ODIs September 8, 2010

ODI batsmen: a totally new look through BCG charts

A look at top ODI batsmen using BCG charts
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This article is a completely different graphical look at the ODI batsmen and has been inspired by the work done by my friend Arvind Iyengar who did a similar analysis in a cricketing site to which we both contribute. I have done some significant changes and increased the scope of analysis.

Bruce Henderson of BCG (Boston Consulting group) had created these charts during 1968 to study the Growth-Share aspects of products/business units. This is an excellent way to study two related variables together. These are plotted on a graph which is split into four equal (or unequal) size quadrants. The placement of a particular product, in this case, the batsman, gives excellent insight into the batsman's position in the galaxy of batsmen.

Arvind had drawn the chart between Batsman strike rate and Batting average. I felt that the Batting average was a wrong variable since that is arrived at by multiplying Strike rate and Average balls per innings. Consequently the Strike rate is represented in both X and Y axis. hence I have changed the Axis variables to Strike rate and Average balls per innings.


The above represents a typical BCG chart. The batsmen in the top-right quadrant, the red one, are the "Top performers". They are to the right of the Strike rate line and above the Average balls per innings line. The ones in the bottom right quadrant, the green one, are the "Dashers". They score quite fast but do not last for many balls. Certainly an asset, but could do better. Similarly, the top left quadrant, the blue one, contains the "Stayers". They last long but score relatively slowly. They are probably more valuable in the ODI game. However the dashers are likely to be more valuable in the T20 game. The bottom left quadrant, the orange one, represents the "Also rans". They fall behind in both areas.

A few things are to be made clear. I have used the Average balls per played innings rather than the balls per dismissed innings. This is to make the analysis fairer across all batsmen since the later measures would benefit the middle order a lot, possibly out of proportionately.

The other thing is that the two central dividing lines can be drawn in two ways. One is to draw the same right in the middle. However this does not take into account the distribution of values. The alternative method is to draw the lines around the median value so that we get around half the batsman on top of the mid line of the Average balls per innings and around half the batsmen to the right of the mid line of the Strike rate line. This leads to unequal quadrants but would make analysis of the batsmen far more meaningful. Let me add that the drawing of the asymmetrical central lines is my own idea and most of the BCG charts have only centrally located divider lines. However my idea of asymmetrical dividing lines ensures a fairer distribution of players across quadrants.

Finally the chart is drawn on two criteria. The top run getters and the top batting averages are used as different criteria, the minimum runs requirement for the later selection being 2500.

The first chart is drawn with the runs scored as the criteria. 6500 runs are the cut-off for selection. Anything fewer will clutter up the graph. Already I feel we are over-populated. The median Strike rate is around 76 and the median Average balls is just short of 45. The dividing lines are drawn around these figures. These lines split the distribution approximately equally on either side. Let us now look at the chart. At the end I have also shown the alternate graph in which the dividing lines are drawn right in the middle.

Graph of runs scored
© Ananth Narayanan


The "Top performers" are led by Tendulkar and include Ponting, Lara, Mark Waugh, Saeed Anwar and Richards. It is difficult to question the credentials of any of these ODI greats. Gayle just about falls short of breaking in. The "Dashers" group is led by Gilchrist, Sehwag, Jayasuriya, Gayle and Yuvraj. Quite a few attacking batsmen also fill this group. The "Stayers" group is led by Haynes and is followed by Kallis, Ganguly, Miandad and a few others. The strugglers group, the "Also rans", has Border, Fleming and Azharuddin as the prominent members. Andy Flower and Sangakkara are in this group but are quite close to the central point. Sangakkara could move out of this group by either increasing his scoring rate or average balls.

The second chart is drawn with the Batting average as the criteria. 40.00 is the cut-off with a minimum of 2500 runs. The median Strike rate is around 76 and the median Average balls is around 46. The dividing lines are drawn around these figures. These lines split the distribution approximately equally on either side. Let us now look at the chart. The selected batsmen are distributed around the whole graph quite well. Hence the mid-point graph is not necessary. It will be almost the same as this one.

Graph of batting average
© Ananth Narayanan


The "Top performers" are Tendulkar, Zaheer Abbas, Hayden and Ponting. No one else is even on the border. Richards leads in the "Dashers" group and is followed by de Villiers, Dhoni, Hussey and Pietersen. Greenidge and Haynes top the "Stayers" group which also has Jones, Ganguly and Bevan. The last "Also ran" group has very few members. Even amongst these, Sarwan, Clark and Martyn are very close to the centre line of the Strike rate. It is easy to conclude that once we select batsmen with averages of 40.00 it is difficult to find really average performers. They compensate for deficiency in one with the other. Lara, Sarwan, Clark and Mohd Yousuf are quite close to the central point.

I had also drawn the charts for the top players by Strike rate. This is quite a lop-sided graph since there is a huge gap between the strike rates of the top batsmen (113, 103, 96 ...). Surprisingly many of these players have fairly high Balls per innings. Hence the graph is heavy with players on the left side.

Graph of strike rate
© Ananth Narayanan


In addition, I had also drawn the charts for the top players by Average balls played. This is also quite a lop-sided graph since there is a huge gap between the balls played values of the top batsmen (67, 62, 57 ...). Surprisingly many of these players have decent strike rates. Hence the graph is heavy with players on the bottom.

Graph of average balls played
© Ananth Narayanan


To view/down-load the graph of top run-makers with an equal quadrant size split, please click/right-click here. The graph is self-explanatory. As I feared, this is a totally unacceptable presentation. Just one player, Tendulkar makes it to the "Top performers" group.

I will next do a similar analysis on ODI bowlers. The intriguing feature in this graph will be that for both Bowling strike rate and Bowling Rpo, the lower the value is the better the bowler. In other words, the quadrants will exchange their significance. Readers are welcome to give their suggestions.

An important announcement to the readers. In one of my comments I had mentioned that I would create an open mail id to which readers could send their suggestions. To start with I would appreciate if readers can send in their suggestions on which batting and bowling performances in the third innings can be considered. I will complete my work and depending on the reader responses will incorporate a few popular performances amongst these. Please note that this is a one-to-one communication and the contents will not be published. Please continue to use the blog posting method for the comments you want to be published. This is not my mail id and has been created only for this purpose. To separate the spam, it will be a nice idea if all readers can follow a simple idea of making their title as "It Figures Blog: ..............".

The mail id is ananth.itfigures@gmail.com

Since the readers would have to use a mail route I give the readers my assurance that the mail id is safe and will never be used by me for anything other than communicating with the reader specifically. This will not be part of any group mail nor will mails be cc'd.

Anantha Narayanan has written for ESPNcricinfo and CastrolCricket and worked with a number of companies on their cricket performance ratings-related systems

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Thejana on July 10, 2011, 13:22 GMT

    Ananth, While appreciating your work, I must suggest something important. Players stats have to be adjusted as they are from different eras. For instance you can't compare the likes of Viv Richards of seventies and eighties era with someone like jayawardena or sehwag who started playing after odi's got revolutionized as a batsman's game on flat dead wickets with super fast outfields. we all know that during Viv's era the acceptable SR was quite low though he had it over 90. Modern day cricket is different, SR of 80 is pretty much the cut off value.So you have to generalize these stats by a correction factor first for each player. Then only you can include to the BCG chart to compare. I would love to do that given that I've got enough time, but since you guys are very much into this I would like to see a modified chart from you.

