Indian cricket January 3, 2013

Tendulkar: I hate him like I love him

Suman Kumar
For a generation that believed success in life was directly linked to an engineering-college berth (or a medical-school berth), Tendulkar was an antithesis
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"Yaaru pethha puallayo? Punyam panna vairu (Which fortunate mother gave birth to this boy? Her womb must be blessed)," my late granny remarked upon hearing about Tendulkar's debut and subsequent exploits. She looked at her sons (my uncles) and said: "Yenakkum vandhu porandhudhu paaru! (And look at the one I landed up giving birth to)" She was paying a glowing tribute to Sachin Tendulkar's mother and lamenting over her sons and their inability to get a job in the 'Gulf'.

For a generation that believed success in life was directly linked to an engineering-college berth (or a medical-school berth), Tendulkar was an antithesis. And by following his exploits, a generation of us continued to live our dreams by proxy. I hated Tendulkar for it.

One foggy February morning in 1992, in Chittoor (a small South Indian city), my friend Arun came running to my house and threw the Hindu newspaper at me. "Read the sports page," he said. The headline, if my memory serves me right, read 'Tendulkar's Brilliance Illuminates Perth'. India lost that match by a massive margin of 300 runs. But that innings, one of the greatest that I have ever seen, was some sort of a magical preamble.

In 1998, when he destroyed Australia in Sharjah, singlehandedly, we realised that he was not just a great batsman. We had had quite a few of them by then, including Sunil Gavaskar. But until then I had never seen an Indian batsman treat the Australians the way Australians treated everyone else. It was almost like Tendulkar was telling them: "Those days are over."

However, it is not his achievements and successes that I want to stress upon. It is how he was reborn after each one of his failures. In Sydney, 2004, he didn't drive on the offside. How can a man be so maniacally focused? I hated him for that.

I could never achieve 2% of that focus. Every time I became lazy, tempted to choose an easy way out, or just plain give up, it is people like Tendulkar that scream at you - from those special corners in your head, through memories etched for life - to not give up. I hated Tendulkar for that; for making me work harder that I wanted to.

A few afternoons ago, my three-year-old little girl paused while pedalling her tricycle, glanced at the TV and said: "Sachin!" I was shocked. I probably had mentioned him when I was pleading with her to switch to cricket from the cartoon show Chhota Bheem. From my granny to my daughter, four generations love him. How can a man redefine longevity like that? I hate him for that!

I'd watched him in the recent past. I'd suffered as he failed with the bat. "Maybe he should go now," I screamed. "Why can't he see? He is diluting his own greatness by suffering this!" I wept. I knew I could be wrong. I was being emotional and stupid. And then, he quit ODIs. The format that he made his very own. How could he? It will be, forever, poorer without him. I hate him for that.

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Musaweer Alam Khan Hunzai on January 30, 2013, 13:27 GMT

    We can't deny that Tendulkar is a master blaster but most of the time when he had performed for his country,India lost the matches. I love to hate him.....!!

  • Arun on January 7, 2013, 5:08 GMT

    contd....I remember each of his shot on that day and he was still a kid and perth was monster of a pitch thought kingston Jamica had lost its pace. And 3 ordinary bowlers ??!! McDermott had been their GOOD LEAD bowler in those times. He was not at all in the ordinary league if not in the brackets of the greats certainly. he had fantastic penetration and on that day he was extracting dangerous movement off the pitch and while other Indian batsmen had any clue, this little guy stoood up to play some spectacular shots. And Merv Hughes too, though ordinary in your belief, on that day withthe help of the pitch was deadly off the pitch. LET US PLS STOP ABOUT TALKING STATISTICS. Let us try to understand the prodigy of this guy. Yes, you were

  • Anonymous on January 7, 2013, 4:58 GMT

    contd.....And, India is manical about cricket and sachin was instrumental in india's transition in their approach of the shorter format. it sounds odd when you say that whateversaid and written is hyped and emotional. by saying this, you ratify that you would'nt have been in the thick of 90's cricket action and followed tendulkar.

    The deadly injuries he suffered and the way he managed to come out and understood his body's rthym and adjusted his game to reinvent his batting in another form. and, importantly i dont think any great cricketer had ever managed to run his machine(body) the way he want. That is sachin.

