October 7, 2007

Inzamam: Pakistan's tragic hero

Thrilling strokeplay and enthralling running
260

In a curious twist of fate, as Inzamam announced his retirement, Darrell Hair was contemplating a return to umpiring international cricket. Just over a year ago, the career-ending boot was on the other's foot. Not that Inzamam wishes to dwell too long on his obstinate nemesis having diligently ignored a summons from an English court. Instead, Inzamam will wish for an exit that befits his stature as a giant of Pakistan cricket.

Comparing yourself with Imran Khan has become something of an occupational hazard for Pakistan cricketers, but I can say without fear of being struck by Shoaib Akhtar that Inzamam desired to match, perhaps surpass, his old master. This last year was meant to be the crowning glory of the way of Inzamam, cricket and religion united in a World Cup triumph. As we all know, Inzamam delivered the exact opposite of his ambitions and had to cope with the terrible death of his coach in the process. Little wonder Pakistan's most impenetrable cricketer has taken the sensible decision to slide away with a final farewell in Lahore.

Too many great Pakistan cricketers have retired without due honour and it is a welcome move by the PCB to afford Inzamam this moment of glory. He certainly deserves it. This is not a time to linger on Inzamam's failings--there will be plenty of opportunity for unemotional critique--for this is a time to consider the genius of Inzamam and hope to glimpse it one last time on the international stage.

The task will not be easy. South Africa are strong and confident. Inzamam and his middle-order deputy Mohammad Yousuf are formidable but under prepared. Pakistan's bowling plan has carried an unfortunate spin-heavy look about it, an approach that misunderstands Pakistan's strengths. In addition, those modern blights of an unsettled opening attack and an unsettling wicket-keeper remain to curse every step of Pakistan's reinvention.

Yet with Inzamam comes hope. His stupendous calm has rescued Pakistan incessantly, even when he has returned from the shadows. And memories of those last stands come rushing to mind. A final-wicket win against Australia in the last decade, another against Bangladesh in this. A valiant knock in South Africa this last winter. Every one of those innings, and many more, with Inzamam fighting against the odds, applying his mind to rescuing a lost cause, a disaster created by his fellow batsmen.

There can be few batsmen who have carried a batting line-up so consistently. For years it has seemed--and approached something close to the truth--that without Inzamam there is no Pakistan innings of substance. Only in the last 18 months has Yousuf raised himself to share his captain's burden.

Throughout all this, Inzamam has remained utterly compelling as a cricketer. Grand heroics combined with inglorious failure. A prized wicket from start to end, oblivious to pressure, situation, pomp or circumstance. Thrilling strokeplay and enthralling running. Unmoving yet unmissable. Fabulous but flabbergasting. Inzamam has won our hearts and gripped our souls.

Over the last year Inzamam has become something of a tragic hero, suffocated by the weight of his country's and his own expectations. What would he or we give for the levity of 1992? But our fates are seldom shaped for a never ending crescendo. Fortune brings happiness and just as easily desolation. Inzamam will have the dusty swirl of Multan as a companion to reflect on a magnificent career that could have been even more glorious.

But for the next five days, all Pakistan fans, and I'm sure many others, will be urging this implacable batting maestro to conjure another great exhibition of subtlety and strength. Inzamam-ul Haq, the taciturn man who revolutionised Pakistan cricket, first with his batting in a World Cup and then with his faith-based captaincy, is bidding goodbye.

I expect a cut and a pull, a forward prod, a clubbing drive. I expect a stroked beard, a trot between overs. I expect a trudge to the crease, a return that is an eternity. I expect a hand raised in farewell, a gush of tears. I expect a guard of honour, a final Bismillah in Pakistan's green. I expect a moment of sadness but also relief. And, for once, Pakistan should not expect and just allow Inzamam to breathe.

Kamran Abbasi is an editor, writer and broadcaster. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • tahir iqbal on December 23, 2007, 6:57 GMT

    Inzy was the great player of pakistan,but we didn,t cear him,we didn,t give actuall respect him.I think without this man our team is uncomeleate.We need another INZY for win next worldcup

  • Mangesh on October 14, 2007, 17:23 GMT

    I remember seeing Inzy first at WC 92. His tour de force in the semis and finals ensured that he burst onto the international cricket scene. To a spectator, Inzy's batting was lazy, graceful, energetic, forceful, delicate, fiesty and all other agreeable adjectives to describe a style that was so uniquely his own. I remember his inning at Karachi 2004 against India where almost single handedly he chased down a mammoth target. It is beyond my brief as an Indian, who is not intimately connected with the going-ons of Pakistani cricket, to comment on Inzy's captaincy and the impact it had on Pakistan cricket at large. Suffice it is to say that as a batsman it was sheer pleasure to watch him. International cricket is poorer without him.

    Walk out with your head held high Inzy. History and posterity have reserved a prominent place for you. Good on ya mate, you will be missed.

  • Muhammad Asif on October 12, 2007, 15:18 GMT

    What I have felt on this blog is that when people have nothing to say about cricket, they divert their "Akhroat" (brain) to hit in one or the other way below the belt to the rest of the bloggers. Why you don't join that kina forum where the people would undress you in the same way as you will undress them.

  • saddness on October 12, 2007, 14:36 GMT

    miandad 8032 and inzi 8030.

    no question miandad was a better batsman, but inzi will always be the second best in my books!

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 12, 2007, 14:05 GMT

    Javed Bhai,

    I think you missed the news of Lahoris abusing South Africans. You stated your disapproval of Indian Gujrati crowd. Do you have anything to say for this Pakistani crowd?

    About your remarks on India’s secularism- firstly Indians just like Pakistanis and Bangladeshis are always subjected to racism whenever they tour Australia. The remarks against Symonds were mostly made in retaliation. Secondly, Symonds has West Indian roots and as such is not like other Aussies. He is a special case and although that does not justify racism, I wonder how Pakistanis speak of him? Pakistanis abused Laxmipathy Balaji when he toured Pakistan- forget Symonds who is not even South Asian. India which features 13% Muslim population, hundreds of different languages and cultures living together happily (with only minor, almost negligible exceptions) compared to Pakistan where religious and regional discrimination is perceived by the majority to be the right thing to do. Plus, India’s Muslim cricketers do not have to change their names in order to seek acceptance within the team. A few days ago I saw on the Indian news that the entire Indian team was invited to a “dawat” at Irfan Pathan’s residence, a family of mosque-managers. In Pakistan you have a federal department of “Inter-provincial harmony” whereas India does not have an equivalent. The truth is that you can’t win the argument that Pakistan is a more stable and fair country than India. In the same way you just cannot win the argument that Inzamam is a greater player than Tendulkar.

    I have just seen Inzi get out and read Cricinfo’s commentary. He wanted to break the record in style which only led to his dismissal. In my opinion it was Allah’s will what happened because of Inzi’s mala fide intentions to play in this last match. I personally do not care who the highest run scorer for Pakistan is but one should not play to seek personal records and glory. So Inzamam plays for the country and fights until the last ball to win matches for Pakistan? What was the need to come forward and get out in such a stupid fashion when his team depended on him? So much for Inzamam’s pressure handling skills! Now you and Wasim Saqib will say, “Come on it was his last innings and he was very nervous”. Nervousness is fine but at the end of the day he just could not handle the pressure.

    You amaze me totally. You continue to ridicule Tendulkar’s supporters. He top scored against the best bowling attack in the world. What about Inzi’s running between the wickets and the times his fielding has let Pakistan down enormously in innumerable matches? Ganguly is a poor runner anyway and has been involved in many run outs, not just with Sachin.

    Cricket is not only about scoring fast. I think you have mistaken the current India Australia ODI series as a “Twenty20” tournament. As far as strike rates go Inzi’s strike rate is much below Tendulkar’s. Look at the overall strike rates of the two players. For God’s sake Javed Bhai, abandon this nonsense and think logically and rationally. Sometimes in a pressure situation you have to take the initiative and slacken the scoring rate. If Tendulkar would have played in his naturally aggressive style there would have been a chance of him being dismissed on 25, which would have let you to criticise him even more. Since you and people like Wasim Saqib feel deep hostility for Indians (I don’t think the purpose of their creation is to destroy Pakistan or Islam) no matter what Indians do, you will always interpret it negatively and feel jealous of them. So if Tendulkar plays riskily and gets out cheaply against the best bowling attack in the world, you will criticise him. If he plays defensively to stabilise the team’s pathetic situation, you will still criticise him. Forget that, even if he would have destroyed Australia’s bowling (as he has done on countless occasions) you would have said that he is a flat track bully. Since he is no God you can’t expect him to score a century with an 80+ strike rate in every innings. Also I don’t understand why so many “ifs and buts” come into play when Inzamam is compared with Tendulkar. So Inzamam is a better player “under pressure”, a better player “when playing pacers”, a better player in “those matches that Pakistan won”. What kind of nonsense is that? If you want to look beyond statistics at least provide cogent reasons for why one player is better than the other. I don’t understand the problem with you or other people defending Inzamam. When you want you can bring out statistics to say for instance that Afridi is a better player than Malik or Asim Kamal. But when statistics go against you (probably every form of batting statistics in the context of Inzi and Sachin) you start talking about “ifs and buts”. Let me compare Inzamam’s performance with Sachin, Dravid and Lara on more bowler-friendly pitches:

    Inzamam averages 31 in Australia, 43 in England, 60 in NZ and 32 in South Africa Tendulkar averages 54 in Australia, 62 in England, 42 in NZ and 40 in SA Dravid averages 57 in Aus, 65 in ENG, 65 in NZ, 34 in SA Lara averages 42 in AUS, 49 in ENG, 37 in NZ and 47 in SA

    So who is the flat track bully amongst these batsmen?

    You talk about blind men and fools. You actually think Afridi can be a permanent fixture in a Test squad. That is the height of foolishness and blindness. Javed Bhai in your response please confirm that someone impersonating as you wrote that post. You were talking about the last paragraph of my previous post. After reading your last para of the abovementioned post I actually started laughing.

    Again let me enjoy the moment while I can. The way you see it, Tendulkar’s supporters are blind fools whereas you think Afridi deserves a place in the Test side???????

    Finally let me clarify that Inzamam has been a great player and one of the best batsman Pakistan has produced. But it is folly to compare him with the batting greats around the world because even the best Pakistani batsman (Miandad) cannot compare with them.

    Jolly good stuff!

    P.s- Tendulkar is not amongst my favourite players (I don’t care what others say- people will always come out with rubbish like, “Tendulkar is your hero”) but I have respect for him. I have already said before that I don’t “like” watching Indians or Tendulkar play well and I don’t like them winning. However, what I do not understand is why most Pakistanis can’t be broad minded and admit he is a greater player than Inzi or Miandad. I personally prefer watching Dravid bat more since he works hard to build his innings and his shots are very exquisite. Ironically the reason why I like Dravid is because Tendulkar is so good- I like to see Dravid working hard and building his innings whereas it is often all too easy for Tendulkar.

  • Awas on October 12, 2007, 13:06 GMT

    Well, our one and only Inzi tried to surpass Miandad’s landmark but it wasn’t in his fate. To play a shot like that so early in his innings was madness. How many times has he got out like this against the likes of Warne and Company? He never learns not even in his last test. I was hoping when he came out to bat, it would be nice to see flashes of his brilliant stroke making for one last time but it was never to be. Borrowing Javed A Khan’s phrase.......what a pupoo he is!

    The team showed some mettle in their last innings and Pakistan managed a face saving draw. It’s a shame they lost a short series with poor planning playing with two fast bowlers only. South Africa were deserved winners as they won most sessions in both tests. In a short series it’s always difficult to get a real contest. It’s a shame most teams never want to play in Pakistan for more than 2-3 tests. You can’t really blame them with the image that our country has. If it wasn’t for fool proof security, no team would bother coming here.

  • Nadeem on October 12, 2007, 12:51 GMT

    PCB sholuld arrange serise against Bangladesh and give Inzi chance to bat at number 4 to break the record of Javed Miandad. Why Bangladesh? Remember Inzi has a best batting reords against Bangladesh (ave is 80 ). His lowest average is against Austrlia and SA respectively. we should bye our hero in the proper way. This is unfair with Inzi to arrange serise against SA.

    Nadeem

  • Awas on October 12, 2007, 12:30 GMT

    Eid Mubarak to the regular contributors to this thread, Kamran Abbasi and to all other bloggers (and to all the Muslims wherever they live……can I dare say that or will I get in trouble? ;-)

    Thank you khansahab(A.A.Khan) for your warm wishes.

  • Hemant on October 12, 2007, 12:13 GMT

    Wow! What an analysis of India-Australia ODI played at “Vadora” (?) by that man from Canada! And I, in my naivety, thought we were 33 for 4 because of some superb bowling by the Aussies. I will take 47 runs scored for “selfish reasons” or “personal glory”, any time and every time, over 14 and 3 runs scored for “the team” (strike rate of 150 notwithstanding). How I wish he had stuck to giving his “expert” comments on Pak-SA Test match! First time in my life I am hoping that Pakistan draw this match just to prove the “Pontificating” Khan from Canada that he is suffering from “foot in the mouth” syndrome (or is it the keyboard that appears to be stuck in that orifice?). Though, personally it is quite distasteful to me to point out mistakes committed by others, I cannot help but remark that “screwed” and “screwed up” have different nuances or “stalkers” and “streakers” are not the same or in cricket you hit the ball “to all corners” and not “in all corners”, provided, of course, a cricket field had corners, in the first place. May be, in Canada they have rectangular and not oval cricket grounds or may be in that land before scoring a run the batsman declares if it is to be added to the team’s total or credited in his personal account. I have a feeling that the double whammy dealt by Indians in T20 World Cup has that man a trifle unhinged. Yaaaay…..News has just trickled in, Pak has managed to draw the match, Jose

  • Hassan Abbas on October 12, 2007, 12:02 GMT

    He threw it away, Inzi you gr8 man. Somehow, I knew he would throw it away, he did that when he was on 329 just 5 runs short of Hanif Mohammed's record. I don't know if he did it intentionally but I had hunch he will throw away his wicket. Maybe, he has done it to place a alsp on the faces of those stupid people who were naive enough to say that Inzi was playing this test to break Miandad's record. What a gr8 tribute to him in the post match presentation. We should all wish him all the best and try to forget the last 18 months of his carrier and try our hardest to remember his merry days when we all had the feeling of security whenever Pakistan batted, because we knew we have Inzi in batting order and more often than not he would save the day for Pakistan. Goodbye Inzi and Good Luck.

  • tahir iqbal on December 23, 2007, 6:57 GMT

    Inzy was the great player of pakistan,but we didn,t cear him,we didn,t give actuall respect him.I think without this man our team is uncomeleate.We need another INZY for win next worldcup

  • Mangesh on October 14, 2007, 17:23 GMT

    I remember seeing Inzy first at WC 92. His tour de force in the semis and finals ensured that he burst onto the international cricket scene. To a spectator, Inzy's batting was lazy, graceful, energetic, forceful, delicate, fiesty and all other agreeable adjectives to describe a style that was so uniquely his own. I remember his inning at Karachi 2004 against India where almost single handedly he chased down a mammoth target. It is beyond my brief as an Indian, who is not intimately connected with the going-ons of Pakistani cricket, to comment on Inzy's captaincy and the impact it had on Pakistan cricket at large. Suffice it is to say that as a batsman it was sheer pleasure to watch him. International cricket is poorer without him.

    Walk out with your head held high Inzy. History and posterity have reserved a prominent place for you. Good on ya mate, you will be missed.

  • Muhammad Asif on October 12, 2007, 15:18 GMT

    What I have felt on this blog is that when people have nothing to say about cricket, they divert their "Akhroat" (brain) to hit in one or the other way below the belt to the rest of the bloggers. Why you don't join that kina forum where the people would undress you in the same way as you will undress them.

  • saddness on October 12, 2007, 14:36 GMT

    miandad 8032 and inzi 8030.

    no question miandad was a better batsman, but inzi will always be the second best in my books!

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 12, 2007, 14:05 GMT

    Javed Bhai,

    I think you missed the news of Lahoris abusing South Africans. You stated your disapproval of Indian Gujrati crowd. Do you have anything to say for this Pakistani crowd?

    About your remarks on India’s secularism- firstly Indians just like Pakistanis and Bangladeshis are always subjected to racism whenever they tour Australia. The remarks against Symonds were mostly made in retaliation. Secondly, Symonds has West Indian roots and as such is not like other Aussies. He is a special case and although that does not justify racism, I wonder how Pakistanis speak of him? Pakistanis abused Laxmipathy Balaji when he toured Pakistan- forget Symonds who is not even South Asian. India which features 13% Muslim population, hundreds of different languages and cultures living together happily (with only minor, almost negligible exceptions) compared to Pakistan where religious and regional discrimination is perceived by the majority to be the right thing to do. Plus, India’s Muslim cricketers do not have to change their names in order to seek acceptance within the team. A few days ago I saw on the Indian news that the entire Indian team was invited to a “dawat” at Irfan Pathan’s residence, a family of mosque-managers. In Pakistan you have a federal department of “Inter-provincial harmony” whereas India does not have an equivalent. The truth is that you can’t win the argument that Pakistan is a more stable and fair country than India. In the same way you just cannot win the argument that Inzamam is a greater player than Tendulkar.

    I have just seen Inzi get out and read Cricinfo’s commentary. He wanted to break the record in style which only led to his dismissal. In my opinion it was Allah’s will what happened because of Inzi’s mala fide intentions to play in this last match. I personally do not care who the highest run scorer for Pakistan is but one should not play to seek personal records and glory. So Inzamam plays for the country and fights until the last ball to win matches for Pakistan? What was the need to come forward and get out in such a stupid fashion when his team depended on him? So much for Inzamam’s pressure handling skills! Now you and Wasim Saqib will say, “Come on it was his last innings and he was very nervous”. Nervousness is fine but at the end of the day he just could not handle the pressure.

    You amaze me totally. You continue to ridicule Tendulkar’s supporters. He top scored against the best bowling attack in the world. What about Inzi’s running between the wickets and the times his fielding has let Pakistan down enormously in innumerable matches? Ganguly is a poor runner anyway and has been involved in many run outs, not just with Sachin.

    Cricket is not only about scoring fast. I think you have mistaken the current India Australia ODI series as a “Twenty20” tournament. As far as strike rates go Inzi’s strike rate is much below Tendulkar’s. Look at the overall strike rates of the two players. For God’s sake Javed Bhai, abandon this nonsense and think logically and rationally. Sometimes in a pressure situation you have to take the initiative and slacken the scoring rate. If Tendulkar would have played in his naturally aggressive style there would have been a chance of him being dismissed on 25, which would have let you to criticise him even more. Since you and people like Wasim Saqib feel deep hostility for Indians (I don’t think the purpose of their creation is to destroy Pakistan or Islam) no matter what Indians do, you will always interpret it negatively and feel jealous of them. So if Tendulkar plays riskily and gets out cheaply against the best bowling attack in the world, you will criticise him. If he plays defensively to stabilise the team’s pathetic situation, you will still criticise him. Forget that, even if he would have destroyed Australia’s bowling (as he has done on countless occasions) you would have said that he is a flat track bully. Since he is no God you can’t expect him to score a century with an 80+ strike rate in every innings. Also I don’t understand why so many “ifs and buts” come into play when Inzamam is compared with Tendulkar. So Inzamam is a better player “under pressure”, a better player “when playing pacers”, a better player in “those matches that Pakistan won”. What kind of nonsense is that? If you want to look beyond statistics at least provide cogent reasons for why one player is better than the other. I don’t understand the problem with you or other people defending Inzamam. When you want you can bring out statistics to say for instance that Afridi is a better player than Malik or Asim Kamal. But when statistics go against you (probably every form of batting statistics in the context of Inzi and Sachin) you start talking about “ifs and buts”. Let me compare Inzamam’s performance with Sachin, Dravid and Lara on more bowler-friendly pitches:

    Inzamam averages 31 in Australia, 43 in England, 60 in NZ and 32 in South Africa Tendulkar averages 54 in Australia, 62 in England, 42 in NZ and 40 in SA Dravid averages 57 in Aus, 65 in ENG, 65 in NZ, 34 in SA Lara averages 42 in AUS, 49 in ENG, 37 in NZ and 47 in SA

    So who is the flat track bully amongst these batsmen?

    You talk about blind men and fools. You actually think Afridi can be a permanent fixture in a Test squad. That is the height of foolishness and blindness. Javed Bhai in your response please confirm that someone impersonating as you wrote that post. You were talking about the last paragraph of my previous post. After reading your last para of the abovementioned post I actually started laughing.

    Again let me enjoy the moment while I can. The way you see it, Tendulkar’s supporters are blind fools whereas you think Afridi deserves a place in the Test side???????

    Finally let me clarify that Inzamam has been a great player and one of the best batsman Pakistan has produced. But it is folly to compare him with the batting greats around the world because even the best Pakistani batsman (Miandad) cannot compare with them.

    Jolly good stuff!

    P.s- Tendulkar is not amongst my favourite players (I don’t care what others say- people will always come out with rubbish like, “Tendulkar is your hero”) but I have respect for him. I have already said before that I don’t “like” watching Indians or Tendulkar play well and I don’t like them winning. However, what I do not understand is why most Pakistanis can’t be broad minded and admit he is a greater player than Inzi or Miandad. I personally prefer watching Dravid bat more since he works hard to build his innings and his shots are very exquisite. Ironically the reason why I like Dravid is because Tendulkar is so good- I like to see Dravid working hard and building his innings whereas it is often all too easy for Tendulkar.

  • Awas on October 12, 2007, 13:06 GMT

    Well, our one and only Inzi tried to surpass Miandad’s landmark but it wasn’t in his fate. To play a shot like that so early in his innings was madness. How many times has he got out like this against the likes of Warne and Company? He never learns not even in his last test. I was hoping when he came out to bat, it would be nice to see flashes of his brilliant stroke making for one last time but it was never to be. Borrowing Javed A Khan’s phrase.......what a pupoo he is!

    The team showed some mettle in their last innings and Pakistan managed a face saving draw. It’s a shame they lost a short series with poor planning playing with two fast bowlers only. South Africa were deserved winners as they won most sessions in both tests. In a short series it’s always difficult to get a real contest. It’s a shame most teams never want to play in Pakistan for more than 2-3 tests. You can’t really blame them with the image that our country has. If it wasn’t for fool proof security, no team would bother coming here.

  • Nadeem on October 12, 2007, 12:51 GMT

    PCB sholuld arrange serise against Bangladesh and give Inzi chance to bat at number 4 to break the record of Javed Miandad. Why Bangladesh? Remember Inzi has a best batting reords against Bangladesh (ave is 80 ). His lowest average is against Austrlia and SA respectively. we should bye our hero in the proper way. This is unfair with Inzi to arrange serise against SA.

    Nadeem

  • Awas on October 12, 2007, 12:30 GMT

    Eid Mubarak to the regular contributors to this thread, Kamran Abbasi and to all other bloggers (and to all the Muslims wherever they live……can I dare say that or will I get in trouble? ;-)

    Thank you khansahab(A.A.Khan) for your warm wishes.

  • Hemant on October 12, 2007, 12:13 GMT

    Wow! What an analysis of India-Australia ODI played at “Vadora” (?) by that man from Canada! And I, in my naivety, thought we were 33 for 4 because of some superb bowling by the Aussies. I will take 47 runs scored for “selfish reasons” or “personal glory”, any time and every time, over 14 and 3 runs scored for “the team” (strike rate of 150 notwithstanding). How I wish he had stuck to giving his “expert” comments on Pak-SA Test match! First time in my life I am hoping that Pakistan draw this match just to prove the “Pontificating” Khan from Canada that he is suffering from “foot in the mouth” syndrome (or is it the keyboard that appears to be stuck in that orifice?). Though, personally it is quite distasteful to me to point out mistakes committed by others, I cannot help but remark that “screwed” and “screwed up” have different nuances or “stalkers” and “streakers” are not the same or in cricket you hit the ball “to all corners” and not “in all corners”, provided, of course, a cricket field had corners, in the first place. May be, in Canada they have rectangular and not oval cricket grounds or may be in that land before scoring a run the batsman declares if it is to be added to the team’s total or credited in his personal account. I have a feeling that the double whammy dealt by Indians in T20 World Cup has that man a trifle unhinged. Yaaaay…..News has just trickled in, Pak has managed to draw the match, Jose

  • Hassan Abbas on October 12, 2007, 12:02 GMT

    He threw it away, Inzi you gr8 man. Somehow, I knew he would throw it away, he did that when he was on 329 just 5 runs short of Hanif Mohammed's record. I don't know if he did it intentionally but I had hunch he will throw away his wicket. Maybe, he has done it to place a alsp on the faces of those stupid people who were naive enough to say that Inzi was playing this test to break Miandad's record. What a gr8 tribute to him in the post match presentation. We should all wish him all the best and try to forget the last 18 months of his carrier and try our hardest to remember his merry days when we all had the feeling of security whenever Pakistan batted, because we knew we have Inzi in batting order and more often than not he would save the day for Pakistan. Goodbye Inzi and Good Luck.

  • ruchit on October 12, 2007, 11:45 GMT

    Great Man has hung his boots. To me Inzy was not just a great batsmen whose batting I enjoyed but a soft spoken mild mannered gentleman. Hats off to great 16 yeards of entertaining cricket. All his fans are going to miss the Big Man.

    Regards.

    Ruchit.

  • anonymous on October 12, 2007, 10:06 GMT

    Farewell inzi, your stats do not reveal the true story behind your greatness (they arent too shabby as they are) but he was a much better player than some of his stats suggest. He had all the time in the world to play a shot, one of the greatest batsmen for Pakistan and many may argue but he is definetly up there with lara,sachin and co.

  • Ruchit on October 12, 2007, 9:31 GMT

    Hello Mr. Javed Khan,

    This article is talking about Inzamam. Why are you trash talking by bringing in Tendulkar and Lara? Agreed that you like India bashing but then you should not convert every stage into India bashing platform. Better focus on Inzamam. No need to compare him to his contemporaries. This does not apply to you only but also others who are making these uncalled for comparisions. Inzamam is/was a great batsmen in absolute terms.No need to do relative comparisions here. Time to celebrate a great cricketer not bash him or any of his peers.

    Also as a cricket fan you can comment on Indian cricket but then you have to draw a line as well. I dont see any rabid comments from Indians on Pakistani cricket or by Pakistanis on Indian cricket the way you do. You have every right to cheer/criticize Pakistani cricket as you are Pakistani but when it comes to other countires you should really hold back most of the comments you make. Some of your comments are vitriolic in essense no matter how much you try to wax eloquent by usage of classy language.

    Yes in India Tendulkar is worshipped or as in your words blindly worshipped. How does this affect you? No one is forcing you to do the same (ideally no one can) so why are you raising such a hue and cry? Let Indians take care of how their cricket is run. It is none of your business frankly to be bothered if Indians get screwed by Australia or Tendulkar runs out Ganguly. Leave it to us.

    Sometimes to me it seems that you are not a genuine cricket fan but just a plain India basher. Otherwise you wouldnot have hijacked this blog with your anti-India tirade.

    Regards. Ruchit.

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 12, 2007, 7:39 GMT

    Javed Bhai,

    Did I not mention in my previous post that I regard my grievances against Inzi as very reasonable?

    At least I do not have ego and am willing to admit fault, hot-headedness and bias on occasions. It is not a regional bias though- it is a grudge which stems from Inzi's personality.

    I still consider Miandad to be a greater player than Inzi, and Tendulkar to be a class apart from both Inzi and Miandad. As far as predictions go, we all make predictions. Without sounding boastful my predictions end up more true than most regular posters on this blog.

    I forgot Ashaq's name in my Eid wishing post. Since he was absent on this blog for some time I overlooked him. His posts have become smaller upon his return but his importance to this blog has not been underminded in any way.

    A very belated "welcome back", Ashaq Bhai.

  • Javed Khan From Gujrat on October 12, 2007, 7:34 GMT

    Wow Javed Montreal khan can actually see what the rest of cricketing fans in the world can not see or understand. He actually sees Tendulkar is fooling the world. Wow javed u surely are brilliant than a millions of tendulkar fans.I have just 2 question for 1) did you loose something/somebody in 1971 to put so much hatred for India in ur mind. 2) If you are so brilliant why are you still unemployed? Chill buddy chill. You know India is a benchmark you cannot achieve. ;) neither in cricket nor in democracy or economy.But the n criticizing India on blogs is not what will achieve the benchmark or change truth of life .Better do something useful like study or work. It might help.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 12, 2007, 7:29 GMT

    EID MUBARAK TO EVERY ONE AND ESPECIALLY TO KHANSAHAB.

    Khansahab:

    You mentioned earlier that great bowlers have never complimented about Inzamam's batting here is a link for you http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/ci/content/current/story/315057.htmlhttp://content-usa.cricinfo.com/ci/content/current/story/315057.html.

    It seems to me that you have never been to Punjab or lived over there,In spirit of Eid and for the sake of harmony I will not respond to your remarks about Punjab which were completely baseless and based on Ignorance.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 12, 2007, 3:54 GMT

    Today is the day to say Alvidaa to Inzi. In Zaheer Abbass's style I would say, "I don't expect any "marry-kills" but, I hope he "place vale". This is his last chance for him, in any case whether he breaks Miandad's record or not is not that important after all its a game and, it will not add any extra feather in Inzi's cap or take away the gloss from Miandad's smiles. They both are great players from the same country, Pakistan. PERIOD !

    Hasan Abbass please don't pass sweeping comments on khansahab. His comments are not always negative. As far as biases are concerned we all have our biases and prejudices, to say that we don't have any means we are lying through our teeth. Besides, khansahab, like everyone on this blog has the right to express his views and he does that well and he never crosses the line of decency as opposed to some of the other bloggers. And that is why I respect him along with Wasim Saqib and a few other regulars. Mais et tu, you too have tied Inzamam's bicycle "carrier" to a roller coaster? Yeah, its sad that his cricketing career is coming to an end. May God bless him. Wasim Saqib, not only Amar deep.....shhhhhhst there are plenty of them from across the border who are here on this blog with fictitious names only to spit venom.

    Amit K. Bachhan, the small horse called 10dull once again proved me right, haven't you read my last post? And I am sorry that your sister complained to you about me for not satisfying her in bed, it must have been due to the excess of ... you know what? But, you can assure her that it won't happen again, you may send her back here and I hope I have satisfied you with this answer.:-) My advise to you is, before you open your big mouth, see that someone is there with a lid (a dhakkan) that could be bigger than your mouth. And, you know I never get upset, I always smile and enjoy reading those petty comments when people write about me. Its like, 'when the purblind nocturnal mouse sees not the sunlight its not the later to be blamed.' Some of you guys come up with weird imagination about me, keep guessing and keep getting jealous. To the dismay of you and so many envious blokes like you, I come from a very well to do family AKS hai, I really don't need to work yet I work for no one but myself. And I work with a lot of enthusiasm to keep myself busy, involved, connected with the rest of the world and you have no idea how much I enjoy "loife." :-) Life is fantastic here.

    Roshan Ara Begum, was a classical singer from Calcutta India, she moved to Bombay and then to Pakistan, got the title of Malika-e-Mauseeqi or Queen of Music and, some of her classical surr - taan, khayaal, the romantic lyrics are very famous AND you are using her first name BUT you are always so out of tune, I wonder why you chose her name? Anyways, I won't say more because you are beginning to agree with me like you said, "On Saeed Anwar....I cant say much as he is in my all time best opener's list." I am sure a few more of my "Chapaits" will set you right, ;-) have a kit-kat for now.

    And once again thanks to Wasim Saqib for correcting those stats posted by the Indian supporter, perhaps he must have had them in his dreams, the correct ones are those posted by Wasim Saqib. If you see them in terms of percentage, Inzi's wins are 56.87% and Tendulkar's are 49.25%. And India Pakistan have played 100 ODI's Pakistan has won 60 times India has won 40 times, do you need percentages here? Take that chill pill that Wasim Saqib gave you.

    khansahab; I reciprocate your Eid greetings with a "Khair Mubarak," and I have supported / endorsed your views whenever I felt them as right. But, something you have said about me from OTT i.e., in translating my views with your mind by saying "extremely bitter views," although in your case you've warned JamJar, I don't warn people, I give them back what they deserve. But, for you, I am only telling you that, what you see or think about me is only "your perception," and that is because you really don't know me in reality or in totality.