    Cheers Anand, nice innovative analysis!

  • Kartikeya on September 17, 2010, 21:41 GMT

    To add to my earlier comment about Tendulkar the Opener, his average balls faced goes from 47.3 to 51.4 - almost a full over...

  • Kartikeya on September 17, 2010, 21:14 GMT

    Dear Ananth, I've tried to do something similar, and one of things that strikes me about someone like Tendulkar - especially Tendulkar, is that his career as an opening batsman deserves to be treated separately from his overall career.

    Overall, Tendulkar's numbers are imposing - 17,598 runs at 45.12, striking at 86.26, over 442 games. But Tendulkar's record as opening batsman is even more imposing, and whats more, longer than a lot of players full careers 323 games, 14482 runs at 48.92, with a strike rate of 88.19

    It's probably worth considering Tendulkar the Opener separately from Tendulkar the ODI player.

  • rajan on September 16, 2010, 12:23 GMT

    besides RPI and SR can it be taken a factor to determine the player's impact in a game by the percentage of runs scored by him to the overall runs scored by his team in that match? could it bring out more facts? [[ Rajan Not really. I have done this anlysis only at career level and match level numbers do not come in. Ananth: ]]

  • Abhi on September 14, 2010, 5:14 GMT

    Ananth, further to all the comments about openers/batting positions etc. A more accurate assessment would be "batting order wise peer ratios".i.e openers,middle order,lower middle order. My gut feeling is, contrary to some comments like those from fahad,that the likes of Tendulkar,Haydos would actually come out even better off. [[ Abhi When I did the Test peer comparisons, I did batting position level comparisons also. It is possibly necessary to do that for ODIs also in depth. Ananth: ]]

  • fahad on September 12, 2010, 20:56 GMT

    Thanks for the response Anand. In your response to RameshKumar, you justify using balls per innings rather than balls per dismissal by pointing out that middle order batsman are likely to have higher strike rates, so while the vertical axis variable might disadvantage them, the horizontal axis variable is in their favor. However, don't you think that strike rates are higher both at the start and end of an innigs. Powerplays are a recent innovation, earlier we used to have the 15 over rule...and fifteen overs are a big chunk of the innings. So I think your graphs are a little biased towards top order batsman by giving them an advantage due to verticle variable, while the horizontal variable does not necessarily advantage middle order batsman. Does using balls per dismissal change the results much ? [[ Fahad Whatever we do, there is going to be some set of players who readers will find hard done by. Everything can be questioned. Openers task is easier or harder ??? Are Powerplays beneficial to batting team or not (my conclusion is No). Is it a benefit to come in for the last part and swing, hoping for the best. The 27* scores, do they compensate for this requirement. Finally I will conclude with one statement. Irrespective of the position they bat in, Sehwag, Afridi, Hayden, Gilchrist, Jayasuriya are going to have one approach. Ananth: ]]

  • Aniket on September 12, 2010, 17:14 GMT

    An amazing post! really appreciate u guys!!

  • Chase on September 12, 2010, 15:58 GMT

    Would this tool be as useful if we extend it to the players who are currently playing? I was hoping to find out if it could be used as an indicator of form, if you used a qualification like runs more than 1500 in the last 50 games.

    Could this also be done for a single tournament? If yes, none of us would be surprised if the Man Of the Series was a top performer but it'd show us the other contenders who often go unnoticed. [[ Narayan The answer to all the questions is "Yes". The only thing is that nothing would come out if it is done as an academic exercise. Probably I could try this on a trial for the CL10. Ananth: ]]

  • Alex on September 11, 2010, 22:40 GMT

    Amit - to continue this digression, I guess if the women needed a successful Mumbai cricketer to go ga-ga over, Tatyarao Vengsarkar was the more handsome choice! Still, RJS was a tough poster-child for not letting celebrity affect your game - he continued to play and stay within his limits whereas Azhar (who really was an equal of Zaheer Abbas) disintegrated within his first year itself.

    IMO, VVS is an all-time top 5 Indian test-cricket batsmen and deserved a stable run in ODIs at #3 after Sehwag arrived. How an outstanding thinker such as Greg Chappell got it so wrong as the Team India coach is a mystery. [[ Alex/Amit Can be revert to the topic on hand. Ananth: ]]

  • Amit on September 11, 2010, 16:33 GMT

    Alex, I think you are jealous of Shastri, because he women were gaga over him :-) Yes, Azhar's 93 was an extraordinary knock against a rampant Imran in tough foreign condition. He hit some breathtaking boundaries on backfoot on a fast bouncy track. Unfortunately, he rarely ever delivered (I tend to remember Test match knock more) against good bowling attacks in 'unfriendly' soil after that. A century in adeilede in 91 (in an otherwise woeful series) and another one in SA with Tendulkar were sprinkled between way too many failures. People tend to compare Laxman with Azhar (style and numbers), but in my books there is no comparison. Sorry for digressing again, but I have to do my part to put Azhar back down where he belongs! Amit

  • Thejana on July 10, 2011, 13:22 GMT

    Ananth, While appreciating your work, I must suggest something important. Players stats have to be adjusted as they are from different eras. For instance you can't compare the likes of Viv Richards of seventies and eighties era with someone like jayawardena or sehwag who started playing after odi's got revolutionized as a batsman's game on flat dead wickets with super fast outfields. we all know that during Viv's era the acceptable SR was quite low though he had it over 90. Modern day cricket is different, SR of 80 is pretty much the cut off value.So you have to generalize these stats by a correction factor first for each player. Then only you can include to the BCG chart to compare. I would love to do that given that I've got enough time, but since you guys are very much into this I would like to see a modified chart from you.

    Cheers Anand, nice innovative analysis!

  • Kartikeya on September 17, 2010, 21:41 GMT

    To add to my earlier comment about Tendulkar the Opener, his average balls faced goes from 47.3 to 51.4 - almost a full over...

  • Kartikeya on September 17, 2010, 21:14 GMT

    Dear Ananth, I've tried to do something similar, and one of things that strikes me about someone like Tendulkar - especially Tendulkar, is that his career as an opening batsman deserves to be treated separately from his overall career.

    Overall, Tendulkar's numbers are imposing - 17,598 runs at 45.12, striking at 86.26, over 442 games. But Tendulkar's record as opening batsman is even more imposing, and whats more, longer than a lot of players full careers 323 games, 14482 runs at 48.92, with a strike rate of 88.19

    It's probably worth considering Tendulkar the Opener separately from Tendulkar the ODI player.