    He is a part-time bowler and he bowled so much prowess that best of best of batsmen feared in those times.

    To Answer Beverly, you were right about that 100 at perth and all that stuff.....we were not talking about tendulkar is bradman after that 100 in perth....we were just igniting our memory of that 100...and have you seen that hundred when he played ?? I remmber each a

  • Arun (the friend over there in the article) on January 7, 2013, 4:37 GMT

    suman, why have you discarded two of my other comments ? I badly wanted that to be published......and one thig, i apologize for the errors in typing as my keyboard is behaving like a rock....

    Mr. hassan, you can whatever u want and feel, but we ( the writer and me especially and among others) worshipped him and for that matter the whole of India. India stranted when he was batting or got out. whats wrong to recollect our hero with our best memmories and emotions. in fact every country would have one or the sportsmen who's worshipped this way. And, India is manical

  • beverly on January 5, 2013, 15:09 GMT

    Cont'd: Mr Kumar, the point I wanted to make earlier is that it is not true that Australian fast bowlers could not be ill treated at Perth. The West Indies batsmen were always humiliating them there. You should have seen what one of our opening batsmen, Roy Fredericks did with Lilee and Thompson there in 1975. Those are the innings that really excite - not batting against three paltry medium pacers. But since that innings by Tendulkar in 1992, he played in 8 more innings against more reputable bowlers, in both test matches and ODIs; and, do you know what is his average in those "8 Innings" against REAL GOOD BOWLING at Perth, since that 100? You may check it for yourself - it is just a dismal "19.5". His career average at Perth is "30". So if you picked Perth to prove to the world something about Tendulkar's genius, you may have picked the wrong cricket ground. Ther are many many great batsmen with much more impressive career averages compiled in a few innings on this ground.

  • beverly on January 5, 2013, 14:39 GMT

    Mr Kumar, Sachin Tendulkar was a very much more distinguished batsman than one whom it seems that people in India thought could not score a 100 at Perth. Perth is just another test ground; so why was there all that excitement when the news broke that the great gentlemen scored a 100 at Perth? Nearly every batsman (great and good) who played a few innings at Perth scored had scored a 100(s) before; and against some of the greatest bowlers ever to play the game. But what is noticeable about the Australian bowlers who played that game, is that you would not see the name of one of them in in even a "10th 11 Best Bowlers of All Time". The bowlers were: Murf hughes - hard trying medium pacer; as was Mc Dermoth; and Paul Reiffel who always looked like an umpire than a bowler. Hence, a 100 against a bowling attack like that was not anything to shout so much about. And what is further wrong about the excitement reported here, Tendulkar had already scored a better 100 (his first) in England.cont

  • hasan on January 5, 2013, 6:51 GMT

    This article is as Indian as it gets. It resembles a Shahrukh Khan Bollywood flick more than a cricket writing. Full of hyper sentiments and unnecessary emotions. You dont have to shout, growl, cry, weep, beat yourself up in order to recognize greatness, you just need to respect it. But thats not the sub-continental way of doing things i guess. We need the spices to charge our day. No normal ingredients would do..:)

  • Arun (the friend over there in the article) on January 5, 2013, 3:02 GMT

    another instance, remember suman ?, when aquid javed took hatrik and some mindless umpire ruled him outwhen he was hit on his left leg away from the leg stump......i think we were watching the matchin anji's house....i came out cring and with bat in hand practised for almost 2 house to satisfy my ego that india and tendulkar indeed didnot feel....

    actually, many were talking about the birth of tendulkar on March 27 1994 in acukland....sorry i dont think so....right from his day of entry he was ruthless in whatever position he batted....i saw him massacre sri lankan labroy, even wasim in sharjaj, and many many sl bowlers who toured india at that time....

    coming to his retirement, yes...even i wanted that badly in all formats....this manis too too great to get out uncermoniously....he strode indian cricket and each of indian cricket fan's like a true monarach...he deserves anything lesser attention than that of 'braveheart' and the send off....sadly that intensity was absent....

  • j patel on January 4, 2013, 20:54 GMT

    superb artical. I live in Canada and watch cricket on tv or internet. I have noticed that Mr. TENDULKAR is most humbled superstar in any sport.