    What you see here is only my reactions to the posts that are directed against me personally, or against the team I support, hence its always a tit for tat retort in light humour. Because, number one its a cricket blog and, I do it in jest. Secondly, if someone insults my religion, then I have to show them a mirror. Do you know how come I know so much about India or the Hindu religion? Thats because I have traveled extensively, been there many times, seen almost all of that country. I have many friends there, they respect me and my religion and I reciprocate their feelings. I hate name droppings, so I won't mention the names on a public forum, but the people in India with whom I deal or meet, are extremely famous and very rich people and they are nice. (OK, this sounds like boasting but, it is still true.)

    Even here, some of my Hindu and sardar friends they read my posts and they laugh at my taunts and they discuss with me, they support India and I support Pakistan, no hard feelings. It may sound strange but, I enjoy eating Dosa, Idli Sambar, Vada Sambar, Uthappa and Basundi. I attend South Indian friend's "Arangetram," a graduation ceremony for South Indian dancers, mostly females. I understand the "Mudras" (hand gestures) and "Navarasas" (facial expressions of nine different moods) of Bharat Natyam and Katha Kali. I enjoy Ravi Shankar's sitar, Pandit Jasraj's classical music, Shiv Kumar Sharma's santoor avec Zakir Hussain's tabla, I don't miss their concerts.

    But, what you see on blogs, chat sites, message boards is very common, some people from both countries use fictitious names and spit venom against each other. I am not scared, I use my real name and what I say is what I see, and I won't hesitate to say on someone's face. If someone is good to me I am good to them, c'est ca. If you look at my first post in every thread, its always to the point and related to the subject, may be sometimes I draw comparisons between players only to add spice BUT nothing personal to bloggers. It is when I am provoked, attacked personally that I hit them back with a tit for tat and, why not? :-) You also reply on jingoism but, it appears more like bitter nagging than a mere retort. Take it easy bro. :-)

  • Salman Khan , Canberra on October 12, 2007, 3:21 GMT

    I am new to this blog but I admit that it is the most enjoyable one I have ever participated in . The passion, patriotism and a good understanding of cricket reflected in most of the posts makes it the best blog on Cricinfo.

    I know I am not Shane Warne but I have taken the liberty of commenting on my top two bloggers:

    JAVED A. KHAN (MONTREAL) Despite the insults and below the belt stuff in your posts, you win hands down as far as the enjoyment quotient goes. Some of your comments are absolutely hilarious. I guess having a reasonable command over the language helps. The fact that you have strong likes and dislikes and you do not mind putting them in your posts, makes them spicier. But is it possible that your dislikes are just a little bit too strong? Can I also express my admiration for your desire and stamina . One would need plenty of both for writing frequent and long posts.

    AA KHAN (KHAN SAAB) I have found your comments to be the most mature, intelligent and respectful .It may be unintentional on your part but you are a good foil to Javed Bhai. By the way I am a Yusuf Zai as well (but that has not influenced my opinion of your posts, I liked them even prior to knowing that).

    Congratulations , you guys are the LARA and TENDULKAR of BLOGGERS( or LARA and INZI , I think Javed Bhai will prefer that).

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 12, 2007, 1:35 GMT

    Shaikh Ji, the other version is:

    The guy who loved Multani Sohan Halwa was a Mullah Ate too much of it and burped only to say, Jazakallah

  • Shaikh on October 11, 2007, 21:13 GMT

    Hey Elle,

    I thought limericks always started with this form :D

    There once was a multani who became a mullah Who started every sentence with "thanks to Allah" ...

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 11, 2007, 18:11 GMT

    My warmest Eid wishes to Mr Abbasi, Javed Bhai, Wasim Saqib, Eemiran, Omer Admani, Awas.....and all other posters on Pakspin.

    Eid Mubarak

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 11, 2007, 17:31 GMT

    Can Pakistan stretch it out for a draw? Pull out a victory? No way Jose, neither of the two is possible, the writing is on the wall, loud and clear - its a white wash. The only thing that I would like to see is some good batting from Pakistan especially Inzi, because this is the last chance that he has and he should not disappoint the people.

    An excellent fielder like Malik, when playing under pressure, can look like pathetic Rana Naiiiii by dropping a sitter and giving Zaheer Abbass's "King-Kay-Liss" a life. Akmal once again dropped a similar one like he did in Karachi to add woes to the sufferings and agony of Kaneria and his marathon spells and making King Kayliss proud for his third consecutive century. What a shame that not only Asif but, Gul too had to leave the field, the new ball was due but, there was no fast bowler to bowl. The spinners were tired of bowling had SA not declared the innings they would have fainted from heat and exhaustion. Shouldn't Malik learn from this experience? Never play a test match with two fast bowlers.

    Having said that Pakistan played very badly, I don't think Elle would like to hear this, the South Africans did not play any entertaining cricket either. In fact I have never seen such dull and boring cricket especially Smithy's innings was pathetic 100 in 254 balls! Although he may be pleased to score a century after 31 innings and that too stretching over a period of 2 and a half years. For that he may deserve a big hug from his "Slinki Minki," who must be dying for that. I was so bored with the negative batting that I flipped the channel to watch the Vadora ODI, only to see the Indian's getting screwed up by the Kangaroos, especially Johnson and Gilchrist did that. And what a shame that while fielding near the sidelines Andrew Symonds was a victim of racial abuse from the crowd in that so-called Secular Democracy and in that very peaceful country or, the State of Gujarat where, people love to love people from any culture, creed or colour.

    Tendulkar, when he was batting, he has once again proved my point. On records he is the top scorer with 47 a strike rate of 64. When he started the innings he got Ganguly run out cheaply. Then, he started his usual defensive tactics and it worked once again in his favour and against the team. At the end of 7 overs when four of the Indian wickets were down Tendulkar had scored 12 runs in 31 balls a strike rate of 38. Apparently in his 47 he hit 9 fours in the total 73 balls he played the strike rate is 64 that means he played 50 dot balls. In my opinion, Pathan's 26 and Zaheer Khan's 28 of 44 balls with a strike rate of 63 is better than Tendulkar's pathetic top scoring. Once again his top scoring resulted in a defeat for India.

    His supporters look at it the way he presents himself to them i.e., he did his job but, the "10 other jokers" failed. Actually, he was instrumental in Ganguly's run out and then while he was struggling and not playing the shots, others tried to score fast and got out. Three wickets down for 12 runs (5 extras) and four for 33 runs is a proof of his negative tactics. I am sure some of the blind men who simply adore him and worship him will never be able to see this side of the game, because he has mesmerized them and fooled them and will continue to do that.

  • Amar on October 11, 2007, 15:31 GMT

    LOL..this Insane J khan dose it again!!

    "I have said that Tendulkar's strike rate always improved after scoring a hundred. Check it out, the moment he achieves a landmark he plays differently no matter how long it takes to do that. It shows that for him, his personal achievements and personal records are more important than the team requirements"..

    *Look PEA BRAIN..after scoring a hundred do you expect the batsmen to play like he's playing a 5-day match? *A batsmen(especially one on whome all the team depends) has to start slow and build up the innings..but what matters is at the end who scores at what scoring rate!! so people dont mind batsmen who start slow as long as they cover up the strike rate!! ..so PEA BRAIN..kindly check the strike rate of your "super duper obese aloos" and big boned parathas.. ;) *Lastly THE WHOLE WORLD ACKNOWLEDGES SACHIN'S BRILLANCE..EVEN SIR DON!!...so your biased/jealousy filled opinions dont count!! (i know it hurts a rabid mulla like you every time you see Sachin playing..and keep wondering when one of your huge big boned 7 feet tall pathans will manage to achieve half of what Sach has achieved!!..let alone consistency of performance!!)

  • Hassan Abbas on October 11, 2007, 13:03 GMT

    @Khan Sahab Your comments are always negative and biased. Better watch more cricket than stats guru and then come here and talk. Never dare to compare batsmen from two different eras cuz its a crime.

    We are here to give a tribute to one of the greatest batsmen in the world produced by our country Pakistan. Inzi was the best player of fast bowling after viv richards and I am not the only one to say that, commentators and experts around the world say it because they watch cricket and not sats guru. Inzi saved more matches for us then tendulkar ever could for india. Secondly, for most of his illustrious carrier tendulkar has batted on batsman friendly pitches even abroad. Whenever India scored over 400 or 500 in a test innings abroad the opposition would score the same or more than that, thats why india hasn't won many matches outside home, because they play on brilliant batting tracks all the time. I know there are a few innings played by Sachin that are exceptional but then he is a gr8 player, there is no doubt about it but to say that he is better than inzi or miandad is a very stupid comment. On baised decisions, well, have a closer look buddy, tendulkar does get a lot of wrong decisions against him but he also gets a lot of wrong decisions in his favour, specially LBWs, because he is short, the ball invariably hits on the flap of his pads or above and the umpire always thinks its goign over the stumps. I've seen a lot of these decisions in given in favour of Sachin when he should be given out. So, lets talk about only inzi here because this war of words is never ending oce it starts.

    Inzamam's carrier was like a roller coaster throughout, so many ups and downs. The highlight of his carrier are all the innings that he played to save the day for Pakistan (and there were quite a few of them). the unique quality of Inzi was that he played the ball so late and seemed to have so much time even against the fastest of bowlers. Honestly, if inzi had retired 2 yrs back when Pakistan was on top of their game, I think there would have been more fans giving him a tribute here and we might have celebrated the greatness of this player in another kinda mood. I salute you Inzi and thank you for giving us such great memories and such glorious victories to our country. ups and downs, well they are just a part of life, aren't they?

  • Ramz on October 11, 2007, 10:49 GMT

    This tragedy end is the fate of all Pakistani great cricketers...no Wassim, Waqar or Mianded got this chance...they all were kicked out regardless of their acheivements or their services to Pakistani Cricket...Thanx to almighty God that Inzi got this chance...he will say bye with glory

    all the best for Inzi in his life

  • Rauf on October 11, 2007, 10:38 GMT

    To all the Pakistani and Indian cricket fans.

    While we praise Inzi, Tendulkar etc etc for past individual glories, Aussies and SA are proving once again that we may have reached the final of "cricket's version of gooly danda slugfest", they still have our number when it comes to grown up cricket... and that too in our own backyard.

    Hows that for a reality check!!

  • lalit on October 11, 2007, 10:36 GMT

    so finally smith has declared the innings. it gives inzamam a chance to overtake miandad. this reminds me of couple of great cricketers final test. Rantunga and steav waugh. Both played there final test with a draw and a series leveled. Inzy's farewell would be the with series loss. I am not sure if selectors did any favor to him in giving a chance to end test career with respect(?).

  • Roshan on October 11, 2007, 10:10 GMT

    Javed Arrogant khan...you can scream from the roof top but you cannot prove Inzi a better player than Tendulkar....May be I am not the right one to comment on that issue as I am an Indian & I can be termed as Biased...same applies to you as well...In that case I believe the neutral observers should have their say...& I can bet if you start collecting neutral views you will be beaten hands down as I have never heard anyone comparing Inzi with Lara or Tendulkar...The last 2 gentle man were always considered all time greats! Not only today but they will be remembered for the lifetime...

    On Saeed Anwar....I cant say much as he is in my all time best opener's list....I put him way ahead of Inzi...Its a pity that he couldnt continue for too long otherwise he is always my pick over Lara.

  • Adeel Hussain on October 11, 2007, 9:30 GMT

    A moment of reflection and worry at the same time for us Pakistani fans. Reflection for obvious reasons, and worries for reasons that are fast becoming obvious. When Inzamam leaves, the stick propping up our fragile and immature batting line-up goes with him. Watching this ongoing test has made me cringe for reasons more than i can name. Here is an attempt to put forth just a few reasons im in gloom. Two test series? It feels as though our adroit and wise cricket board wants to quietly sweep the test game under the rug. I find no reason why a team should not be given a chance to comeback after a loss, unless of course the aim is to make the whole thing ridiculously boring, and to swindle the viewing public of the pure game just to make sure the money keeps rolling in from the ODIs. We all do know how much more lucrative those are in Pakistan. Two seamers only? For a side that is weak against spin, and IF you possess a class spinner, this is a great option. As it turns out, neither of the two cases are true. SA is not a weak side while playing spin, a look at Kallis and Prince will prove my point, and any such fallacy should be quickly slashed. The second misconceived notion begging to be dropped is that Danish Kaneria is a match winner. I have never seen this lad single handedly win a match for us against a good side. He only spins on tracks tailor made for him, and still (as is evident) can’t pull off good figures against a team (apparently) weak against spin. Our board seems to have a grudge against Asif and his seamer colleagues. I will not be surprised and neither should they, if Asif or/and Gul injure themselves under the strain of long spells. A scenario brought about by inspired selection. Not to mention the big dent delivered to their confidence by bowling on dead tracks, prepared in an apparent attempt to shield our listless and immature batting line-up against the SA seamers, and for our world class spinner. This trend should stop since our batsmen don’t perform anyway and on any track, so might as well play to our strengths rather than protecting our weakness and ignore our strengths. What an impatient and nervous batting line up we possess. The only previously held notion that survives after this test is that our batting line-up is prone to collapse. We have been prepping and preparing a young batting line-up that has failed to perform at any and all levels. Not stopping there, the board in its collective wisdom has decided to appoint as vice-captain a batsman who cant seem to shake off the nerves even after seemingly ‘getting set’. How is this man going to help our new (capable) captain? The poor guy can’t even help himself. Talk about rewarding mediocrity. With a little more luxury of time, I could go on. Unfortunately or fortunately, this is all for now. I am sure there will be many more opportunities for some more of these realistic (I wouldn’t call this pessimism, no) pieces. Our cricket seems to be headed in the general direction of everything else in this unfortunate country of ours. Update: Gul and Asif are both apparently injured and off the field. No really?

    A moment of reflection and worry at the same time for us Pakistani fans. Reflection for obvious reasons, and worries for reasons that are fast becoming obvious. When Inzamam leaves, the stick propping up our fragile and immature batting line-up goes with him. Watching this ongoing test has made me cringe for reasons more than i can name. Here is an attempt to put forth just a few reasons im in gloom. Two test series? It feels as though our adroit and wise cricket board wants to quietly sweep the test game under the rug. I find no reason why a team should not be given a chance to comeback after a loss, unless of course the aim is to make the whole thing ridiculously boring, and to swindle the viewing public of the pure game just to make sure the money keeps rolling in from the ODIs. We all do know how much more lucrative those are in Pakistan. Two seamers only? For a side that is weak against spin, and IF you possess a class spinner, this is a great option. As it turns out, neither of the two cases are true. SA is not a weak side while playing spin, a look at Kallis and Prince will prove my point, and any such fallacy should be quickly slashed. The second misconceived notion begging to be dropped is that Danish Kaneria is a match winner. I have never seen this lad single handedly win a match for us against a good side. He only spins on tracks tailor made for him, and still (as is evident) can’t pull off good figures against a team (apparently) weak against spin. Our board seems to have a grudge against Asif and his seamer colleagues. I will not be surprised and neither should they, if Asif or/and Gul injure themselves under the strain of long spells. A scenario brought about by inspired selection. Not to mention the big dent delivered to their confidence by bowling on dead tracks, prepared in an apparent attempt to shield our listless and immature batting line-up against the SA seamers, and for our world class spinner. This trend should stop since our batsmen don’t perform anyway and on any track, so might as well play to our strengths rather than protecting our weakness and ignore our strengths. What an impatient and nervous batting line up we possess. The only previously held notion that survives after this test is that our batting line-up is prone to collapse. We have been prepping and preparing a young batting line-up that has failed to perform at any and all levels. Not stopping there, the board in its collective wisdom has decided to appoint as vice-captain a batsman who cant seem to shake off the nerves even after seemingly ‘getting set’. How is this man going to help our new (capable) captain? The poor guy can’t even help himself. Talk about rewarding mediocrity. With a little more luxury of time, I could go on. Unfortunately or fortunately, this is all for now. I am sure there will be many more opportunities for some more of these realistic (I wouldn’t call this pessimism, no) pieces. Our cricket seems to be headed in the general direction of everything else in this unfortunate country of ours. Update: Gul and Asif are both apparently injured and off the field. No really?

  • Hyder raza on October 11, 2007, 8:43 GMT

    Dear All, I shall like to bring to your notice one important point that is also a master stroke from the burly man. And that is destroying the cricketing attitudes and commitment of Pakistan team by bringing in religious fervor and craziness in the dressing room. Our nation mostly uses religion as a escape route from their responsibilities and commitments. And that is exactly what happened to Pakistan team in last few years. Conceding easy defeats and lack of professionalism becomes a norm. For inducing that attitude, congratulations to Saeed Anwar and InzamamulHaq.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 11, 2007, 7:46 GMT

    AMAR take a chill pill dude, maybe you were sleeping when people from your country were writing some ridiculous posts and making personal attacks on Javed A khan for no apparent reason. As regards your statement regarding Sachin's ODI record I would suggest you to read my post again I was only discussing his Test record, Out of 140 tests that he played for India only 44 were won and out of his 37 test 100's only 13 were match winning performances.

    Now that you have brought up the ODI record I will discuss that too.

    Inzamam has played 378 matches for Pakistan out of which Pakistan has won 215 matches.

    Tendulkar has played 399 matches and out of which India has won only 197.

    Khansahab: If you look at Sachin's record you will find several years where his average was not consistent with his cumulative average, very few batsmen have been consistent all along their career. You must also keep in mind that Inzi played most of his cricket under Wasim Akram and in his tenure Pakistan mostly used to prepare supporting wickets at home as at that time we were blessed with the best pace bowling attack in the world. Where as India in their domestic matches have always prepared batting tracks or spinner friendly wickets. Also those who quote his performance against Australia should also remember that how many times Australia came to Pakistan in the last 16 years, our team has not played much against them especially the Aussies avoided us for one reason or another when we had the best pace attack and Inzamam was at his peak along with Saeed Anwar. On the other hand they play India at least once every year. I f Dravid and Tendulkar are so great then why their team didn’t moved into the second round of WC 07, Why their Win/Loss ratio is worse than Pakistan. Don’t you think you are exhibiting double standards here as you expected a beat-up Pakistan team to move into the next round but from a full strength Indian team you had no expectations. Also I would remind you again with Inzamam in the team Pakistan once have won the WC in 1992 and in 1999 we reached the finals. In 2003 they failed to move into the second round because rain affected two of their pool matches.

    Please don't comment on Miandad as you have already confessed that you have never seen him play ask an older Indian and he will tell you who Javed Miandad was and how he tormented Indians for so many years. Ps. Javed A khan thanks for the kind words and supporting my views.

  • shashank on October 11, 2007, 6:53 GMT

    Inzi was by far the most talented batsman of the last decade.Sometimes his fitness and motivation let him down, but one could watch and admire those lazy drives that made donald's of the world look like spinners. He will be missed by all cricket fans. He was also a great ambassador for Pakistan and for cricket in general. Wishing him all the best for his future endeavours .

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 11, 2007, 4:12 GMT

    Hopefully for three more days we shall be discussing on this blog about Inzi the great. Obviously where there are heroes like him, there is also a crowd the, "riff-raff" of the "kers and purrs." which comes and goes like flies and locust, and one cannot avoid that. My dear khansahab by raising the subject of "consistency in performance" you have negated your own statement that you made about, "The God who never under performs." If only he was a God, then may be you were right! "Magar yae ho na saka! Aur ab yae Aalam hai," his pathetic, poor performance is so obvious that even, "a not so bright kiddo like roshan dan" and his kanyadaan wants that Bhaagyawaan to retire gracefully! But, he is not such a Bhaagyawan to retire gracefully because, its a matter of "Will & Grace." Will is not there and Grace is lacking behind along with his pitiful past. His present average is in mid twenties, now he is no more a horse of the big race, but a small horse, "from" a small race. ;-)

    There is a new kid on the blog who is pretending to be Mohammad #1, he is not a Bhola Nath but, a Sheesh Naag simply spitting venom for sheer pleasure. He thinks like that wolf who disguised in sheep skin and thinks he would be unnoticeable. Mohammad #1 why don't you give us a break and go for a change, to a place where you belong to have a few more of the "Besan Murkuls" from that Kesar's Khatara Van which is actually a "Thaila" or a "Rairee," and thats your or "Thiiya" - place!

    Amar Deep Shhhhhsssht .... I wasn't talking about religion or race. In fact you guys make fun of Inzi and also about Pakistanis bringing religion in cricket. But, the fact is so many times we have seen on TV, the Indian supporters bringing "Ganesh Moorteez" and multi-heads play cards on the ground, for what? Don't dodge the issue by calling me an insane khan, OK wise man tell me why? Take a peep into your own conscience if you have any and then smile because you are not on candid camera.

    By the way thank you for those stats, you can now check out more in detail of all those big hundreds i.e., what is the strike rate before 50 and before 100 and after 100. He plays so slow in the beginning especially when his opening partner is out and still more when a couple of wickets fall, then he goes into his defensive mode, obviously when others see the great "master-bater" has slowed down the process they get under more pressure and get out. In every single match its the same tactics, even today's match in Vadora IF Ganguly gets out early you will see how he will play.

    He puts the whole team under pressure and thats why India has lost more times, even when he scores hundred India looses, there must be at least 10 times, only against Pakistan this must have happened. It is only recently that players like Dhoni, Yuvraj and Uthappa have taken charge and made the difference in batting and they don't play for themselves, unlike him. He plays only for personal records. Just look at that pathetic, 146 runs in 153 balls against a team like Zimbabwe! You think it is good? Do you know the meaning of 100 in 37 balls, perhaps not. But you sure know the meaning of 100 in 45 balls, sounds familiar? :-) I won't rub salt on your wounds.

    khansahab, I was reading the last paragraph of your last post, you are negating and contradicting yourself too much and also mixing your gut feelings with IF's and Butt's. Gut feelings are pure without IF's and Butts. So, think deliberately not simply by placing your palm under your chin or by wearing Dr. De Bono's thinking hat. Just close your eyes, be yourself and there is no harm in admitting that you were wrong about Inzi. Just keep your biases aside don't put a coloured curtain in front of your eyes. Wash out that cortical clutter and see clearly and feel feelingly. No one can predict the future for a minute, how can you do that for 2 years? If you can do that, go to India and you can beat the hell outta that guy Steve, and sure you can take his place! :-) Take care!

    Ps. JamJar are you from Pollokshields or Renfrew?

  • Ahsan Khan on October 11, 2007, 2:32 GMT

    WHAT IS WRONG WITH PAKISTAN CRICKET?

    Let me just start by saying there is nothing wrong with pakistan cricket, because it is not cricket that they play, they try to imitate a game that they learn on the streets near their homes; thinking all the while that they are actually playing cricket.

  • Mahadevan on October 11, 2007, 1:28 GMT

    This is a message for both Indians and Pakistanis. This blog is on a great batsman Inzamam. But there are some comments where Indians try to prove Tendulkar better than Inzy and Pakistanis retaliate showing Inzy better than Tendulkar. Also some comments are really in bad taste with words like ass. Those who write in this blog must note that this blog is viewed all over the World. The first point I like to make is comparisons never make sense. That applies even if you unfavorably compare Inzy's captaincy with Imran. When Imran was at helm, he always had four strike bowlers in his team. What about Inzy? During the period 2003-2007, Pak used matchwinning bowlers Akthar, Gul, Rana Naved, Shabbir, Asif and Razzaq. Saqlain played till 2004. Yet in WC 2007, Pakistan was caught short of strike bowlers. Is Inzy responsible for this problem? Even in the current test series against SA, Pakistan is found short of strike bowlers. Why there is no genuine fast bowler in the team which traditionally produced very good fast bowlers who had struck terror all over the World? A concerted effort should be made by the authorities to tackle this problem which can have long term adverse effects. Inzamam is one of the few batsmen who scored more than 10,000 runs in ODIs that also playing at No: 6 at times while most of the players in 10,000 clubs were openers. This aspect shows his greatness.

  • Hassan Abbas on October 11, 2007, 0:17 GMT

    Mr.Abbasi, plz moderate this blog, there is a lot of bad language used in so many posts and u print them all, have a look at the post with this heading "for LITTLE maharashtrun and OILY malabaran" in ur article about afridi not playing test cricket. Secondly i would like to say that u must give ur comments at the end of the blog about which bloggers u agree with. Thx.

  • Mohammed #1 on October 11, 2007, 0:16 GMT

    Nicely written. But an issue with Inzi is that many commentators say that Inzi was scared of the NEW SEAMING AROUND BALL in ODI thats why he batted so lower down the order.

    It is said that the best batsmen in your team should be facing the most number of balls. Thats why Ponting bats number three, Kallis used to and Dravid and Tendulkar bat at 2 and 3 repectively because THEY CAN ALL FACE THE MUSIC produced by a moving ball.

    Whereas in many matches Inzi himself has decided to bat down the order where the conditions become more easy. He has done this mainly as a captain and in many situations which require the 'best batsmen' to stand up and be counted and set an example for the rest of the batting line up. But Inzi has refused this resposibility and hidden down the order throughout the last 15 years.

    This is not signs of greatness but weakness and cowardly mentality. He may be rememberd as the batsmen who shirked away from batting high up the order and dominate the attacks from the onset.

    Everybody knows the best bowlers and fast men open the bowling, so did inzi, but instead of wanting to dominate them, he avoided Great bowlers so he decided to bat at number 5. By that time there quota would be finished or the bowlers would be tired and bowl with old bowl that doesnt talk.

    Apart from these great flaws, congrats to Inzi for a fine ODI and test record. And for scoring triple 100 and WINNING the WORLD CUP 1992. Pakistan will miss you for sure. But the next good batsmen is just aroung the gully.

    IMRAN KHAN, Aquib JAVED SAQLAIN, MUSTAQ AHMED, SHOAIB, WASIM AND WAQAR WON Pakistans matches Inzi was just there for the ride. That's a dream bowling line up. It's a pity his batting wasn't dreamy like the bowling.

    AS I SPEAK INZI IS OUT VS SOUTH AFRICA FOR A SCRATCHY 14. We should not be losing like this to a Pollock less South Africa. I don't think Inzi should break Miandad Bhai's record. It would not be good for Inzi to be regarded as our best batsman on stats.

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • Amit on October 11, 2007, 0:02 GMT

    A good thread about Inzi, but many have dragged Sachin Tendulkar inside. Some bafoon name JAVED KHAN from Canada thinks Inzi is better because blah blah blah...I smell jealosy,since Pakistan cricket is going through worst decade. Buddy stop giving excuses why INzi is great or why Saeed Anwar is great than Sachin. Sachin has always been tormentor of Pak bowling and Inshallah you will see in November series.you are entitled to your opinion but that doesn't give you license for character assasination. Sachin has scored all over the world. He has toured Australia 4 times...and will go again in Nov-Dec series...and everytime he has scored against them. Sachin for most part has opened in ODIs not because he gets to score more runs, but to face the best of the oposition ( new ball attacks, seaming, quick attacks) He has been hit on the body and helmet numerous times...but got up and carried on. I am amazed how a 5'5 footer can handle world class bowlers because he is a phenomenon. he has all the shots and plays them in a way that dont look like slogs. He goes to bat with million people's hopes....thats some serious pressure because great soccer greats like Maradona have crumbled under pressure/fame. With Sachin in the team India has won many two,tri-series cups, besides good success in all ICC held tournaments. Finally let me do your character assination or let say Physco Analysis. Seems like Sachin really upsets you, It also seems like you have let yourself down in life (dissappointed your wife in bed, bad job or somebody u cared left you?) what ever it is My advice to you Cricket is a game, Life is not. Get a Life Javed.

  • abdal butt on October 10, 2007, 23:46 GMT

    The genius could have gone for another year or two entertaining the cricketing world. First it was Waqar Younis now its Inzimam's turn. These great heroes will always be remembered, but nobody will remeber Nasim Ashraf and PCB. My heartiest regards to all the national heroes who were the victims of dirty politics.

  • saif Ahmed on October 10, 2007, 23:42 GMT

    I am being dragged into this by some of the bizarre comments made regarding 1992 WC. People tend to forget that on the other end it was none other than Javed Maindad who was guiding his partners all the way through. It was his fatherly figure that helped players like Inzimam and othes perform under those trying conditions. Javed Miandad never gave up against any opposition under any circumstances. He had this unique ability to guide and teach his juniors. No doubt Inzimam is a very good batsman but he lacks the qualities of a great cricketer. If hitting out sixes and boundaries is the only criteria for being a great batsman then no one comes close to Afridi, Shehwag, Tendulkar etc. The Pakistani media and some of the stalwart of Pakistan cricket never recognised Javed Miandad's contributions to Pakistan cricket. Imran Khan led the compaign to demean javed all his life and allowed the crooks like Wasim Akram and the rest to the same against this great man. Now we have live for this!

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 10, 2007, 22:59 GMT

    Jamjar, I appreciate your comments (thanks) but please do not mention anything about my personal life on this blog in the future.

    Javed Bhai,

    If you must know that article was written in Dawn and I can’t be bothered to locate it. I don’t think any “jingoism” will be allowed in that type of a newspaper. It is the national newspaper and the most popular newspaper in the country. As regards Punjabis, I only ever called them “Pay&Do” to echo your (light-hearted) sentiments. Paindoo is a Punjabi world that was created by Punjabis for Punjabis. Contrast that with “matarwa” which is a Punjabi creation. Anyhow, I really do not hate anyone from any background. As a Pathan you will have faced relatively little discrimination compared to Karachiites, who have many grievances. Although I am a Yusufzai Pathan originally my connections to anything Pathan are very remote and I am very much Urdu Speaking (although I prefer the term “Pakistani”). My best friends have always been Punjabi. Karachi is a multi-ethnic city with less than 50% Urdu Speaking population; many will be surprised to know. The city has affluent Parsi, Hindus and Christians with some status in society unlike other provinces in the country where these minorities have “bhungee” status. It has one of the most concentrated regional representations of Shia’s and is the core residence of Memons, Aga Khans, Boris and all types of minorities who would be treated differently if they were living in Punjab or NWFP. It is the only region in the country that is not “owned” by any particular linguistic group and where everyone is welcome to prosper and seek life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The richest people in Karachi are Punjabis, not Urdu Speakers. Since Urdu Speakers are broad minded people with a history of “seasoned culture”, they are tolerant which is why most of them have relatively liberal views on religion and society. That explains why I detest religious bigotry, parochialism and regionalism. Javed Bhai, I can understand (although I do not support) your extraordinarily bitter views against India or Hinduism, but please do not go to the extent of saying that there is no discrimination against non Punjabis in Pakistan. Every educated person who understands Pakistani history, who understands the different provinces of the country and who understands what the terms “politics”, “discrimination” and “governance” mean, has some idea of the problems I speak of.

    As for the troublemaker on this blog who is always attacking Punjab, all I can say is that Mr Abbasi is very liberal to allow his comments. I am personally sick of this individual and I don’t take notice of his comments although much of what he says is the truth. Since Punjabis outnumber everyone else by a sizeable proportion, they have less of an opportunity to mingle with people from other backgrounds and understand their mentalities. For instance, most families we know are Punjabi but those Punjabi families know only one or two Urdu Speaking families. If you look at Pakistan at a national level, with a huge Punjabi majority, you can apply the same analogy. Everything else being equal, we have to assume that the views non Punjabis form about Punjabis hold greater credence than vice versa, for the sole reason that non Punjabis have had greater opportunities to mingle with and hence understand Punjabis. Hence I think the onus lies on Punjabis to think calmly, realise these truths and resolve problems by peaceful negotiation, as opposed to aggression, obstinacy and bigotry.

    Now what I have stated does not directly relate to cricket, but it is a response to your message to me regarding the Karachiite who is being a nuisance.