  • rajan on September 16, 2010, 12:23 GMT

    besides RPI and SR can it be taken a factor to determine the player's impact in a game by the percentage of runs scored by him to the overall runs scored by his team in that match? could it bring out more facts? [[ Rajan Not really. I have done this anlysis only at career level and match level numbers do not come in. Ananth: ]]

  • Abhi on September 14, 2010, 5:14 GMT

    Ananth, further to all the comments about openers/batting positions etc. A more accurate assessment would be "batting order wise peer ratios".i.e openers,middle order,lower middle order. My gut feeling is, contrary to some comments like those from fahad,that the likes of Tendulkar,Haydos would actually come out even better off. [[ Abhi When I did the Test peer comparisons, I did batting position level comparisons also. It is possibly necessary to do that for ODIs also in depth. Ananth: ]]

  • fahad on September 12, 2010, 20:56 GMT

    Thanks for the response Anand. In your response to RameshKumar, you justify using balls per innings rather than balls per dismissal by pointing out that middle order batsman are likely to have higher strike rates, so while the vertical axis variable might disadvantage them, the horizontal axis variable is in their favor. However, don't you think that strike rates are higher both at the start and end of an innigs. Powerplays are a recent innovation, earlier we used to have the 15 over rule...and fifteen overs are a big chunk of the innings. So I think your graphs are a little biased towards top order batsman by giving them an advantage due to verticle variable, while the horizontal variable does not necessarily advantage middle order batsman. Does using balls per dismissal change the results much ? [[ Fahad Whatever we do, there is going to be some set of players who readers will find hard done by. Everything can be questioned. Openers task is easier or harder ??? Are Powerplays beneficial to batting team or not (my conclusion is No). Is it a benefit to come in for the last part and swing, hoping for the best. The 27* scores, do they compensate for this requirement. Finally I will conclude with one statement. Irrespective of the position they bat in, Sehwag, Afridi, Hayden, Gilchrist, Jayasuriya are going to have one approach. Ananth: ]]

  • Aniket on September 12, 2010, 17:14 GMT

    An amazing post! really appreciate u guys!!

  • Chase on September 12, 2010, 15:58 GMT

    Would this tool be as useful if we extend it to the players who are currently playing? I was hoping to find out if it could be used as an indicator of form, if you used a qualification like runs more than 1500 in the last 50 games.

    Could this also be done for a single tournament? If yes, none of us would be surprised if the Man Of the Series was a top performer but it'd show us the other contenders who often go unnoticed. [[ Narayan The answer to all the questions is "Yes". The only thing is that nothing would come out if it is done as an academic exercise. Probably I could try this on a trial for the CL10. Ananth: ]]

  • Alex on September 11, 2010, 22:40 GMT

    Amit - to continue this digression, I guess if the women needed a successful Mumbai cricketer to go ga-ga over, Tatyarao Vengsarkar was the more handsome choice! Still, RJS was a tough poster-child for not letting celebrity affect your game - he continued to play and stay within his limits whereas Azhar (who really was an equal of Zaheer Abbas) disintegrated within his first year itself.

    IMO, VVS is an all-time top 5 Indian test-cricket batsmen and deserved a stable run in ODIs at #3 after Sehwag arrived. How an outstanding thinker such as Greg Chappell got it so wrong as the Team India coach is a mystery. [[ Alex/Amit Can be revert to the topic on hand. Ananth: ]]

  • Amit on September 11, 2010, 16:33 GMT

    Alex, I think you are jealous of Shastri, because he women were gaga over him :-) Yes, Azhar's 93 was an extraordinary knock against a rampant Imran in tough foreign condition. He hit some breathtaking boundaries on backfoot on a fast bouncy track. Unfortunately, he rarely ever delivered (I tend to remember Test match knock more) against good bowling attacks in 'unfriendly' soil after that. A century in adeilede in 91 (in an otherwise woeful series) and another one in SA with Tendulkar were sprinkled between way too many failures. People tend to compare Laxman with Azhar (style and numbers), but in my books there is no comparison. Sorry for digressing again, but I have to do my part to put Azhar back down where he belongs! Amit

  • Gireesh on September 11, 2010, 14:00 GMT

    Runs/innings on y-axis would be a better measure than the present one.. But I had great fun reading it, considering the fact that I have my Strategy end-term exam tmrw.. [[ Gireesh Both RpI and BpI are fine. BpI is truly independent of the S/R while RpI is BpI x S/R. All the best for your exam and I hope you get an A+. Ananth: ]]

  • Alex on September 11, 2010, 6:48 GMT

    Amit and Ananth - I gladly solicit any opportunity to bash RJS, a snobbish shrewd Mumbaikar. He did very well in the '85 B&H World Championship, no doubt. However, as a batsman, Srikanth & Azhar far outperformed him: RJS upped Srikanth in only the SF vs NZ.

    I think the win vs Pak in the 1st match was the turning point in team India's fortune & in SMG's ODI outlook. It gave the team an immense self-belief (Javed's famous 6 duly shattered it in '86). Young Azhar hit a glorious 93* when Imran, in his 1st match in 2 years, had reduced India to 27 for 3. Thereafter, the whole bowling unit clicked with Binny & Kapil unplayable and Siva mesmerizing. However, RJS got the award since bowled well _and_ batted well ... I can't believe I have to praise Srikanth & Azhar to bash RJS but such went that tournament! [[ By now the Audi would have been traded for a state of the art BMW. He probably was a better bowler than batsman in the B&H bash with 8 economical wickets. But his three 50s were at the top of the order although the one in the final was an excruciatingly slow one. Overall he deserved the award more than anyone else. Ananth: ]]

  • Abhi on September 11, 2010, 4:24 GMT

    Re. all those suggestions for "era adjustment"...the previous "peer ratios", both "peak peer ratios" and "average peer ratios" are perhaps the best comparative statistical tool available. [[ Abhi Very valid point. And I can see where this is leading into. All of you have a conspiracy to load me with whole lot of work. I think there is room for a BCG graph incorporating Peer ratios. Ananth: ]]

  • Vinish Garg on September 11, 2010, 2:30 GMT

    Ananth [for MoM comment/response]

    You are right, but I could not judge whether you agree or disagree to my comment on MoM awards :) A graph or statistics purely on MoM awards do not reflect the balanced picture of players' contribution. This is because of the same reason as I cited example in my earlier comment. [[ Vinish Implicitly I agreed with you. I had a method of adding up the Batting and Bowling rating points for the team and individuals and then assigning % contributions. It worked like a charm. The cases you are referring to would come out like 29.2%, 26.5%, 23.1% and so on. This is possible because I have taken great pains to equalize Batting and Bowling rating points. Maybe one day I should come out with an article on that. Ananth: ]]

  • Vinish Garg on September 11, 2010, 1:41 GMT

    For Alex's suggestion on MoM, I do not think MoM ALWAYS reflect true facts of players contribution. Many a times it is a team effort and if 4 batsmen score fifties, only one gets a MoM award because of his impact on the game. It does not mean that others contribution is less. Similarly when a bowler gets a MoM match award for outstanding spell, it does not batsman's innings of 78* was less important.

