl a few bad balls every now and again but when he lands them he's good. I think they could have gone in with both those spinners, they've got guys like Watson and Maxwell as well. They could have mixed and matched a bit better.

Finch, however, backed up the decision to continue battering away with the quicks. "Bangladesh are very good players of spin and in these conditions they probably haven't been exposed to the pace as often," he said. "I think that that was absolutely the right decision to make. Both our legspinners are very attacking, in Hogg and Muirhead, so if that doesn't work it becomes a situation where you don't really have much to fall back on."

The presence of Mitchell Johnson would certainly have augmented such a strategy but the adherence to it with Bollinger as an unlikely-for-like replacement erred towards dogmatism.

Almost half of Australia's squad, including Finch, Warner and Coulter-Nile, will head on to the IPL to extend their tutorial on subcontinental pitches before an interregnum and a return to international competition against Pakistan in the UAE in October. Success in franchise leagues may plump reputations and bank balances but it will not make up for another World T20 that has passed Australia by.

"I think we've let ourselves down in all three disciplines over the first couple of games," Finch said. "And in such a short format like this that really comes back to haunt you quickly. When you have games back-to-back like this, momentum is really crucial. And we probably let that slip in the West Indies game. When we got to the India game we were out of the tournament. It's very disappointing. We came here with hopes to win the competition and we're going home with nothing."

Alan Gardner is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY PrasPunter on | April 7, 2014, 8:31 GMT

    As an Aussie fan, I would be concerned only we had lost a test-series. Haven't we just won the Ashes 5-0 and beat the world's best test team after 6 years ? So why fret about losing a t20 tournament ? I wouldn't want to see the likes of Steve Smith wasting their time playing limited overs games. Move on.

  • POSTED BY pitch_it_up on | April 3, 2014, 18:22 GMT

    I just loved it the way the WI celebrated the victory over the Aussies! They deserve it. With due respect to their fighting skills, Aussies have a long way to go in developing a sporting spirit. Thanks to them, we have this so called 'sledging' as par of Cricket, and to make it worse they eulogize it by giving it a term - 'Mental Disintegration'! I believe, a true sportsman enjoys competing, playing in the right spirit, and giving due respect to the opposition. Remember, its not a war!

  • POSTED BY Jagger on | April 3, 2014, 7:33 GMT

    @Wefinishthis - We already have a wide variety of pitches. The Subcontinent doesn't so why should we change? They must drop in a few pitches with carry for once. We already provide spinning pitches in Sydney and Adelaide, in fact all our pitches spin to some degree. You watch the batsmen trying to get under a delivery in Mirpur - even Warner had to bend right down low and reach for it. That's slow and low. Nowhere near the spectacle our pitches provide. No way should we change. Our pitches are infinitely better.

  • POSTED BY espncricinfomobile on | April 2, 2014, 14:01 GMT

    Who cares about t20s let west indies play test than we will know who's better in original format n about India we all know what will happen to them next summer does anyone know what happen to England it will be same or may be worse

  • POSTED BY Protears on | April 2, 2014, 13:35 GMT

    @TheBigBoodha Yet you played a T20 series against England and a T20 series against SA in build up to the T20 World Cup they played plenty warm ups and played well in them all, after winning those series the Australian fans were cock sure of doing well in the tournament yet its ironic that settled team bowed out with straight losses. Momentum was holted by India and it was safe to say Australia didn't adapt to the conditions as a result went out.

  • POSTED BY Shaggy076 on | April 2, 2014, 11:37 GMT

    Just a T20 tournament it is a very unpredictable game and Australia chose to play an arrogant/very risky way and it didnt come off. Recent one day series in India, the last T20 world cup in Sri Lanka, one-day victories in Sri Lanka suggest that playing on the subcontinent is no issue. The batting was reckless, the bowling not sure they picked the best lot ie Starc just back from injury, Hogg and Muirhead hadnt played first class cricket for a couple of months and Bollinger a liability in the field. But having said all that we put ourselves in winning spots both against Pakistan and WI where each game was lost through one or two overs and we are that one or two overs away from the Semi FInals. Cpt.Meanstar you have conveniently left out beating the worlds best team on there home soil out of your petulant argument. I guess when we were beating Sri lanka in test cricket on home soil somehow our inability to play spin was masked too.