  • Ali on October 10, 2007, 19:54 GMT

    I agree with you Jerry, though I believe Inzis glorious career could have been statically better but what ever Inzi has achieved for Pakistan is just worth admiring. As far as comparing Inzi with Imran Khan or Javed Miandad is concerend I believe in terms of talent he might surpass them but in my opinion what really didn’t let Inzi achieve those highs was the lack of on the spot, clever and cheeky decision making ability of which javed was the master or the dynamic Imran Khan personality which didn’t only influence the Pakistani team but more often then not influenced the oposition as well. However, I believe there can only be one Imran in a century and most of Pakistan’s current team lack Miandad like traits. (I can only see shoaib malik or misbah showing glimpses of Miandad like thinking). All in all I must say, a great career is coming to an end ,and Inzi will always remain a hero in our hearts

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 10, 2007, 19:43 GMT

    Wasim Saqib very good analysis and thanks for the stats that should put 'lids on the cans.' Thats exactly what I have been saying that its not the quantity but the quality that matters. Inzi's contribution is more of quality and in terms of quantity he is not behind others 11701 runs in ODI, used to be second highest when he retired is no joke. The added responsibility is always an added pressure which Inzi has always handled better than others. IMO that makes him a better player than others.

    Yesterday was a bad day from Pakistan's batting point of view not only Inzi couldn't add more, even when Malik came in to bat, he was looking so disconnected and I wonder why? What puzzles me is, if tail enders like Abdul Rahman can easily bat against Paul Harris then, whats wrong with the superstars? The only way to deal with mediocre spin bowling is by playing on the front foot and lofting occasional straight drives over the bowler's head, which a bowler like Abdul Rahman showed them how to bat. In any case, people should read all of Wasim Saqib's posts carefully and then make sensible comments about Inzi or draw comparisons rather than jumping to their own conclusions without any facts and figures.

    khansahab, Wasim Saqib has already answered most of your questions with the help of stats and also with some good reasoning. The point you are missing here in comparing the strike rate of Tendulkar with Inzi is, which I have already mentioned in my previous post. I have said that Tendulkar's strike rate always improved after scoring a hundred. Check it out, the moment he achieves a landmark he plays differently no matter how long it takes to do that. It shows that for him, his personal achievements and personal records are more important than the team requirements. Whereas, Dhoni, Yuvraj, Uthappa or none of the new Indian players have that kinda agenda or attitude. It started with Gavaskar, Kapil, Kumble and Tendulkar that personal milestones are more important for them and that is why I don't rate them as team players.

    About your quoting the Pak newspaper about Inzi playing with a motive in this match, all I can say is, that newspaper especially that particular sports journalist loves to air jingoistic comments. I make fun of pay&do-ism but that doesn't mean I am against Punjab or Punjabis, some of my extremely good friends are from Punjab and even they never hesitate in calling a Paindoo, a Paindoo. Or, I never miss an opportunity in calling one of our kind, an akhroat. But, what I see here is some Karachi blokes are pretty serious in carrying out this regionalism banter seriously and religiously. And they use ten different nicks on this blog to show they are in majority. And those who think I write with other names are mere simpletons and you know that I am not you! As hinted by that eucephoolish guy that khansahab aka Javed A. Khan or Javed A. Khan is also Kamran Abbassi. No way Jose, I am the one and only, ;-) and you, not only know that, but you agree with me on that! Those who cannot write like us should not feel jealous, besides there is no competition here and no awards being given, write on cricket if you can or be a spectator, but don't be jealous and start mud-slinging on others. It only shows where you are coming from.

    You have talk about Indian talent, I think Vinod Kambli was a far better talent than Tendulkar unfortunately he couldn't harness his energies which got dissipated and drained out due to so many distractions. But, as far as talent is concerned he was a class player, the way he mauled Shane Warne with three straight sixes and a couple of fours in one over in Sharjah was not slog but, a treat to watch. I don't think anyone ever did that to Shane Warne, he looked so helpless. I still don't buy your argument about his list. I have seen that list when it came out. Its just a discriminating crass - a load of Kangaroo poop!

    The other point you've made was about openers that, Inzamam got more opportunities because Pakistani openers did not score big. WRONG! Because, Pak opening conundrum is in continuum since the departure of Saeed Anwar which is 2003.

    Talking about Saeed Anwar and also in ref. to Roshan at Oct. 10, 2007 12:53 PM where he said: "I am again raising the point that if one consider performances till 2003...there is no match for Tendulkar." Here is a quick trot with some "factum de quotum." My dear not so bright Roshan dan, Saeed Anwar and Tendulkar started their career more or less at the same time. And, during his career he was in and out of the team a few times - missed the 92 WC too - due to injuries and personal family issues. But, the way he was batting in 1998-99 was phenomenal. In the ODI fastest 4000 runs ranking i.e., before 1996-97, Tendulkar was ranked 15th and Saeed Anwar was ranked 18th. Then, in the ODI fastest 5000 runs ranking i.e., upto 1997-98, Tendulkar was ranked 12th and Saeed Anwar was ranked 13th. Then in the ODI fastest 6000 runs ranking i.e., during 1998-99, Tendulkar was ranked 14th and Saeed Anwar was ranked 7th. So this was the period he was leading way ahead of Tendulkar in scoring runs but, then he had family problems and the tragic death of his daughter in 2001 kept him out of cricket, even when he retired in 2003 with 8000 plus runs in ODI, he was ranked 4th and his 194 against India is still a world record.

    The moral of the story is: don't open the Roshan dan dhakkan for getting extra light in the room when it is night time. Cheers! ;-)

  • Mohamed Z. Rahaman on October 10, 2007, 18:47 GMT

    On behalf of all West Indians I want to wish Inzi all teh best. Insha'Allah he will find success in life after cricket. He was truly a great batsman and I remember him in his first WC when he went on a rampage against NZ and saved Pak and then as they say the rest is history. Inzy, I feel however, should have retired several years ago. For many years he has been a liability running between the wickets and even batting in crucial situations. Truthfully, he should have not been picked for the last 3 years or so. Having said that, I do believe that Woolmer's death and the subsequent accusations against Pakistans' players and the Darrell Hair debacle of the forefeited test, was very unfair to Pak and Inzy in particular. After all, he was just standing up for his team. The press, especially the English was harsh on Inzy but, as all Pakistanis know, it's the local critics, many of whom are former players, whose words stings the most.

    Inzy will go down in history as one of the best hitters of the ball and a truly great batsman. I do not wish to compare him with others because this is his day and that is for another time. From the time he stepped on the field and his boyish celebration when Pakistan won the WC in Australia to the mature contemplative leader of his country's cricket team, Inzamam-ul-Haq went to the wicket a boy and came back a man

  • ali_a on October 10, 2007, 17:31 GMT

    Wow I have never seen so much poetry on this blog before, amazing... I wish Inzi would read this blog to see how much he is admired world over.

    Yes it is sad to see him go like this, but after the wc failure it was inevitable that he would not get a chance to play even if he wants to. But thanks to PCB for finally getting some sense and letting a great Pakistani cricketer go with dignity.

    Inzi you were a great batsman for Pakistan and we thank you for this. We wished if your captaincy also matched your batting. Anyways, you have one more innings to play and Pakistan really needs you to score a double century and win this game for one last time.

    I still remember your batting in the 1992 world cup. The only other batsman who played his strokes as effortlessly as Inzi did was Majid Khan. While he did not have a good farewell match, I pray for Inzi to have a memorable one.

    While I wished Inzi would have scored 10K runs for Pakistan and would have continued to play for at least one more year. To others it may seem meaningless, but I still feel some experienced players should be in the side for the younger generation to watch and learn from. I don't know why age plays such a big part in Pakistani sports, it certainly does not in Australian cricket (looked at Warne, McGarth and Hayen etc.). Also don't understand why playing under a young captain as Inzi pointed out that the environment in the dressing room was different. Again you see Jayshuria play with a younger team. But I respect Inzi's decision to go with dignity.

    Inzi may God bless your soul and give you happiness in life. We hope to see you maybe as a Pakistani batting coach, as they definitely need one. I wish other Pakistani cricketers to have better farewells.

  • talal javed, Mississauga, Ontario on October 10, 2007, 17:17 GMT

    very well written Mr. Kamran. when we made inzamam the captain of pakistan team, he was the only choice at that time. but look at him, he brough peace, discipline with the team. At this time we should only look at his successes but not the failures. every one in the team priases him other than shoaib akhter (:) )which no one cares. he is very nice hearted person, good heart, good human being. he has given a lot to pak cricket and he deserves the best. thnak you inzamam bhaie and we all wish you the best and success.

  • wije on October 10, 2007, 17:05 GMT

    He is a wonderful batsmen.God bless him

  • JamJar on October 10, 2007, 17:05 GMT

    Dear All,

    I find it despicable that on a thread which was created by our fair man Abbassi to celebrate and commemorate Inzamam’s outstanding contribution to Pakistan cricket and the sport itself, some bloggers are taking this opportunity to belittle his talents and pull apart his record to support their own arguments and views. Not naming any names, but you all know who you are!

    Inzi is a legend in Pak cricket. The feats he has produced with the bat, the matches he has won, the dire situations his skill and temperament have untangled for Pakistan are without parallel. True, there have been moments where he has greatly disappointed, especially with his running between the wickets, but the dude has carried Pakistan’s batting for a long time. His wicket was prized among bowlers all round the world and that says it all.

    As talented as he is/was, the only regret I have of him is his inability to apply some professionalism to his batting (in terms of his fitness). If only he was fitter, slimmer and more athletic, he would have been even greater. But you have to consider his environment, this after all is Pak cricket, hardly the most professional of set ups.

    On to Pak’s performance in this test series. The batting has been a shambles. Its ironic that in a situation where Pak’s openers have mischievously constructed a decent platform to build a good innings lead, the middle order fails to click. Pak needs to play to its strengths and construct pitches which will suit their potent pace bowling attack. However, in my opinion, this is a double edged sword and the PCB are aware of it. Creating fast bouncy tracks will not only help Pak bowlers outdo the opposition, it will also expose the frailties of our batsmen. If our batsmen are struggling on a slow pitch, what will happen to them on a pitch with some juice?

    Wasim Saqib – Agree with your sentiments on YK. I have no idea what goes on in his head to gift his wicket on soo many crucial moments. It happened in the 20:20 final and its happened in both his first innings against SA (although he did redeem himself in the 2nd innings of the first match). Truth is, I lost a lot of respect for dude on the whole captaincy saga which I was why when I had a lone chance encounter with him on a quiet street in Glasgow city centre in July, I walked straight past him without any greeting or acknowledgement.

    Khansahab – Dude, its thread on Inzi. The guy has made a great contribution to Pak cricket and has held the batting together on countless occasions. You talk about Tendulkar’s record. True he has a superb record but Inzy’s centuries have won more matches for Pakistan than Tendulkar’s has for India. You’ll have your opportunity to lavish praise on your hero Tendulkar once he retires, for now, give Inzy his due. With regards to our last exchange on your difficult with assessment centres. All I can is that I can empathise with your experiences having gone through the process myself. It takes a couple to get under your belt before you learn how to perform in them. Persevere dude and you’ll get there in the end.

  • Vikas on October 10, 2007, 16:58 GMT

    While the outpouring of commendations for most probably the finest batsman of his country is well and truly justified,it has with many of his countrymen trying to place him at the pinnacle of cricketing bats inhabited with the likes of Lara and Tendulkar.While Inzamam was certainly a genius bat,he still came with limitations.It doesn't go blind with the eye that Inzy took a few overs to get settled in while batting and then go in for the big shots,a limitation that doesn't dog either Lara or Tendulkar.Also he doesn't possess a boasting record against the Australians in Australia,the finest cricketing time for a long time and for many a years to come .Having said that I have no wish to deny Inzy his glory in his final moments in the field that he had so enthralled many a public for countless times.

    Hats off Inzy,

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 10, 2007, 16:53 GMT

    Wasim Saqib,

    When I say Inzamam has been an inconsistent player, I mean to say that his performance levels have fluctuated and he has not been able to demonstrate continued decent performances over a period of time. If you go in Cricinfo Statsguru and see his performances every year since his debut, you will know what I am talking about.

    In ODI’s, his average was 51 in 1993, then in 1996 it dropped down to 25, it was 50 again in 2001 but then in 2002 it dropped to 29. In Tests his consistency is slightly better. His average in 1993 was 40, then next year in 1994 it was 62, but then in 1998 it was only 18, again in 2001 he was superb with an average of 70, but then again in 2004 it went as low as 37.

    Whereas Miandad’s batting average ever since his first inning never dropped below 50.

    People have spoken about biased umpiring. In my experience the two players who have suffered the most from umpiring errors are Ganguly and Tendulkar. Whatever limited matches I have seen Tendulkar play, it is almost like one out of his five dismissals is in truth not out. I don’t know what umpiring errors you are talking about; if you mean to say that Inzi was not out when he was given out obstructing the field, then he should have known better and it was his stupidity that he was not familiar with the rules. Plus your comment about Pakistanis not admiring their players and lavishing other countries’ players- for one thing, Pakistanis are very reluctant to praise anyone, especially Tendulkar and secondly, as commentators why should we be biased? I don’t have a problem saying that Miandad is probably nothing compared to Tendulkar.

    I don’t care if Miandad’s average is only 2 more than Inzi and I was not putting forward this point in my earlier arguments. I apologise if that is how I came across. Since I have never seen Miandad play (except his last ball six on youtube) I cannot comment on his raw batting skills. But I was just comparing the overall careers and records of the two batsmen. When it comes to Australia I don’t see how you can say that Inzi’s (lack of) performance against McGrath and Warne can be ignored. Tendulkar and Dravid, even Sanjay Manjrekar and Ravi Shastri, may consider Inzamam to be one of the best, but I have never seen a bowler applaud Inzamam the way I have seen McGrath and Allan Donald applaud Tendulkar. I personally witnessed some highlights a decade ago when Sachin was toying with Pollock’s and Donald’s bowling. Donald was fiery and arrogant; he bowled a vicious quick delivery outside Sachin’s off stump. Somehow Sachin managed to jump, flick the ball from outside off stump towards midwicket for a four. Donald was more amazed than me. For a while he was shocked, then he relaxed, elevated his arms and clapped for Sachin. I have never seen a moment like that ever, where a fiery pace bowler has applauded a batsman who has just smacked him for a boundary.

    I accept your point about Tendulkar and Dravid having more able partners than Inzi. That is a good point to make.

    But Wasim Saqib, Dravid and Tendulkar have been great in previous WC’s whereas Inzi has not performed to potential in WC’s. If you or Javed Bhai want to say that his pressure absorbing skills make him better than Tendulkar, then you will also have to accept that Inzi failed in the most prestigious tournament, the World Cup(s).

    Since Pakistanis are very emotional people who forget reason and fairness when making assessments, I think it is fair to forgive me for having a grudge against Inzi owing to his rubbish captaincy. I don’t care how rubbish a captain Miandad or Tendulkar was, my concern is that Pakistan should have gone far into the World Cup. I don’t care what kind of captains Miandad or Tendulkar were.

    I do accept I have a certain bias against Inzi (although at the same time I feel my arguments criticising him are very reasonable too). I know he has been a great player. But I think Yousuf will overtake him in two years if he is still playing. People misinterpreted my comment when I said Malik is better than Inzi. What I was trying to say is that by the time Malik retires, he will be a more prolific batsman than Inzamam. Call it a gut feeling.

  • aamir khan on October 10, 2007, 16:17 GMT

    Inzi has been bad news for pakistan lately and its good that he is finally gone. Didn't score much on his exit anyways.. Bye Bye old inzy. Dont ever come back in any form of cricket. and keep yr religion to yr home . Its not helping !!!

  • Ashaq on October 10, 2007, 15:57 GMT

    "Champions are not made in gyms.Champions are made from something deep inside them. A desire a dream a Vision.They Have to have last minute Stamina...they have to have the skill and the Will. But the will must always be stronger then the Skill."

    Greatest Of All Times ..Muhammad Ali.

    So total respect Inzi for having the Mark of a True champion...Happy retirement and Oh yes Happy eating, Old Chap.

  • Elle on October 10, 2007, 15:41 GMT

    Posted by: Jerry at October 10, 2007 1:37, PM

    Aaahhh Jerry, thanks for telling it like it is...And as another non-Pakistani I share your views on Inzi.

    It would be great if people stop this Inzi bashing now! Goodness gracious me! I am not a Graeme Smith fan, but at least I know when to draw the line! And when Jacques Kallis calls it quits one day I will hope to remember the great innings'instead of the tortoisy ones.

    This blog has served to prove at least one thing: What a fool believes he sees, no wise man has the power to reason away. (Thanks Michael McDonald)

    Uhm, I'll wait till the end of the test and say my final goodbye to the big guy. Later days people.

  • Amar on October 10, 2007, 15:40 GMT

    Javad INSANE montreal Khan...

    Pls do not comment about Tendulkar..keep your comments to the pakistani players..and this blog is about INZI ..so pls dont hijack the it with your silly boring stuff...besides you have shown yourself to be utterly racist!! And i really have to warn you do not comment on someone elses religion or his or her practices..as i am sure others too are very well capable of enlightning you on your own religion and practices ...(only clearly shows what a loser mentality you have..selecting some odd bizzare negative news and generalising the same...no wonder you and you lal-mandi ilk spoil the name of the whole community in the west ) ....I am not even sure if the author of this blog will post this..because if he is allowing your fundamentalist,racist views like yours here..surely he wouldnt like my post!!

    and as for someone commenting on Sachin not being a matchinner..and only 17 of his 44 hundreds contributing to wins for India in one-dayers..

    THIS IS AN ARTICLE FOR YOU...(SACHIN HAD 41 AT THE TIME)

    When many people say how many of Sachin's hundreds have come for a winning cause, Here is analysis of each of those centuries he scored when INDIA lost and reason why it went in vain. Out of the 41 hundreds,........................ Out of the 41 hundreds, 11 hundreds have gone in vain.

    1. 137 off 137 (Strike rate 100) balls Vs SriLanka at Delhi in 1996 World Cup . India scored 271/3 in 50 overs. The only other 50 score was from Azhar. SL made 272 in 48.4 overs. Manoj Prabhakar had 4-0-47-0. He also opened in the innings and scored 7 of 36 balls.

    2. 100 of 111 Balls Vs Pak in Singapore- Apr 96 . India 226 all out in 47.1 overs, When Sachin was out score was 186/4 (We cant blame because next 3 are match fixtures) . Pak had a reduced target of 187 from 33 overs.

    3. 110 of 138 Balls (Slower but...) vs Sri Lanka In Colombo - Aug 96. Again India 226 for 5 in 50 overs, Only other 50 score from Azhar (58 of 99 balls !!!) .Sachin has also bowled 6-0-29-1 , the second most economical bowler and the only wicket taker (SL were 230/1 in 44.2 ) of the match next to Srinath. 7 bowlers were used by Azhar.

    4. 143 of 131 Balls (!!!) Vs Aus at Sharjah, Apr 1998. This was chasing under lights. The qualifying match before the final. The whole world knows about this match. Still one interesting point, when Sachin was out India were 242 at 5 at 43 overs. Target was 276 in 46. Still India finished at 250/5 scoring just 8 of the next 3 overs. Great performance by Laxman and Kanithkar indeed.

    5. 101 of 140 Balls against SL at Sharjah in Oct 2000. Indian score was 224/8 in 50 overs. (No other 50 score). SL got 225/5 in 43.5, Sachin also bowled 5-0-22-0, better economy rate than everyone except Srinath.

    6. 146 of 153 Balls against Zimbabwe at Jodhpur - December 2000 (Game of Dougla Mariliar) India made 283 / 8 in 50 overs. Sachin was the last man to be dismissed, score was 235/8 at 46.3 overs when he was out. Agarkar and Zaheer Khan propelled India to 283 in the last 3.3 overs. When Sachin has scored 146 of 235 in 46.3 overs, you can guess what the other 8 great batsmen were doing against the World class Zimbabwe attack. Second Highest scorer was Zaheer Khan with 32. Zim got 284/9 in 49.5 overs. Kumble bowled the last over. Sachin also got 6-0-35-1

    7. 101 of 129 Balls Vs SA at Johannesburg - Oct 2001 India got 279/5 in 50, Ganguly made 127 of 126 balls. When Ganguly got out, the score was 193-1 in 35.2 overs. Sachin was the last man to get out at 263. SA got 280 in 48.4 overs. Sachin bowled 9-0-51-0, second best in economy rate next only to Agarkar (10-0-45-1)

    8. 141 of 135 balls Vs Pak at Rawalpindi, March 2004 . India were chasing 329 and were 317 all out in 48.4 overs, 8 balls to spare. No other batsman made even a 50 (when chasing 300 ) and when Sachin was out, India were 245-4 in 38.4 overs. They needed 85 from 68 balls with 6 wickets in hand.

    9. 123 of 130 Balls vs Pak at Ahmedabad, April 2005. India made 315/6 in 48 overs (48 over match), again no other 50 score. Second highest was Dhoni 47 of 64 balls, (third highest was extras - 39). Pak made 319 in 48 overs. The three quicks (Balaji, Nehra and Khan went for 188 runs from 26 overs between them taking only 2 wickets). Sachin bowled 6-0-36-1. No Harbhajan and no Kumble.

    10. 100 of 113 Balls Vs Pak at Peshawar, Feb-2006. India were 328 all out in 49.4 overs. Pathan and Dhoni got 60 each. When Sachin was out when India were 305-5 in 45 overs. Managed only 23 in the last 5 overs.Pak scored 311/7 in 47 overs and won by D/L method. Could have been anybody's game. Sachin did not bowl.

    11. 141* of 148 balls vs WI at Malaysia. India made 309 /5 in 50 overs. Sachin was not out. Pathan was the only other 50 scorer. WI made 141/2 in 20 overs and won by D/L method. Again could have been anybody's game.

    In the other 31 instances India has won 30 times and once there was no result.

    Now, please think again when you say sachin's 100s were in the losing cause and that he is not a team player.

    It is a fact that for the entire 90's India played International cricket with 1 PLAYER and 10 JOKERS.

    [no wonder "J insane khan" wants Sachin to retire..his BIG horses still cant catch up half of what Sachin has done..and he dosent want the bar to be raised higher!!]

  • Mohammed #1 on October 10, 2007, 15:24 GMT

    Nicely written. But an issue with Inzi is that many commentators say that Inzi was scared of the NEW SEAMING AROUND BALL in ODI thats why he batted so lower down the order.

    It is said that the best batsmen in your team should be facing the most number of balls. Thats why Ponting bats number three, Kallis used to and Dravid and Tendulkar bat at 2 and 3 repectively because THEY CAN ALL FACE THE MUSIC produced by a moving ball.

    Whereas in many matches Inzi himself has decided to bat down the order where the conditions become more easy. He has done this mainly as a captain and in many situations which require the 'best batsmen' to stand up and be counted and set an example for the rest of the batting line up. But Inzi has refused this resposibility and hidden down the order throughout the last 15 years.

    This is not signs of greatness but weakness and cowardly mentality. He may be rememberd as the batsmen who shirked away from batting high up the order and dominate the attacks from the onset.

    Everybody knows the best bowlers and fast men open the bowling, so did inzi, but instead of wanting to dominate them, he avoided Great bowlers so he decided to bat at number 5. By that time there quota would be finished or the bowlers would be tired and bowl with old bowl that doesnt talk.

    Apart from these great flaws, congrats to Inzi for a fine ODI and test record. And for scoring triple 100 and WINNING the WORLD CUP 1992. Pakistan will miss you for sure. But the next good batsmen is just aroung the gully.

    IMRAN KHAN, Aquib JAVED SAQLAIN, MUSTAQ AHMED, SHOAIB, WASIM AND WAQAR WON Pakistans matches Inzi was just there for the ride. That's a dream bowling line up. It's a pity his batting wasn't dreamy like the bowling.

    AS I SPEAK INZI IS OUT VS SOUTH AFRICA FOR A SCRATCHY 14. We should not be losing like this to a Pollock less South Africa. I don't think Inzi should break Miandad Bhai's record. It would not be good for Inzi to be regarded as our best batsman on stats.

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • Mohammed #1 on October 10, 2007, 15:19 GMT

    Imran khan, mustaq ahmed,javed, Shoiab, Waqar, wasim and Saqlain WON Pakistani matches Inzi was just there for the ride.

    Good player Inzamam, nice article. But apart from Imran Khan no Legends of the game regard Inzi as a great. He was not even in Shane Warne's top 50 cricketers of his generation even though Warnies top 10 made perfect sense.

    In addition Richie Benaud who has seen all the Greats play cricket from Bardman to Imran Khan to Tendulkar. He has never even acknowledged Inzi as a legend. Close inspection of Inzi's performance against WORLD CLASS bowling attacks reveals he was not good enough.

    He is lucky to have bowling greats defending his runs or HE WOULD NOT BE A MATCH WINNER at all. WASIM WAQAR, SAQLAIN, MUSTAQ AHMED, AND SHOAIB. 3 Great fast bowlers and 2 fine spinners. Lara had Ambroase and WALsh aswell. Tendulkar had and still has average bowlers defending his runs.

    NO GREATS OF THE GAME DISCUSS INZI, BRADMAN never made any comments after Inzi destroyed New Zealand in 1992. Sir Viv Richards has never spoke of Inzi, maybe he wasn't GOOD enough to them to discuss????

    But I must say he was a GOOD servant for Pakistani cricket but not the best batsmen for Pakistan. Where was Inzi during World Cup 1996,2003 and 2007?

    I hope Inzi becomes a great in whatever he pursue next in life because it wasn't as a batmen.

  • sami on October 10, 2007, 14:44 GMT

    Inzi... one of the greatest batsman of all times and probably the best player of all times under pressure.I have not seen anyone more efficient and a class act than inzi under pressure.He had won lot of matches for pakistan under pressure situations.My salute to one of the greatest batsman of all time

  • hari on October 10, 2007, 14:43 GMT

    It is not a new story in pakistan cricket.Whoever has played well for Pakistan has been tarnished so badly at the end of their career and has been forced to go out of the team in the form or inevitable retirement. Wasim and Waqar had won infinite no of matches for Pakistan, but the whole world did not even heard of their retirement, which is very pity. So, i think the same thing happend to Inzamam also, so not only he is a tragic hero, but whoever has played well for Pakistan has been tragic heroes at the end of their career.

  • Rauf lala on October 10, 2007, 14:28 GMT

    It is a sad end to inzy bhai's career. I mean unfortunate debacle in world cup. Last match which pakistan is going to loose. Script for inzys farewell could have been better.

  • Gopinath on October 10, 2007, 14:03 GMT

    Inzamam deserves the best possible fairwell,mind you he single handedly brought Pakistan into reckoning in that classic 92 semis.NZ which had cruised in a fairytale way was absolutely taken aback with his knock. Though not comparable with Imran Khan w.r.to captaincy,just for his WC performance he is an all time great of Pakistan cricket.

  • Jerry on October 10, 2007, 13:37 GMT

    I don't agree that his career could have been any more glorious. What he achieved is what every cricketer dreams of. A few more runs or a few more centuries isn't going to make him any more great. He played like a champion and will always be remembered as one. What happened last year should in no way make us forget the joy he brought with his batting. Being an Indian, i would always pray to see him out as early as possible, but the genius of the man never failed to make me applaud every shot he played and every lazy run he ran, he was a class apart and one who deserves an ovation from every cricket lover.

  • Rajiv on October 10, 2007, 13:09 GMT

    I think the greatest contribution of Inzy is to bring cricketing glory to Indo-Pak ties. First time in history,after Imran-Miyadad-Gavaskar-Kapil days that the victory of other side by Indians and Pak people were acknoledged and accepted. India beat Pak in 2004 with a reversal in the next year in India. On both the occassions, there was no bitterness either among the players or the crowd or the countrymen. Previously, all the players played for their heroics. That was the greatest contribution of Inzy in support with Saurav Ganguly, who fought well but only on the field.

  • Preetam on October 10, 2007, 12:57 GMT

    Inzi...one of the greatest player who ever walked(literally :-) on the cricket pitch. I salute you and thank you for the wonderful memories you gave us with your silken yet powerful batting. Hats off to you Inzi. May you have a great life ahead.

  • Roshan on October 10, 2007, 12:53 GMT

    On the risk of being repititive I am again raising the point that if one consider performances till 2003...there is no match for Tendulkar...the only blemish that will always haunt him is his decision of not quiting the game now...he is clearly struggling....For all those who are jealous with his record they can well say whatever they like...some are saying that Tendulkar is better Bcoz he played a lot as an opener...just to correct them...he always played in middle order in test matches....& one better reply...If openers job is that simple then I think people like Salman butt, Kamran akmal, Yasir hameed, Imran nazir are all better than Inzi...arent they???? They are if you apply Javed arrogant khan logic.

  • Fardan Khalid on October 10, 2007, 12:50 GMT

    The people (Inzi's Detractors) who have written on this blog, "the MOHAMMEDS, the SAIMAS (PS - women should stick their crap to their kitchens) and the RAJA PAKISTANIS should go back to their Rickshaws and Pakoda thailas" because by writing crap we have come to a conclusion, illiterates or semi-literates who've not even held a bat properly in their sad lives are not welcome and their knowledge about cricket should be limited to Galli/Mohalla cricket. Dr. Nasim Ashraf and his fellow goons running the show are just as predictable as our current military regime of idiots. The saying goes like "BANDAR KE HAATH MEY MACHIS DO GEY TO WO SAARE JUNGLE TO AAG LAGA DE GA". Dr. & Co. have somehow convinced Inzi at gun point to a so called respectable farewell or the fear of being dropped for good will be looming at his head - knowing what happened to the likes of Wasim, Waqar, Saeed, & others, this is highly possible. STOP praising buffoons like Dr. Nasim Ashraf & Co.!!!!!!! Inzi wanted to play Test cricket for another 2 years at least, which was also CLEARLY highlighted by him!!!!! The sudden decision was not his own but of the people running the show. We DO NOT have technically correct players or as a matter of fact anyone who is good enough to replace him. We do not have any back ups for his replacement. I was just a school boy on the 25th of March 1992 and have seen you throughout these years. INZI, YOU ARE AND WILL ALWAYS BE ONE OF THE BEST & FINEST PAKISTAN HAS EVER PRODUCED. I CONSIDER MYSELF LUCKY TO BE BORN IN THIS ERA AND TO HAVE SEEN YOU PLAY. Years & years down the line, if I am alive, I will tell my grand children that there was a time when I grew up seeing INZI BAT. You have truly lived your life like a CANDLE IN THE WIND!! GOD BLESS YOU!!

  • fair enough on October 10, 2007, 12:34 GMT

    I like inzy.. his attitude and ability were a delight to watch in full flow, but so often it wasnt anywhere near that.

    He appeared to perform when it suited him and lacked discipline at other times. His averages (not centuries, etc) against the best teams of his era was not up to the mark and his touring averages in general were not like those of when he played at home.

    A good batsman yes. One of the most talented batsman ever yes. But they dont hand the title of "Great" out for talent - it is handed out for results and averages.

    The simple fact is that Lara, Tendulkar, Dravid, Ponting, Kallis are all on a different plane when it comes to consistency and performance against all teams - and the sad new for inzy is that that plane left the terminal with his boarding pass waiting at the gate - he just didnt take the flight that his talent booked him a ticket on.

  • Saad Khan on October 10, 2007, 12:00 GMT

    yes,offcourse we are waitfull for all that inzi special episode and Inshallah Allah will bless him.we love you Inzi wheter u loses or wins we are with you bcz we knw that ur the best batsmen of this era and Pakistan ever produced.just to keep ur 19 match wining centuries and ur 2861 runs as ODI captain are best figurs for anyone .Ur the best ur the best and ur the best thats wot i wanna say. LOVE u INZI ur pride of PAKISTAN. our LANGUID HERO.

  • imran on October 10, 2007, 10:25 GMT

    Enough about Inzi, and I say that after watching his performance in the first innings. It proves that he needs to hang his bat. As far as I can remember, there are a very few times in his long tenure in the Pak team that he has played an innings of substance, today's match against SA is prime example. When we need the most from him, is when he has time and time failed the Pak team.

    So again enough about Inzi, I am more concern about the current situation of the match. IS IT JUST ME OR the ASIF & UMAR are not bowling with any passion, as if going thru the motions. What a horrible display of team. It seems someone cut the balls out of the Pak team. I hate to say this, as much of an ASS&%$& Shohaib Akhter is, we (PAK) needs him, purely because he bowled with aggression, with intent, with passions. This I do not see from the current team selection....

  • Aasim Zafar Khan on October 10, 2007, 9:36 GMT

    the next time you have a drink, how about a toast to the gentle giant, who for many a year shepherded a band of men without cause and without direction.

    this whole bottle's for you inzi, may you stay forever young.