    Personally, I am not a great fan of MoM. Invariably players who stablize the innings (builders) get fewer MoM awards because flashers get it because of their impact. However, contribution by both is equallly important! [[ Vinish Until a few years back the problem was that an average 50 would win the award against an excellent spell. Note match #396. Greenidge's 67 in 104 out of 165 for 6 wins the award against Gray's 3 top order wickets for 20 or match #191 in which again Greenidge's 64 in 98 out of 167 for 3 wins against Gomes' 4 good wkts for 38. Just took Greenidge for examples. Ananth: ]]

  • Amit on September 10, 2010, 21:57 GMT

    Alex, I dont mean to compare Shastri's and Dravid's talent, but rather the ability to read situation and adapt, work hard to improve and soak up pressure. Dravid took up wicket-keeping and ended up finishing with 10000+ run in a format he was not naturally suited for. Shastri started as a #10 batsman and ended up being an opener in a very strong batting lineup. He was willing to put himself on the line during critical moments and often succeeded (E.g. Mini world cup in 85, Sharjah encounter in 80s. BTW: The tie test inning was one of the most perfect short innings I have seen anyone play under pressure). [[ Amit I also did not want to put down Shastri who did great service for India, shouldering differing levels of responsibilities. Today I may not like his supercilious, holier-than-thou commentatary but there is no denying that he was at least 50% responsible for winning us the most important tournament outside the World Cups. Ananth: ]]

    Kapil SR of 95 should be put in the context of his ODI ave of only 23. [[ Amit In one sentence you have brought out the essence of this graph. Note how far to the RIGHT Kapil is but how far DOWN. Ananth: ]]

    Cant believe I am defending Shastri, when he often cured my insomnia! Sorry for digressing! Amit.

  • Alex on September 10, 2010, 12:53 GMT

    Amit - in ODI's, RJS was anything but Dravid of 80's. He was a shrewd player with quite limited talent (however, I give him props for making most of it). [[ Alex Dravid was a far greater stroke maker who curbed his strokes. Thilak raj notwithstanding, Shastri was nowhere near Dravid's class. The differnce in strike rates is a clear indicator of this. Ananth: ]]

    Ananth - to bring out outliers that transcend eras, I nominate one more BCG chart: freq of MoM awards vs # MoM awards won. I personally don't like this metric but it is the only one that truly brings out the outstanding ability of Greenidge. He and Viv are the only 2 batsmen to win MoM awards with a freq greater than 14%; SRT probably comes in 3rd at @12%. [[ Why get into a two-dimnensional chart when a flat one dimensional table would suffice. Ananth: ]]

  • ted on September 10, 2010, 11:58 GMT

    any chart that has border as a also run has to be questioned.maybe the different eras and border batted at no6 [[ Ted Without in any way playing down Border's batting credentials, I have to say that his batting average is 30, despite 39 not outs (15% of his innings). This is reflected in the chart. Even amongst hiis contemporaries, Jones is way ahead, Boon, Marsh and even Wood have higher averages than Border. Ananth: ]]

  • Amit on September 10, 2010, 11:42 GMT

    Ananth, Nice analysis. A comment on your comment. You mentioned 'kapil would be considered a far superior all-rounder compared to Shastri', that is certainly not how I remember Shastri in ODI. Shastri and Maninder made the most potent pair in the middle overs for much of late 80s. He was also one of the most reliable batsman (a tremendous asset when you had srikanth to open with) and willing to move up and down the order to suit the teams need. Shastri was really the Dravid of the 80s and his contibution to Indian cricket is grossly undervalued (although both struggled at times to get out of a self created bubble while batting).

    Shastri's value to the Indian team was no less thans Kapils in ODI as an allrounder, IMHO. Amit [[ Amit Considering the times they played in, there is some truth in what you say. All more the raeson to appreciate Kapil's attacking 95+ s/r batting. Ananth: ]]

  • K Venkataraman on September 10, 2010, 11:37 GMT

    Hello Ananth

    Great article, good analysis. Interesting to go through the graph with run and balls. CONGRATULATIONS. Hope to see more of this nature in future.

    K Venkataraman

  • Ravindra Marathe on September 10, 2010, 9:53 GMT

    Ananth, 1.In one of your provious blogs on significant ODI innings, I had extracted the data into Excel and sorted them acc.to strike rates and found that most significant innings were those with v high AND a bit quantum of runs. I recall the avg score to be 68. The BCG graphs also reflect scoring high and fast to be v important. And great players do both over a long period of time consistently (better than saying longevity I think). 2.The BCG plots will also be very useful in tracing a player's career over his no. of matches (eg Dhoni's v high SR initially, maturing into a lower SR but more balls- and therefore more effective batsman). 3.Another thing that will do is help identify milestone innings or passages. Eg jayasuriya in WC96, Ganguly in Toronto, etc. Doing this for every player is a big ask, but will definitely be worthwhile. Just an idea. Thanks. [[ Ravi Each graph is a laborious task. At best I can probably do the graphs for, say, the top 10 batsmen. Ananth: ]]

  • CricketPissek on September 10, 2010, 9:06 GMT

    enjoyed this analysis. stats need to be taken with a pinch of salt, but some are still quite tasty :) i was almost surprised to see Ranatunga there in the 'dashers' quadrant in your first graph. that shows how underrated he was as a top ODI batsman i think. He features in the top 10 of your most consistent batsmen of all time as well. A true legend that was more famous for his captaincy and his big belly and not enough for his pure cricketing skills! [[ Ranatunga was deceptive. His now-famous walking-the-run was done so often that people forget that he was a great overall ODI player. Ananth: ]]

  • hussain on September 10, 2010, 8:05 GMT

    i dont think this idea works, we cant judge batsman from thier strike rate , like inzi his strike rate his not too good but he was a consistent and very great batsman and he had got a very healthy average, my suggestion is to make a graph on average basis , this will really work . i hope u;ll take a look on my suggestion and work on it.

  • Meety on September 10, 2010, 5:08 GMT

    Hi Ananth, Great article, I loved the graphs. A few suggestions; 1. Can you do an "Anti-batsmen" graph focussing on the likes of McGrath, Morrison & Tuffnell 2. An analysis that uses the raw data but is limited to the position in the batting order. I personally adds a little bit more context.

    Look fwd to the bowling analysis. [[ Meety Both excellent sugegstions. In future, can you send this mail to the special mailid. That is the one for retention. Ananth: ]]

  • Fahad on September 10, 2010, 4:45 GMT

    Very interesting analysis. You use ball per innings, as opposed to balls per dismissal, to make it fairer for openers. However on the flip side isnt this measure unfair to lower order batsman, who probably dont get the chance to face as many balls ? The fact that they are throwing their bats around and taking more risks at the end of the innings should compensate for the advantage that they might end up not out. In any case ending up not out is a sign of a finisher, and there is nothing unfair about rewarding that. [[ Fahad This has already been responded to. Pl see response to Rameshkumar. Ananth: ]]

  • anmol on September 9, 2010, 23:47 GMT

    good to see bcg matrix used for cricket, dhoni missed criteria in 1st work otherwise he would have lied above & right to tendulkar adaccordingto this study he will be most accomplishd batsmen. it's not fair to include batsmen of diffrent era s cricket has changed in past 30 years & become more & more batsmen game

  • Alex on September 9, 2010, 21:29 GMT

    Ananth - re Chetan's comment, comparisons across eras should be avoided since only raw numbers are used. I suggest the following: 1. Divide the batsman's runs in a match by the batting avg (taken over both sides) in that match --- likewise for the # deliveries faced; 2. Divide his SR by the avg SR of the best batting side in that match. 3. Obtain the BCG chart for these revised metrics.