  • POSTED BY TheBigBoodha on | April 2, 2014, 11:05 GMT

    Protears, you do realise that this was a T20 comp, yes? Honestly, I don't think I have seen a more illogical bunch of extrapolations based on the flimsiest of relationships between ideas. Let's just try one. Australia ran out of momentum? You do realise that there were only three players from the test team who played here? What on God's Earth has momentum got to do with two different cricket teams? Momentum cannot be passed from one object to another object that it never makes contact with.

    Ah, now back to the real world.

  • POSTED BY Protears on | April 2, 2014, 10:40 GMT

    Did someone call Mitchell Johnson a bowler for all conditions? of his 250 wickets 200 are in Australia and like 37 in South Africa, where conditions are hard and bouncing and Mitchell is in the full moon phase he is destructive but like the full moon it goes away for a long time and he is distinctly ineffective, something like 20 wickets everywhere else is indicative of that.

    Australia ran on momentum and the momentum kinda ran out. If Australia are basing dominance on Johnson, Harris and Warner, its going to get very ugly fast. The other "talents" Starc took a pummeling in India and England, Pattingson is something to work with, Cummins came and went and never will again, Lyon is lol makes you wonder how he got a hundred wickets, and the rest are unproven at international level. I am very much waiting for the India tour of Australia, as poor as India are abroad I believe if they leave Ashwin out they will have a chance. Amit Mishra anyone?

  • POSTED BY Wefinishthis on | April 2, 2014, 10:39 GMT

    Like I've said before, we need to turn Marrara stadium in Darwin into a dusty clay minefield exactly like in India and play regular shield and T20 games there to develop our batsmen's ability against spin as well as improving our spinner's ability in exploiting assisting conditions. As Bangladesh and other new subcontinent teams become more competitive, we're going to have to expect to be playing more games on such tracks, so we need to suck it up and learn to play them at their own game. Australian batsmen are great in bouncy, seaming tracks, but spin and reverse swing leave us bewildered. I can only see this changing if we introduce such a pitch in Australia's highest-level competitions. Who knows, we could even make subcontinent selections based purely on player's records on this ground instead of their overall Australian records.

  • POSTED BY punterdgr8 on | April 2, 2014, 9:27 GMT

    no way michael clarke would have lost that odi series in india or the first two matches in the wc.the fact is bailey is a man who looks clueless while captaining.aus needs a brash man like punter or pup not some bailey.how on earth is he praised for his captaincy?ppl must stop lookin at the 4-0 hiding in india,that won't happen the next time round but aussies need to pick lyon,sok and other spinners on sub-continental tracks.the likes of our very avg spinners look menacing in our familiar conditions like ashwin,jadeja says it all,although have to agree ozha,harbhajan,kumble and mishra are/were great.eng did it with monty(yes) and swann with excellent batting from cook.i'm sure clarke can play that role here and a davie warner with his priorities set right can do the job for aus.also stevie smith,a sedate doolan,the phenomenal MJ and ryano can boost their performances.from a hardcore indian aussie fan!!!

  • POSTED BY PrasPunter on | April 7, 2014, 8:31 GMT

    As an Aussie fan, I would be concerned only we had lost a test-series. Haven't we just won the Ashes 5-0 and beat the world's best test team after 6 years ? So why fret about losing a t20 tournament ? I wouldn't want to see the likes of Steve Smith wasting their time playing limited overs games. Move on.

  • POSTED BY pitch_it_up on | April 3, 2014, 18:22 GMT

    I just loved it the way the WI celebrated the victory over the Aussies! They deserve it. With due respect to their fighting skills, Aussies have a long way to go in developing a sporting spirit. Thanks to them, we have this so called 'sledging' as par of Cricket, and to make it worse they eulogize it by giving it a term - 'Mental Disintegration'! I believe, a true sportsman enjoys competing, playing in the right spirit, and giving due respect to the opposition. Remember, its not a war!

  • POSTED BY Jagger on | April 3, 2014, 7:33 GMT

    @Wefinishthis - We already have a wide variety of pitches. The Subcontinent doesn't so why should we change? They must drop in a few pitches with carry for once. We already provide spinning pitches in Sydney and Adelaide, in fact all our pitches spin to some degree. You watch the batsmen trying to get under a delivery in Mirpur - even Warner had to bend right down low and reach for it. That's slow and low. Nowhere near the spectacle our pitches provide. No way should we change. Our pitches are infinitely better.