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 10, 2007, 9:21 GMT

    Javed Bhai,

    First of all we were never comparing the batting performances of Tendulkar and Inzi when they were captain. So I can skip this point. Many great players have faltered in their batting with the responsibility of captaining a side. We were talking about the overall careers of the batsmen.

    Secondly, the Pakistan top order has always been weak. You say being an opener Tendulkar has had more opportunities to score. Firstly he has only often opened in ODI’s; in Tests he has rotated in the top 5 batting slots. Since the Pakistani top order has been so weak, Inzi has had many opportunities to come in to bat in the first 15 overs, even when the field restrictions have been in place. The reason why I rate Saeed Anwar so highly is because he was as an opener and opening is difficult, especially for Pakistani batsmen. Here we must give greater credit to Tendulkar because of his unmatched brilliance in opening. Also, it seems all Inzi could do was bat at no 5, whereas Tendulkar has opened in ODI’s and has established himself as one of the finest middle order batsmen in Tests in the history of cricket. A look at Tendulkar’s career summary reveals that he has played the vast majority of his Tests at no 4 and the vast majority of ODI’s as opener. Traditionally middle order batsmen score much more than openers- the top batsmen in the world (with the exclusion of Tendulkar) are middle order batsmen (Lara, Kallis, Ponting, Inzamam, Yousuf, Jayawardene). So if Tendulkar has demonstrated such brilliance as an opener, then he must be better than the world thinks he is! Plus another reason why this argument of yours is weak, is because Tendulkar is a naturally attacking batsman whereas Inzi is only moderately attacking (compare the strike rate of both batsmen in ODI’s- Tendulkar’s is 85 whereas Inzi’s is 74)). When you look to attack from the first ball there is a greater chance of being dismissed, whereas Inzi usually settles down first and then starts scoring.

    As far as your accusation of Tendulkar’s thirst for personal records goes, I have repeatedly made reference to a newspaper article from a leading Pakistani newspaper which outlines Inzi’s real motives for participating in this current Test. If that isn’t lust for personal glory, I don’t know what it is. I don’t really care if a player plays for himself or for the country; the important point is that he should score big because it is the team that benefits at the end of the day.

    Javed Bhai, I am surprised you missed the fact that in his list Warne has only mentioned players whom he has played against sufficiently to be able to give them a fair rating. I was initially surprised at the exclusion of Imran Khan but then I realised that Warne is only rating his peers whereas Imran is a bit before Warne’s time. The fact that poor Inzi did not even make it in the top 50 tells you the type of respect the best bowlers (Aussies) have for him. You can’t say here that Warne was biased because he placed Wasim Akram at no 6, which is fair. So whether you “care” or not what the Aussie or the outside world thinks of Inzamam and Sachin, you can’t escape the fact that to the vast majority of neutral observers, Sachin is a class apart from Inzamam. I enjoyed watching Inzi bat more than Tendulkar but that is only because of the natural bias.

    Finally your accusation of Indians and their quirky worshipping ethic. First of all Javed Bhai, their religion is very, very old, originating from the days where it was normal to worship and respect anything that was vaguely “inhuman”. As Muslims regardless of how ridiculous or erroneous we may find their religions practices, you have to accept that fact that they are told by their religious texts and their parents that their religion is the correct one, just like how the Quran and our parents have embedded in our minds that we follow a sensible and “the” correct religion. So have some tolerance. Secondly, they worship “people” who have achieved so much that it is unusual for a human to achieve that much. Of course I am not saying they are justified in worshipping humans, but suffice to say, they worship Bachan, Shahrukh Khan and Sachin, they do not worship Yuvraj, Dravid or Ganguly (you may get the odd crowd randomly worshipping anyone, but here I am mentioning an organised, systematic form of worship). Hence, they worship Sachin for his unmatched achievements- for instance they do not worship Dravid who will probably be considered as one of the greatest batsmen of all time too, when he retires.

  • faizullah khawaja on October 10, 2007, 9:05 GMT

    INZI IS A GREAT PLAYER NO DOUBT BUT HE DID NOT DESERVE TO BE IN THIS MATCH.he was not match fit nor mentally fit to play the test. He should have been rewarded for his servise by giving him some tamgha imtiaz or something and a few carores or whatever and a big sending off party. to drop a deserving young player who did ok in karachi was not good for the team and the results will reflect our mistake. everyone has to go one day and it has been way past his time.these days players get more than enough monetary compensation to think about sending off games specially when they have been sitting on their backsides for many months and not fit to play.our players are not professional enough to keep fit during off season so when they come back they are rusty. secondly pakistan should have played a third seamer. they are a bowler short. i thought lawson being a fast bowler should have realised that. we are going to loose badly once againe and it would be one of our worst home performance. I think we were not ready for tests .our prep was for T20 ONLY.WE can see our players struggling to play a long innings.

  • Elle on October 10, 2007, 9:04 GMT

    Oh great! Right in the middle of another "literary masterpiece" and we have a power outage throughout South Africa...You have just got to LOVE this country...

    Now, before I was so rudely interrupted, I believe I was making a comment on the post by Shaikh Uh, yeah. :-)

    It is not in my nature to heap praise on anyone. I only give it when its due. And this morning on SuperCricket, the panel agreed with me: Inzi has meant a lot to the game of cricket, not only for his country, but for the game of cricket as a whole. Yes sir, I agree with that. I will NOT go into the discussion of what he achieved against what teams and what he did not. The fact that he played the game for 17 years, and can leave it with people from around the world singing his praises says a great deal about the man.

    Some people still need to understand that you dont you have to LIKE someone to acknowledge their achievements. I think someone once said that watching Inzi in full swing is poetry in motion.

    Unfortunately, not a lot of that poetry on display yesterday...Maybe just a little limerick:

    After 17 years we say goodbye, Seventeen years, in the wink of an eye A final drive, one last pull past fine One more sweep (across the line!) Seventeen years..Hey, I'm a girl so I'm allowed to cry!

    Heh heh! My daughter does not think its funny... If Inzi does not get that last 100, Pakistan is going to lose this test. Sorry guys.

  • John Gilash on October 10, 2007, 8:39 GMT

    As usual Pakistan batting coked and they are all out for 206. Pathetic performance once again as expected and that too on a purposely made spin friendly track for the home team.The saga of choking since T20 final continues. Afridi was smart enough to gauge it and took Ramadan reason as escape route. am sure this shall be blamed on fasting too.

  • Rauf on October 10, 2007, 8:37 GMT

    While everyone is jumping on the "Praise Inzi" bandwagon, Pakistan is on the verge of loosing the home test series to SA.

    Inzi was a class act and should be given his due praises, but he is leaving behind a team that is still a classic pendulum from one extreme (reaching the 20/20 final) to the other extreme (loosing the test series to SA) witin one month.

    We can shower praises on retired heroes, shower praises on current young captain but underneath the surface, Pakistan team is still suffering from the same ill affects that has kept it under blankets for last few years. No descent openers to compete even in a high school match let alone international cricket, soft middle order, lack of confidence and timid behavior on the field etc etc.

    I say good luck to Pak cricket!!

  • Suvadip Basu on October 10, 2007, 8:01 GMT

    Great work Kamran bhai.. Inzy's greatness cannot be described in a few words but you did a grea job buddy.. Inzy can definitely be called pakistan's greatest batsman , perhaps ahead of the great Javed Miandad.. Whenever I used to watch a IND-PAK match , although I always wanted India's victory, still Inzy's lazy elegence used to provide me with a lot of entertainment.. He is a gentleman in all aspects and is very much loved in India and of course all over the world.. Come on Inzy bhai score a hundred , surpass Javed bhai's record and have a great life ahead.. My prayers will always be with you..

    Regards,

    Suvadip

  • Tariq Rashid, Wah Cantt on October 10, 2007, 7:19 GMT

    Inzamam is all time great. No one can deny this fact. Critics always say filthy about him but he is favorites of thousand of thousands cricket lovers not only in Pakistan but also in the other cricketing nations. I am deeply saddened on the departure of great legend from the Pakistan cricket and would miss him throughout my life. No one will be able to produce his unbelievable short making skills. We need not to compare him with any other great player but remember only one thing that he is our great hero and has done a lot for Pakistan cricket. When he was in the team he was backbone of the team and always played anchored role for Pakistan.

    Wish you best of luck GREAT INZI. We will miss you a LOT.

  • Mohammed Munir - Sharjah, UAE. on October 10, 2007, 6:06 GMT

    "Pakistan's tragic hero" or rather "Tragic End to Another Pakistani Hero".

  • Jayant on October 10, 2007, 5:50 GMT

    Thanks for the memories Inzy...All the cricket lovers around the world will miss u !

  • Omair Paracha on October 10, 2007, 5:49 GMT

    @Shaikh....You nailed it. Javed in my opinion has nothing else to do...Just look at the number of threads he has posted in two days. Get a life man. Inzi has always been one of my favorite batsmen. A quick note for all the Indians contributing here, I've always admired Ganguly and Sachin. Great players but my favorite is Ganguly and I rate him higher than Inzi or Sachin. Why is he so underrated in India?

  • BrownHouse on October 10, 2007, 4:56 GMT

    Great player of his time.. Loads of Luck to him.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 10, 2007, 4:23 GMT

    Another interesting statistical analysis for those who would like to compare Inzamam with other great batsmen.

    Inzamam played 120 tests and out of those 120 pakistan has won 49 matches.

    Lara has played 131 matches out of which WI only won 32 matches.

    Sachin has played 140 matches out of which India has won only 44 matches.

    Dravid has played 112 matches out of which India has won only 36 matches.

    Sachin has played 20 more tests than Inzamam and Lara has played 11 more tests than Inzi thats the only reason they have scored more runs than Inzi.

    The great ViV Richards have played one more test than Inzamam has scored one less century and one less 50 than Inzamam his total aggregate of runs is also less than Inzi their average is almost the same.

    The records reflect the true class of Inzamam he will always be ranked amongst the top 10 batsmen of the world.Those who doubt his class should get their heads examined.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 10, 2007, 4:10 GMT

    This one is for Shaikh at October 9, 2007 10:29 PM

    Shaikh jee - this is neither a literary work nor a poetic one, but just for the heck of it and for fun only, here are a few lines for Inzamam in Pun-job-ee.

    Abhee jummay nahee hain zameen pay qadam Inzamam kay Idher alfaaz ban rahay hain ghazal kiskay naam say? kyaa aaj hi woh din hai, jo khush hogi qaom Inzi kay naam say? Qudrat hai darakhshaan younhi apnay nizaam say Zinda har aik cheez hai koshish-e-naa-tamaam say Bay fikr-o-bay-khayal hai woh haal-e-awaam say Maahireen-e-naaz ko hai gharaz qatl-e-aam say chowkay chakkay maarnay hain ussay sar-e-shaam say Aaya hai raqeeb-e-jaan (Gunther) aaj bahut intayzaam say Dushmano, nahee daraingay hum, gardish-e-madaam say Laikin khailay ga Inzamam aaj bahot itminaan say

    For non-pun job-eez :-)

    Inzamam hasn't set his foot on the ground yet words are shaping into verses in thy name is it the day that he is going to please the nation by his fireworks like the mother nature when it brightens up the universe by its own (solar)system every living thing on this planet is striving and struggling to survive and there he is, unaware of the feelings of the nation which is behind him experts are only hoping to see the ultimate massacre and fireworks and expecting him to play sixes and fours from the outset the opponents are also very well equipped today (especially Gunther) Opponents beware! he is not afraid of anyone today Whatever is destined to happen will happen but, one thing is for sure, Inzi will play cool.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 10, 2007, 3:59 GMT

    Inzi is going to start a new day and the whole world including his 'fans and foes' are impatiently waiting to see how he fares and how he performs after his overnight score of 10 n.o.? There must be a hundred million or more prayers for him to score a hundred and there must be hundreds of millions if not a billion who are perhaps cursing and voodooing at him to see his back without adding any runs to his overnight total. Already enough comparisons have been drawn between him and his compatriots and, between him and his counterparts. But, that is not going to make any difference in what Inzi is going to do in a few hours from now. Lets see what next, as the Urdu expression goes, "ghora dooor na maidaan." Talking of ghora or a horse:

    This one is for "suraj rana at October 9, 2007 1:58 PM" He says: "comparing Tendulkar with Inzi is like compatring Ghora with GADHA." LOL. Ha ha ha good one rana, I am very pleased to know the size of an Indian Ghora. From your analogy the Indian Gadha must be even smaller than the ghora, because an Ass is smaller than a horse, right? So, this Ghora of yours must be for the pygmies, is it? And, do you know what we call this size of Ghora in Pakistan? A "Khach-churr," - a "Tuttoo" or, a "Mule" in English. Come on suraj rana say cheese now! :-)

    Mike Rosario, why are you are exposing your cricketing 'P' brain and taking the trouble of writing about Inzi and telling good riddance to him? You would be better off saving your chronic gingivitis breath to cool off Endulkar's lentil porridge when he departs at the age of 53, may be! Another old rag with a new name on this blog, without knowing how to use thesaurus decided to describe Inzi's qualities in these words:"The apparent humility in his demeanor was paradoxical to the the subtle but strong Narcissism he manifested in his captaincy and general handling of players." Wow "bum-bass-tick" use of words, you have made a big "Empress Markeet" here. LOL.

    Inzi and Narcissism ? This guy doesn't know the meaning of Narcissism. He is confused rather, "discombobulated" like the dislocated bull aka ball, Haray Krishna Haray Rama. Poor Inzi he would never imagine being labeled as a Narcissist. And chanda honey moon my posts are too big for you? Thats because your span of attention is as small as your munni samajhdaani, and andame nahani whatever, so don't stress it so much, you better save them for some big occasion and don't come here among adults, janu we are discussing cricket here. You may spend some more time dreaming about the pink butterflies and playing with purple Barbie in yellow polka dot bikini in your toy room ....tsk, chalo jao khelo!

    khansahab, pls don't even mention the name of Taufiq Omar he is 'stale' even for domestic cricket. He was presented for test cricket, in 'clearing and collection' so many times and got so many rubber stamps on his face and its hard to recognize the original face of that old 'bill of exchange' or the negotiable instrument called, Taufiq Omar...jis ki Omariya beet gayee and he failed in finding a match and establish himself ;-). In short he got enough chances to prove his worth and on most occasions he failed, besides his fielding is "disgustipatingly" pathetic And the names of the commentators you've mentioned, Amir Churail and Moin Khan they both need to take a peep into their own phutta purana "giray-baan" before they speak. Amir was and still is, a very arrogant custard with a B, and Moin Khan needs to cut down a few pegs from his hourly intake before he picks up the microphone. And btw, did you check out that link? Please do if you haven't. Also, take a look at the pictures below.

  • Another Raja from Karachi on October 10, 2007, 3:39 GMT

    Inzi is the best ever batsman for Pakistan. He was the best batsman under pressure, best batsman against fast bowling and definitely the most elegant batsman to watch. Guys like Javed Mian had no elegance and he had the worst batting stance of his times. BTW Javed scored only 1 hundred against Austrailia in Australia in 16 test matches and Inzi scored 1 hundred agaisnt Austrailia in Hobart in 8 test matches so what is the point of his not performing in Austrailia. Its a fact that most of the asian batsman struggles on bouncy pitches in Austrailia.

  • Ali on October 10, 2007, 3:29 GMT

    It really bothers me that player like Inzimam is praised like a real hero.everyone seems to have forgotten that he has failed miserably in the last two World cups(and yet they call him a big match player.how ironic).His average is mere 23 in all the world cup games he has played just go and compare his world cup stats with Miandad who was by far the best batsman ever for Pakistan.Inzama has been given too much of a credit. He has cost us many more matched than he has won,the only Match he has won in my opinion was the test match against bangladesh. Imran Khan praise Inzamam lavishly is just because he hated Miandad and its a fact. No other Great player has rated Inzamam as one of the greatest. Inzmam's record is plain pathetic against teams like Australia and South africa. lol and Imran says he is the best batsman aginst quick bowling lol,how ridiculous just show Imran's tremendous admiration for a truly average player. Inzamam has revelled against lesser attacks. he couldn't even hit a fast bowler for a straight six. In Javed's era every single team had at least one great fast bowler in their teams. while inzamam had none other than MCgrath and shaun pollock. In javed's era there was Richard Hadlee of newzealand and Kapil dev of India Dennis Lille and Jeff Thomson and many others for Australia,West INdies had the greatest bowling Attack of all-time.there were many others. While Inzamam is the luckiest batsman in the world to have been given so much confidence from everyone this something Javed has never experienced he was such a marvelous player that he stayed in the team just because of his performances. Miandad overall had far bigger influence and impact on the games than any other batsman from Pakistan. Inzamam is definitely not the best but the most overrated batsman of Pakistan. oh and in 1992 if it wasn't for Javed's brilliance and his constant advise to inzamam he wouldn't have been able to play the innings he played in 1992 inzamam barely managed to hit only one six in that innings in the smallest ground of new zealand it was the brilliance of Javed miandad alone that made him shine in the world cup semi final. In INzamam's era game is heavily tilted in favour of the batsman and everyone knows it. Javed rules there is no other player like him(in pakistan) whether you live it or lie it. Javed made Inzmam whatever he is now and INzamam is returning the favour to Miandad with such disrespect. Who can ever forget Mark taylor's great gesture to Bradman but INzamam chose to do the opposite. if you closely analyse his 92 semifinal inning you will clearly see that he had hardly middled any bowl in that game.

  • Amir Khan on October 10, 2007, 2:42 GMT

    You simply can't compare Inzy with Miandad.Even at his best Inzy has struggled against Aus & S.A. Miandad on the other hand scored against all teams in all conditions. In 1987 he scored two centuries against W.I in W.I. The bowling attack then included Marshall,Ambrose & Walsh in their prime !!

  • Iyer on October 10, 2007, 2:15 GMT

    I just happened to read what my paki bros have got to say about Inzy. It is a mixed response - some were critical about Inzy's failure against quality bowling and some were heaping praise over Inzy based on statistics, and were even comparing him with legend like Sachin. The incontrovertible truth is 'Sachin Tendulkar is above Bradman - and for all practical purposes, he should not be compared'. Sachin is an all time great. Please for allah sake do not even compare bradman or gavaskar with sachin tendulkar. When I say bradman or gavaskar, you pakis should understand inzy or miandad do not fit in anywhere near those players. In my opinion, Inzy can be compared only with Sourav Ganguly and not with gavaskar/ponting/sachin/dravid/laxman/viswanath etc. They are of different league.

    Cheers,

  • Iyer on October 10, 2007, 1:57 GMT

    Although an Indian, I think Inzy is a pretty solid batsman and he truly deserves a good farewell. He certainly belongs to the league of India's old nemesis - Imran Khan, Javed Miandad and Zaheer Abbas! It is going to take a long time for Pakistan to replace this vacumn. I can relax when India plays Pakistan next time, as there is no Inzy! ha ha ha

  • Paul on October 10, 2007, 1:51 GMT

    Great batsman, greater man.

    I'll miss watching his style and grace, at the crease and during interviews... Paul from England

  • Andy Singh on October 10, 2007, 1:29 GMT

    One of the few gentleman left in this game. Absolutely impeccable hand eye coordination was the reason of his success. He will be missed. This thread is about tribute to Inzi, not for something else. Please dont hijack the topic. Inzi will definitely be missed.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 10, 2007, 1:14 GMT

    Pakistan team is again paying the price of not selecting three fast bowlers,it seems that Shoaib Malik is not learning from his mistakes,this is the second time in the series that our bowlers were unable to get rid of the tailenders,Umar Gul failed to bowl his deadly yorkers and Asif was already tired because of extended bowling spells, field placement was ridiculous Pakistan was giving away easy runs to tailenders in shape of singles I don't know why Malik had all the fielders in the deep,he should have taken close in fielders to stop singles.

    If Inzi and Misbah score a big partnership only then Pakistan will be able to save this match. Younus khan again threw away his wicket in his trade mark fashion,whenever Pakistan gets a good start why is he in such a hurry to throw away his wicket.I think he has made up his mind that he is not going to play for the team.The shot he played was criminal,and now it has become a routine he should not be considered for the ODIS.

  • Salman Khan , Canberra on October 10, 2007, 0:59 GMT

    DEAR JAVED BHAI(JAVED A. KHAN , MONTREAL)

    The last comment today was by SHAIKH which stated " this thread has been a Love Fest , a Hate Fest and a literary discussion ( where he referred to you and Elle)".

    I therefore decided to have a look at your comment because I was expecting a sensible , reasonably unbiased point of view. I usually do not read beyond the first few lines if the entry is "Indian hate mail" or "Pakistani hate mail" because of the huge bias those views have . I must admit though that I was surprised to find that your entry was an "Indian hate mail" in disguise. The dislike which you have expressed for everything indian , from the movies to Tendulkar, in an input which was suppose to be about Inzamam , is incredible.

    It is human to have biases , all of us have them . However , when one uses a platform to express his opinion , one makes an attempt to balance out .The hallmark of a heavily biased view is when the points that substantiate one's argument are highlighted and the points which don't are intentionally sequestered . Examples of heavily biased views would be :

    -for someone to highlight Tendulkar's performance between 1998 and 2003 but not mention his failures over the last couple of years

    OR

    -for some one to highlight that Australia did not have Warne and McGrath in 2003(against India) but not mentioning that they were there in 1998 and 2001 .

    OR

    repeated refernce to Inzi's batsmanship (which was absolutely awesome indeed) but not mentioning his many shortcomings in other aspects of Cricket.And also not talking about the contribution of Pakistani bowling (the most well balanced bowling attack in the history of Cricket) during Inzis "match winning " innings.

    I will probably not change your views about Inzi or Tendulkar (or everything Indian) and it is not my intention to do so.However, I was hoping for you to focus on the positives in Pakistan Cricket rather than focussing on the negatives in Indian cricket.

    There are lots of Pakistani haters and Indian haters out there but that does not mean that we get sucked in to that.

    If you find my comments offensive, please let me know and I promise I will not comment on your views in the future.

    Regards and Eid Mubarak ,

    Salman.

  • Aamir Yunus on October 10, 2007, 0:50 GMT

    So why Inzi and Javed never scored abroad the way they scored at home? Ever thought about it? It was the biased umpiring. The opponents know that Inzi or Javed, if they can stay for 3 hours, it will be a century. So better get them out, let it be an LBW, or caught behind. Inzi, Javed and S Anwar were the 3 greatest Pakistan ever produced in 80's and 90's.

    Good luck Inzi, score a century and go not out. (You are never out, you will always be in our hearts!)

  • Muhammad Umair from Attock - Pakistan on October 10, 2007, 0:44 GMT

    TO...JAVED A. KHAN , Montreal Canada

    Mr. I think you like the sound of keyboard too much.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 10, 2007, 0:23 GMT

    Dawar,Saima Khan,Raja pakistani,Sialkoti,etc.

    My advice to you is to take Younus Khan home and you can all amuse each other,I am sure that clown will get a lot amused by your multiple genders and personalities.

    PS Please donot stop writing as nobody else can do a better job of embarrasing people from your Pind than yourself.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 10, 2007, 0:13 GMT

    Those who say that Inzamam was inconsistent all along his career should look at his record again he averaged 50 or above in tests through out his career, his average in ODIS is 40 with 10 centuries and 83 half centuries a record which has been just broken by Tendulkar he is the third highest scorer in ODI cricket he has 25 100's in test matches 17 of them are match winning performances, how many match winning 100's Lara has to his name?only 8, and Tendulkar 13 out of 44.

    Credit should be given where it is due, we are generous to shower accolades on our opponents but when it comes to our own heroes we become misers, it’s pathetic. Can somebody explain to me that what is the difference between an average of 52 and 50?

    I rated Miandad above Inzamam because Miandad was the most intelligent cricketer the world has ever seen his skills were beyond compare in pressure situations. He was the best finisher the game has ever seen; in pressure situations he used to constantly guide his partner at the other end, his mere presence used to elevate the game of his ordinary partners. He was a street fighter and a master of the game and one of those rare breed of players who would control the game the moment he would come in to bat and would dictate his terms to the opposition all the time, but that does not mean that Inzamam is a lesser batsman than Miandad.

    As far as batting skills are concerned Miandad used to play a grinding game and Inzamam is a more dominating and powerful player as he has more shots in his book than Miandad the only advantage Miandad had over Inzamam was his running between the wickets and his improvisation skills.

    Some bloggers continue to highlight Inzamam's average against Australia just to prove their point, Miandad's average against WI who were the best team in his era was a mere 29 does that mean that he was not a great batsman well then ask ViV Richards or Micheal Holding they will tell you what they think of Miandad. Similarly ask Tendulkar or Dravid about Inzamam they will have nothing but praise and respect for him. Those who are comparing Inzamam with Tendulkar or Lara should ask themselves:

    1-Out of the three who enjoyed a better supporting cast?

    2-Who has a better record as a captain out of the three? 3-Who won a WC for his country?

    If Tendulkar is so superior to Inzamam then why he was never able to win a WC for his country even though that he enjoys the company of batsmen like Dravid, Ganguly and Sehwag a luxury which Inzamam had never enjoyed.

    Inzamam should have retired before the WC 07 but Pakistan never had any chance to win the cup or even to advance in the Semis without Afridi, Shoaib and Asif a fact which most of us very conveniently forget.

    It was India who went in the tournament as favorites and was at their full strength and yet they also failed to move into the next round.

    If failure in WC 07 is going to be the only criteria to judge then how come Lara, Tendulkar and Dravid are still being rated above Inzamam they also failed miserably in WC 07. Come on guys lets be honest for once, Inzamam is great, and is not in anyways a lesser batsman than Lara, Tendulkar or Dravid.

    A lot of people hate Inzamam because of his Captaincy,I would just ask them to compare the record of Inzamam as a Captain with that of Wasim Akram and Javed Miandad and while doing so also compare the strength of the teams each of them commanded respectively. I am sure you will be surprised by the results.

  • Aleem on October 9, 2007, 23:13 GMT

    Lets not belittle a Great Man by arguing if he was as good as Lara or Tendulkar. We all know what he did for Pakistani cricket and the way he was always the perfect gentleman, a brilliant batsman and captain. And it is to the last point that I think Inzi really stood out. As good as Tendulkar and Lara are/were this was one area they both failed miserably, as captains. When it comes to the crunch, the real pressure, the sharp end, a nations expectations, Inzi's record as a Captain is far superior to that of the above mentioned batsmen. Both Tendulkar and Lara's averages as batsmen almost halved, their leadership witthered and they simply melted under the pressure.

    There have so many highs, 1992, beatin India in India, bringing England's ashes winners back to earth with bump.

    I am happy about his decision to go on his terms rather than being shunned and treated poorly as seem to be the PCB way...Miandad, Akram, Younis, Anwar to name a few.

    Personally I will shed a tear when this test ends as my all-time favourite player will be no more. I'll miss so many aspects of his game. Watchin Pakistan in the short term just wont the same.

    Huda Hafiz Inzi Bhai you will be sorely missed but never forgotten..

  • Shaikh on October 9, 2007, 22:29 GMT

    It's an Inzy love fest (everyone) .. no wait .. it's an Inzy hate fest (Saima and Raja).

    But hang on .. it's a literary discussion (Javed and Elle).

    Ah well Inzy, this is why we love you, for the range of emotions that you inspire.

    What a singularly YUMMY thread!!!

  • michael Hamid on October 9, 2007, 22:12 GMT

    Inzy will be missed for sure by all cricket lovers,A Gentleman and a its a treat to watch him Batting.

    We wish him all the very best for his future and may he be involved in the Game in someway,It would be an advantage for Pakistan to have someone like him even in the board of control for cricket.

  • Syed H Murtaza - London on October 9, 2007, 21:53 GMT

    Bye Bye Inzi !!! What a player, What a character, what a human!!! A great batsman fitted with a builtin calculator in his mind. Classic player, elegant timer of the ball, back bone of the team. I've been following cricket for last 20 years but never felt so emotional before. So much could have been written for a person like him, to cut it short though THANX INZI, for whatever you did not only to your country but the cricket in general. I wish you best of luck in you post retirment life.

  • ali on October 9, 2007, 21:40 GMT

    God bless inzi bhai . last nite since it was one of the holy nights in ramadhan and i was praying namaz my mind wondered for a second toward cricket and inzi last test apperance came to my mind and a duwa from dil came out fr inzi this shows how much he means to us pakistani cricket lover. i hope he scores 200 in his test seem like pakistan need that at this stage of game anywaz ill miss his apperance on ground alot :(

  • Raja Punjabi on October 9, 2007, 20:57 GMT

    Asim Kamal is better than Inzimam. But why Asim is not with team?

    You decided !!!

    here is the true summary of the story:

    Asim Kamal played very well in the test matches , Inzi put stamp of test player on him. They never gave Asim chance to play one day or 20/20.

    Now Asim is also out from test cricket. (SHAME) But other hand Misba played bad in test cricket. In five test matches his average was 13. But they gave him chance in 20/20. He played well in 20/20. But no one put the stamp of 20/20 on him. He is the test team too, he did not play well in first test but still with the team in second test --- GEY PUNJABI

    Advice to Asim: Move to PUNJAB or Join BANGLADESH team.

    Raja Punjabi Sialkot

  • Truth on October 9, 2007, 20:49 GMT

    Inzi highest average is against Bangladesh. Inzi lowest average is against Austrlia. Inzi never scored century in Austrlia. Inzi average in the world cup is 23. Inzi never scored century in the world cup. Except in 92 world cup he never played well in the world cup.

    Please do not comapre Inzi with great players like Pointing, Miandad, Tendulkar, Richard, Jay Saryuia etc. Inzi is a home ground player.

    wow Truth

  • bilal rashid on October 9, 2007, 20:43 GMT

    INZI , U r the best :)

  • Gulab Khan on October 9, 2007, 20:42 GMT

    Good note from Nadeem Rajput.(above)

    Inzi highest average is against Bangladesh.

    http://www.howstat.com/cricket/Statistics/Players/PlayerOpponents.asp?PlayerID=1794

    wonderful link about Inzi perforance against good bowling attack and outside Pakistan.

    Younis Khan, Asim Kamal and Mohd Yusuf are much better than Inzi. Unfortunately PUNJAB always put Asim Kamal out from any form of the cricket.

    Gulab Khan Peshawer

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 9, 2007, 20:16 GMT

    Malik is paying a price for wrong team selection. I have suggested earlier that, Butt should have been rested and Malik should have filled in the opening slot avec Akmal i.e., to get an extra fast bowler in the team. But, he wanted to give Butt one more chance on his home ground to bring back his confidence. In some way Butt did not disappoint him with a quick 30 and then slowed down and finally got out at 40. At hindsight it seems that Malik's decision was good because, the openers put on a decent total of 90 runs in good time. But, the Pakistani batting is very similar to the script of any old Indian movie where you can not only predict whats gonna happen next, but you can even tell the next dialogue before it is blabbed out from the 'horses and cows' mouth.

    When Butt halted his shots it was expected that he won't get past his fifty and soon he will throw away his wickets and he did. When Younus Khan scored a century in the second innings at Karachi, it was expected that this time he will throw away the wicket like there is nothing to worry about because, Inzi bhai and Yousuf bhai are behind and they said, "mai hoon na" so he had to be irresponsible like a clown. And while this was happening it was also expected that Kamran Akmal will add fuel to the fire, as he so often does at the right moment, not simply to put pressure on Inzi and Yousuf but, to blow up the whole situation. The good work that he did was blown away just like that. So, within 14 balls from 90/0 they were 99/3.

    Then it was expected that if a close call for LBW is made from Marc Benson's end the appeal will be upheld. And Yousuf was the victim. Had that been Simon Taufel, he wouldn't have given him out. Marc Benson as usual is a tad harsh with Pakistani batsmen, you give benefit of doubt decisions to batsmen and not to the bowlers. The ball hit him above the knee roll and that foot was at least 3-4 inches above ground when he went forward to play that shot and missed. Besides, the ball was on the rise and had to travel another 4 feet, so the trajectory clearly indicated that the ball would have gone above the stumps. Unfortunately all these details don't go on records. Inzi has been a victim of so many LBW decisions that went against him not because he played across the wicket. But, simply because many people like Hair didn't like him.