    Also, pl add 2 more BCG charts (using raw numbers only): IPF vs RPI, IPF vs average. [[ Alex Re comparisons between eras. The idea is to look at people who transcended ages and periods. People like Bradman and Richards stand in comparison with the others who probably had things in their favour. Especially in ODIs, we have passed 40 years and we should look at such comparisons with an internal adjustment. Not that I have not done era-wise adjustement. I have done plenty of that. My feeling is that this chart should be between basic data. Intricate calculations and derived figures would make the chart difficult to understand and derive meaningful results. Also drawing this chart is not an easy task, not like creating a table. Ananth: ]]

  • Kannan on September 9, 2010, 18:14 GMT

    Nice analysis Ananth! Can you please do a similar analysis for test also? I guess the strike rate is not as important in tests, but it would still be interesting. [[ Kannan Determining the Test variables is quite tough. Ananth: ]]

  • Anand on September 9, 2010, 16:32 GMT

    Ananth:

    A very interesting article as always and as can be expected from you. Just out of curiosity. None of the 4 great all rounders (Imran, Hadlee, Botham and Kapil) feature anywhere in the quadrants. Is it to do with the fact that they were batting in the lower middle order (number 6 or 7) most of their career? They all had trmendous strike rates to qualify even in modern cricket. I am sorry if you have already mentioned the reason in your article or if you have addressed this in response to somebody else's comment. [[ Anand You have answered the question yourself. Those four are all-rounders. They do not qualify under any criteria. Not 6500 runs, nor average of 40.00. However Kapil Dev qualifies in the Strike rate graph with a s/r of 95 and he is right there in the middle of the right quadrant. His average balls figure is a very low 20. As and when I do a Batting Average/Bowling Average graph these four will be right up there. Ananth: ]]

    Its interesting that "also rans" feature some legends. Ur analysis has brought forth some observations that are not really obvious.

    Is it possible to compare the strike rates of stayers over the first and second half of their innings(mid point being half the number of balls they face)? Inzi, Haynes, Sourav, Javed usually cut loose towards the end of the innings. Is it possible to determine at what point they normally cut loose in their innings? [[ This information is not available. Ananth: ]]

  • sivaraman on September 9, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    Hi Anantha Narayanan,Great Work Done By You And Your Friend Arvind Iyengar. I Like This Article Because It Analysis Best Batsman From Different Point Of Views. I Suggest Instead Of Batsman Strike Rate In X Axis, We Can Have Batsman Average Runs Scored In Dismissed Innings. Because The SR Is Not Much Necessary In ODIs.The SR Also Required Differently In Different Times, For Example, The Good Batsman In Before 80 May Have SR 60-70, But Now A Good Batsman Must Have Above SR 85. If We Calculate Good Batsman By Runs Scored Per Innings The Openers Will Be Benifited,Because In All ODIs The Middle Order Batsmans Doesn't Have Full Chances To Prove Themselves. If We Calculate Good Batsman By Average,The Middle Order Batsmans Will Be Benifited Because Average Is Calculated By Runs Per Wicket.However,The Middle Orders Are NO Many Times Due To Facing Less Balls.Average Runs Scored In Matches Also Not Useful Because Middle Order Batsmans Don't Have Enough Overs To Prove Themselves. [[ Any ODI analysis without taking into account Strike Rate will be meaningless. Runs and Balls are linked by Strike Rate. Ananth: ]]

  • Navin on September 9, 2010, 15:57 GMT

    You should have batsmen with "away" statistics on a decade by decade scenario. I don't think you'll get many Indians then!

  • sumanth on September 9, 2010, 12:22 GMT

    Also i suggest to have this tool implemented as regular tab in website giving the analysis of playing XI of each side [and domestic level cricket also]. Viewers can findout who are performing consistently [[ Sumanth That is a huge demand. Cricinfo should do that. I will forward this mail to Rajesh of Cricinfo. Ananth: ]]

  • sumanth on September 9, 2010, 12:15 GMT

    Hi Ananth,

    First of All, good Analysis. I am quite intersted to see similar type of analysis for test cricket where parameters would be BPI and total runs in partenships in each innings [test cricket is all about maximum stay in crease with building parterships i think]. or may be plain BPI and RPI. [[ Sumanth This is the sort of suggestion which I would like to be sent to the special mailid I have mentioned since that is going to be my retention box. No problems in sending here so that it will be published but pl send there also. Ananth: ]]

  • Chetan on September 9, 2010, 11:25 GMT

    I have read a lot of people talking about Runs Per Innings. That would leave openers with an unfair advantage - they have the opportunity to play more balls. You might even end up with Ravi Shastri looking better than Kapil Dev because Ravi opened the innings and therefore, scored more Runs per Innings - Kapil came during the last 10 / 12 overs, risked his wicket to score fast - succeeding spectactularly sometimes, missing a few. The misses which result in lower RPI would have readers presuming that Ravi is the better of 2 all rounders. We all know what is right. [[ Chetan Let us not forget that Kapil would be considered as a far superior all-rounder mainly because his bowling is far superior to Shastri's. Shastri performed a difficult job as an opener competently.Don't judge him by today's standards.Bpi of 39 and SR of 60 won't let him see many matches today. Ananth: ]]

  • Ramesh Kumar on September 9, 2010, 10:52 GMT

    Ananth

    Very good analysis and really interesting to see the distribution. A few quick questions: 1. With no 4 onwards potentially face less no. of balls, will the charts always be favourable to positions 1-3? 2. Since the first innings will generally be the full quota of overs and the chasing team in many situations face less balls, is there a case for looking at two innings' charts seperately? Also, while chasing, the run rate is tied to the asking rate and hence the strike rate may vary.

    On another point about progressive strike rates over course of innings--with power plays, this has been tempered as one can score with high strike rates in the first 15 overs. The problem is in losing one's wicket in this phase.The greatness of SRT comes out here, I think-he plays long innings without losing his wicket in the powerplay with attractive strike rate, changes his course mid innings and give the push later, not to mention the total aggregate of runs across so many matches/years. [[ Ramesh I get the feeling that the middle order batsmen might get to play fewer balls but will invariably have a better strike rate. So, on balance, the Batting avereage should work out. Pl see the perceptive comments of Mark Petrie. Ananth: ]]

  • Abhi on September 9, 2010, 10:02 GMT

    Ananth, Great new framework. "Refreshing" to view such a format as compared to the relatively "drab" older ones! Also, several top notch comments. Just one observation on my part (and a typically biased one at that).. With the currently "2D" presentation we have the usual suspects with Tendulkar/Viv as the top ODI batsmen. This is more or less accepted among most cricket fans. However,If you add another "Z axis" with longevity and so get a sort of "3D" view like a box, you would truly get Tendulkar out in a different league altogether. [[ Abhi You are a "Robert Bruce" where the little master is concerned.There is no mistaking the bias there. However you have also made a valid point. Maintaining an average of 40 overs 15 years should be considered better than maintaining the same over 10 years. Note my use of years rather than matches. You remember that I had done an analysis last year on the years played by players and the average number of matches per year. Let me improve the 2-dimenaional graph before going into the third dimension. Ananth: ]]

  • Mark Petrie on September 9, 2010, 8:08 GMT

    Very interesting analysis, to which I offer some comments.