  • POSTED BY espncricinfomobile on | April 2, 2014, 14:01 GMT

    Who cares about t20s let west indies play test than we will know who's better in original format n about India we all know what will happen to them next summer does anyone know what happen to England it will be same or may be worse

  • POSTED BY Protears on | April 2, 2014, 13:35 GMT

    @TheBigBoodha Yet you played a T20 series against England and a T20 series against SA in build up to the T20 World Cup they played plenty warm ups and played well in them all, after winning those series the Australian fans were cock sure of doing well in the tournament yet its ironic that settled team bowed out with straight losses. Momentum was holted by India and it was safe to say Australia didn't adapt to the conditions as a result went out.

  • POSTED BY Shaggy076 on | April 2, 2014, 11:37 GMT

    Just a T20 tournament it is a very unpredictable game and Australia chose to play an arrogant/very risky way and it didnt come off. Recent one day series in India, the last T20 world cup in Sri Lanka, one-day victories in Sri Lanka suggest that playing on the subcontinent is no issue. The batting was reckless, the bowling not sure they picked the best lot ie Starc just back from injury, Hogg and Muirhead hadnt played first class cricket for a couple of months and Bollinger a liability in the field. But having said all that we put ourselves in winning spots both against Pakistan and WI where each game was lost through one or two overs and we are that one or two overs away from the Semi FInals. Cpt.Meanstar you have conveniently left out beating the worlds best team on there home soil out of your petulant argument. I guess when we were beating Sri lanka in test cricket on home soil somehow our inability to play spin was masked too.

  • POSTED BY TheBigBoodha on | April 2, 2014, 11:05 GMT

    Protears, you do realise that this was a T20 comp, yes? Honestly, I don't think I have seen a more illogical bunch of extrapolations based on the flimsiest of relationships between ideas. Let's just try one. Australia ran out of momentum? You do realise that there were only three players from the test team who played here? What on God's Earth has momentum got to do with two different cricket teams? Momentum cannot be passed from one object to another object that it never makes contact with.

    Ah, now back to the real world.

  • POSTED BY Protears on | April 2, 2014, 10:40 GMT

    Did someone call Mitchell Johnson a bowler for all conditions? of his 250 wickets 200 are in Australia and like 37 in South Africa, where conditions are hard and bouncing and Mitchell is in the full moon phase he is destructive but like the full moon it goes away for a long time and he is distinctly ineffective, something like 20 wickets everywhere else is indicative of that.

    Australia ran on momentum and the momentum kinda ran out. If Australia are basing dominance on Johnson, Harris and Warner, its going to get very ugly fast. The other "talents" Starc took a pummeling in India and England, Pattingson is something to work with, Cummins came and went and never will again, Lyon is lol makes you wonder how he got a hundred wickets, and the rest are unproven at international level. I am very much waiting for the India tour of Australia, as poor as India are abroad I believe if they leave Ashwin out they will have a chance. Amit Mishra anyone?

  • POSTED BY Wefinishthis on | April 2, 2014, 10:39 GMT

    Like I've said before, we need to turn Marrara stadium in Darwin into a dusty clay minefield exactly like in India and play regular shield and T20 games there to develop our batsmen's ability against spin as well as improving our spinner's ability in exploiting assisting conditions. As Bangladesh and other new subcontinent teams become more competitive, we're going to have to expect to be playing more games on such tracks, so we need to suck it up and learn to play them at their own game. Australian batsmen are great in bouncy, seaming tracks, but spin and reverse swing leave us bewildered. I can only see this changing if we introduce such a pitch in Australia's highest-level competitions. Who knows, we could even make subcontinent selections based purely on player's records on this ground instead of their overall Australian records.

  • POSTED BY punterdgr8 on | April 2, 2014, 9:27 GMT

    no way michael clarke would have lost that odi series in india or the first two matches in the wc.the fact is bailey is a man who looks clueless while captaining.aus needs a brash man like punter or pup not some bailey.how on earth is he praised for his captaincy?ppl must stop lookin at the 4-0 hiding in india,that won't happen the next time round but aussies need to pick lyon,sok and other spinners on sub-continental tracks.the likes of our very avg spinners look menacing in our familiar conditions like ashwin,jadeja says it all,although have to agree ozha,harbhajan,kumble and mishra are/were great.eng did it with monty(yes) and swann with excellent batting from cook.i'm sure clarke can play that role here and a davie warner with his priorities set right can do the job for aus.also stevie smith,a sedate doolan,the phenomenal MJ and ryano can boost their performances.from a hardcore indian aussie fan!!!