  • Gopi on January 4, 2013, 19:26 GMT

    This is my mirror image of my mind...Thanks Suman

  • Musaweer Alam Khan Hunzai on January 30, 2013, 13:27 GMT

    We can't deny that Tendulkar is a master blaster but most of the time when he had performed for his country,India lost the matches. I love to hate him.....!!

  • Arun on January 7, 2013, 5:08 GMT

    contd....I remember each of his shot on that day and he was still a kid and perth was monster of a pitch thought kingston Jamica had lost its pace. And 3 ordinary bowlers ??!! McDermott had been their GOOD LEAD bowler in those times. He was not at all in the ordinary league if not in the brackets of the greats certainly. he had fantastic penetration and on that day he was extracting dangerous movement off the pitch and while other Indian batsmen had any clue, this little guy stoood up to play some spectacular shots. And Merv Hughes too, though ordinary in your belief, on that day withthe help of the pitch was deadly off the pitch. LET US PLS STOP ABOUT TALKING STATISTICS. Let us try to understand the prodigy of this guy. Yes, you were

  • Anonymous on January 7, 2013, 4:58 GMT

    contd.....And, India is manical about cricket and sachin was instrumental in india's transition in their approach of the shorter format. it sounds odd when you say that whateversaid and written is hyped and emotional. by saying this, you ratify that you would'nt have been in the thick of 90's cricket action and followed tendulkar.

    The deadly injuries he suffered and the way he managed to come out and understood his body's rthym and adjusted his game to reinvent his batting in another form. and, importantly i dont think any great cricketer had ever managed to run his machine(body) the way he want. That is sachin.

    He is a part-time bowler and he bowled so much prowess that best of best of batsmen feared in those times.

    To Answer Beverly, you were right about that 100 at perth and all that stuff.....we were not talking about tendulkar is bradman after that 100 in perth....we were just igniting our memory of that 100...and have you seen that hundred when he played ?? I remmber each a

  • Arun (the friend over there in the article) on January 7, 2013, 4:37 GMT

    suman, why have you discarded two of my other comments ? I badly wanted that to be published......and one thig, i apologize for the errors in typing as my keyboard is behaving like a rock....

    Mr. hassan, you can whatever u want and feel, but we ( the writer and me especially and among others) worshipped him and for that matter the whole of India. India stranted when he was batting or got out. whats wrong to recollect our hero with our best memmories and emotions. in fact every country would have one or the sportsmen who's worshipped this way. And, India is manical

  • beverly on January 5, 2013, 15:09 GMT

    Cont'd: Mr Kumar, the point I wanted to make earlier is that it is not true that Australian fast bowlers could not be ill treated at Perth. The West Indies batsmen were always humiliating them there. You should have seen what one of our opening batsmen, Roy Fredericks did with Lilee and Thompson there in 1975. Those are the innings that really excite - not batting against three paltry medium pacers. But since that innings by Tendulkar in 1992, he played in 8 more innings against more reputable bowlers, in both test matches and ODIs; and, do you know what is his average in those "8 Innings" against REAL GOOD BOWLING at Perth, since that 100? You may check it for yourself - it is just a dismal "19.5". His career average at Perth is "30". So if you picked Perth to prove to the world something about Tendulkar's genius, you may have picked the wrong cricket ground. Ther are many many great batsmen with much more impressive career averages compiled in a few innings on this ground.

  • beverly on January 5, 2013, 14:39 GMT

    Mr Kumar, Sachin Tendulkar was a very much more distinguished batsman than one whom it seems that people in India thought could not score a 100 at Perth. Perth is just another test ground; so why was there all that excitement when the news broke that the great gentlemen scored a 100 at Perth? Nearly every batsman (great and good) who played a few innings at Perth scored had scored a 100(s) before; and against some of the greatest bowlers ever to play the game. But what is noticeable about the Australian bowlers who played that game, is that you would not see the name of one of them in in even a "10th 11 Best Bowlers of All Time". The bowlers were: Murf hughes - hard trying medium pacer; as was Mc Dermoth; and Paul Reiffel who always looked like an umpire than a bowler. Hence, a 100 against a bowling attack like that was not anything to shout so much about. And what is further wrong about the excitement reported here, Tendulkar had already scored a better 100 (his first) in England.cont