    Graph 2 (batting average) - Distribution is scattered upper left to lower right. This suggests play safer/face more balls (upper left) or play risky/face less balls (lower right). Seems sensible given the nature of the 1day game.

    Graph 3 (high strike rate) - You note with surprise that strike rates of the top batsmen have high balls per inns. I do not find that too surprising. Often a batsmens' strike-rate will rise over a longer innings; gets his eye in, pressure to up tempo. On average good batsmen tend to hang around longer and increase their strike-rates over of an innings. [[ Mark That is a very interesting observation. Cameos excepted, it is true that for longer innings, the s/r of the second half of the innings will almost always be better than that for the first half. Ananth: ]]

    Graph 4 (average balls faced) - The players in the upper left (higher balls faced/lower strike rates) are pretty much all openers while the lower right section (lower balls faced/higher strike rates) consists "mainly" of non-openers. This graph mirrors the historical course of one day innings i.e. run rates increases over course of innings. [[ Again another good observation.That also shows the true value of Hayden and Tendulkar. Mark, thanks. You have added a lot of value to the analysis. Ananth: ]]

  • saurabh on September 9, 2010, 7:47 GMT

    Hi Ananth,

    Great Analysis, as always you amaze the statistical hungry audience with your work :)

    Keep it up.. Looking forward for more such gems

    P.S: Wish Dravid was playing in the ODI Team :(

  • pramod on September 9, 2010, 7:20 GMT

    Hey can you please do this graph thing team wise. [[ Pramod If you mean that the basis for selection is players of one team, yes it is possible. Ananth: ]]

  • Arvind Panchal on September 9, 2010, 7:16 GMT

    Nice work Ananth, I am happy to see that finally graphics are coming in play to describe the players performance. It is really powerful to be able to see the numbers in graphical form.

    Just to let you know that some time back I did a similar analysis inspired by one of your analysis on allrounders. That analysis nicely showed why Gary Sobers is few steps ahead of Jacques Kallis

    Please check out http://rightarmoverfast.blogspot.com/2009/06/criterion-to-classify-player-as-bowler.html http://rightarmoverfast.blogspot.com/2009/06/why-gary-sobers-is-better-than-jacque.html

    I wonder if you could elaborate on that analysis

    Thanks Arvind [[ Arvind First let me publish this comment and then take my time to view your work. This also gives others chance to send their comments. thanks. Ananth: ]]

  • Raijaved on September 9, 2010, 6:47 GMT

    Hi Dear Ananth, No doubt it is a good effort on your part, actualy i am also looking for similar sort of program for my Ph.D research studies to plot a graph B/w two parameters, in which each individual genotype could be placed clearly, and can be tracked visually. would you like to develop its software for commercial, or from where i can get it. thx. [[ Raijaved As and when I complete the program and distribute the same it will be only on a Shareware basis with no restrictions on use of the same. Will keep you posted. Ananth: ]]

  • Vinish Garg on September 9, 2010, 5:05 GMT

    In the first graph “>6500 runs”, we see Dravid’s ABF as close to 47 with SR of around 72. In the last graph ‘Bpl of >46.00”, we see that not many contemporary batsmen have faced more ABF than Dravid (Only Hayden and Attapattu and both opened the batting). And when you have flashers like Sehwag and Ganguly, builders like Yuvraj and Dhoni, and a master like Tendulkar in the lline-up, Dravid is the PERFECT player to have in a team to lend balance. Sadly the vested interests deprived millions of Dravid fans for last 3 years now to see him in ODI team. Ananth, though your blog is not platform for fans to vent out personal frustrations, I could not stop myself from advocating Dravid though the overall objective of this post is something else. I really feel sorry for this last ‘Gentleman’ of cricket. [[ Vinish A very valid observation. Dravid was not a slow scorer and he lacked not a whit in stroke play. The presence of him to balance the team has been, as you have pointed out, unfortunately missed out. He is also in the top right of the "stayers" quadrant. Ananth: ]]

  • Abhishek Mukherjee on September 9, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    A fascinating analysis, as usual. However, since runs scored, batting averages and strike rates have all been steadily increasing with time (runs scored isn't that obvious, but it has definitely gone up since the number of matches being played is more), one should probably put an era-specific weight of some sort. For example, had Haynes had his career strike rate of 63.09 today he would possibly been dropped after 20-odd matches. On the other hand, Zaheer Abbas and Viv Richards' supreme batting averages in their age mean a lot more than Kallis' in the contemporary era. Just my two paise. [[ Abhishek These are good comments. This is a first attempt and will improve as we go along. It is possible that we should do some era level adjusting and then plot the graphs. Let me wait for all the comments to come in. Ananth: ]]

  • Bijit on September 9, 2010, 3:10 GMT

    I agree, so long as the SR is fixed it does not matter, whether we use Rpi or Bpi. However the problem arises while comparing across Sr's. One of the uses of plots such as these is that if player A is in the lower left quadrant with respect to player B, then player B is no-doubt better than player B. If player A on the other hand is the top left or bottom right quadrant, then things are not clear anymore. It depends on which criteria is more important.

    Keeping this in mind lets look at a simple example: comparing Haynes and Sachin. Haynes scores 36.48 runs per innings, facing 57.83 balls per innings at a strike rate of 63.09. While Sachin 40.83 runs per innings 47.33 balls per innings at a strike rate of 86.26.

    If you plot Bpi on the Y axis(look at your graph), Haynes is in the top left quadrant with respect to Sachin. leading to doubts about who is better/more important. While from a cricketing perspective it is clear that Sachin is definitely better. This is obvious if you use Rpi. [[ Bijit As I have told you earlier let me wait for some time before doing the SR and RpI analysis. I get your point. However the quantum of difference between Tendulkar and Haynes on the two measures will leave no one in doubt. Ananth: ]]

  • Fruho on September 9, 2010, 2:30 GMT

    Hi, I always read your blog, and this is one of my favorite articles yet. I do have a few questions for you, however. 1. How much value do you place by raw stats?I know you've touched upon this in other comments, but do you really feel that the whole game of cricket can be viewed accurately by using numbers? 2. Sachin Tendulkar, according to the graphs, is head and shoulders above the rest.Do you believe this qualifies him as the best ODI batsman in history?Many would argue for Viv,Ponting, or Kallis, but by the numbers Tendulkar is the clear winner...in your opinion, is this an accurate reflection of what is? On an unrelated note,I was wondering if you could consider a blog post about the best XI of players in history.I know Cricinfo is doing the best XI for each team,but it feels objective and there seems to be a preference for the "golden oldies"(eg. Chappell and Border over Ponting).Could you use stats to make the best overall XI ever?That would be a great read Thanks for your time [[ Fruho I have done extensive work on both types of analysis. When the standards of the 1980s was applied Richards was ahead of Tendulkar. Overall Tendulkar seems to have better figures. That is not the point. My work is not the ultimate deciding one. For that matter NO ONE ELSE'S IS. No one person has the right to say that his words are the final word. Please take my work as presenting a few points of view in a readable and intelligent manner, unobscured by technical mumbo-jumbo. My strength is the lack of bias. Finally how do you conclude that Tendulkar is head and shoulders above all. There are batsmen who are ahead of him in both measures. It is his ability to be in the top-10% of both which sets him apart slightly. Ananth: ]]