  • POSTED BY ScottStevo on | April 2, 2014, 8:47 GMT

    @TheBigBhooda, exactly! For some reason, questioning the author finds your post moderated - but my argument was along your lines. In our recent limited overs cricket in India I think the 297 was the lowest total we made and twice we made 350. In the one T20I we played, we scored over 200! Albeit, we managed to lose most of these! That would suggest we need to learn to bowl better and have much better tactics when defending totals in sub continent conditions, rather than this myth that Aus cannot bat in sub continent conditions in limited overs cricket. In test cricket in India (and I stress IN INDIA), fine, I'd accept that our batting (especially in the last series) is dire and needs monumental improvement. However, so too our bowling options/choices and tactics, as I fear even if we do manage to post middle of the road scores, we'd still get humped.

  • POSTED BY on | April 2, 2014, 8:44 GMT

    Australia's success in the last few months has depended so much on an "in form" Johnson. They were exposed this time.

  • POSTED BY Vindaliew on | April 2, 2014, 7:19 GMT

    When will teams learn that no matter how good your quicks are, when you go to the subcontinent you really need to have spin options? I recall in 1993 when England went to India and decided to bring their quicks, rationalising that maybe India would be weak against pace, and left Tufnell at home. After three maulings in the Test series, the part-time offspin of Graeme Hick netted the most wickets at the best average (and coincidentally the highest number of runs, the highest score and the highest average on the English side). The quicks just couldn't get the ball to do anything off the pitch. Hick wasn't nearly as good as some of the spin options Australia have these days, and as Warney said, the selection was totally wrong.

  • POSTED BY muzika_tchaikovskogo on | April 2, 2014, 5:01 GMT

    Australia, like nearly every other team right now, is unstoppable in familiar conditions and pretty ordinary elsewhere. Most worryingly, only two of their younger players have made a significant impact in recent times: Warner (check his record outside Australia & South Africa) and Smith.

  • POSTED BY on | April 2, 2014, 4:47 GMT

    The simple fact is that Australia could, and probably should have won their games against Pakistan and WI. They ended up being decided in the latter stages by some crucial moments. That is different from being outclassed or thrashed or simply not good enough. The loss to India was disappointing, but they were fresh from Pakistan having knocked them out of the tournament by beating Bangladesh so they had nothing to play for.

  • POSTED BY on | April 2, 2014, 4:23 GMT

    I think people are confusing formats here. The longer the game is, the better Australia are as a team at the moment. I wouldn't back Pakistan or Windies to win against Australia in longer formats consistently with the bowling attack they have with Johnson leading in any condition. Starc proved to be a disappointment with his temperment. He reminded me of a old Johnson whose shoulder shrugged at the slightest hint of pressure. The skill is there. Just the mind set is not right. Bailey is not as in your face as Clarke.

  • POSTED BY Not_Another_Keybored_Expert on | April 2, 2014, 2:23 GMT

    @ Neanderthal you say "Any team winning in their own conditions needs to be taken with a pinch of salt" and then you claim Aus needs to go back home to flat tracks to score runs, have you already forgotten Oz's win in SA? If you have let me refresh your memory, David warner scored something like 550 runs in the series on low swinging and seaming wickets granted they have a lot to learn against spin but it proves your theory false.

    @ Cpt.Meanster even with AUS weakness against spin they still posted big scores against Pakistan and the WI, they were in a position to win both games but fell short, Australia's problem was their tactics, they seem to think if they stack the team with very attacking batsman that they will be able to either post an unobtainable target or that they can chase anything down, their bowling just seems to be an afterthought.

  • POSTED BY David_Bofinger on | April 2, 2014, 1:21 GMT

    Was it really "a tournament they entered as one of the favourites"? Australia's never been good on the subcontinent, or at T20. This result shouldn't be a surprise.

  • POSTED BY ToneMalone on | April 2, 2014, 0:49 GMT

    Agree with Warne: Australia needed to accept the conditions and play their two specialist spinners (I think from day one of the tournament). Probably didn't help that both Brad Hogg and James Muirhead are tailenders, and with Doug Bollinger in for Mitch Johnson, that would've made a long tail. IMHO it's better to have the right bowling attack and accept an extra tailender - the specialist batsmen needed to take more responsibility. Too many pre-meditated shots and needless wickets proved costly for Australia, they really should've won the first two matches.

  • POSTED BY MinusZero on | April 1, 2014, 23:25 GMT

    It isn't much of a consolation given that it was Bangladesh they beat. Why don't they get warnie to bowl to them in the nets?

