Alex Hales (Sydney Thunder)
Innings 15; Runs 543; Average 38.78; S/R 161.60

Hales sent a reminder to the England selectors of his quality with a stunning season for the Thunder. He bounced back from back-to-back golden ducks in his first three innings of the season to finish as the BBL's leading run-scorer. He made three half-centuries and a superb 110 from just 56 balls against the eventual champions Sydney Sixers in Adelaide. His strike-rate of 161.60 at the top of the order was unrivalled and a huge reason why the Thunder finished third on the table.

Josh Philippe (Sydney Sixers)
Innings 16; Runs 508; Average 31.75; S/R 149.41

The wicketkeeper-batsman is now one of the hottest properties in Australian cricket having backed up his breakout season in BBL09 with another excellent season at the top of the order for the Sixers. He was a pivotal part of their title defence scoring a blistering 95 in their first win of the season and two other match-winning performances against the Thunder and Scorchers to help secure the Sixers top spot. He is now on the verge of making his international debut for Australia in the T20 series in New Zealand.

James Vince (Sydney Sixers)
Innings 16; Runs 537; Average 38.35; S/R 143.58

Vince's first 11 innings of the season were at No.3 and were relatively lean by his high standards but his move to the top at the pointy end of the tournament brought his class to the fore. He made an important 46 against the Stars to win the Sixers the Bash Boost point that secured top spot in the final round of the season. He then torched the Scorchers in back-to-back finals scoring 98 not out and 95. He richly deserved at least one century but had to settle for Player of the Match in the BBL final and a second successive title.

Colin Munro (Perth Scorchers)
Innings 15; Runs 443; Average 31.64; S/R 128.03

The left-hander had a very consistent tournament for the Scorchers, making three consecutive half-centuries and four in five innings as the Scorchers overcame a horror start to the tournament to rocket into title contention. He batted No. 3 for the majority of the tournament but was adaptable, combining regularly with Josh Inglis outside the Powerplay. He lost a little bit of rhythm late in the tournament and was unable to have a big impact in the finals series but overall he was a valuable contributor for the runners-up.

Jordan Silk (Sydney Sixers)
Innings 14; Runs 382; Average 38.20; S/R 144.69

Silk was one of the surprise packets of the season and one of the players who really benefitted from the new Power Surge rule. Traditionally an accumulator with a career strike-rate of 124.48, he was the third-highest scorer in the Power Surge for the tournament and played a number of outstanding cameos in the difficult No. 5 role. He made a career-best 78 off 49 balls against the Hurricanes and was the Sixers safety net in the middle order combining beautifully with Dan Christian in a number of tight chases.

Daniel Christian (Sydney Sixers)
Innings 14; Runs 272; Average 34.00; S/R 182.55 | Matches 16; 15 wickets; Average 26.53; Economy rate 8.84

Like a fine wine, Christian keeps getting better with age and keeps winning trophies wherever he goes. It was a masterstroke from Sixers coach Greg Shipperd to poach the 37-year-old from the Renegades. He delivered in spades on his way to his ninth T20 title. He continued to showcase his ability to chase down any total with the bat making 61 not out against the Heat to steal an improbable victory off the final ball. His bowling in the Surge and death overs was invaluable. He showed his class in the final arresting the run-rate with his first over in a Powerplay for years before delivering his best Surge over of the tournament.

Daniel Sams (Sydney Thunder)
Innings 8; Runs 200; Average 40.00; S/R 188.67 | Matches 10; Wickets 10; Average 23.72; Econ 8.51

His season was interrupted by concussion and a hand injury but he still had a significant impact for the Thunder, especially with his rejuvenated batting where he exploited the Power Surge. His 65 off 25 balls against the Heat was breathtaking striking. His bowling wasn't quite as consistent as previous season but in this side he brings the value of the left-arm angle.

Jhye Richardson (Perth Scorchers)
Matches 17; Wickets 29; Average 16.31; S/R 7.69

The leading wicket-taker for the season, Richardson was a constant threat even if his form tailed slightly at the back-end of a long campaign. Was able to find significant swing both ways at good pace. While he remains a little hampered in the field by his shoulder, he looks primed to resume his international career on the T20 tour of New Zealand. His batting is also more than handy down the order.

Tanveer Sangha (Sydney Thunder)
Matches 15; Wickets 21; Average 18.28; S/R 8.08

The 19-year-old legpsinner was one of the breakout stars of the tournament in his first BBL season. There were some big names among his haul including Chris Lynn, Aaron Finch, Ben McDermott and Dawid Malan. His challenge will come as batsmen see more of him but the T20 tour of New Zealand will be a valuable experience.

Peter Siddle (Adelaide Strikers)
Matches 13; Wickets 19; Average 17.00; S/R 7.45

He remains a banker in the T20 format with the fourth-best economy of the season for a quick bowler to send down at least 30 overs. Took a career-best 5 for 16 against the Srikers early in the tournament. However, where he really stood out was in the Power Surge where he had far and away the best economy (7.36) of any bowler used more than twice.

Adam Zampa (Melbourne Stars)
Matches: 12; Wickets 19; Average 17.47; Econ 7.35

A hugely reliable performer in the T20 format, Zampa continued to combine wicket-taking with economy. Made the most of a poor Strikers batting display to take 5 for 17 but perhaps his standout performance was 2 for 10 off four overs against the Thunder in a spell that included 15 dot balls.

X-Factors

Chris Lynn (Brisbane Heat)
Innings 13; Runs 458; Average 35.23; S/R 154.72

Wes Agar (Adelaide Strikers)
Matches 15; Wickets 22; Average 20.77; Econ 8.35

Alex Malcolm is a freelance writer based in Melbourne