    When people say Inzi is calm and cool and absorbs a lot of pressure it is true and not everyone can take that kinda pressure (so, my dear khansahab yes pressure absorbing is a prerequisite but look at Inzi, under the burden of captaincy he scored more runs than before. Whereas, as a captain, Tendulkar failed miserably in his batting and bowed out and people tried to justify that he cannot concentrate on his batting - sure a big LOL!) Anyways, this time the pressure on Inzi is more than ever, the situation at the end of the second day and early on the third day will be more like a "pressure cooker." The heat is on him, not only he has to perform well like he always does, but he is playing after a big gap and that too, his last match and lot is expected from him, the whole world is looking at him. Thank you Elle for your best wishes and nice words for Inzi.

    khansahab for you and me its simply a stroke of the keyboard that can reflect the weakness of any player or highlight the strength of the other, the reality is far different from what you and I think. In my previous post I have written why Tendulkar has more runs to his name i.e., because of his opening the innings as compared to Inzi's late order batting. And you can check this out, whenever Tendulkar's opening partner got out early or wickets start falling, he slows down and tries to score runs for personal records at the expense of the team's requirement.

    So, even if Tendulkar scores big India has lost on many occasions and, his run rate improves only after he scores a fifty or a hundred. When Tendulkar, Laxman and Dravid scored big in Australia, McGrath and Warne were not playing in that series, are you aware of that? I don't care what Shane Warne says or rates, because in his list there is no Imran Khan either he can have whosoever he wants in his list, who cares! Besides, I want to correct you that in India people don't need any reason to worship someone or anyone. Check this one out. http://dailycupofyoga.wordpress.com/2007/09/20/tooting-man-is-hindu-goddess/

    Back to Malik's captaincy, since he is using Abdul Rahman so sparingly then what was the point of including him in this side? On the first day he bowled only 10 overs and got the only wicket of Prince, that too because of Prince's madness, a rush of blood to hit the ball out of the park and he paid a price. On the second day he bowled only 4 overs mais, pour quoi? Pakistani bowlers were lacking the pace and the penetration and Harris was frustrating them. I wonder why Malik did not rotate the bowling instead he kept trying the two tired fast bowlers for long. It was obvious that both Gul and Asif did not have the strength to bowl any yorkers. And I wonder why Malik keeps himself away from the bowling department? A lot depends on the two huq's and Malik. It seems like a win is beyond Pakistan's reach especially with this kind of defensive tactics. Once again Malik will be left with no partners in the end like the second innings of Karachi test.

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 9, 2007, 19:49 GMT

    Once again Younis Khan did not perform. His time is up. Either he should have the brains to request batting down the order or he should just be sacked now. Younis, Butt and Akmal are the type of players who have no respect for consistency and only perform when they are pushed to the limit.

    Pakistan cricket needs a revolution. Either they need a consistent rotational policy where openers keep getting rotated without any sort of guarantee of future inclusion. Commentators like Aamir Sohail and Moin Khan support the theory that openers need to be tolerated for a while until they gain the requisite confidence. Well, pardon me but that is exactly what has been happening to Butt, Nazir, Hafeez and Farhat.

    I don’t think playing Yasir Hameed, Taufeeq Umar, Khalid Latif or Khurram Manzoor will help in the long term although I can say without a moment’s hesitation that they are more talented than Butt, Nazir or Farhat. If that stringent rotational policy is not adopted, then the only remedy to that problem is making a middle order batsman and the wicketkeeper open with specialist batsmen or genuine all-rounders taking their position lower down the order. A good captain needs to keep experimenting until he gets the winning combination. I would play a utility player like Hafeez and make him bat at no 6, 7 or 8, whichever number Akmal (or any other wicketkeeper for that matter) would otherwise bat at, and let Akmal open. This guarantees that Hafeez will be more effective with the bat.

  • Longmemory on October 9, 2007, 19:42 GMT

    The langorous grace and the immense amount of time Inzy had to play his shots will remain forever. He was one of the classiest players in an era marked by the crassest behavior by so many others. Inzy's subtle and self-deprecating sense of humor will be missed. Perhaps most of all, I will miss Inzy's reminder to all of us that, in the end, cricket is just a game - a sport meant to be for enjoyment, not to establish national superiority or other such things. And in sport someone wins and someone loses. Finally, I think Inzy's retirement also marks the end of an era for a certain type of cricketer: Inzy, like G R Viswanath some years ago and VVS Laxman now, is a classic batsman - not an uber-athelete. From here on in, the body-type that will predominate is that of Symonds or Yuvraj: muscled, fit, fast and furious. One-dayers and 20/20 will ensure the disappearance of batsmen who relied on pure timing. Enjoy your last glimpse of Inzy bhai - his type is going to be extinct very soon. And that will be a sad day for cricket and for all of us too.

  • Rohit on October 9, 2007, 19:38 GMT

    I think he was an exceptional batsman with superb hand eye coordination and always had more time than others to play his shots. Being a bit on the heavier side just added to the charm and his fan following. Pretty much a role model for fat young lads like myself and for countless other heavyset cricketers . Cricket is primarily a game of skill with the bat and ball and not athleticism or fitness , and it is unfortunate that we will miss out on more such characters like Inzamam because of the robotic or Australian way of playing cricket and the unrelenting emphasis on fitness.Despite his "aaloo" antics and overt religiosity , he was definitely the most respected Pakistani cricketer in India.You could sense the amount of relief on the Indian fans and players when Inzamam got out in tense India Pakistan matches.Finally people who question the skill , commitment and individual records of both Inzamam and Tendulkar on this blog need to get their head examined. You will never find more committed and skillful cricketers , even in their twilight.

  • Gary on October 9, 2007, 19:26 GMT

    Farewell to Inzy, the gentle giant ! But I wonder if he is saying this farewell on his own terms ? Looks to me like its PCB-induced...

  • nasir siddique on October 9, 2007, 19:07 GMT

    It will indeed be extremely sad to see Inzi trudge off for one final time. He is my favorite Pakistani batsman and I eagerly awaited his every turn to bat. He is undoubtedly Pakistan's greatest batsman for his successes made Pakistan a strong team as well.

    He has been a loyal servant to our nation. He gave us many many memorable moments and most astounding was that he never let fame get to his head, he reamined humble throughout his career.

    He will always be remembered by me and many others. Some say he did not do justice to his talent, there were questions about his captaincy and controversy in the last year. But all will be forgotten when the nation rises to bid adieu to this gentle giant for one last time. Good luck for the future Inzi and thanx for your services to Pakistani cricket.

  • akmal on October 9, 2007, 18:28 GMT

    it is so difficult to let go of something as beautiful, almost perfect, as batting of inzi has always been. i am watching every ball of this "last episode" with a stinging pain in my heart that these are to be the last ever seen of something of the like of one and only inzi. i always was a dead fan of wasim and inzi, and now i realize that these farewells (something which wasim never got) are more painfull. i dont think i would be watching much cricket featuring pakistan from now on as somehow it would never be same without the maestro.

  • Sameer, India on October 9, 2007, 18:23 GMT

    Inzy was one of my favorites and is very popular in India. Girls, yes girls in India became his instant fan in the 92 world cup and hope you all know that Indians were supporting Pakistan in that world cup.

    Please do not compare Sachin with Inzy. Sachin's name should be uttered in the same breath as Inzy's bismillah. You are comparing the world's best ever with a Martin Crowe of Pakistan.

    Good luck Inzy. We will miss you.

  • Amyn Habib on October 9, 2007, 18:11 GMT

    I am not convinced that the forced retirement of Inzamam from test cricket is in the best interest of Pakistan cricket. If you look at the current truly pathetic batting line up, we have only one and a half batsmen (Yousuf is one and Younis is half).

    Of course, Inzamam bears significant responsibility for the team’s performance in the World Cup, and I don’t disagree with changing the captain. But he should have been allowed to continue to play in the test side until a suitable replacement comes along and the transition is planned. It is interesting that after the debacle of the World Cup all the chronically underperforming losers (Hafeez, Nazir etc) were retained. They have now played the game of musical chairs at the top of the batting order for some years.

    But then, this is typical of the hypocritical attitude of PCB and also-some fans. Some of our best players are booted out prematurely-recent examples are Saeed Anwar and Waqar Younis.

    And then we wax nostalgic about how great they were.

    Finally, I agree that Inzamam is one of the finest batsmen Pakistan has produced and wish him success in his future endeavors.

  • Moon on October 9, 2007, 17:56 GMT

    We will certainly miss you Inzi, no matter how many wickets fell at the top and how quickly wickets fell, we always had this in the back of our mind that Inzi is still there and let me tell you Inzi, you didn't disappoint the nation for more than a few times, its all part of the game, but right now we are on the verge of losing the ever reliable Inzi, with no one like Inzi in the short frame of future players, but i hope we'll find someone. By the way we are one pacer short for this Lahore Test match and it might cost us the match and series as well. I have a little concern over match referee's role, Afridi was banned for throwing bat at some spectator which most probably cost us early exit from Wrold Cup, where is that match referee in this current series between Australia & India. I saw Harbhajan Singh brandishing his bat towards Adam Gilchrist, and its not the only thing there are few other examples too. Why double standards? Uncle Javed A(fridi, Elle) Khan has finally started coming back towards his Oakaat. Mind you, uncle you will get a lot more bashing if you dont stop ridiculing others and if you dont stop your meaningless long posts. Great post from Saima Khan, i wonder how sharp is your cricketing brain that you spotted out Raja Pakistani's post. Need a sand paper?

  • Cricket Fan on October 9, 2007, 17:41 GMT

    Inzy was a good cricketer, though not the best Pakistan has produced. At this moment, people might get emotional about Inzy, but honestly I don't think he deserves to mentioned in the same breath as Sachin or Lara. In my opinion, the top 5 batsmen of our generation are 1. Tendulkar 2. Lara 3.Ponting 4.Dravid 5. Kallis/Jayasurya

  • hrishi on October 9, 2007, 17:25 GMT

    JAVED A. KHAN, This is an article about Inzi. Please don't drag in your obvious jealousy of Tendulkar. Before you criticize him for not retiring gracefully, please check Tendulkar's scores in the recent India-England series and the India-SA matches just before then. Enough said. And please stop being juvenile about other posters. We all know you are a 19 year old. Stop acting like one.

    We will miss Inzi, no doubt. Thank you, Inzi.

  • Abbas on October 9, 2007, 16:57 GMT

    Your last paragraph bought a tear to my eye...

  • Biraj on October 9, 2007, 16:56 GMT

    I am big fan of Inzy. The most impression aspect about his greatness for me is, he is a marvel in pressure situation; not Rickey Pointing, not Tendulkar; he is THE best when it comes to absorbing and performing under pressure. Also, his ability to play fast bowlers with such ease put him in a different class. Thanks Inzy. It was a previlege watching you since 1992.

  • Mike Rosario on October 9, 2007, 16:36 GMT

    I am glad he is leaving finally.He should have gobe atleast a couple of years back.Somehow he managed to stick around despite being the most unfit and clumsy man in cricketing history.What a shame . Now , thanks to home we have lost desrving middle order batsmen who were on their prime. The world cup was lost thanks to his pacifist and tame team leadership.All those accolades for him and here is a fact he never performed in Australia or England.All his records were in the sub-con pitches with low bounce and no swing.So much for his record and career.Why can't some of the fanatics see the light and accept that this was just an ordinary batsman ..with nothing great to boast about.He never performed overseas when it mattered and never performed under pressure. Good riddance . Need some sense in the PCB thinking process.Can't be making dumb and emotional choices all the time. The 4 wheel syndrome needs healing.

    Regards

    Mike

  • prasantt,india on October 9, 2007, 16:06 GMT

    always loved inzi.

  • Saima Khan on October 9, 2007, 15:42 GMT

    he makes the good decission to take retirement after only one expensive test. He will join Indian leauge after words to make more $$$.

    Inzi, Spend your money on your family on Eid Day: Good Luck

    Saima Khan Islamanad

  • Nadeem on October 9, 2007, 15:37 GMT

    Inzi highest average is against Bangladesh, one of the weakest side in the test cricket in his playing time (Ave: 80).

    Inzi lowest average against strongest team in his arena "Austrlia". (Ave: 30.40)

    Inzi never scored century in Austrlia. Bowl come fast with move :-)(

    http://www.howstat.com/cricket/Statistics/Players/PlayerOpponents.asp?PlayerID=1794

    He is a great batsman against weak bowling and at home grounds.

    His World Cup records are miserable too. His total average of WC is 23. Highest score is 81 in the world cup.

    After that how could you consider him a great player?

    Nadeem Rajput

  • jaspreet on October 9, 2007, 15:35 GMT

    I liked Inzy right from WC92. Ofcourse I wanted him out asap against India :) No matter what the situation, no match was over unless Inzy was gone. Not that it matters much but seemed like a likable guy too.

  • Monodeep Chakraborty, India on October 9, 2007, 15:14 GMT

    One of the greatest of his genaration.. He will be fondly remembered, not only by Pakistanis but throughout the Cricket loving world. specially Indians.

  • Noor on October 9, 2007, 14:49 GMT

    At first my immediate, reaction to Inzamam selection was that PCB have made a big mistake. Pakistan one down in the series and bringing Inzy back for Inzy who had a very played little cricket. I thought PCB should put country first ahead any personal whims of any Pakistani players. Pakistani as a nation always tend to pay more attention on individual records rather than the country.

    But now my thinking has changed, Inzy for whatever he is worth cant do has bad as the current players playing for Pakistan. Younis Khan a player will always seems to fail when a good innings is required of him. Last test, yes he amde century but he got out once he got his century and then Pakistan lost. Younis Khan usually scores when the team has lost.

    Yousif and Inzy are far better players than any of current players. Pakistan rarely had players who had the balls to play a match winning innings. They panic when they sense victory, India steel of nerve maybe they should learn from India how to remain cool and not swing bats around like idiots.

  • bari on October 9, 2007, 14:35 GMT

    the end of an era: this is a sad day in pakistan cricket, a day when one of its finest batsmen retires. inzi, without the shadow of a doubt, was the best pakistani batsman of his era, if not ever. his ability to deliver big in pressure-cooker situations is unmatched. i hope he scores a century in his last test and finishes with a career average of over 50.

  • Praveen Tyagi on October 9, 2007, 14:05 GMT

    Not only Pakistan cricket fans but for cricket lovers all over the world Inzamam has been a lovable character. The lazy elegance that he brings to the game is sheer delight. With a bat in his hand he could be one of the most dangerous batsman. I used to love his post match press conferences. especially when his Team won the match. "Ladkon ne accha khela". OH boy!!! He went about his game like a workman. No aggression. No emotions. No show. Just cricket. One of a few batsmen who can claim to be true match winners. He could have done much more had PCB treated him properly.

    Inzamam you have been a fantastic cricketer. In your final international game may you have fun. You are going to miss cricket for sure but rest assured criket is going to miss you as well.

  • Mohammed #1 on October 9, 2007, 14:00 GMT

    Nicely written. But an issue with Inzi is that many commentators say that Inzi was scared of the NEW SEAMING AROUND BALL in ODI thats why he batted so lower down the order.

    It is said that the best batsmen in your team should be facing the most number of balls. Thats why Ponting bats number three, Kallis used to and Dravid and Tendulkar bat at 2 and 3 repectively because THEY CAN ALL FACE THE MUSIC produced by a moving ball.

    Whereas in many matches Inzi himself has decided to bat down the order where the conditions become more easy. He has done this mainly as a captain and in many situations which require the 'best batsmen' to stand up and be counted and set an example for the rest of the batting line up. But Inzi has refused this resposibility and hidden down the order throughout the last 15 years.

    This is not signs of greatness but weakness and cowardly mentality. He may be rememberd as the batsmen who shirked away from batting high up the order and dominate the attacks from the onset.

    Everybody knows the best bowlers and fast men open the bowling, so did inzi, but instead of wanting to dominate them, he avoided Great bowlers so he decided to bat at number 5. By that time there quota would be finished or the bowlers would be tired and bowl with old bowl that doesnt talk.

    Apart from these great flaws, congrats to Inzi for a fine ODI and test record. And for scoring triple 100 and WINNING the WORLD CUP 1992. Pakistan will miss you for sure. But the next good batsmen is just aroung the gully.

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • suraj rana on October 9, 2007, 13:58 GMT

    hello kamran

    im reading the comments posted on your blog regularly. I have noted one thing that the pakistanis are also great fan of God Tendulkar that's why they knows every thing about the little master. Now let me tell you that comparing Tendulkar with Inzi is like compatring Ghora with GADHA.How these people can compare Tendulkar with iNZY. He is not even second to Tendulkar. Go out of Pakistan and you will find the difference yourself. Stop self praising.

  • Mohammed #1 on October 9, 2007, 13:43 GMT

    Good player Inzamam, nice article. But apart from Imran Khan no Legends of the game regard Inzi as a great. He was not even in Shane Warne's top 50 cricketers of his generation even though Warnies top 10 made perfect sense.

    In addition Richie Benaud who has seen all the Greats play cricket from Bardman to Imran Khan to Tendulkar. He has never even acknowledged Inzi as a legend. Close inspection of Inzi's performance against WORLD CLASS bowling attacks reveals he was not good enough.

    He is lucky to have bowling greats defending his runs or HE WOULD NOT BE A MATCH WINNER at all. WASIM WAQAR, SAQLAIN, MUSTAQ AHMED, AND SHOAIB. 3 Great fast bowlers and 2 fine spinners. Lara had Ambroase and WALsh aswell. Tendulkar had and still has average bowlers defending his runs.

    NO GREATS OF THE GAME DISCUSS INZI, BRADMAN never made any comments after Inzi destroyed New Zealand in 1992. Sir Viv Richards has never spoke of Inzi, maybe he wasn't GOOD enough to them to discuss????

    But I must say he was a GOOD servant for Pakistani cricket but not the best batsmen for Pakistan. Where was Inzi during World Cup 1996,2003 and 2007?

    I hope Inzi becomes a great in whatever he pursue next in life because it wasn't as a batmen.

  • Mohammed #1 on October 9, 2007, 13:32 GMT

    Nice article, but Inzi is FANTASTIC batsman against POOR BOWLING AND FLAT PITCHES thats why he has excellent records against average attacks like Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, India and a Shane Bond LESS New Zealand and teams with fast bowlers.. Every batsman SECOND FAVOURITE BOWLING OPPOSITION IS India. The team he has fantastic record against.

    He has never done anything of note against the Mighty Aussies thats why they dont mention his name in the same sentence as Tendulker nor Lara. They have taken out Austrailia throughout this era.

    Inzamam does have a better match winning record because he has world class bowlers to defend his runs: Acquib Javed, Imran Khan, Mustaq ahmed and MAINLY Saqlain, Razzaq when he used to bowl 90mph,Azhar Mehmood, WASIM and WAQAR and AKHTAR. Obviously your going to have a MATCH WINNING RECORD when you have these bowlers defending your runs.

    He was a good batsmen for Pakistan but not in the class of Tendulkar and Lara. Maybe just below Dravid and Ponting and Kallis.

    Make runs against the best team/ bowling attack in your generation and on MULTI SURFACE WICKETS and your WORLD CLASS like Tendulkar and Lara.

    If you don't then the jury's out.

    By the way IMRAN KHAN said Inzamam is the SECOND BEST BATSMEN OF HIS GENERATION.

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • Viju Jacob on October 9, 2007, 12:56 GMT

    Just yesterday I happened to watch Inzy driving Balaji through the covers with minimum fuss & movement that made one wonder if he has all the time in the world to do his things. Watching him bat, unruffled & unhurried, one can't help but think that cricketers like this are rare these days. One enjoyed his batting irrespective of which country you belonged and it was unfair he was called names and blamed for enforcing religion - my take is, atleast he didnt take youngsters on a drinking binge, instead he led them to faith. May Pakistan and international cricket have more players like him gracing the cricket fields.

  • Junaid on October 9, 2007, 12:43 GMT

    Great Inzi is no doubt the best ever batsman for Pakistan. He should have played test cricket for another 2 years but now if he has made the decision than best of luck to him for his future life. He is 10 not out on day one and I hope he will be able to make a hundred tomorrow. BTW: great opening stand between talented Akmal and Salman. Younis and Yousaf messed it up but Pakistan still have a chance to take lead in first innings.

  • Umair Amjad Rathore on October 9, 2007, 12:39 GMT

    Inzi a down to earth hero, never looking for rewards but self dignity and country's pride. His records may be broken due to frequency of cricketing games but his character is high like K-2 unbreakable. In his 17 years career, he never faced a single scandle when there was match fixing around him. I wished him to play for next few years but undoubtedly this is the perfect time for him to leave people with tears in their eyes to save is reflections forever. I salute u Inzi

  • Bingo from India on October 9, 2007, 11:39 GMT

    Inzy was a great character to have on the field. His artistry was fantastic, and it was difficult not to admire his skill, even when he was smashing our bowling attack to pieces. Most importantly, he (along with Dravid) seemed to be from a very different era. Inzy (he is still lovingly referred to as Aaloo in most parts of India!) will be most sorely missed. I sincerely hope that he has a great last match. It is indeed very saddening to think that we would not be able to see this gentle gaint on the field from now on... but then.... all good things come to an end ! Thank you Inzy for all the memories !!!

  • srivathsan on October 9, 2007, 11:28 GMT

    Iam surprised that some bloggers have questioned the ability of Inzy in playing aussies.It might have been a shere coincidence that he might not have played well against them & i have no statistics to confirm their views.Nevertheless I can shout from the roof top & say that AUSSIES BOWLING DESPITE BEING BEST WAS/IS IN NO WAY A THREAT TO HIM.A BATSMAN OF INZY/S CALIBRE HAVE NO REASON TO FEAR THEIR BOWLING.I CAN AGREE IF IT WAS AFRIDY & NOT INZY.IF INDIA & PAKISTAN HAVE TONED DOWN THEIR RIVALRY WITHOUT DILUTING THE PASSION & CONTEST, THEN FULL CREDIT SHOULD GO TO INZY & DRAVID ON ACCOUNT OF THEIR HUMILITY & COURAGE TO GIVE CREDIT TO THE OPPOSITION EVEN WHEN LOSING.INZY DOES NOT NEED CERTIFICATE FROM ALL OF US & HIS STATISTICS(MEAN HERE QUALITY RATHER THAN QUNTITY) WILL SPEAK FOR HIM.LET HOM SIGN OFF WITH A CENTURY & A WIN FOR PAKISTAN.

  • tabs farooq on October 9, 2007, 11:28 GMT

    Dear Mr. Khan I was only pulling your leg and even so in a fairly polite manner. If you have taken seriuos offence then i do apologise, whoever it was meant in good jest! I have not written in a while as I was away for a few days on holiday. rest assure i am back in my "student digs" (NOT!) and shall be once again trying to get you to spit the dummy as much as possible!! As for Mr Mawali....I agree with mr khan(rarity) as I think Mr mawali is fairly delusional. Let have both barrels back then mr khan!

  • Shahid Afzal on October 9, 2007, 11:21 GMT

    Thank you, Inzi....for all the wonderful innings and the breath-taking strokes.....everything that would distract the nation from its worries and rivet its attention on a cricketing crusade being contested on far off lands. Inzi was the best Pakistani batsman of his generation and for a brief period, perhaps the best in the world. We will surely miss you and your hurricance assaults on terrified bowlers world wide. Inzi had so much time on his hands playing spinners and fast men alike, he would get into position so early and judge the ball to excellence. Very sorry all this is now going to end....but not before one final fling at the S Africans. It all started on that warm afternoon in Cristchurch in the WC '92 semi when a young man, deciding that all was not lost yet launched into the bowling attack and broke many a Kiwi heart... Well played sir, we shall never see the likes of you...

  • yousuf burki on October 9, 2007, 10:11 GMT

    All time my favorite. I wish you all the best in your life after cricket.

  • Roshan on October 9, 2007, 9:34 GMT

    We all have a right to blow our own trumpet irrespective of the facts...Thats what Javed Montreal khan is doing...Last time he was quoting stats from all over the place to defend Afridi this time he is negating their very existence just to prove Inzimam is better over Tendulkar (as stats are tilted in favour of Tendulkar). I am again holding my opinion on Tendulkar. No matter what happens he cant play near to what he used to play till 2003 & he is now riding on Asian mentality to make most of the money while you are on the verge of ending your career but I cant take anything away from what he did till 2003. As I said earlier also the moment you put current situations in place & demands of international cricket now you cant pick either Inzimam or Tendulkar or Lara or even if you pick them the side will lose more often than winning, The prime example was World XI chosen to play against australia. Players were picked on reputations & we all know the end result. We all have to think objectively as they say "Pick Horses for Courses & not the other way round"..but our strong emotional attachment or should I say asian mentality stops us from doing that. I have no grudges for Inzimam till 2003 but now like tendulkar he fits no where!

  • khansahab(A.A.Khan) on October 9, 2007, 9:11 GMT

    Javed Bhai, God knows I had compiled some notes I would draft in my post when this thread was created. Later, when I read some very vehement comments (some influenced clearly by provincial biases) I decided to discard my notes, thinking that my views would invite much opposition giving Mr Abbasi a headache. Since I have a great deal of respect for you I have now decided to pass my comments (upon your insistence).

    For the sake of national unity and national cohesion I would like to say that according to Pakistani standards, I am willing to classify Inzi as a “great batsman” since Pakistan has not produced many batting greats. I have noticed Imran Khan, Sanjay Manjrekar and Ravi Shastri say that Inzamam is amongst their top 3 batsmen. My argument is, when we decide about what Inzi’s calibre is, why do we pay so much attention to his pressure-absorbing skills? Is that all what batting is about? What no one can deny is that looking at Inzamam’s batting chart reveals that he is not amongst the most consistent batsmen in the world. What Pakistan cricket has lacked is consistency in batting and despite having a world class bowling attack, the only reason why Pakistan is not a top team anymore is because of its inconsistent batsmen. Here I would like to give credit to Miandad, who is amongst the only two batsmen in the history of cricket whose average remained above 50 ever since their very first international inning. That makes Miandad one of the most consistent batsmen the world has ever produced because at the time of his retirement his average was 52. I believe that is the reason why Wasim Saqib must have put Miandad above Inzamam. Even though Miandad probably did not match Inzi’s pressure handling skills, I do believe he was an excellent batsman under pressure because if he was not, he would not have been able to connect the bat with the ball well enough (on the last ball of the match) for it to comfortably pass the boundary rope in that final against India. I know it was a wild slog, but he still required immense concentration and pressure absorbing demeanour to strike the ball with such strength and timing. Here I would like to say that although Inzi’s contribution in the semi final vs New Zealand helped Pakistan catapult into the final, Miandad was the second highest scorer in that tournament and Pakistan would have struggled to reach the semi final had it not been for Miandad’s efforts.

    When we draw comparisons with Tendulkar, Tendulkar has not performed to potential in the last 3 or 4 years, which is exactly the period when Inzi’s batting average increased to around 50. That was the time Inzi’s golden period commenced. However, whether it’s Miandad, Inzi, Kallis or Lara, I don’t think they can be compared with Tendulkar if you consider their respective careers in their entirety. There is a reason why Warne mentioned Tendulkar as his no 1 cricketer on his list recently (incidentally Inzi is missing from the list). There is a reason why when you play certain cricket games that have been “endorsed” by Brian Lara, you hear commentators speak of more praise for Tendulkar than Lara, the man whom the games have been based on. No batsman since the time of Bradman has demolished and dominated the best bowling attacks with so much ease. There is a reason why Tendulkar is worshipped as a God in India. For the same reason, he is expected to score a 50 every innings. One of the hallmarks of a great batsman is that he can play every shot in the book. Whereas Inzi can play every shot, it is particularly the pull and the late square cut he excels at. Many times he has attempted to play the on drive, trying to shuffle across the stumps, but only being given out LBW in the process. Tendulkar is arguably the only player who plays every shot with equal brilliance, whether that is the cut, the cover drive, the flick for six above the bowler’s head, the flick off the pads or the on drive played with the straight bat. I have seen Inzi play more match winning innings than Tendulkar and as a player I like Inzi more than Tendulkar. However, that is not to say that Inzi is a greater batsman. There was a time when if Tendulkar failed, India would fail. The whole team depended on just one individual to decide its fate in any given series or tournament. If you ask me, hailing from a country where people consider you a God, where more than a billion people have such expectations from you and expect you to deliver in any circumstance, plus the feelings of millions of Indians all around the globe, will put you under extreme pressure.

    Finally I don’t believe Inzi is a very fair or good human being, or even that his interpretation of Islam or life in general is correct. He started Tableegh in the team that has dented the psyche of the team to a great extent, so much so that a legacy has been laid. He played Imran Farhat for a year continuously despite the latter’s pathetic performances. Under him we saw the decline of Asim Kamal, Yasir Hameed and Misbah, three great batting prospects for the team. I wanted Pakistan to go far in the World Cup 2007; winning the Cup would have been great but I know Pakistan could have reached the semis had it been for a sensible captain. You can’t expect me to pardon Inzi saying that he is not a bright man and that I could not expect more from him. Blame has to be given where it is due. A judge can reduce a sentence of a murderer, prostitute or a drug dealer if he hears about their “extenuating circumstances” or “under privileged backgrounds” but he cannot exculpate them. In the eyes of the law, they are still criminals, even if lesser criminals than many others.

    I remember Inzi as a “great Pakistani batsman”, someone with unmatched pressure-handling skills and someone who could play the pull and square cut better than everyone else. However, Inzi’s overall inconsistency, his Tableegh psyche and the World Cup 2007 have been instrumental in tainting my overall views on this great player.

  • Elle on October 9, 2007, 9:03 GMT

    JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA

    Well...I am one of those people who LOVES one particular line from a poem or a song...

    So...Gentle on my Mind is how I want to remember Inzi. Getting back to the bikini-clad young thing...Uh NO! I was NOT in that line. But the years have been kinder to me ;-)

    I have read that Inzi said: "I need a century against South Africa to have a set of Test hundreds against every country I have played against ..." Well, I for one, certainly hopes he achieves that...I really do. He deserve it. And the PCB did the right thing to choose him for this test series vs SA. No cricketer as valuable as Inzi was to his side, deserve to fade into grey.

    And to all of those who choose to harbour on anything negative...the following Beauty is truth, truth beauty -- that is all you know, or ever need to know Hmmm especially an Inzi innings with the tail was a thing of beauty...and not to mention those match-winning efforts. THAT is all you ever need to know.

    Oh, final wicket down. Pakistan in to bat now. Great going by Bouchie there with the tail. Emulating Inzi? ;-) I couldnt care less if SA should lose this test if it means Inzi gets his 100. That will be the cherry on the cake. And I hope we will get one more funny quip from him. Something like: Now I can have my cake AND eat it!

    Posted by: Muhammad Usman Aslam at October 9, 2007 5:01 AMThanks for the sentiments. Boundaries dont mean that much to me. I am boundaryless! :-)

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 9, 2007, 7:55 GMT

    Wasim Saqib I concur with your views that people are being extremely unfair in judging Inzamam's performance by saying that he has not scored well against teams like Australia and South Africa. You have highlighted a very important point that his team did not have good seasoned players like other captains had. For those who don't know, must know that Inzi has scored century against every test playing nation except for South Africa.

    The closest he came to score a century against SA was in January 2007 when remained 92 n.o. at Port Elizabeth. That was one of the best innings he played and for that Mr. Kamran Abbassi dedicated a thread, titled: "The best hundred that Inzy never got." So, the ignorant blokes should better get their facts right before commenting so indiscriminately against him. Also, they are saying that he scored against he weak bowling of India and West Indies. If Indian and West Indian bowling attack is weak, then those who are saying this must be the world champions of gully cricket.

    Raja Pakistani, Sialkot and Saima Khan, Islamabad we all know how many more masks you wear and you have also confirmed what I wrote in my previous past that you are all chips of the same block and act like; "mai tera raag tu meri raagni" and you keep congratulating and patting each other's shoulder after every single post. You can do this Tom & Jerry act to satisfy yourself. It is also like Mr. Bean does, by sending Christmas Cards and Birthday Cards to himself and getting very excited upon receiving them. But, please stop this chronic nagging and unending criticism on Punjab and Punjabism, it really sucks. It sounds so jingoistic when you say a lot of injustice is being done with Karachi players and Punjab is exploiting everything, blady blah and it goes on and on in ever in every single post of yours.