  • POSTED BY TheBigBoodha on | April 1, 2014, 22:50 GMT

    Neanderthal, Austalia scored 297+ in all five games in the ODI series vs India. They scored 170+ twice here in the T 20 (effectively three times, as they had three overs to go in the last game and got 158 - add 30 odd if innings complete). They posted 200 vs NZ in the warm up game. So we have 9/10 recent games in the subcontinent where Australia posted BIG totals. Now look how many teams posted low or moderate scores in this WC competition!

    But we are supposed to believe that the one bad game vs India represents divine truth, when clearly the mindset of the team had been affected by the news that they were eliminated from the comp a few minutes before the game started.

    I'll draw my conclusions from the 90% of the data, not the 10% in special circumstances.

    Many other teams had an equally uneven batting history in this comp. SA, WI, PAK, NZ... One or two players scoring, the rest failing. Why aren't we analysing those teams to death?

  • POSTED BY electric_loco_WAP4 on | April 1, 2014, 22:41 GMT

    Lot of comments hyping up IPL.No doubt it is big in its own right.But the no.1 league in the world is Big Bash,IPL's not a patch on.BBL has taken off in past 2 seasons or so,is getting bigger,more successful.Crowds,viewership,quality of cricket the proof.

  • POSTED BY VivGilchrist on | April 1, 2014, 20:50 GMT

    I hope we learn from this as re the Pakistan series in the UAE and pick a purpose built squad for the conditions. Lyon and OKeefe must bowl in tandem. Johnson and Harris ( if fit) taking the new ball, with Watson and Smith as back up. Australia must pick a number 3 that can play spin.

  • POSTED BY neanderthal on | April 1, 2014, 18:26 GMT

    This Australia team's batting is abysmal in spinning conditions and that's true in tests as well. Their current test record is 8-0 in India. It seems any win by any team these days in their own conditions need to be taken with a pinch of salt. I don't expect Finch, Warner etc to ever get better at playing spin. They need to get back to the flat tracks of Adelaide to get runs.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 18:22 GMT

    T20 is much more of a gamble than other formats. If a particular team doesn't do well in a tournament it doesn't mean much

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 18:20 GMT

    Australia had only one bad game, the games against pak and wi were very close. in a shorter format, luck plays a huge factor. Those critizing australia are being too harsh. They are an excellent t20 team in my opinion. Only a matter of time before they win something major.

  • POSTED BY correctcall on | April 1, 2014, 17:53 GMT

    Three T20 World Cups in a row on the Sub Continent - indicates the influence of the President Elect of the ICC - after all he has to win something, sometime to avoid total humiliation away from home.

  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | April 1, 2014, 17:35 GMT

    @Mihil Ranathunga: Not so sure about your point. However, the reason why you see a lot of Aussies taking part in the IPL is because of their availability for the whole season. Same can be said about the South Africans who are a southern hemisphere side. Plus, Australia has produced many coaches, trainers etc who provide valuable back room assets to the franchises. Last but not least, there is still some hangover in the minds of many Indians about the glory days of Australian cricket when they used to win everything pretty much. While this current Aussie team is far from anything their predecessors were, the Indian public simply admires them for their professionalism and approach towards cricket. Also, the IPL pays well. Who can turn down such offers ?

  • POSTED BY ScottStevo on | April 1, 2014, 17:19 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, we also preyed on South Africa, who murdered your lot in limited overs stuff without even breaking a sweat. Have you ever beaten ANY teams away from home? We may have troubles on slow , low, turners, but India can't even beat NZ in ODIs on pacy tracks. Yet, here you are saying we're arrogant. Funny how short your memories truly are. Good for you, your in the semi's. We'll see how you go against a depleted Eng side in the summer before I even start to worry about the impending whitewash you're going to be handed when you get to Australia.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 17:18 GMT

    In this tournement, Australia did not play well and are out of it..fair enough. yes they need to get better at playing spin bowling if they are to have a chance..but, to make fun and say they need to play England all the time is not acknowledging the fact - last time they played SL in SL, they WON the series, and have just beaten SA IN SA..not just beat England in ashes at home..

  • POSTED BY xtrafalgarx on | April 1, 2014, 17:16 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster: Win a test then celebrate mate. T20 is hardly a yardstick to judge teams by, you blokes lost in India and NZ, you haven't won a test away from home in over 2 years.

    Australia is ranked above India in tests and Odi's, until you win as many world cups and test series as Australia, I'd be shutting up. India hadn't even made the semi's for T20 is over 5 years, so you have got a lot of nerve to suggest than India are a patch on Aus.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 16:49 GMT

    IPL call Aussie players not because they are talented..Indians like to be happy by seeing aussies doing chores for them. When time passes even bitter becomes sweet..