  • Gaurav on September 9, 2010, 2:29 GMT

    Ananth,

    If you feel the graph was getting cluttered, try using colored dots to represent each player, and use legend to explain it, graph should look neater. [[ Gaurav Good idea. Since this is my own program, I will find ways of improving the presentation in future graphs since I get the feeling that I am going to do a lot of work using this methodology. Even numbering the circles and an accompanying legend would be better. Thanks. Ananth: ]]

  • himanshu on September 8, 2010, 22:33 GMT

    Hi,

    This is a great analysis. To make the analysis more accurate, a measure can be taken by factoring the runs per over in the strike rate. For example assuming the average runs per over was 4, the strike rate should be adjusted for it. You can use 2005-2006 as the base and adjust the innings accordingly. [[ Himanshu This suggestion already responded to. Ananth: ]]

  • Anonymous on September 8, 2010, 20:17 GMT

    Some interesting tidbits on the above: Sachin and Richards are in a league of there own. Very difficult to chose between them. Dhoni and Yuvraj ahs the same strike rate, but Dhoni scores significantly more runs per innings. Goes onto show who the more dangerous batsman is. Ranatunga and Jawardane are so close together, and it reflects on their roles in the team also. Ganguly is sort on top among the stayers. Calling the bottom quadrant also rans is not that appropriate because we are already looking at the top performers. Even though Afridi leads in strike rate, his low rpi makes him less useful to the team.

    And heres another graph with cutoff at runs > 2500 and SR > 80 [[ However good your comments are you should always give your name. Ananth: ]]

  • Anonymous on September 8, 2010, 19:43 GMT

    You are using balls per innings as one of the variables. However using runs per innings makes more sense. What is the goal of a batting team: its to score as many (or the required no.) of runs as quickly (within the required overs) as possible. It is not to spend the most time at the crease. [[ I think this is only play of words. If you play 50 balls at a s/r of 0.8 you will score 40 runs. If you play 60 balls at s/r of 0.8 you will score 48 runs and so on. One can use any variable. Ananth: ]]

    About your point regarding batting average including strike rate twice, that is true for all such three related variables. Because now I can say that strike rate is nothing but runs/balls and so on.

    Lets then redraw the plots using rpi and sr as the variables. The selection criteria is no. of runs greater than 6000. And I included Dhoni, Younis Khan and Grame Smith because they are close to that mark and will get there soon.

    [IMG]http://i52.tinypic.com/14y6ek8.jpg[/IMG]

  • dr. jha on September 8, 2010, 19:09 GMT

    now.. i am a doctor..one thing i can say.. whenever we come across numbers or graphs.. we develop all sorts of palpitations and tremors..:) nice work though..great effort man... the closest a doctor comes across a graph is an ecg and the first thing we think of ,on hearing BCG is the vaccine for tuberculosis :)

    just blabbering..i'll shut up :)

    again great work.. respect.... :) [[ Dr.Jha I myself am probably more faniliar with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine as expansion for BCG than Boston Consulting Group. We live and learn. Thanks for your commenrs. Ananth: ]]

  • Vinish Garg on September 8, 2010, 17:17 GMT

    Ananth

    For the open email invite:

    - By 'It Figures Blog: ..............'. did you mean that this should be the subject to help you identify/filter the emails? - You say "readers can send in their suggestions on which batting and bowling performances in the third innings can be considered." Does it mean that we send you particular 'performances' or the criteria/weightage for you to compile such a list? I would suggest that if you ask for 'specific performances (such as 5/24 by ABC in 3rd innings of xyz test)', you should ask readers for their reasons/criteria for sending every such performance. Else, you may be flooded with too many suggestions, and a few irrelevant/incorrect entries as well. [[ Vinish You are right. As of now I will be using only the web-based mail gathering for this specific account. However if and when I use a mail client, I would like to have a more informative subject line to do some fltering. I think you are right. But it goes without saying that mails which are self-explanatory will have a much greater chance of being taken seriously, especially if there are many comments. I leave it to the readers to do what they want to do. Ananth: ]]

  • Arun on September 8, 2010, 16:10 GMT

    Nice work.i like your idea.

  • jamzy on September 8, 2010, 15:06 GMT

    excellent article and analysis. what tool did you use for the scatter plots? [[ Jamil I have created my own special program to create the graphs. I found that the Excel graphs are very basic and cannot be customized well. Also there is very little chance of drawing different sizes. I will make the program available to the readers once I standardize the parameter inputs. Ananth: ]]

  • Venky on September 8, 2010, 14:23 GMT

    Very good attempt. Now if you could plot "situational" batting it would be great. By situational batting, I mean a batsman adapting to the current needs and hitting accordingly. A batsman walking in at 17/5 will bat carefully to make the best total for the team under the circumstances. Similarly a batsman walking in at 350/2 will launch into the innings with gusto to put the total beyond reach of the other team. Dhoni is a great example of both types. So these charts still reward consistency but does not necessarily reflect the batsman's value to the team. Who can argue against the value of stayers such as Miandad. Likewise it is quite harsh to characterize Azharuddin as an also ran when he was clearly the most valuable batsmen in the team in that era. Players from strong teams don't have to bat through adversity as often as players from weak teams. Gathering data on situational batting will be painful, but will reflect a batsman's real value. [[ Venky Your suggestions have a meaning in a different type of analysis. This is an analysis based on career figures. There is no point in complicating it further. Ananth: ]]

  • Navillus on September 8, 2010, 14:15 GMT

    Hi Ananth I am a post graduate in statistics from Indian Statistical Institute and most often I find statistical analysis very elementary and peurile. They often are very trivial analysis staying clear of the depth that can be explored by the figures. May be that is because of the public factor. However, this particular analysis has rally caught my eye. Great work.

  • Vijayfrombangalore on September 8, 2010, 13:25 GMT

    Great work Ananth, you seem to put in a lot of time and effort to gather information thats always 99.99%(i believe nobody are 100%) accurate. I'am a bit curious here to know about your academic qualification if its not so personal (hope you don't gimmi the names of any of the IIMs as a cliched answer to my question) [[ Vijay Don't worry. I am an ordinary B.E. degree holder from a non-reputed college from Coimbatore !!! Ananth: ]]

  • jkgsrt on September 8, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    one side(x axis) run/inn ie sachin 17598/431 and one side strike rate(y axis) and then prepare a chart. [[ Jit It is my mistake. I have used Balls/Inns and I mistakenly refrred to it as Runs/inns. I get your point. I will wait for some time and get more readers' responses before looking at your suggestion. This is because unlike other articles posting a new graph is a more involved task which will require me to work qith the technical people. Ananth: ]]

  • jitendra on September 8, 2010, 12:43 GMT

    i want to know the figures if the average of a batsman can be measured in following terms. if not out innings >15% then reduce the average by this more %. for example average= 45 not out innings=23 more average=8% then the average = 45 - 8%of 45 =45 - 3.6 =41.4 this is the new average. it will provide the exact results. if not out inn<15% then no effect would be generated. i want to know the full list after this analysis. please send me a reply afetr this analysis. [[ Pl see my reply to Navin. These are based on raw data and adjustments will complicate the whole thing. This is a visual representation of basic figures. Look at it from that point of view. Ananth: ]]