    Yes, we all know the politics of the game and the country, and we don't need to discuss that on this thread, but its all crap that "Inzi beat physically Younus Khan" and all those silly accusations against him are baseless. We know his shortcomings as a captain but, that doesn't mean he is a monster or a demon! He is a thorough gentleman in the true sense. In his big frame he has a big kind heart, which is so obvious when he said, I pardon Darrell Hair and the way he cried and wept upon Woolmer's death confirms that.

    If you cannot write something nice about him then -- just for the sake of being a Pakistani -- please don't write such disgusting and derogatory comments about a person who has given his heart out for Pakistan and played some glorious match winning innings for the country. You may hate him for whatever reasons you have, but he doesn't hate Javed Miandad, he respects him. I am not from Punjab and I am not from Karachi either and I am giving a very fair, unbiased opinion about Inzi. I may have criticized his captaincy or his lethargic nature or passed a few light hearted comments but, I admire him as a batsman and I have written enough about his good qualities, still that is not enough to do any justice to what he really deserves.

  • srivathsan on October 9, 2007, 6:11 GMT

    Kamran, Iam surprised as to why my comments are not posted .Did you find any thing wrong ? If so you can edit it but I feel my comments ,as always,will be non controversial & I have expressed my view only.I JUST WANT TO PAY TRIBUTE TO A GREAT PLAYER.

  • Muhammad Usman Aslam on October 9, 2007, 5:01 GMT

    Gosh... cant believe how come people still find time and space to criticize and negate achievements at this historical juncture of the Men in Green.

    Inzi was an absolutely great cricketer FULL STOP. there's no denying that... his ability to handle pressure when we off the field were cracking.. biting the fingers out of our hands... was extraordinary.

    Its also heartning to read alot of indian and SA supporters giving the genius the respect he deserves... but the best feelings have got to go with the Elle expressions.... :)... pretty much seemed like u summed it all up for even people seperated beyond boundaries.

    come to think of it, imagine if Wasim, Waqar , Saeed Anwar would've had similar farewells.. anyhow its not time to ponder over past failures and hasty decisions... its time to rejoice the achievements of a wonderful man.. who upheld the values of our society so brilliantly on and off the cricketing world that so many people find time and words to show their admiration for him here.

    I'm pretty sure, INZI u wouldnt be reading this blog... but i hope your young son is.... DO TELL YOUR DAD that its a sad sad day for we'll miss him big time... just like ELLE said... WHY DID HE HAVE TO GO... quite unthinkable of a Pakistani team without him. anyhow... INZI ... may you have as much rest and food as u always wanted.... THANK YOU SO MUCH for bringing joy into our lives.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 9, 2007, 3:17 GMT

    There you go, Mr. Mawali is back after a long time to pay his last tribute to Inzamam. Mr. Mawali it is good to hold an opinion about someone and not change it, but to hold a grudge for nothing and keep swearing at the humble giant is not something very generous of you. Anyways, its your way of mincing words by praising and congratulating him in 'Yiddish' that he is an upright man and yet taking out your grudge by swearing at him in abbreviations and calling him "AMF." Uttering that abbreviated word each time in your every single post, does it make you feel any good? Thats so nebbish of you to noodge at him and it goes to prove that you do have a real nudnik in the rear to think like that. Btw, its neither a travesty nor it is ludicrous to compare him with Endulkar just because his stats are better doesn't mean he is the best or uncomparable?

    The point most people miss out in comparing Inzamam avec Tendulkar is the later has always opened the innings and had more time, number of overs / balls and opportunities to play and score runs. Whereas, earlier in his career Inzamam played in the lower middle order and much later that he started batting at number three and four. And once again it is not the quantity but the quality that counts, it is the situations in which Inzi came to play and won so many matches for Pakistan that counts and, not how many centuries you have made to improve your personal record and yet you couldn't save your team from a defeat, is really pitiful. I know I am igniting the back-yard of so many of Tendulkar fans that they would be swarming out of their bee-hives now. The not so bright roshan dan has already "dimwittingly" but "very firmly" confessed that Tendulkar is not a great player anymore. I would like to see how he is gonna chew his words to prove a point here. ;-)

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 9, 2007, 2:32 GMT

    Its unfair to judge Inzimam's career in light of his performances aganst Australia.We all have short memories can anybody tell me how many times he became a victom of biased umpiring rather than the bowlers in Australia.Also we fail to recognize that Inzimam has lead one of the weakest Pakistan team ever as compared to the teams under Imran and Wasim Akram.Considering this factor alone his record as a Captain was not that bad.

  • Saima Khan on October 8, 2007, 23:58 GMT

    Great note from Raja Pakistani. (above)

    Saima Khan Islamabad

  • Mawali on October 8, 2007, 22:25 GMT

    Kamran Sahib, I see the blog, continues to grow. I am compelled to contribute today and add to the growing list of tributes showered upon the exiting Inzamam. No need for me to go into histrionics of Inzamam’s career for many an able have already done so.

    Needless to say as I peruse through some of the post’s the comments seem more emotionally charged than reality based. Realize though that the accolades showered upon the man today are more of a fond farewell and so we say fine! Omer Admani, I thought quite aptly described Inzamam the cricketer. I would not even venture to speculate on Inzamam as a person except to say that he comes across as a gentle person, a religious zealot who repeatedly violated the line between religion and profession in this case cricket for Inzamam.

    It would be very unfair to label Inzamam as the greatest cricketer Pakistan ever produced. There are many who quite deservingly are ahead of Inzamam in that count. The best tribute to Inzamam would be to take him for what he is a gifted batsman who played some remarkable innings over his career alas, never made an effort to add to or enhance the gift. It would be safe to say that he was one of the greatest backyard bullies ever (The backyard being the sub-continent). There is no need to start comparing him to the other greats of the past or present time. Especially to compare him to Tendulker as a great cricketer would be in my opinion a travesty. Finally, Inzamam thanks for your contributions you are a good mensch, Mazel Tov. AMF!

  • Tay'yab-Ali on October 8, 2007, 21:51 GMT

    A few on this blog have refused to give Inzamam credit because he has a below average against Australia.

    Ijaz ahmed has scored 6 hundreds against them-does it make him a GREAT batsman?

    Success against the Australians alone is insufficient to identify the true potential of a batsman. The ability to score quality runs under pressure is more significant than making hundreds in foregone conclusions. Inzamam played these significant innings for fun.

    We all know about THAT 1992 innings..but did you know he was unwell and asleep whilst Pak were chasing. Imran K had to wake him up when it was his turn to bat. The rest is history. That 92 innings was just a flavour of what this man can do under pressure -IMO the best batman under pressure. Surely a quality not be underestimated when considering his true worth.

  • Haseeb Ahmed on October 8, 2007, 21:26 GMT

    Let me start with a spoiler: "I can say ...that Inzamam desired to match, perhaps surpass, his old master." That's not really fair to Imran Khan, who was by some distance the greatest cricketer ever to have been born in these parts. Statistics alone don't tell the whole story, but if they did, in Imran's case it would be a compelling tale. And then throw in the capitancy, the fact that Imran pioneered genuine fast bowling on these dead sub continental pitches, etc etc---and the case becomes forceful. That said, Inzi is surely one of the two greatest Pakistani bastmen ever, and arguably the greatest on talent alone. Like many of my fellow bloggers, I am saddened by his departure and feel he had a few more years of cricket left. For that matter, not sure why cricketers who are still playing well---Inzi, Steve Waugh---are forced into retirement thus just because they are seemingly too old.

  • WASIM SAQIB on October 8, 2007, 20:43 GMT

    I was fortunate to be present at Gaddafi stadium on Inzimam's ODI debut, It was 1991 and Pakistan was playing against WI, before the match I had never heard of Inzimam other than some rumors that there is a boy who is practicing with Pakistan team and he cuts and pulls like the Great Viv Richards and he might be included in the team soon, Pakistan was already trailing in the 3 match series by one match primarily because of the bowling strength of the WI their attack comprised of Marshall, Ambrose, Bishop and Patterson.

    I was a bit disappointed when I found out that the new boy has been included in the team in place of Javed Miandad, I don’t exactly remember why Miandad didn't played that match but when the score was 27 Pakistan lost their first wicket when Aamer Sohail got out and that is when I saw Inzimam for the first time, his lazy walk to the wicket didn't encouraged me at all but within the next half an hour he scored a brisk 20 odd runs and he played the likes of Marshall and Ambrose with style and authority and with no signs of fear or intimidation, in his brief but brave innings he showed his talent and class and impressed everybody but it was not in my wildest dream that this boy will become the mainstay of Pakistan batting for the next 15 years, in the next match he scored 60 runs and that was the highest score by a Pakistani batsman in that three match series.

    But it was the semi final of the WC 92 when Inzimam stunned and surprised everybody and showcased his true potential ,his match winning performance in the Semis and the finals earned him an instant hero status and all of a sudden he was being compared with the best in the game. He lived up to his reputation most of his career, and single handedly carried the burden of Pakistani batting during his career.

    16 years later he is playing his last game. It’s a sad day for Pakistan cricket as when Miandad was about to retire we got Inzimam but today when I look at our team I don't find anybody who can possibly replace Inzimam. Was he the greatest batsman Pakistan ever had? I have never asked this question to myself as for me Miandad was the best batsman/cricketer Pakistan ever produced, but as a batsman I find Inzimam not too far behind. His career would have been more distinguished if he had retired a year before the 07 WC, but his poor batting performance in the 2003 WC and Poor leadership and batting performance in the 07 WC has tarnished his otherwise illustrious career he is also responsible for taking aggression out of Pakistan cricket, but despite all the shortcomings, I think we should all thank Inzimam Ul Haq for a wonderful and entertaining career. At least he won us a WC in 92 unlike Tendulkar and Lara who have been unable to achieve that feat for their nation in spite of all their individual brilliance.

  • Badar Siddiqi on October 8, 2007, 20:18 GMT

    It's been said that the PCB is creating a new tradition of honorable farewells but I sincerely think it's more of premature farewells. If Inzamam himself had declared himself fit to play for another couple of years then why did the PCB rush him into retirement? He could have stayed with the team and would help Malik groom as the future captain. Malik looks lost as a captain but if he had the former captain available for advise, that would help him much. By retiring from the ODIs, Inzi would have extended his career in the tests like some other players have done in recent past. He's one of his kind and absolutely irreplaceable in near future. If the PCB wants to try out new talent, it should do so in ODIs and T20s. Test matches are serious matter. Here you need players who could stay at the crease for several sessions, dig out and graft their innings, absorb pressure, and bail out their team when most needed. Can the PCB name anyone on the domestic circuit who could do that? They will find many sloggers but not a grafter like Inzi. I'd like to see the President of Pakistan, who's also the Patron-in-Chief, to call Inzi out of retirement just like President Zia did to Imran Khan many years ago. Inzamam is our hero and an asset. We should make the most use of his talents before saying adios to him.

  • saif ahmed on October 8, 2007, 19:54 GMT

    Yes, Inzy will be sorely missed! I feel he could have easily played another year or so but knowing our set up, I think he made a good decision to bow out with a bit of dignity. He is perhaps one of the best batman of his generation, right there with Brian Lara and Sachin. We have witnessed a lot of great innings that brought Pakistan victory on many occasions. It is due on us to pay him respect for his contributions. Thank you Inzi. I had been reading all the comments made in response to this particular thread and I strongly feel that while people are paying tribute to this son of Pakistan they are demeaning the other. Just to say that Inzi is the greatest is a big insult to someone of the stature of Javed Miandad. No matter how big a player he had become, he never had a cricketing mind as Javed. Just imagine the quality of attack the other teams had when Javed was playing and compare it with the recent crop of bowlers. There is no comparison to tell you the truth. We have seen both eras and we know. So, please do not try undermine Javed Miandad!

  • Raja Pakistani on October 8, 2007, 19:09 GMT

    Kamran,

    I am not totally agreeing with you.

    As a Captain Inzi destroyed Pakistan cricket a lot. Who will impeach him? Now Inzi is coming back to break record of Javed Miandad, only for his personal desire. This is not a good example for our young generation. If Inzi is breaking any world record or record of Tendulkar, Pointing etc, I can see as a Pakistani. Now Inzi wants to break the record of the person, whom Inzi and his group never respect him as a Captain or Coach.

    I remember when Imran Khan declared the inning when Miandad was 280 not out, at that form Miandad could easily break the highest total score by any individual but for some reasons Imran declread the inning. But Miandad never put same captain down, he won many matches for the Pakistan under Imran captainship. In other words if Javed Miandad was not in Imran's team, we could not won the world cup. Pakistan won only five matches in the world cup 92 and in all winning matches Miandad scored more than 50 runs.

    What Inzi has done? Asim Kamal is a current example, after marvelous record in test cricket, this young man is out from the natinol cricket. He played good in test cricket, Inzi put stamp of ONLY test player on him. But on other side Misba played well in 20/20 but no one put stamp of 20/20 on him. Even though Misbah test record is very bad.

    Under Inzi Captainship ** First time in cricket history, We lost against India in Pakistan. ** After 26 yesrs, We lost against England in UK. ** We lost against Irleand in the World Cup. ** We were out in the first round of the world cup. ** Inzi removed Waqar Younis and brought his fried Mustaq Ahmed as an Asst Coach of our fast bowlers. ** Inzi beat physically Younis Khan. ** Inzi put Asim Kamal always out from the team, why, why, why, now his followers doing same thing. ** We badly lost against SA in SA just before the world cup. ** Another victim of Inzi was Yasir Hamid. ** Except world cup 92, Inzi never performed well in the world cup, why, In the presence of Inzi, why we lost against Bangladesh (WC 99), India (in all WC), Ireland (Last WC).

    Inzi should impeached. Kamran please be realistic.

    Raja Pakistani Sialkot

  • EHU on October 8, 2007, 19:04 GMT

    IMO, Most foreign cricketing greats dont reckon Inzamam as one of the great batsman due to the following reasons; 1- His batting record as a test batsman against teams like Australlia & SA specially in away tours. 2- His not so great batting displays against against the swinging ball speacially early in his innings which was due to lack of foot work. 3- His captaincy .....may be??

    But the qualities which the stats dont reveal are as follows;

    1- His ability to absorb pressure in tough circumstances which not all great batsman of present era have. 2- His ability to pace the innings & to finish in close encounters.. 3- His ability to play spin, pace & bounce.

    Its one of the most facinating sights in the game of cricket to see Inzamam coming down to the pitch to loft a spinner down town.

    He is a real character & deserves the credit for what ever he has achieved for the country. He is definitely one of the Pakistani greats if not an international legend batsman.

    He is a character & will be remebered for the years to come for the run outs, on & off the field incidents & more so for his contribution to Pakistan cricket.

    He had a successfull career over all, well done Inzi for that .. & what ever he was not able to achieve, perhaps it was bad luck or ??????????

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 8, 2007, 18:53 GMT

    Its good to see a few more tributes coming along in support of the burly bearded gentle bear and hopefully many more to follow in the next four days when he scores a hundred - Inshallah. Waqqas Qavi Melbourne, Australia its a good one sir.

    Those who are saying that Inzi is playing only to break the record of Javed Miandad are not doing any justice. Neither Inzi has this desire to feel that kinda elation after improving the record of his hero, a compatriot he respects a lot, nor the hero Miandad himself would be jealous if he breaks the record. Besides, it is not a world record, even then, records are meant to be broken by someone. Wouldn't Saeed Anwar be more happy one day when one of his compatriot scores a double century in ODI?

    tabs on farooq, we all are students and will always be students. At least me, I believe this way, because we are always learning something new everyday. Unless you are a professor of nothing and claim to have achieved everything in your life and that is decadence. And my dear sir - if I have time to type, you waste yours in reading. Like someone on this blog said, he stopped writing because he considered it as a waste of time but, I guess he never stopped reading and now he is writing again today! Whatever reasons he gives to justify aren't good enough. He is acting as if he is doing a big favour to others, as if anyone cares whether you write or you stop writing? So, why try to be so cynical about others?

    Omar Admani I quite agree with your views about Inzi's hasty decision to retire. You are right, he could have easily stretched his era for at least a year or so, just to be a part of the team for the India and Australia series. We have already seen the void or the vacuum in the middle order. He could have come up with a suggestion after the world cup that, 'I am stepping down from the captaincy post but, I would like to be a part of the team for the next one year or so.' It is his captaincy thats been under fire and not his batting, although some blokes argue that his singles have cost matches for Pakistan, not really but, thats their perception.

    Talking of perception, I ought to tell you that you are absolutely wrong in being so sure about me being Kamran Abbassi. Its OK with me, but I am sure he may not like that because he is the avatar of this blog and must have a feeling that he obviously writes better than me.(not always :-) lol) You must have also noticed this cute chanda here, called 'moon' who is always 'moaning and groaning' even without any foreplay ;-) and believes that I write with different names! Common sense ki baat hai, why the 'hello' would I like to do that by writing such substandard pieces?

    Besides, I am bold enough to write my real name along with my residency. That means I am real, unlike some nameless crappy coward dimwits dolts who can do nothing except attacking me personally and thats their achievement in their pathetic "loife." And anyone with a little sense can spot the commonality in the writings of Dawar L.A., Saima Khan, Raja Pakistani and Raja Sialkoti. They have the same style, same writing pattern and same thoughts, they are not different people but one person and they never miss a single moment to give a pat on each other's shoulder. To spot that, you don't need to be Einstein or Sherlock Holmes or even a graphologist or a "typologist." Btw, which Biologist were you referring to in the previous post? As long as it is not Charles Darwin, then I its OK. Finally, to add some spice to your bottom line on Inzi's retirement: wouldn't you like to see a river of nihari flowing through that castle of potatoes? :-)

    Ps. khansahab, I know you don't like Inzi, but put your biases aside, write something and "give the devil his due." Well thats an expression but, Inzi is no devil - he is an Angel of Peace.

  • Shahid Adnan on October 8, 2007, 18:29 GMT

    I was about 7 when pakistan won the world cup in 1992. my grandad and other family members were watching the new zealand-pakistan semi-final on tv. our chances were 50-50 and it was quite tense till inzy bhai came out. he totally changed the situatuin of the game and i remember my grandad would not stop shouting "inzamam ko dekha...new zealand kai bowlers ko ruladia" which means did u see inzy...he made the new zealand bowlers cry.

    that was in 1992. my grandad passed away last year and he was always a great admirer of inzy, as is the world. now with inzy retiring, it really is the end of an era. i salute u inzy, for all u have done for cricket and for pakistan. you turned a bunch of kids into potential world beaters and although u didnt have ur final glory in the world cup, i hope u do something magical in lahore in ur final match. u deserve it if anyone does. pakistanis were proud of u the moment u used to walk out and take guard ( a rare thing ). whether we will see another like inzy again in the pakistan line up remains to be seen. but i am sure younis khan and yousuf will not disappoint. i am priveliged to say i have grown up watching someone as good as inzy represent his country.

    you will be sorely missed. so long inzy. best of luck in the future.

  • Ehsaan on October 8, 2007, 17:45 GMT

    Wait a minute I think this blog is getting too emotional on Inzi...Please somebody could tell me if he scored any runs in Australia or south africa??? I think he was clueless there as most of flat track bullies are. Inzi was a great player but only against mediocre bowlers...In came a good attack there goes our hero...Tendulkar & Lara are regraded as greats not because they scored tonnes of runs but because how they dominated bowlers all over the globe. Although Both greats became ordinary players at the fag end of their careers.

  • Roshan on October 8, 2007, 17:08 GMT

    Somebody on this blog has misquoted the statement of Great Imran khan...This is exactly what he said.."Inzimam would have been a better player than tendulkar had he put his mind in his batting, ability to quickly think on his feat is what taken Tendulkar ahead"....I have a newspaper cutting of this famous interview with imran....Having said that I can firmly say that tendulkar is not a great player anymore...his best is his past & he is struggling to hold on to his place in the side.We asians has a tendancy to ride too much on the past glory of a player & we always forget to include the impact of current situations while we decide our best players...I can hardly see a better player that Mathew Hayden..this guy is a run machine yet he is not considered an all time best..bit unfair to hedos.

  • Qasim Hussain on October 8, 2007, 15:36 GMT

    I stoped writing in this blog a while back when I realised that it is nothing but a waste of time as most normal folks have similar views and then there are others who like to stand out a bit and while doing so, try to undermine others and hence, make a fool out of themselves.

    I am writing now because Inzi deserves all this and allot more. Am not going to get into what he has done or what he hasn't done but I believe what needs to be looked at is what Pakistan will miss and how we will compensate.

    To make matters worst, Pakistan have not been the best at compensating in the past decade or so. I know we have had a great line of Legends arriving when the other departs but that stoped a while back.

    Most people state and quote that Javed M. a legend was replaced by Inzi but most people as always forget to mention another master of the craft known as Saeed Anwar.

    Inzi, as great as he is will surely be missed for me, not as much as the legandary Wasik Akram or Saeed Anwar. I wish they could still be playing because you see, there was another to fill in Javed's shoe > Inzi, there is Yousuf to fill in Inzi's boots but they're will never be another Wasim Akram or Saeed Anwar for Pakistan.

    No disrespect to M. Asif or Umar Gul "two future legends of fast bowling" even togather they can not fill in Wasim Akrams shoe. And as far as Saeed Anwar goes, if Salman Butt, Imran Farhat or M. Hafeez had half the talent he did, Pakistan would be a force to be reckoned with!

    PCB's main flaw is that they think they look for the future, plan for the future and while doing so destroy the present!

    It's not just PCB, its Pakistani people in general. We all plan for the next few years. We all want to be smarter, wealthier (knowledge wise and money wise) we all are experts, visionaries or so we like to think because all I know is "if you destroy you present for the future, then the future isn't worth it".

    Before people start writing threads about where I got this from, i'd like to point out what am talking about.

    Back in 2003, PCB got rid of Wasim Akram and Saeed Anwar on the basis of building a strong team for the next world cup. They got rid of Pakistan's two most consistant players in the world cup tournament and tried out a dozen new opening pair and relentlesly tried to make M.Sami into a spear head bowler for the next 3 years or so.

    Now they are doing the same by getting rid of Inzi when he could still play for a year or so. We need to look at India; Sachin, Dravid, Ganguly and if we go further east in Australia, Hayden, more recentlt McGrath and Warne were and are all playing in their Mid-late 30's then why can Pakistani players not play and not look at age alone.

    I just have one thing to say to the people who want to look at the future, "look at our past, learn and then decide for a better future or even better yet, a better present!"

    P.S. M Sami, Imran Farhat, Salman Butt can try all they like but won't make it in another 3-5 years because they lack the determination let alone the skill!

  • imran shafi Khan London City on October 8, 2007, 15:14 GMT

    Inzamam the GREAT!!!! Salaam E Lekum to all brothers and sisters and fellow pakistan fans, Salaam E Lekum to Kamran Bhai. I am thankful to the PCB for allowing Inzamam to play in this last test match of his long and wonderful career, he has been the best pakistan batsman that I have seen in my time, I am 30 and he is surely the best Pakistani Batsman I have seen play, I remember the 92 world cup I was at high school and loved everything that had anything to do with Pakistan and being a British pakistani who was born in England, I take great pride in my roots and where my Parents come from, and I originate from. I remember watching Pakistans test series in England in 92 and can barley remember Javed miandad who was captain then. My time was for Inzamam the GREAT who has played so many superb and fantastic innings for our country and has made it GREAT and has worn that shirt with pride and has made us Pakistanis proud to be Pakistani, without him we would have won all these matches. All this is due to him and also others but especially Inzamam the GREAT. His style and grace at the wicket, such a lazy style, but wahat great skills.The world cup 07 was not all because of Inzi Bhai, its down to the whole setup, Inzi won us the cup in 92 and it was mostly doen to him we won and Allah will repay him for that and for his nature a humble man who like his shirt said eat, gym, sleep. I think Inzamam is better than Faisal Iqbal and would always be my choice ahead of him and Misbah even though Misbah played well in 20/20 he will never be a good as Inzamam and will never win us as many matches. Players like the Great Inzi are found only a few in a decade, I think PCB should let him play until he dceides to stop or if is performances start to lack, he should still be NO 1 choice as his replacements are not as good.

    Good luck with everything Inzi Bhai, Inshallah Allah Paak will help you suceeed futher in life, as you have made Pakistan cricket great and I for sure am going to miss your style, grace and batting you have made us proud.

    Long Live Inzi

    Allah Hafiz Imran Shafi Khan

  • Mohammed on October 8, 2007, 15:10 GMT

    Good player Inzamam, nice article. But apart from Imran Khan no Legends of the game regard Inzi as a great. He was not even in Shane Warne's top 50 cricketers of his generation even though Warnies top 10 made perfect sense.

    In addition Richie Benaud who has seen all the Greats play cricket from Bardman to Imran Khan to Tendulkar. He has never even acknowledged Inzi as a legend. Close inspection of Inzi's performance against WORLD CLASS bowling attacks reveals he heavily underperformed.

    He is lucky to have bowling greats defending his runs or he would not be a match winner at all.

  • Abdul H Junaid on October 8, 2007, 14:38 GMT

    I love Inzi as a person and his batting dedication and service to his country. He achieved high honors in the field of cricket. I wish him good health and success in future. May Allah bless him and his family happiness and prosperity. Ameen

  • Atiq on October 8, 2007, 14:25 GMT

    My heart moved a lot once I read the news on his retirement - what a great player and person Mr. Inzi -- I still feel pain for him - as I wanted him to play longer in his own style. He is such a great player in this cricket world and I hope he will get the real love and respect from the PCB and other bodies.

    We the mass, mob - love and salute him from our heart.

    May God bless him and ease his heart so that he can enjoy his rest of the life in full spirit, love and safe.

    We should bring his greatness more - more n more through various media............... LOVE my lovely Inzi. May Allah bless you.

  • Shabbir Ahmed on October 8, 2007, 14:15 GMT

    Great player, his stand out quality was his humbleness. Every so called cricket star should take a page out of his book. I feel that Inzamam had the capability in him to score 50 test and ODI hundreds. This last year has been tragic for him, he was continuously fighting for his survival every other week. BTW can anyone on this post pleaaaassssseeee tell me what the name Inzamam means and where are its origins??

  • Cricket Fan on October 8, 2007, 14:13 GMT

    Hereos never die...they keep living in our hearts.

    Farewell Inzi, you're probably one of the few heroes that Pakistan could ever muster up in any field. We need to learn from you, take pride from your achievements and move forward. Despite all that critisism we slammed on you in all eras, we know you'll forgive us because thats the stuff legends are made off.

  • Mohammed on October 8, 2007, 14:12 GMT

    Nice article, but Inzi is Fantastic batsman against Poor bowling thats why he has excellent records against average attacks like Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, India and a Shane Bond LESS New Zealand.

    He has never done anything of note against the Mighty Aussies thats why they dont mention his name in the same sentence as Tendulker nor Lara. They have taken out Austrailia throughout this era.

    Inzamam does have a better match winning record because he has world class bowlers to defend his runs: Acquib Javed, Imran Khan, Mustaq ahmed and MAINLY Saqlain, Razzaq when he used to bowl 90mph,Azhar Mehmood, WASIM and WAQAR and AKHTAR. Obviously your going to have a MATCH WINNING RECORD when you have these bowlers defending your runs.

    He was a good batsmen for Pakistan but not in the class of Tendulkar and Lara. Maybe just below Dravid and Ponting and Kallis.

    Make runs against the best team/ bowling attack in your generation and on MULTI SURFACE WICKETS and your WORLD CLASS like Tendulkar and Lara.

    If you don't then the jury's out.

    By the way IMRAN KHAN said Inzamam is the SECOND BEST BATSMEN OF HIS GENERATION.

    Eid Mubarak to all.

  • M. Irfanullah on October 8, 2007, 14:10 GMT

    Criketers come and go, but some of them like inzi make a mark and always remain in the memories of cricket fans. Whenever inzi performed pakistan won, This actually exemplifies the stature of a great batsmen. Thanks inzi for all the memories. we will miss you whenever pakistan. May Allah bless you in this world and after. Irfanullah, M. New Delhi

  • Bharat Shah on October 8, 2007, 13:53 GMT

    Inzy has been one of the greats of the world cricket and certainly of Pakistan cricket.It was always amazing to see almost no pressure on him even when he came into bat under pressure situation.I think, not only we in India, but all the opposition in the world were glad to see his back. Such was his genius that with minimum fuss he would despatch a ball to the boundry. I wish he scores a magnificient century in his last test and wins the match for his country. Inzy, all the best in your post active cricket era and thanks for entertaining all of us for almost 16 years.

  • the boy who grew up with inzy on October 8, 2007, 13:50 GMT

    what a humble soul, a true legend, a great player. this test match marks the passing of an era for pakistan cricket, and a passing of an era in my life.

    i've grown up with big inzy, his 120 test matches have been anchors in my life - through my entire teenage years in school, my student days, the start of my working life in my early 20's, and into my late 20's and the associated responsibilities of real adulthood.

    through it all big inzy has been there in the background, the serene legend plundering runs, flickering away on the old tv set in my teenage bedroom, or listening to his beautiful back-foot play on the radio i managed to sneak into my maths class, and now watching his every innings on cricinfo through my working day.

    my favourite memories? the mythical innings in the '92 semi-final, the last wicket partnership with his friend mushtaq against the aussies in '94, launching ambrose into the stand for 6 after ambrose had chucked the ball at his head the ball before in 2000, the brutal triple century against the kiwis, the thin inzy who failed so badly in the 2003 world cup, but then rescued his nation's dignity in the 1 wicket win over bangladesh, the 100 in his 100th test match against india in bangalore and his skillful captaincy on the last day of that match, the hercules of the pakistan middle-order against england in 2005 with centuries in both innings in faisalabad, the incredible last wicket partnership with mohammed asif in south africa earlier this year, the man who made a stand against those who insisted pakistanis were cheats and ball-tamperers with flimsy evidence and who lacked the grace to acknowledge our skill.

    inzy - i'm gonna miss you man. the kids of today are just not made of the same stuff.

  • Syed M Umaid on October 8, 2007, 13:44 GMT

    Hmm.. enough said abiut the legend we all know as Inzi. Yes he was a treat to watch when batting, his sublime drives and hooks and pulls, well i don;t see anoyone in our current playing eleven copying. But what needs to be done here is, without any doubt, inzi should be given some role among coaching batsmen. Jeff thomson is doing a great job, but even he needs some one who can provide his personal example and work with the basics if not fine tuning of the openers. I hope the PCB take notice of this, and reward Inzi with the stature and respect. We all owe this man our thanks and well wishes for his service to our contry. Inzi, you will always be our legend, forever!

  • Muhammad Asif on October 8, 2007, 13:32 GMT

    Inzi would be missed for quite some time due to the unavailability of proper replacement. Hats off for the great moments! atleast for WC92'.

  • Zohair Shahid on October 8, 2007, 13:29 GMT

    Well what can i say about the greatest legend of pakistan cricket !!!!! He was one person who used to turn the match on his own. He was the sole match winner !!! One cant think of a match winner other than inzi !! People call ricky ponting the greatest batting talent but can u even quote one instance when ponting won the match for australia when the entire country depended on him . the answer would definitely be no!!! He got one oppurtunity to do so in the ashes at old trafford but failed to make an impact !! so for a person who has won innumerable matches for his country on his own and whose 17 out of 25 test centuries made pakistan win the matches , u have all the reasons to term him the best batsman to have played in the last two decades or so alongside sachin tendulkar (both are at par) !!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Salman Khan on October 8, 2007, 13:24 GMT

    Some facts about Inzi :

    1.Inzi was a very , very good Batsman.

    2.Apart from Batsmanship he was below par in all other aspects of Cricket.

    3.Apart from Pakistani Press he will never be considered as one of the top four to five batsmen of his generation.

    4.Javed Miandad probably is the greatest Pakistani batsman of modern times .Although Inzi is very close and certainly Inzi was a better Batsman of Pace.

    5. Inzi will never admit it but introduction of religion in Cricket(initiated by him) was a mistake.

    6.He was a reasonable captain but not a very intelligent one. Certainly his understanding of strategy and usage of a Coach in Cricket was poor.

    7.The apparent humility in his demeanor was paradoxical to the the subtle but strong Narcissism he manifested in his captaincy and general handling of players.