  • POSTED BY Jagger on | April 1, 2014, 16:47 GMT

    Top order batsmen should not be getting bowled by a full toss. Us mortals can do that, we don't need to pay to see it.

  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | April 1, 2014, 16:46 GMT

    They are just an average team who preyed on an insipid England outfit. If you take away Mitch Johnson, this Aussie team is a joke. Finch, Warner and Maxwell are all sloggers at best. They cannot play quality spin bowling on sub continental pitches. The good thing about T20 is that it masks those weaknesses to a certain extent. So you will get the odd 30 or 50 from an Aussie batsmen in these kind of tournaments but overall, their inability to counter spin will expose them and that's what happened. The better teams got the better of the Aussie team in this tournament. Sadly, we can't have them play England in every game in order to win the World T20 lol.

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  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | April 1, 2014, 16:46 GMT

    They are just an average team who preyed on an insipid England outfit. If you take away Mitch Johnson, this Aussie team is a joke. Finch, Warner and Maxwell are all sloggers at best. They cannot play quality spin bowling on sub continental pitches. The good thing about T20 is that it masks those weaknesses to a certain extent. So you will get the odd 30 or 50 from an Aussie batsmen in these kind of tournaments but overall, their inability to counter spin will expose them and that's what happened. The better teams got the better of the Aussie team in this tournament. Sadly, we can't have them play England in every game in order to win the World T20 lol.

  • POSTED BY Jagger on | April 1, 2014, 16:47 GMT

    Top order batsmen should not be getting bowled by a full toss. Us mortals can do that, we don't need to pay to see it.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 16:49 GMT

    IPL call Aussie players not because they are talented..Indians like to be happy by seeing aussies doing chores for them. When time passes even bitter becomes sweet..

  • POSTED BY xtrafalgarx on | April 1, 2014, 17:16 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster: Win a test then celebrate mate. T20 is hardly a yardstick to judge teams by, you blokes lost in India and NZ, you haven't won a test away from home in over 2 years.

    Australia is ranked above India in tests and Odi's, until you win as many world cups and test series as Australia, I'd be shutting up. India hadn't even made the semi's for T20 is over 5 years, so you have got a lot of nerve to suggest than India are a patch on Aus.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 17:18 GMT

    In this tournement, Australia did not play well and are out of it..fair enough. yes they need to get better at playing spin bowling if they are to have a chance..but, to make fun and say they need to play England all the time is not acknowledging the fact - last time they played SL in SL, they WON the series, and have just beaten SA IN SA..not just beat England in ashes at home..

  • POSTED BY ScottStevo on | April 1, 2014, 17:19 GMT

    @Cpt.Meanster, we also preyed on South Africa, who murdered your lot in limited overs stuff without even breaking a sweat. Have you ever beaten ANY teams away from home? We may have troubles on slow , low, turners, but India can't even beat NZ in ODIs on pacy tracks. Yet, here you are saying we're arrogant. Funny how short your memories truly are. Good for you, your in the semi's. We'll see how you go against a depleted Eng side in the summer before I even start to worry about the impending whitewash you're going to be handed when you get to Australia.

  • POSTED BY Cpt.Meanster on | April 1, 2014, 17:35 GMT

    @Mihil Ranathunga: Not so sure about your point. However, the reason why you see a lot of Aussies taking part in the IPL is because of their availability for the whole season. Same can be said about the South Africans who are a southern hemisphere side. Plus, Australia has produced many coaches, trainers etc who provide valuable back room assets to the franchises. Last but not least, there is still some hangover in the minds of many Indians about the glory days of Australian cricket when they used to win everything pretty much. While this current Aussie team is far from anything their predecessors were, the Indian public simply admires them for their professionalism and approach towards cricket. Also, the IPL pays well. Who can turn down such offers ?

  • POSTED BY correctcall on | April 1, 2014, 17:53 GMT

    Three T20 World Cups in a row on the Sub Continent - indicates the influence of the President Elect of the ICC - after all he has to win something, sometime to avoid total humiliation away from home.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 18:20 GMT

    Australia had only one bad game, the games against pak and wi were very close. in a shorter format, luck plays a huge factor. Those critizing australia are being too harsh. They are an excellent t20 team in my opinion. Only a matter of time before they win something major.

  • POSTED BY on | April 1, 2014, 18:22 GMT

    T20 is much more of a gamble than other formats. If a particular team doesn't do well in a tournament it doesn't mean much