  • jkgsrt on September 8, 2010, 12:26 GMT

    a very good analysis. i like these analysis. ther shoul be a graph for run/inn and sr/inn on x and y coordinates. so that good batsman can be found easily. run/ inn means out or not out odes nat matter. so i am waiting for run/inn graph [[ Goyal I am not very clear on your mail. Balls/Inns is what has been used in the Y-axis. Ananth: ]]

  • Deepak on September 8, 2010, 12:24 GMT

    Wonderful analysis, maybe making the graphs a little more attractive would increase the visiblity [[ Deepak There is always a conflict betwen legibility and not missing any key players. I could do one thing. Re-do the analysis on a 1000x800 size graph and post for users to download. Ananth: ]]

  • Navin Agarwal on September 8, 2010, 11:59 GMT

    I like the chart Arvind posted at CC site. My fear is that once again people will start "Ananth Bashing" as Tendulkar has topped the table. Nice article Sir. I think that we cannot compare seventies,eighties,nineties and noughties. I think Richards and Dean Jones were way above anybody else in early and late eighties respectively. Since Mid nineties Tendulkar has been the lead actor on each of the plays. I also believe that if India had better team in mid eighties than Azharuddin would have had better record. He was a complete package, nice strike rate(if adjusted across eras), superb runner between the wicket, he was also good judge of the singles and excellent fielder with exceptional catching skills. This charts will always have him in left bottom of the chart, but for me he was the top draw in ODI's for India. [[ Navin These are charts based on raw numbers which always communicate a lot. Enough analysis has been done after adjusting the numbers. Richards and Zaheer are examples of great batsmen who transcended the ages. Ananth: ]]

  • alan on September 8, 2010, 11:54 GMT

    I can't see Kallis on your graph of batsmen with an ODI average of greater tha40? [[ Alan Unfortunately too many entries on the graph. Kallis is very much there, jammed between Jones and Ganguly !!! Ananth: ]]

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • alan on September 8, 2010, 11:54 GMT

    I can't see Kallis on your graph of batsmen with an ODI average of greater tha40? [[ Alan Unfortunately too many entries on the graph. Kallis is very much there, jammed between Jones and Ganguly !!! Ananth: ]]

  • Navin Agarwal on September 8, 2010, 11:59 GMT

    I like the chart Arvind posted at CC site. My fear is that once again people will start "Ananth Bashing" as Tendulkar has topped the table. Nice article Sir. I think that we cannot compare seventies,eighties,nineties and noughties. I think Richards and Dean Jones were way above anybody else in early and late eighties respectively. Since Mid nineties Tendulkar has been the lead actor on each of the plays. I also believe that if India had better team in mid eighties than Azharuddin would have had better record. He was a complete package, nice strike rate(if adjusted across eras), superb runner between the wicket, he was also good judge of the singles and excellent fielder with exceptional catching skills. This charts will always have him in left bottom of the chart, but for me he was the top draw in ODI's for India. [[ Navin These are charts based on raw numbers which always communicate a lot. Enough analysis has been done after adjusting the numbers. Richards and Zaheer are examples of great batsmen who transcended the ages. Ananth: ]]

  • Deepak on September 8, 2010, 12:24 GMT

    Wonderful analysis, maybe making the graphs a little more attractive would increase the visiblity [[ Deepak There is always a conflict betwen legibility and not missing any key players. I could do one thing. Re-do the analysis on a 1000x800 size graph and post for users to download. Ananth: ]]

  • jkgsrt on September 8, 2010, 12:26 GMT

    a very good analysis. i like these analysis. ther shoul be a graph for run/inn and sr/inn on x and y coordinates. so that good batsman can be found easily. run/ inn means out or not out odes nat matter. so i am waiting for run/inn graph [[ Goyal I am not very clear on your mail. Balls/Inns is what has been used in the Y-axis. Ananth: ]]

  • jitendra on September 8, 2010, 12:43 GMT

    i want to know the figures if the average of a batsman can be measured in following terms. if not out innings >15% then reduce the average by this more %. for example average= 45 not out innings=23 more average=8% then the average = 45 - 8%of 45 =45 - 3.6 =41.4 this is the new average. it will provide the exact results. if not out inn<15% then no effect would be generated. i want to know the full list after this analysis. please send me a reply afetr this analysis. [[ Pl see my reply to Navin. These are based on raw data and adjustments will complicate the whole thing. This is a visual representation of basic figures. Look at it from that point of view. Ananth: ]]

  • jkgsrt on September 8, 2010, 12:54 GMT

    one side(x axis) run/inn ie sachin 17598/431 and one side strike rate(y axis) and then prepare a chart. [[ Jit It is my mistake. I have used Balls/Inns and I mistakenly refrred to it as Runs/inns. I get your point. I will wait for some time and get more readers' responses before looking at your suggestion. This is because unlike other articles posting a new graph is a more involved task which will require me to work qith the technical people. Ananth: ]]

  • Vijayfrombangalore on September 8, 2010, 13:25 GMT

    Great work Ananth, you seem to put in a lot of time and effort to gather information thats always 99.99%(i believe nobody are 100%) accurate. I'am a bit curious here to know about your academic qualification if its not so personal (hope you don't gimmi the names of any of the IIMs as a cliched answer to my question) [[ Vijay Don't worry. I am an ordinary B.E. degree holder from a non-reputed college from Coimbatore !!! Ananth: ]]

  • Navillus on September 8, 2010, 14:15 GMT

    Hi Ananth I am a post graduate in statistics from Indian Statistical Institute and most often I find statistical analysis very elementary and peurile. They often are very trivial analysis staying clear of the depth that can be explored by the figures. May be that is because of the public factor. However, this particular analysis has rally caught my eye. Great work.

  • Venky on September 8, 2010, 14:23 GMT

    Very good attempt. Now if you could plot "situational" batting it would be great. By situational batting, I mean a batsman adapting to the current needs and hitting accordingly. A batsman walking in at 17/5 will bat carefully to make the best total for the team under the circumstances. Similarly a batsman walking in at 350/2 will launch into the innings with gusto to put the total beyond reach of the other team. Dhoni is a great example of both types. So these charts still reward consistency but does not necessarily reflect the batsman's value to the team. Who can argue against the value of stayers such as Miandad. Likewise it is quite harsh to characterize Azharuddin as an also ran when he was clearly the most valuable batsmen in the team in that era. Players from strong teams don't have to bat through adversity as often as players from weak teams. Gathering data on situational batting will be painful, but will reflect a batsman's real value. [[ Venky Your suggestions have a meaning in a different type of analysis. This is an analysis based on career figures. There is no point in complicating it further. Ananth: ]]

  • jamzy on September 8, 2010, 15:06 GMT

    excellent article and analysis. what tool did you use for the scatter plots? [[ Jamil I have created my own special program to create the graphs. I found that the Excel graphs are very basic and cannot be customized well. Also there is very little chance of drawing different sizes. I will make the program available to the readers once I standardize the parameter inputs. Ananth: ]]