    From a neutral/unbiased point of view :

    A close to great batsman but a slow fielder , poor ruuner between the wickets , unintelligent strategist , emotional/religious person who did not understand where religion ends and occupation begins and the worst shortcoming as a captain , Inzi had a poor eye for talent.

  • Shahid on October 8, 2007, 13:22 GMT

    i am already missing Inzy. Still remember that cold morning of march 25 when he under the captaincy of Imran brought us the world cup. Inzy there wont be another one like you. Thanks for whatever you have done.

    Thanks Shahid.

  • wlog on October 8, 2007, 13:21 GMT

    Inzamam will leave a big in the world cricket. He is my favorite cricketer. A perfect role model as a sportsman and as a person. I wish he had a better exit.

  • Hameed Malik on October 8, 2007, 13:10 GMT

    Kamran good job buddy

    BismillaHirrahmaniRahim. I like and respected him very much the way he atarted his speach. It was greatest thing he did by thanking Allah. I will always remembered that he used to say Bimillah so religiously. Cricket and religion was first time mixed in the cricket in the field.He was the pioneer. Probably He used to pray to Allah to help win the cricket match against his opponents. Who knows opponents might have been also praying to same God for Pakistan's defeat thinking their God is different. I wonder if God has any interest in boring 5-day cricket match and whose prayers should he hear specially if it is the same God. May be God prefer only Twenty20 cricket match as He is very busy.

    Talking about 5 days cricket,I like to see two days single inning, 90 over for each team , test match, would do wonders.We would call it Mini Test "MT" which would save us from 5-day match. Any way about Inzi I have only seen Inzi on TV since I lived in USA, but I have never seen live in the stadium. I believe he was magistic. The First video I saw about him when he won world cup for Pakistan in 1992. I was really impressed when I watched his shots that he had no fear of any kind. I had a hunch he would prove to be great batsman one day.In world cup final he thrashed all his opposition bowlers. I am familliar with pressure but I was amazed to see his fearless approach which I have never witnessed previously. I learned from him that if you want to be successful, catch the fear, roll and compress it in the shape of a cricket ball and toss it up in the air and then hit a Six on it out of the stadium and then get on the job.

    I must say Inzi will always be in our hearts and we want him to be around some way attached to cricket. Luckiely I saw a amusing picture of his son may be 7 years old that time, walking with his father Inzi, they were exact copies of each other, what a wonderful seen it was! He looked just like him and very cute. In another words at least we would have a copy in the future just like him. Our and Inzi's future is safe Inshallah.

  • Junaid on October 8, 2007, 13:07 GMT

    Simply he was a Legend and a great Ambassador for Pakistan we will Miss You Inzi Bhai

  • adeel khan on October 8, 2007, 13:01 GMT

    as u said before "with inzi , the last link to 92 glory is fading". we all will miss him big time. our poor middle order will miss him big time. farewell Inzi

  • Aditya on October 8, 2007, 13:00 GMT

    Inzamam is truly one of the best batsman of the generation. Especially during the 90s' when I grew up watching the game. Everyone remembers that innings against NZ in 92 WC. That was a great knock. But there is another knock which remains clear in my mind. In the 2003-04 series against India in the 1st ODI when India had made 349 batting first Inzamam almost got Pakistan to victory with an astonishing innings of 122 of 102 balls. The calm way in which he batted really baffled me. He just played a seemingly normal innings but almost won it for Pakistan. This was truly a great innings. I wish Inzamam-ul-Haq all the best for his future. We will truly miss this batting maestro who made batting look so easy with his silken touch.

  • DR HAROON CHAUDHRY (UK and LAhore) on October 8, 2007, 12:59 GMT

    What can one say about the great Inzimam that hasn't been said already. He truly was a giant amongst men, a true gentleman both on and off the cricket pitch. Inzimam had the best temperament for any Pakistani batsman I can recall. He always batted for his team as the situation demanded and not for his average as many of his predecessors did for theirs ! Inizmam comanded respect from everyone regardless of their nationality and we will all miss him. I sincerely hope that PCB are able to find an appropriate role for him in his retirement as he has still much to contribute to Pakistan Cricket. Best Wishes Dr Haroon Chaudhry.

  • HemaN DhingrA on October 8, 2007, 12:51 GMT

    It would not be wrong and certainly not a falcification that Inzamam has not only captured the hearts of millions of Pakistanis but also of Indians. Critics might remember him for sleepy and slowish runner between the wickets and for all wrong reasons but for true cricketer he will always be remember as one of the greatest cricketer Pakistan has produced. With Inzamam retiring from world of cricket, it will bring curtains to the most cherished moment of Pakistan's cricketing history (the '92 World Cup win. Its good to know that Paksitan Cricket Board has finally decided to give its players a due farewell. Its always in a habit of avioding it and not recognising the efforts of its players who have given their best part of their lives for their country. Its heartening to know that Inzamam is getting farewell for which he deserves every penny of it. At the same time it will be a loss to not only to Pakistan cricket but to millions of cricket fans that we will not be seeing more of this great Pakistani player. Players like Inzamam are not born everyday, they are class players, difficult to get and difficult to find their replacements. Inzamam is one such player whose replacement will be a big headache for Pakistani cricket board. As we say good things must comes to an end, so is his stay with cricketing world. Great cricketer....

  • Omer Admani on October 8, 2007, 12:42 GMT

    I think it wouldn't quite be right to claim that Inzamam is the greatest batsman Pakistan produced. Certainly Javed Miandad, and arguably Saeed Anwar, were better batsmen than Inzamam only in the last 15 years. Also, Inzamam was found wanting against opposition such as Australia and South Africa. However, undoubtedly, he was one of the best batsmen of his generation. I don't think comparisons with Shoaib Malik (in terms of batting) do either Inzamam, or batting, justice.

    I didn't like his defensiveness as a captain, yet credit to him for being able to unite an otherwise volatile people and a team.

    After the worldcup, however, I thought he could have gone on for a year or two. With an India and Australia series coming up, and no equal replacement in sight, Inzamam could have been vital. The new captain argued against him though (referring to DAWN) and the giant realized, thus, he could never fit in. Best wishes to Inzamam and I hope he makes a castle of potatoes in Multan.

  • tabs farooq on October 8, 2007, 12:36 GMT

    I hope he gets past Miandad's record and helps us level the series. The man has been simply awesome for us for a long time. I am sure he will take his place in history as one of the games great players and rightly so. As for my learned friend mr.Khan in Canada I presume you are a student sir as you seem to have far too much time on your hands! Looking forward to your response!

  • Javed Iqbal on October 8, 2007, 12:36 GMT

    Well, it is really a sad moment to let him go like this. I still remember while bowling to him in nets in Combined Cricket Club for hour during his off days in international cricket. He is really a true legend and a humble person yet aggrassive which people beleive he is not. I still don't believe on his comments of age difference in the dressing room and this is totally a push from the PCB. Well Hat's off the great batsman of the our era. Will miss you inzi.

  • Neeraj on October 8, 2007, 12:18 GMT

    Well I'm not surprised to see people comparing him to Tendulkar. He isn't better than Sachin, but he was good nonetheless. Winning the WC is not an individual effort, its about the team. So that point is irrelevant. And most of Sachin's hundreds have not been futile, and those that have owe to a team of jokers in the 90s.

  • muhammad on October 8, 2007, 12:11 GMT

    for me he is the best batsman pakistan ever have. good luck in the future we love you.

  • Krish on October 8, 2007, 11:56 GMT

    I think the Big 3 of Indian cricket should take a leaf out of Inzamam's book and should gradually ease out - at least the ODI team.

  • AJ on October 8, 2007, 11:50 GMT

    Can somebody tell me, why us (people from subcontinent) keep on berating the player every step of the way during his career and then start heaping praise after praise when he decides to retire. They are lots of examples, Kapil Dev, Wasim Akram, Mahanama, Ranatunga, and now Inzamam & Tendulkar. What hypocrisy and from those people who haven't held a bat or can't even run 100 metres...and that probably explains why we do not have any international sports start...because they know one bad day and there houses would be burnt, there family members threatened and when they retire whole world will come with heaps of praises making the final moments even more miserable... Farewell Inzy, our people really do not deserve a master like you...

  • AZFAR on October 8, 2007, 11:16 GMT

    Farewell to a Pakistani and World batting Great! Inzamam ul Haq did for Pakistani cricket what Miandad and Imran did. Though he had a different tempo, personality and style but he is to stand there with the other two as a one of the cricketing genius. Have a great life Inzi and thanks for all you provided to the Pakistani fans!

  • UmeshD on October 8, 2007, 11:01 GMT

    Wishing all the best to Inzy the gentle giant. I am one of the many Indians, (and there must be many others as well) who used to curse Inzy when he arrived at crease with bat in hand. That alone should be the testimony of what he has achieved as a cricketer.

    This time, I'm eager to watch him one (or rather two) last time.

  • Waqqas Qavi - Melbourne- Australia on October 8, 2007, 10:55 GMT

    The sentiments exhibited by Mr.Abbasi are an amalgamated set of thoughts for anyone bearing a true Pakistani heart or a mere cricket fan. For what Inzi has presented to this world of cricket in 16 odd years needs no nations ‘barriers or bias attitudes.

    A thrilling and adventurous entry in WC 92 was only followed by innumerable innings and countless rescues with his classy batting techniques. Inzi started his career as a young heavy built middle order hard hitter of the cricket ball and proceeded to be crowned as one of the most if not the most gigantic sportsman of the Pakistan; where cricket is assumed to be the only momentous sport and treated as religion along side the Indians.

    Inzi’s journey as a batsman was always calm and composed apart from some exhibited rivalry against the arch rivals Indians. The same being the feature of his ‘Aloo’ Incident in Toronto, Canada but it is quite apparent that emotions of all these 22 players in addition to those sitting in the dressing run high during any Ind-Pak clash. That whole issue in Toronto was a mere consequence of the-then aggressive sentiments.

    On the contrary, Inzi’s career has been one cool and relaxed one; a very distinctive Inzi’s laid back gait to take his guard and a usual belief for any opponent to attain his prize wicket before the team realize with the scoreboard stating ‘ Inzi 32*’. Inzi has never looked back and pressures arouse the best he had. His match winning talent is depicted in 17 of his 25 Test hundreds and it is almost an impractical task to track down his one day success and innings composure.

    Being a resident of Melbourne, Australia it is futile to avow that ever sight of MCG reminds us of the glorious Imran Khan Tigers in WC 92 but it is always the thought of Inzi in the semis and Inzi and Wasim at the MCG who made that crown an unpredictable possibility and an honour which we proudly own eternally.

    Inzi’s promotion as a leader brought about a different perspective of his notion of cricket. Countless times has be been criticized for his defensive captaincy and protective approach on the cricket field. A major factor could be the impact of his predecessor i.e. Wasim Akram who always stated ‘ the best way to defend is to attack’ and it is immaterial to state how he always kept his vision with one of the most furious displays of fast bowling the world of cricket has ever witnessed.

    Differing from Wasim, Inzi had his captaincy styles rarely seen conversing with the bowlers during the fielding moments but it is the batting of Inzamam and his concrete nature which have resulted in celebrations at the Pak camp and through out the nation. Inzamam once stated that had he not won the match against Bangladesh where he scored a remarkable 138*- he would have retired then. It was one of the most discussed topics of 2003-2004 but where would you rate that for a comeback?

    It is vital to state that Inzi’s class deserves more credits as his No.5 was not preceded by openers like Tendulkar, Ganguly, Hayden, Gilly, and Jayasuria with dominators in the likes of Dravid, Kallis and Ponting etc to follow. The demise of Saeed Anwar and Aamir Sohail was the start to an endless count of experiments at the top order; an issue which is as current as of today with likely opening of Salman Butt and Younis or Kamran. It is the delicacy of this top order which has forced tremendous pressure on Inzi but with the techniques and cricket brain he possesses; he made it appear as ‘ a piece of cake’. Inzamam’s lone hand in the middle order started to achieve some support from Younis and more importantly from Yousuf in the 2 yrs or so; the latter two being the only Pakistan hope in the upcoming years along with our new skipper Shoji and another possible ‘Ul-Haq’ in Misbah.

    Inzi- you have granted a new rank to our cricketing brains and our loyalty as fans and your well-wishers will always be obvious in your upcoming life; full of prayers and pleas on our behalf. It was a treat to watch you play and thank ALLAH in your own perception of English but you served us with what you were there for. It is a sad farewell but hopefully it is just a start to your new horizons of life awaiting your attention. Bets of Luck and Allah Hafiz

  • Suhaib Jalis Ahmed on October 8, 2007, 10:49 GMT

    Inzi's contribution to Pakistani cricket is phenomenal. After the 2003 World Cup, we found him, Saeed Anwar, Wasim Akram and Waqar Younis dropped from the team. In his comeback, he probabl saved Pakistan from perhaps the biggest humiliation there can be.

    He led the Pakistani team well. Only under his captaincy did the inexperienced Pakistani team reach the 3rd ranking Tests and ODIs. In fact, in the presence of the big guns, i.e. Anwar Akram and Younis, Pakistan never got a rank a higher than 6.

    HE led the team to a series win against India, and is the only Pakistani captain to defeat South Africa in a test series.

    Durng his reign as captain, his batting blossomed. The way he would single-handedly turn matches around was simply phenomenal.

    As far as the Oval fiasco goes, I still remember that when Hair gave 5 runs to England on account of ball-tampering, Nassir Hussain and other commentators said that if they were in Inzi's place, they would walk off the ground there and then. However, after the match, everyone was very quick to blame Inzi for denying the spectators entertainment.

    I believe that the loss to Ireland and Woolmer's death must be the most painful memories he has. I hope he can give the Pakistanis one last moment to rejoice.

    His career is definitely worth celebration.

  • Murtaza , Irving, TX-USA on October 8, 2007, 10:48 GMT

    We will miss you. at least this time PCB got it right and honored this revered giant. Though Pakistan lost in the WordlCup and he accepted the failure but look at the reviews none you will find against him, because he is a not political or i must say a positively minded politician.

    Though he may have lesser records than Tandulkar and Lara but he has played far more match saving innings than either of these guys.

    Thanks Inzi.

  • GIRISH-INDIA on October 8, 2007, 10:44 GMT

    Inzy is the consistent player in cricket world.So he is remained ever and forever in all the minds of cricket lovers around the globe.

  • Shane A on October 8, 2007, 10:34 GMT

    I am not a Pakistani, but i would like to add that the retirement of Inzamam Ul Haq should be celebrated for his achievements throughout his career rather then his loss from cricket. I have been fortunate enough to meet the man, and what got me was that this man had just won the world cup with his team mates and yet there was not even a hint of arrogance.. he had reached the top in terms of achievement yet inzamam was still a humble man with an extra ordinary ability to play shots that were.. well just mesmerising. Ive seen him bat on many occasions here in Australia and as one of the few Asian batsman who have adjusted to the harder bouncier tracks of Australia, he has pesonally delighted me. Whats amazing is he has done this the world over, for so many years and still remained just as humble. He has inspired many a young cricketer and i would like to say I, for one will miss this batting maestro. Inzamam Ul Haq, today im not diasppointed to see you go, rather i want you to know today ive been given the chance to remember all the fantastic memories you have given us. Thank You

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 8, 2007, 10:25 GMT

    Come on guys please don't use the past tense in describing or giving a tribute to Inzamam, don't say he was a great batsman. He isa great batsman, he is alive and he has to play this match before he retires from test cricket. And that will not be the end, we might still be seeing him playing here and there.

    Elle its a nice piece on Inzi, a stroll down your memory lane, especially with that "Gentle On My Mind." nostalgia, mais et tu - burying poor Inzi alive by quoting one from the "funeral tunes" of John Hartford. :-) If Inzi had any interest in western music, after reading this he would have been singing "Please Don't Bury Me" by John Prine. And btw, were you in that queue, shouting at them for an autograph? Not the same Elle today though. :-)

    ubaid I owe u a thanks for the previous post of yours in the previous thread. But, I must admit that in this thread you have made Inzamam look like a bicycle by talking about his 'carrier'. Actually his bicycle's carrier may have been small but his cricket career is great. And, its not just the beginning part of it, but he has been consistent through out his career, except for a few lean patches here and there, which is normal in every person's career.

    Be it Inzi, Lara or Tendulkar they've all been through this lean patch once in a while. And, look at the way Tendulkar struggled in the last three matches and even today to get runs. He opened the innings with Ganguly and after 33 overs he had scored only 48 runs, a strike rate of 53 then, finally he got out at 79 and then it was Dhoni and Uthapa who propelled the score at a phenomenal rate and giving India a reasonable total to defend but not really good enough to win. At least Inzi and Lara both announced their retirements on time and gracefully retired (and retiring) and only God Tendulkar knows how long he will play at the expense of the youngsters. There must be many more Uthappa's and Gambhir's waiting in the wings.

  • GIRISH-INDIA on October 8, 2007, 10:14 GMT

    Inzy is the consistent player of cricket world.So he is remained ever and forever in all the minds of cricket lovers around the globe.

  • ckb on October 8, 2007, 9:44 GMT

    I agree with the blog and wish Inzi the best for the next stage in his life.

    He was a fine batsmen who was a joy to watch when on song. To be fair I think that he would rank below the very best batsmen of his era due to his below average record against Australia (esp in Australia) compared to others such as Lara and Dravid who have risen to the occasion against the best in the business (similarly S Waugh, Gooch and Border saved their best for the best). Inzi's captaincy was also ordinary and uninspiring on occasions (like a few of the other great batsmen of his generation outside of Waugh). The players who have a fine record and who have done well against the best teams in the world deserve top billing.

    As for where he sits in the order of Pakistani batsmen, it is difficult for me to say as I am not from Pakistan. Like Miandad, Inzi has struggled against the best team in the World (Miandad had a poor record against the West Indies) but otherwise they have been fine players. Miandad probably gets the nod as the standard of bowling was generally higher across the board in Miandad's era. Personally I enjoyed Saeed Anwar and I think that he was a very underrated player.

    Like many others my great memories of Inzy will be of his super efforts in the '92 World Cup and of his genial nature.

  • Zain on October 8, 2007, 9:40 GMT

    Inzi has been a great servant to pakistan cricket. It gladens me that we are giving him a send off he deserves. Good Bye Inzi..

  • Amjad Husain on October 8, 2007, 9:36 GMT

    The best batsman produced by Pakistan will be missed. Thanks for wonderful memories. All the very best.

  • Shuja-Dubai on October 8, 2007, 9:21 GMT

    Hero's aren't born everyday and in this match we bid farewell to probably the best ever that Pakistan produced. Yes I'd have liked to see a similar exit in ODI's but then that's cricket -right. Inzi, these words are for you. For the last 15+ years, you have made every Pakistani proud whenever you came to the crease ( a feeling that we are not very fimilar of). You made us laugh with your comical running and you made us cry with unlikely victories over the years. When we fell, you brought us up. There are no words to describe what you meant to Pakistan cricket except that all Pakistan salutes you. You made us proud Inzi, best of luck with the future.

  • ceeko on October 8, 2007, 9:11 GMT

    Excellent articulation of emotions and tribute, Kamram. Inzi was the best batting talent Pakistan ever produced without a doubt. Everyone here is paying tribute to his skills and presence on the cricket field. Our notices can not escape his patriotism. No matter what the world has to say about him the Pakistani nation should be proud of him for what he did at the Oval to save his team's and his nation's reputation.

    We love you, Inzi. You were my favourite player always. You are a genuine match winner! I have grown up watching you play and I am very very proud of you indeed!

  • Farooq Butt on October 8, 2007, 8:30 GMT

    Inzamam is the greatest Batsman Pakistan has ever produced but he is unlucky one too. Given out LBW when he was not out happened, often then not.

    I have been a fan of Inzamam ever since he came out to bat in his first oneday international against West Indies and hit 2 consectetive Boundaries of Malcom Marshall in his first one day International. Walking on the field without a helmet, without fear, without thinking of consequences great example of excellent Batsmen. Credit should be given to Imran Khan for picking him up from no where. First Hundred in Test match was a match saving innings against West Indies in Antigua in 1993. When he started off he was playing in shadow of Javed Miandad, Salim Malik and others. But as soon as he was given responsibilities he excelled in his Batting. The story goes on and on, I could write a book on him but I just want to say that he will be definitely be missed and Pakistan team will take lot of time to recover from this lose of Great Batsman. Good Bye Inzamam, but I think we are going to see another twist in his career.

  • fasih on October 8, 2007, 8:30 GMT

    A wonderful tribute to a great Pakistani. What a cricketer and what a batsman, he was huge and great in every sense of the meanings. God bless you Inzi

  • Shahzad Arif on October 8, 2007, 8:24 GMT

    Inzi has been an ambassador for Pakistan cricket for well over a decade now and what an ambassador to have! I've got huge amount of respect for this man not just for his cricketing abilities but for him being a real gentleman. In his Int'l cricket career I've never seen him starting off any aggressive conversation with anyone. As a batsman what a batsman he's been for Pakistan both in ODIs and in tests. All I could say is Inzi we'll miss you from the very bottoms of our heart for years or I should say for decades to come. You'll always be remembered as one of the best Pakistan bats ever. I wish you all the best in your life after cricket .

  • Sreekumar on October 8, 2007, 8:20 GMT

    It is definitely the end of an era and not just for pakistani cricket but for cricket in general. I remember the incident in Toronto i also remember the comments that he moves like a cruise liner to him being a safe pair of hands in the slips. maybe the faults are more media made. not that man is without fault everyman has hsi share. but inzamam has been a great player. who can forget hsi inngs at multan or his innings in the semifinal as a young gun...a great player...

  • Ahmad Shariq on October 8, 2007, 8:19 GMT

    Yes, indeed Inzamam will be missed dearly as one of the most memorable batsmen in criket world history. He does appear to have more cricket left in him. He should have been encouraged and allowed to play more - especially in the Test Match form of the game - if not as a captain. It is usually the age factor which produces slowness and hence the need for retirement. However, Test Cricket should suit more of such 'elderly' cricketers as it is a different ball-game altogether when compared to the ODI or T20. These three are likened to different forms of slow and fast transport - a bus, a car and a motor-bike respectively. Test cricket is slow and not as demanding as the ODI or T20 where allround abilities figure more and being quick and agile on the field count high. As there is so much cricketing talent these days - seen by the mere number of existing and emerging players, it would do far better to have a separate playing outit (team) for the three different forms of the game. Older players could be retained for Test match cricket as their physical abilities would suit more here. This way we could be fairer and do greater justice to so much otherwise unutilized talent. Likewise, captaincy need not be expected or thrust upon one single man. We could have separate captains for the 3 different ball-games and this would reduce the pressure of expecting too much from one single man. This way there is lesser competition and most players are given a chance to show and play their full potential. More importantly, we do not end up discarding our heroes like Inzamam (somewhat prematurely) and would give full credit to the older cricketers as well. Thanks, and many good wishes to Inzamam, Mr Kamran Abbasi and all genuine cricket-loving fans!

  • siraj on October 8, 2007, 8:10 GMT

    Inzimam's career is very unique and settled in many ways he was a batsman of real class pakistan had among the very few and was very much evergreen. His performance as a captian is also full of stars. Just one major miss in world cup seems to be the real failure at large as if he batted all, bowled all and fielded all. The only thing that the PCB, critics,media reps of stereo types like PJ Mir could not stand the faith based-cricket team with high moral values and ethics in most of them. We are seeing this religious tempo aginst them as if we are not Muslims from Pakistan and Cricket and Islam do not go together. I have a piece of advice for all those who critise Islam to live out of the domain of All Subhan Allah where they will not be answerable to HIM ! (let me if u find one including PCB and all those who have seculiar mind. The "Cricket Bahar" from from Pcb and the Chief Patron had already set a tone of "Curse from Allah". Which has brought the worst national shamfull result in the world cup plus the most painful situation(it portrayed like criminals all over the world) after the death of Bob Woolmer. If we set a pattern like this we as a whole nation will be accursed by Allmighty Allah, there fore let us not dare to be seculiar as others do!

    Last but not the least PCB must realize they must do need to balance the team with experienced players like Inzi, Yousuf, younus, Shahid and Abdul Razzak for test matches otherwise we are about five years away for any worth out of the Test Cricket. Dressing room age difference is just a balogny for face saving and excuses by PCB!

  • Umar Naseem on October 8, 2007, 8:04 GMT

    Inzamam ul Haq is a legandry player but I think he should not retire at this moment, Or if anybody wants him to retire they should wait until India series as he is the main player of Pakistan and specially for that tough series. I kindly ask him to think once again or if there is anybody in the PCB who is loyal to Pakustan must do something worth appreciating to make inzamam play for some more time or atleast till upcoming india series.

  • Arshad Ali on October 8, 2007, 8:03 GMT

    Inzamam-ul-Haq is the real hero of pakistan sports. He never played for his recored he always played for the country. So many times he alone move the team on the winning track . if you compare him With S.Tendulkar you will find that he is bigger match winning playeer. He scored more than 11000 runs and his batting order was middle order. World Cup 2007 now is history we should leave the sad day but Inzi bahi has given so many time happiest movement to the nation & tour of India in 2005 was brillant (with yougster)

    Thnx Inzzi

  • Elle on October 8, 2007, 7:59 GMT

    The first time I saw Inzamam, he scared me...BIG TIME! And then Jonty ran him out. It didn't help South Africa anyway. Hmmm I digress... The next time I saw him was Pakistan's first tour to SA p.a (post apartheid). When Inzi came on to bat, there was this banner held by someone in the crowd: " Ul-haq Ul-haq, hier kom GROOT xxx". (of course, in the place of the stars, there should be a 3-letter Afrikaans word (rhyming with Haq)which has the same meaning as a well-used 4-letter word in English, beginning with "s") I digress again...

    I believe that is how we, as South Africans have always viewed the big guy. Your troubles wont be over until you see the back of him...I still have a collection of cards from that series though. Man, Inzi looked svelte! And sexy too. I remember a glossy magazine article written during that tour. Young girls in itsy bitsy teenie weenie bikini's hanging around Inzi, Waqar, Aqib Javed, Aamir Sohail and Ata-ur Rehman. Screaming and shouting at them for an autograph...anywhere on their bodies. LOL! Not the same Inzi today though.

    Yeah, brings back some memories...But now I have to get used to a Pakistan side WITHOUT him. And it feels a little funny. I mean, he is one of those players who you want to see playing forever and ever and ever...Although you KNOW its just not possible; but you still wish they could. I cannot believe this is the last I am going to see of Inzi. Somehow, it seems unnatural. Am I weird for saying that?

    As long as I enjoy and love the game of cricket, Inzi will be one of those players who deserve a special place in my memories. Inzi, I will always see you "waving from the backroads by the rivers of my memory...Ever smiling, ever Gentle on my Mind." (courtesy John Hartford)

  • suresh kumar on October 8, 2007, 7:57 GMT

    we will miss inzi bhai...the greatness of a batsman is defined by the time he has to play his shot - and inzi had all the time in the world to play his shots - whether a defensive shot of a savage pull.

  • Mohammad Manzoor on October 8, 2007, 7:42 GMT

    Alvidah Inzi, Alvidah. I don't really have words to say goodbyes to a man who will be remembered as one of the greatest pakistan has ever produced.The space created by his exit will never be filled by anyone.No one will ever be as good as him to fill his shoes. I wish Inzi the best of luck for his future and i hope that he can be involved with pakistan cricket somehow. I heard the he wants to build an cricket academy for youngsters.Wish him all the best for that too.. and once again, Alvidah Inzi, Alvidah.

  • Addy on October 8, 2007, 7:40 GMT

    Nice article Kamran.

    Great words for a great batsman.

    We will surely miss him and would be looking to create another Inziman in the future.

    Good luck to Inzi on his final match.

  • Ravi on October 8, 2007, 7:34 GMT

    "This last year was meant to be the crowning glory of the way of Inzamam, cricket and religion united in a World Cup triumph." - The way each time cricket is linked to religious feelings is hurting. The passion and enthusiasm dies the moment we read this type of narration. Inzamam is certainley a great player and surely the sport as well as pakistan will miss this cricketing genius. Wish the team and himself make it a glorious exit.

  • mohsin on October 8, 2007, 7:27 GMT

    spot on article. Inzmamam is right up there with the greats and will be sorely missed. In times of desperation his temperament was unrivaled and his consistency has time and time again contributed to many of Pakistan's successes. Inzi, we salute you.

  • Qasim on October 8, 2007, 7:22 GMT

    It has been a pleasure to have witnessed Inzamam's career. Was there for his first match back in '91 against WI at Qaddafi stadium.

    Did not fulfill his promise but the fact that he still ended with averages of 50 and close to 40 in tests and odi's respectively speaks volumes of his immense talent.

    To me the best Pakistani batsman and slip fielder ever.

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL, CANADA on October 8, 2007, 6:54 GMT

    Having said what I had to say about Inzamam in my previous post, I would like to say something about Malik's captaincy. If Malik wants to show that he is aspired by Inzamam, he should demonstrate that in his batting skills but, not in emulating Inzi's captaincy. Inzamam may have bagged a few good victories during his tenure as a captain and, he may also have gelled the young team very well with his fatherly and "faith-based" approach. But, in general Inzamam's tactics as a captain were very defensive. He wasn't an aggressive captain like Imran Khan or Majid Khan. It wasn't just about field placement or bowling changes, but Inzi's team selection and batting order were always very orthodox, conservative and defensive.

    After having experienced a defeat in the first test at Karachi, Malik should have been a little more aggressive in his team selection. IMO, he should have asked the selectors to give his VC Butt some rest and himself taken the initiative to open the innings along with Kamran Akmal to fill that slot. And, that would have opened another slot for a fast bowler in the team. Playing against a team like SA with only two seamers and relying on two spinners is asking too much. With such poor fielding they cannot take 20 wickets. I will be very pleased to be proved wrong.

    With Inzi, MOYO back in the team, the middle order at least on paper is very strong, Malik has opened for Pakistan on many occasions and he has accepted to bat at any position in the past, simply to be a part of the playing XI. Now, that he is the captain, he should have been bold enough to say, I am taking this initiative and I will open the innings and I will lead from the front. He should have insisted that we need one more fast bowler in the team either Rao or Tanvir. Shame that both are now sitting on the sidelines.I would have opted for Tanvir because, he is a left arm bowler and not to mention his deceptive wrong foot action that would have taken the South Africans by surprise as they have not faced him yet. Besides, he can bat a bit as well.

    Abdul Rahman has taken eight wickets on his test debut. For me, his first innings performance was very ordinary. Apart from the wicket of Boucher, all other three wickets he took were of the tail-enders. He bowled better in the second innings and on that basis I would like to retain him in the second test. However, I rate Kaneria as a better bowler than Abdul Rahman, Kaneria was unlucky, had he taken that wicket of Kallis he may have bowled with more aggression. It does happen to bowlers that when a catch is dropped and that too, of a world class batsman then they get disappointed and exactly the reverse happens when the opportunity is taken.

    When Graeme Smith said: "Inzamam's swan-song could distract Malik" he didn't mean that Inzamam would be patronizing him or imposing on-field decisions over him, but it was something finer and beyond the obvious, it was more like the subliminal message to the subconscious mind, an approach that is below the threshold of conscious perception. Malik took it for granted that the team would be complete with the induction of the two big guns. Malik lost his ability to see the overall strength of the team. And being the captain he is also using his prerogative to bat at a position which he thinks suits him best. But, that is not the team's requirement at the moment. The team needs an extra fast bowler and I wonder how he cannot see that? Sometimes you are blinded by the very obvious and thats what is happening to Malik. I suggest he should play chess and he should also take lessons on strategy and man-management and of course, the English language lessons which he so badly needs now.

  • Ehtisham khalid on October 8, 2007, 6:50 GMT

    whatever opinion anybody has about the retirement of inzi, i will always say inzi has been forced to retire form test cricket. He has enough cricket left in him, no doubt about it. But, one must give credit to Mr. Naism Ahsraf as for the first time one of our national heroes will get that respect and farewell. I agree with you Mr. Kamran mostly but you should mention that he has been forced to retire. That is irony and one of the sadest moment of my life as big man goes. i want to write, write and wirte about inzi the "legend" but there is short of time and space. i am sure inzi will end is career in high note, a "century" is on the cards. :) Inshallah WISH YOU VERY VERY BEST GREAT INZI

  • Tughral Turab Ali on October 8, 2007, 6:49 GMT

    Why is it that we Pakistanis have to wait till either a man retires, or is on the verge of it, or dead, before we can manage to appreciate his achievements and talent? Inzi has been under scathing criticism for being a dictator, taliban, vegetable and a has-been for about year now by the same lot who will singing hymns for him in the coming days. We did the same with Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis and most other legends of cricket. The less said about the vitrolic (and injust) pakistani press assault on Bob Woolmer the better. Wouldnt it have been better to give them support in their careers while they needed it? Can the turncoats in the press please mature already?

    Anyway.. to Inzi.. best of luck. Cricket will be poorer without his talents and resoluteness. Probably the best batting talent this country ever produced.

  • Basit on October 8, 2007, 6:33 GMT

    What can I say about Inzi ,Kamran bhai you have describe him beautifully in your words and as a Pakistani fan I just would like to thanks Inzi for last 17 years of service to Pakistan cricket.Thank you for 1992 world cup and thanks for all your those innings which you played for Pakistan and won us matches .I am sure we all Pakistani fan will miss you and we are not going to find the player like you .I wish you Good Luck for your future.

  • Muhamed Kunhi on October 8, 2007, 6:26 GMT

    Fare Thee Well oh big man. The cricket world will remember you for all of your achivements, which start with that crucial innings in 1992 World Cup Semi Final. Once more thank you for everything you provide for the cricket world

  • Salman Shakeel Leghari on October 8, 2007, 6:21 GMT

    He is a truly unsung hero...He may not be a good captain or a natural leader but as a batsman he was truly superb and great.One of the best when it comes to calmness and remaining cool under pressure. He deserves a great farewell and we all Pakistanis will support him,He is a great treasure for Pakistan Cricket-Hatts off to Him,Thank You GR8 INZI We will surely miss ur giant presence of urs on the field.BestLuck for your future.

  • Atif Memon on October 8, 2007, 6:00 GMT

    Completely agreeing with writer, we should forget that how he performed in last world cup and remember that how many times he was Pakistan’s team Hero and performed match winning performance, we’ll definitely miss him.

  • Sohail Qureshi on October 8, 2007, 5:56 GMT

    Sad moment for cricket. Inzamam Ul Haq, the great batsman and the pride of Pakistan has decided to retire from the test cricket. In my opinion it is the disappointing behavior of the PCB which make him decide to retire otherwise he could have played for Pakistan for at least a couple of more years. But it is really nice to see that PCB has allowed him to play his last fare well test match in honor of what he has done for the country, a new and positive trend for Pakistan cricket. Thanks to the PCB!

    Sohail Qureshi

    Kitchener ON, Canada

  • Adam H Nadir on October 8, 2007, 5:51 GMT

    Well said Kamran. Inzamam represented an era of Pakistani cricket-giants, who presented us all with some genuine talents honoring their smallest of Pakistani towns. Perhaps the equivocal of the English counties. He could have very well achieved even higher cricketing grounds, if he would have gravitated towards the more needed cunning sportsmanship spirit necessary in the modern game to finish first. As opposed to his sublime and modest approach, which he himself represented. Or, perhaps, that is a virtue not worth the bargain. Nevertheless, he had booked himself the spot of another immortal in the paki cricket annals. At the moment as mediocre as it may sound. But, I believe that he also represents the beginning of another era for Pakistan. An era, where the fans are beginning to understand that players are for keeps, faltered or unsuccessful. Support, spectatorship and the simple love of this great game comes before any other covenant. And,idols must not be broken faster than they are created. Especial thanks to Ramiz Raja for his resounding tributary to Inzy on cricinfo. Best of luck Inzy, and do not be an absentee ballot, but stay involved in the process of improving the Paki cricket team. You have much to offer and much to learn, still. For great men always carry-on their missions, especially, when they have nothing to gain from it (Pres. Jimmie Carter). We will miss ya.

  • sree on October 8, 2007, 5:48 GMT

    All great things must come to an end. It is a sad day when he anounced his retirement but we should be grateful to this genial pakistani for making this game exciting, enjoyable through his masterful strokeplay.He made batting look so easy and effortless. He will be missed.

  • arijit on October 8, 2007, 5:38 GMT

    Ditto to Mr.Abbasi. No one deserves a more fond farewell than our beloved Inzy. Its difficult to grasp the fact that we will not witness this sublime lovable maestro any more. We will miss the lazy elegance, the lazier strut to the middle and for once we should learn to acknowledge the supreme artistry which made so much more of the man than the stupid quips about his running between the wickets.

  • Yafis on October 8, 2007, 5:37 GMT

    Great post Mr Abbasi. Inzi is a legend and I am sure all his fans are praying for his success.

    Lets not talk about Inzi's failures today. Lets just sit and admire one of the greatest heroes this sport has ever seen.

  • Sohail Bhatti on October 8, 2007, 5:27 GMT

    I cried as i read this post! We'll miss you inzi! pakistan cricket will never be the same without you.

  • zohair on October 8, 2007, 5:24 GMT

    beautifully written.. this is your best work i've written so far

  • junaid on October 8, 2007, 5:22 GMT

    It's sad to see Inzy's exit from test cricket. After Brian Lara it is now Inzy's turn to suffer a forced exit from test cricket despite being able to carry on for another year or two. Inzy has had an amazing career. His value to the side can be gaged by the fact that so many of his test centuries resulted in a win for Pakistan. As a batsman he was a treat to watch. His timing was impeccable and he seemed to have so much time to play his strokes. He was a gentleman cricketer respected by team mates and opponents alike. Pakistan will definitely miss his solid batting and ability to rescue the team time and again. I wish Inzy the best of luck in his post retirement life. And I thank him for providing us with a chance to watch his wonderful batting.

  • Faraz.s on October 8, 2007, 5:16 GMT

    Inzamam-ul-haq...what a player and what a character he had been for Pakistan over a last decade..Who knows if he had not played like he did in the semi final against new-zealand in 1992 world cup,Pakistan can ever grab that prestigious trophy,which every pakistani will and had cherished for almost his whole life.Inzi, the big man has chosen the right time and the right way to leave the game,Thanx to Mr,Nasim for giving him the oppurtunity and breaking the tradition of humiliating the ending days of our great heroes.Lets just leave all the crcitiscm aside and see this great man playing at his final game.Take a bow Inzi.U have been a great player and we cant just thank u for what u have done for Pakistani Cricket.but still I wanna say that and I think we all cricket lovers should...Thanx Inzi....

  • Nabeel Adeel on October 8, 2007, 5:15 GMT

    The first cricket game that i watched was the 92 world cup semi final and from that day on inzi has been my favorite player.There are so many moments to remember but i think 20000 international runs bear testimony to inzi being Pakistan's best batsman ever.I know there is javed miandad but inzi might just nudge ahead of him due to 17 of his 25 test centuries coming in winning causes.This is not the time for comparisons though it is time to revere and praise, as Rameez put it, Pakistan's best batting talent.Inzi was Pakistan's last link to a world cup win and the mainstay of the batting line for over 15 years but he was so much more.The lazy attitude on the wicket, the running between the wickets and the interviews after matches are all things that will stay in memory of almost all pakistanis and i think most of the cricket world.Its so sad to see inzi leave but i hope he plays one last big innings for Pakistan.it will be hard to see him leave the field for the last time at a place where it all started in 1991.We will all miss the great inzi.All good things come to an end but inzi has left a legacy that will stay with us forever.

  • daneal on October 8, 2007, 5:13 GMT

    I sincerely believe that Inzamam-ul-Haq is the finest batsman of his era in world cricket without being biased, as I m not a Pakistani nor am I a supported of the team. He might not have scored as many hundreds as sachin tendulkar but did sachin produce more match winning innings than Inzi? Inzi might not have a breath taking poise to his style compared to Brian Charles Lara, but does Lara’s best inning portray selfless desire to put the team before personal record? These are all very good players, the best to be precise, but I think Inzamam is an extra mile ahead of the “best rated batsmen’s” in the world simply because he won more matches for his team, while the others scored more runs than the rest of the bunch. Inzi was never a man of stats, that’s why he is not rated next to the greats like Sachin and Lara, but due to his undeniable talent he is not very far away even on stats! My question is simple does scoring more centuries matters more than winning more matches for the team? And if stats is more important then I guess Inzi is probably just ‘one of the finest batsman’ of this era but if match winning is equally important if not more than I think it would be safe to rate him as the best of the era as he is well and truly miles ahead of both Sachin and Lara in those term. Inzamam not only had the flare but also the determination and calmness backed by enormous talent to play the game. He may not have been the best leader to have come through the Pakistani ranks but certainly the best batsman if not the best cricketer among the men in green. With Inzamam, ends Pakistan’s era of exhilarating and inspired cricket. As they seem to be aiming for a new approach. What lied ahead no one can predict, but a certain aspect would be missed greatly, and no one but Inzi can ever fill that special place. It is difficult to say bye to Inzi after all these years of exiting and smart cricket from this living legend but I console myself that I still might be able to catch some of his actions through the icl. Never the less he surely would be missed.

  • ADNAN KHALIQ on October 8, 2007, 5:04 GMT

    Thanks inzi! I put you and javed on a par i cannot seperate the two when judging who the best batsman is in pakistan history! However I must make a very important point here that with Inzamam retiring the Legacy of Imran Khan also ends....He picked up Inzi,Waqar, Wasim, Aqib, Mushy, Saeed the list goes on.. these players mentioned were class, world class due to the scouting eye of Imran......I grew up watching these players and they have left the arena one by one but this one hurts the most cos as I have said before with the exception of Imran khan Inzi was the best. Salaam to you Inzi you gave us a lot of good memories..You are leaving a huge hole in our mediocre batting line up!

  • raza on October 8, 2007, 5:02 GMT

    Beautifully written, finally an article that comes close to delving in the persona of the phenomenon that is Inzamam. The first memory of cricket , even before i could spell cricket, was of Inzamam coming to the crease and pulling his first ball for a four in a test-match in the carribean in early 90's. Since then i Have learnt as much about cricket as any non-cricketer could ever learn. Inzamam does have faults in his game, but if ever "romantic lazy elegance" was a word in sport it would be for him. A thorough gentleman if ever cricket had one. you only spoke of a few of his innings, but there are more countless more. you may talk of the lara's and the sachin's and the ponting's but to those who understand cricket know that stats are numbers without a story. To speak of Izamam in terms of numbers is a dis-service, you have to see him play to know what real, unadulterated and raw class is about. IF Consistent Performance under Pressure is a benchmark for greatness, Inzamam surely does take the cake. I take an extremely strong exception to the praise of the PCB. They are ending his career, on merit he will make the pakistan test team anyday. He has a lot more to offer as he says, and nobody can dispute that. He has been given JUST one lousy test-match to leave his mark, in a losing series , with massive pressure on the batting line-up. The pitch has to be result-oriented so it would not be a batting paradise. If anything , knowing Inzi this WILL make him perform in a perverse way. Its difficult to explain but when everything is against him, you can count on seeing the best of Inzamam. i regret that i did not see Bradman playing , if records are anything to go by , It would have made a challenging comparison to who the best batsman in cricket would be. IF he makes a huge score I daresay anybody could keep him out ( I appeal to the president to intervene , even though I don't like him) , but if he does retire , and for his farewell i say this with a knot in my throat. Men are taught not to shed tears or cry, but I am sure Inzamam WILL and SO WILL I.

  • ubaid on October 8, 2007, 4:59 GMT

    The best moment of his carrier was at the start of his carrier. In a way it is tragic. Still the gentleman desrves credit for his service and for standing up to defend the country's honour. thankyou man.

  • Farhan Arif - Sydney on October 8, 2007, 4:50 GMT

    After Imran Khan, Inzamam was by far the best Captain Pakistan has had. I hope he scores 2 centuries in his last game, taking Pakistan to a much needed win. Pakistan should play another pacer with Gul and Asif.

  • subodh bhat on October 8, 2007, 4:42 GMT

    Nice piece Kamraan. If there was one international batsman who has not got the recognition he deserves it has to be Inzi. His record is awesome to say the least. One would like to brush of a mere 8000+ runs as a minor acheivement as compared to the five figure runs rattled off by the Gavaskars and the Borders to the Laras and the Tendulkars. But at times its not the quantity of runs scored that should be a measure of the greatness and abilities of a batsman else where would even the great Don measure up? Its but natural to compare Inzi to another post 70s Pak great like Javed Minandad. But here, we have to think a while and realise that Javed had the company of other stalwarts like the irrepressible Zaheer Abbas , Majid Khan, Mudassar Nazar etc to soften the opposition for Javed to run riot. On the other hand Inzi has single handedly at most times taken the Paki batting on his ample shoulders. Scoring runs is one thing and scoring it when the team needs it the most is crictical. The fact that 17 of the 25 hundreds that Inzi has managed in his long and illustrious career have resulted in a victory for his country. No greater indicator needs to be put forward for his contribution to cause of Pakistani cricket. A lot of hullabaloo is raised about his running between the wickets or the lack of it. But hey every batsman has a chink in his armour. Some cant play the moving ball on the off stump , some cant read the wrong 'un from the hands of a leggie so by the same token Inzi could not run between the wickets as well as he would have liked. Does that make him less of a great? Not in my opinion . If a guy can knock the ball around the park in all conditions and across all continents this small folly is most easily forgiven. However , if there is one area where Inzi fell short then without doubt it has to be his leadership. As has been proved time and again the best of players need not make the best man managers (captains) .He , am sure could have contributed his mite as a batsman and elder statesman that much more had he not been saddled with the teams leadership . But , as in all Asian cricket teams it is assumed that the best player is the one to be nominated to the hot seat. How wrong this has proved is amply visible when u looks at Inzi , Sachin etc. Its heartening news that this modern day great ...and i mean 'Great' (because this word has been so badly abused by the media that some one day wonders have got this tag) ... is getting a chance to wear the Green cap one last time to bid adieu in the perfect manner a sportsman of his calibre should . It would have been tragic had he walked into the sunset with out a final hurrah . Knowing Inzi and his past , it wont be a huge gamble to put a few rupees on a wager that Inzi will finish his career with a 100. One sincerely hopes that this dream finish comes true .... no better way to cap a golden era with a 100 and a Pak win to sqaure the series. Play it again Inzi ... one last time !!!

  • Khondkar Abdus Saleque on October 8, 2007, 4:40 GMT

    Inzimam was perfect gentleman and dedicated soul for Pakistan. Time and again he resued Pakistan from desperate situation. He started his career in a beligerant fashion and later on settled down as the mainstay of Pakistan batting. This unselfish personality could have scored more runs and more centuries if only he batted at higher order .He has a sound technique. In the brittle Pakistani batting line up he should have batted at number three because of his superior technique against fast bowling and ability to build long innings. Imran used to rate him as abetter batsman to fast bowling than even great Sachin. He will have his swansong .Couls have played at least two more year. But you never know PCB. They may maltreat him . It is always better to go down as hero than to get shabby treatment. World cricket will loose a master of his craft.

  • Abhishek on October 8, 2007, 4:37 GMT

    The viewing public in India (and everywhere else) generally indulges in nostalgic admiration - admitting the greatness of an opposition player when he has retired. Inzamam belongs to a rare breed - a player loved and admired in India during his playing days.

    Few players can look so elegant with such economy of movement. Understatement was Inzamam all over - especially in the latter part of his career. Even when he was hitting the ball all over the park, it was with almost an apologetic air.

    Despite being an anachronism in modern day cricket Inzamam was born to bat. It will be strange watching a Pakistan team without Inzamam - let's hope his swansong will be a melodious one.

  • Fahad Khan on October 8, 2007, 4:34 GMT

    One last connection to the 92 world cup win. I've grown up watching wasim, inzimam, moin khan, waqar, saeed anwar, aamir sohail, and then shoaib akhtar, abdul razzaq, and afridi...

    its sort of sad to see they are all gone pretty much.. afridi aside.. who is not himself anymore anyways..

    I still remember the day when my dad and his friends were talking about this new guy inzimam who made pakistan win the semi final in 92.

    Life passes most people by while they are making grand plans for it..

    and with this.. I still support pakistan.. but nothing else is the same.. we have passed an era

  • Adnan Yusuf on October 8, 2007, 4:33 GMT

    Nice article, Kamran. I think Inzamam's tragedy lies in the fact that he could have been the greatest ever batsman if he was a better runner. He has won a World Cup, won more ODI's and Tests than Tendulkar: therefore, his tragedy does not lie in the fact that he hasn't achieved anything, but that he has not done 100% justice to his immense talents.

    Lets hope he gets 2 hundreds and walks out of the game with his head held high.

  • KiwiRocker on October 8, 2007, 4:32 GMT

    Inzy was best Batsman of modern era along with Lara. Tendulkar is not even close as Inzy Won World cup and scored 17 centuries that resulted in Pakistan's win. Fully Agree with Kamran and It time to Cherish a glorious cricketer who always stood by whatever he did!

  • JAVED A. KHAN, MONTREAL on October 8, 2007, 4:27 GMT

    A tribute to the humble giant - a tragic hero - who deserves a nice send off.

    It was the summer of 92 in Australia, cricket fans all over the world were gripped in the fever of the world cup mania. It was also the advent of the satellite dishes and live transmission that made people glued to their TV sets to see live matches. Imran Khan's tigers were injured and cornered in the early stages of the tournament, the early losses were enough to get scorn from the nation to write them off from the tournament no one expected any miracle or how they will fare in the tournament but, they emerged as Champions, even without their two inform key players, Waqar Younus and Saeed Anwar. But the two players who made it possible were, Wasim Akram and Inzamam ul Haq.

    Even after winning the final round match against the unbeatable Kiwis on their home ground, they had to wait for the result of another round match between Australia and West Indies to qualify for the semi-finals. Perhaps that is the only time in the history of Pakistan's cricket that not only the whole team but, the entire Pakistani nation was behind Australia for a win. And as hosts they did not disappoint Pakistan. After the world cup some Pakistani supporters were seen wearing T-shirts with this message on the front: "Pakistan World Champions" and on the back it was written:" Thank You Australia."

    It was the first semi-final between Pakistan and New Zealand saw the awakening of a humble giant, Inzamam ul haq, he came into the arena like a saviour, no one knew who he was and where he came from? He started playing shots in all corners of the park as if he has been playing international cricket all his life and he scored 60 in 37 balls alongside the most experienced Pakistani player Javed Miandad, who scored 57 n.o. and he kept guiding Inzi and later Moin Khan all the way to the end to cruise a comfortable win in the penultimate over.

    Once again in the final, Inzamam played a crucial innings by scoring a brisk 42 to build up the momentum that was initiated by Imran and Miandad. After winning the world cup, Imran Khan announced his retirement, but even today he proudly boasts about discovering Inzamam's raw talent and rates him above Tendulkar. I concur that view because whenever Inzi scored big, Pakistan has won whereas, Tendulkar's efforts have gone in vain most of the times. Inzi since the last 16 odd years has seen his ups and downs owing to his lethargic attitude and defensive captaincy but, as a batsman he is one of the greatest in the history of cricket in both forms of the game.

    Its time for us to bid him a farewell for now, and forever. So, let all of us bid him a true farewell forever - sooner than we complain again, for our complaint is too well grounded to be uttered for no reason. I do not wish to express my sentiments in lyrics because, mai shayer tou nahee, magar, I would love to quote Keats here: "If poetry comes not as naturally as the leaves to a tree, it had better not come at all." Anyways, I wish to bid a real farewell to the humble giant, with a honest farewell message for him to be content and be happy all through his life. Contentment or, Itminaan ul huq and Mutma'een ul haq are his other names.

    He is a unique batsman who has all the time in the world to play his shots, I've never seen anyone playing the shots as late as Inzamam, whether it is a pull shot or a cut shot he always plays it to perfection. A few years ago in India, Ahmadabad, the four on the last ball of Tendulkar was a classic late cut from the maestro, it turned the tables against India, after that defeat India never recovered in that series. After that it was Kanpur catastrophe and Delhi debacle, it was a series which India started winning 2-0 went down 4-2. The turning point was Inzi's last ball four.

    We saw him walking instead of running for singles, we saw him getting run-out on several occasions, we saw him getting out falling on the wickets and we saw him twice getting out in a funny way for obstructing the ball. We saw him loosing his cool and climbing into the crowd brandishing his bat towards a spectator who reportedly called him "Aloo" or potato but, it was more than that, he abused him personally for no reason and kept on doing it for hours using a mega-phone.

    We saw him leaving the field in tears when Bob Woolmer had died, now we are going to see him one last time at Lahore. We always saw him thanking Allah first, before his interesting speeches. He had a great sense of humour. I reckon when he was out on a full toss from Dave Mohammad in the last world cup, told Ramiz Raja (who was doing the pitch report) he said: "Ramiz, don't forget to mention that this pitch helps the bowlers who bowl a full toss." How can anyone forget his love for nihari and his motto: "Eat, Sleep & Gym."

    Now, I wish to bid farewell to the hero of the summer of 92 who fought bravely and won so many matches for the country, a hero when he scored a 100 brought more laurels to the country than any of his compatriots, it made each one of us proud. I know it is very easy to criticize and it is very hard and sometimes impossible to say all the nice things we think and feel about them, even to our truest friend. But, we still try and do our best, especially when it matters most to them. And when we say what we say, we must remember to be who we are, and say what we feel. Because, those who mind don't matter, and those who matter don't mind. It is the sentiments and the feelings that matter. Even though one may write a book on Huq, laikin:

    Huq tou youn hai kay huq adaa na huvaa Such tou youn hai kay Inzamam ul Huq qoam say kabhee juda na huvaa

    The truth of the matter is, truth did not matter, and The truth is, Inzamam ul Haq never bid farewell to the nation.

  • zia ansari on October 8, 2007, 4:27 GMT

    I would not be as sad to see him if we had a replacement for him. All the younster combined that represented pakistan in the first test do not possess half of his batting talent. It is indeed going to be tough for Pakistan to play test cricket and win without him. Well played Inzi and good luck.

  • Omer on October 8, 2007, 4:24 GMT

    Inzamam is the greatest pakistani batsmen and one of the best in the world. A true batsman is the one who can win matches for the team and not jus play for personal records and glory. Inzaman is one such batsman who has won many matches for Pakistan. Even the greatest batsmen have succumbed while playing under pressure but Inzamam always thrives under pressure, winning matches for Pakistan in difficult situations. All the best to the best player of fast bowling.

  • atif mir on October 8, 2007, 4:24 GMT

    Inzy has served Pakistani cricket admirably. His winning batting knocks in the 1992 World Cup's semi-final and final strongly suggested that Pakistan had found a true heir of Javed Miandad; comparison with the legent, Miandad, is no small honour to Inzy. Over the years, Inzy proved himself worthy of this honour. He was ready to give crowning touch to his captaincy and do what only Imran had done as a captain. The team was not favourite to win world cup but it had a decent chance but what transpired in the world cup 2007 was the tragic blow to Inzy's cricket reputation. A captain who commanded respect with his calm and fatherly style became a lazy and failed captain. Indeed he is a tragic hero but during and after Lahore test, I am sure people will remember his wonderful batting and his successful captaincy before Oval fiasco. The world cup 2007 made him a tragic hero but after Lahore farewell he will be remembered as a legend.

  • Kaustubh Acharyya on October 8, 2007, 4:17 GMT

    Inzy will stand out in history and Indian public memory for two reasons, both equally compelling. First, his unbelievable talent (almost genius) with the bat in high-pressure situations. The situation in which he introduced himself to the world was almost a schoolboy's dream-i was a shoolboy then. It was THE game vs NZ in the '92 WC , and all of us were rooting for NZ i.e. for a Pak defeat. It seemed all over bar the shouting, the topline batsmen gone and an asking rate of 8. What happened then is history. Gradually, all of us were rooting for Inzy's success, such was his brilliance. There have been many such instances ever since. The 2nd reason for which Inzy will stand out is more India-specific. When he led Pak against India, he did it on the spirit of the game, not as if the match was a proxy-war, which was a refreshing change from the eighties and nineties. That is perhaps his more important contribution to the game. He layed to rest the lie that Indo-Pak cricket runs on aggro. Thanks, Inzy, for all the memories.

  • yusuf nurdin on October 8, 2007, 4:14 GMT

    very thoughtful article, differences aside,perhaps inzi after all was the greatest batsman pakistan ever had. selfless individual who gave more than 100% while batting, gracias inzi, gracias indeed!

  • Manhal on October 8, 2007, 4:13 GMT

    All the best to Inzamam ul Haq. He was a true legend for Pakistan cricket,a great match winning performer and a great server for his nation's cricket. Pakistan will surely miss his presence.

    Manhal Ali Sylhet, Bangladesh

  • Bikram from Nepal on October 8, 2007, 3:59 GMT

    Yes Kamran you are right "Inzamam has won our hearts and gripped our souls". He deserves everything coz he has given his everything to the cricket and his country. It is hard to find the player of his caliber. He was just a genius and I still believe he can produce lots of match winning knocks like in past. He has nothing to prove again. Everyone has to retire but donno why I always love to see him playing and wish the same even it is not possible.........I feel so sad when I thind I cant see him playing again. We all shall miss him. Therefore, I m not gonna miss you Inzi either you bat or field in slip....I just want to see you in the gorund nd do well.... All the best wishessssssssssssss..........

  • Ahssan Javed on October 8, 2007, 3:58 GMT

    I wouldn't say that this is a fitting end to one of the greatest batsman Pakistan has produced. I wouldn't say that this is the way Inzi wanted to bow out. Nevertheless, Pakistan and people of Pakistan will never doubt his heart and soul that he put in Pakistan cricket. He was my hero my idol soon after I say his Innings against New Zealand in the 1992 World Cup. He will alway be my hero for what he did for Pakistan since then. I was only 9 when I first say him and will be 24 years old in two weeks and unfortunately would be the last time I see him play for Pakistan. Inzi it was an honor just to witness the skill and calm you displayed on the crease either when you scored a hundred or a naught.

    It was pleasure watching yah. Good luck for the future

  • Tariq on October 8, 2007, 3:50 GMT

    One of the best batsmen of our generation. No doubt and no ifs and buts about it. Inzamam will be sorely missed. He is an icon and an inspiration for millions of fans. I had hoped he lasted for another year or so but i guess he realized the age difference in the dressing room (which shouldnt be the case) We will miss him as there can only be one Inzamam. Good Bye Inzii.. we will miss you

  • shujaat on October 8, 2007, 3:48 GMT

    Inzy is the greatest batsman of pakistan undoubtly. His most important stat is his contribution in the wins pf pakistan. He has one of the best percentage when he has scored a century and make Pakistan win. Unlike many other he played unselfishly and pulled up some amazing victories as mentioned above. He is a true legend. Much better than the others who have better record but couldn't contribute much to their team.

  • Faisal Fareed Kamal on October 8, 2007, 3:47 GMT

    Yes we are really gonna miss inzy.. He has been a wonderful servant to pakistan cricket and I wish he could play for another year or so.. but considering the fact that a handful number of players have left the cricket scene with respect and dignity, i feel this is the right decision by inzy. May ALLAH bless him here and after.. and succeed him in his future endeavours. Many wishes for a great player..

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  • Faisal Fareed Kamal on October 8, 2007, 3:47 GMT

    Yes we are really gonna miss inzy.. He has been a wonderful servant to pakistan cricket and I wish he could play for another year or so.. but considering the fact that a handful number of players have left the cricket scene with respect and dignity, i feel this is the right decision by inzy. May ALLAH bless him here and after.. and succeed him in his future endeavours. Many wishes for a great player..

  • shujaat on October 8, 2007, 3:48 GMT

    Inzy is the greatest batsman of pakistan undoubtly. His most important stat is his contribution in the wins pf pakistan. He has one of the best percentage when he has scored a century and make Pakistan win. Unlike many other he played unselfishly and pulled up some amazing victories as mentioned above. He is a true legend. Much better than the others who have better record but couldn't contribute much to their team.

  • Tariq on October 8, 2007, 3:50 GMT

    One of the best batsmen of our generation. No doubt and no ifs and buts about it. Inzamam will be sorely missed. He is an icon and an inspiration for millions of fans. I had hoped he lasted for another year or so but i guess he realized the age difference in the dressing room (which shouldnt be the case) We will miss him as there can only be one Inzamam. Good Bye Inzii.. we will miss you

  • Ahssan Javed on October 8, 2007, 3:58 GMT

    I wouldn't say that this is a fitting end to one of the greatest batsman Pakistan has produced. I wouldn't say that this is the way Inzi wanted to bow out. Nevertheless, Pakistan and people of Pakistan will never doubt his heart and soul that he put in Pakistan cricket. He was my hero my idol soon after I say his Innings against New Zealand in the 1992 World Cup. He will alway be my hero for what he did for Pakistan since then. I was only 9 when I first say him and will be 24 years old in two weeks and unfortunately would be the last time I see him play for Pakistan. Inzi it was an honor just to witness the skill and calm you displayed on the crease either when you scored a hundred or a naught.

    It was pleasure watching yah. Good luck for the future

  • Bikram from Nepal on October 8, 2007, 3:59 GMT

    Yes Kamran you are right "Inzamam has won our hearts and gripped our souls". He deserves everything coz he has given his everything to the cricket and his country. It is hard to find the player of his caliber. He was just a genius and I still believe he can produce lots of match winning knocks like in past. He has nothing to prove again. Everyone has to retire but donno why I always love to see him playing and wish the same even it is not possible.........I feel so sad when I thind I cant see him playing again. We all shall miss him. Therefore, I m not gonna miss you Inzi either you bat or field in slip....I just want to see you in the gorund nd do well.... All the best wishessssssssssssss..........

  • Manhal on October 8, 2007, 4:13 GMT

    All the best to Inzamam ul Haq. He was a true legend for Pakistan cricket,a great match winning performer and a great server for his nation's cricket. Pakistan will surely miss his presence.

    Manhal Ali Sylhet, Bangladesh

  • yusuf nurdin on October 8, 2007, 4:14 GMT

    very thoughtful article, differences aside,perhaps inzi after all was the greatest batsman pakistan ever had. selfless individual who gave more than 100% while batting, gracias inzi, gracias indeed!

  • Kaustubh Acharyya on October 8, 2007, 4:17 GMT

    Inzy will stand out in history and Indian public memory for two reasons, both equally compelling. First, his unbelievable talent (almost genius) with the bat in high-pressure situations. The situation in which he introduced himself to the world was almost a schoolboy's dream-i was a shoolboy then. It was THE game vs NZ in the '92 WC , and all of us were rooting for NZ i.e. for a Pak defeat. It seemed all over bar the shouting, the topline batsmen gone and an asking rate of 8. What happened then is history. Gradually, all of us were rooting for Inzy's success, such was his brilliance. There have been many such instances ever since. The 2nd reason for which Inzy will stand out is more India-specific. When he led Pak against India, he did it on the spirit of the game, not as if the match was a proxy-war, which was a refreshing change from the eighties and nineties. That is perhaps his more important contribution to the game. He layed to rest the lie that Indo-Pak cricket runs on aggro. Thanks, Inzy, for all the memories.

  • atif mir on October 8, 2007, 4:24 GMT

    Inzy has served Pakistani cricket admirably. His winning batting knocks in the 1992 World Cup's semi-final and final strongly suggested that Pakistan had found a true heir of Javed Miandad; comparison with the legent, Miandad, is no small honour to Inzy. Over the years, Inzy proved himself worthy of this honour. He was ready to give crowning touch to his captaincy and do what only Imran had done as a captain. The team was not favourite to win world cup but it had a decent chance but what transpired in the world cup 2007 was the tragic blow to Inzy's cricket reputation. A captain who commanded respect with his calm and fatherly style became a lazy and failed captain. Indeed he is a tragic hero but during and after Lahore test, I am sure people will remember his wonderful batting and his successful captaincy before Oval fiasco. The world cup 2007 made him a tragic hero but after Lahore farewell he will be remembered as a legend.

  • Omer on October 8, 2007, 4:24 GMT

    Inzamam is the greatest pakistani batsmen and one of the best in the world. A true batsman is the one who can win matches for the team and not jus play for personal records and glory. Inzaman is one such batsman who has won many matches for Pakistan. Even the greatest batsmen have succumbed while playing under pressure but Inzamam always thrives under pressure, winning matches for Pakistan in difficult situations. All the best to the best player of fast bowling.