  • hasan on January 5, 2013, 6:51 GMT

    This article is as Indian as it gets. It resembles a Shahrukh Khan Bollywood flick more than a cricket writing. Full of hyper sentiments and unnecessary emotions. You dont have to shout, growl, cry, weep, beat yourself up in order to recognize greatness, you just need to respect it. But thats not the sub-continental way of doing things i guess. We need the spices to charge our day. No normal ingredients would do..:)

  • Arun (the friend over there in the article) on January 5, 2013, 3:02 GMT

    another instance, remember suman ?, when aquid javed took hatrik and some mindless umpire ruled him outwhen he was hit on his left leg away from the leg stump......i think we were watching the matchin anji's house....i came out cring and with bat in hand practised for almost 2 house to satisfy my ego that india and tendulkar indeed didnot feel....

    actually, many were talking about the birth of tendulkar on March 27 1994 in acukland....sorry i dont think so....right from his day of entry he was ruthless in whatever position he batted....i saw him massacre sri lankan labroy, even wasim in sharjaj, and many many sl bowlers who toured india at that time....

    coming to his retirement, yes...even i wanted that badly in all formats....this manis too too great to get out uncermoniously....he strode indian cricket and each of indian cricket fan's like a true monarach...he deserves anything lesser attention than that of 'braveheart' and the send off....sadly that intensity was absent....

  • j patel on January 4, 2013, 20:54 GMT

    superb artical. I live in Canada and watch cricket on tv or internet. I have noticed that Mr. TENDULKAR is most humbled superstar in any sport.

  • Gopi on January 4, 2013, 19:26 GMT

    This is my mirror image of my mind...Thanks Suman

  • asutosh nayak on January 4, 2013, 17:40 GMT

    Dear Sachin Please come back in blue jersy...want to see one last time...really cricket will not be same with out SACH...

  • salman on January 4, 2013, 16:35 GMT

    odi belongs to little master...m an pakistani bt respect his class ...pakistan couldnt win this series which such ease if he was thr ...

  • Saood on January 4, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    From a Pakistani, hes truly a legendary batsman, few if any even come close.

  • KAMLESH NARWANI on January 4, 2013, 15:18 GMT

    I read not only this article but almost half of the comments. My eyes are wet when i read it. Even though I am from Pakistan but I liked Indian team only because of Sachin. I is the superman of cricket. Now i am waiting for any test match of India or IPL to watch him on big screen again.

  • Anonymous on January 4, 2013, 14:39 GMT

    There was a time, a time before Ganguly, Dravid and Laxman were even known to many of us....a team on which the country seldom was confident...until a little master appeared.....Those of us who remember then days will remember for ever, graciously, how the world of cricket changed on the appearence of a 16 year old kid.

    If I could give away my youth to someone, I would have given it to Sachin, just out of the desire to see him play international cricket for atleast another decade.

  • Anon on January 4, 2013, 14:29 GMT

    He made the Indians believe that they can fight and even stand tall in a match even at defeat.

  • Dinesh E on January 4, 2013, 14:09 GMT

    I have a theory: Sachin retired from ODI to shut his detractors from asking and questioning him to retire. Now he can peacefully focus for another couple of years on Test which is the format he likes the most.

  • srinivasa rao on January 4, 2013, 11:20 GMT

    superb..... I am too emotional to write about his retirement. I have stopped watching cricket since then.

  • rashid on January 4, 2013, 10:34 GMT

    I loved him because he was the best batsman of my generation but hated him only because he was always in the opposing team.

  • Mayank Agarwal on January 4, 2013, 9:37 GMT

    Excellent Suman!!One of the most practicle article i've read about the master..Yes four generations love him..whether it be Perth 91,Sharjah 98,sydney 08,he has been a master class..and now see the dffrence...India has already lost first ODI series aftr his retirement...hope to see him play in tests fr another year ...

  • Shahid on January 4, 2013, 9:21 GMT

    Once a Pakistani tv host asked Aaqib as to why cricketers become arrogant after becoming famous and Aaqib replied "When someone says "Imran Khan ka Pakistan then you have all the right reasons to be arrogant". Years have passed by and Sachin kept on piling records but this lad never became arrogant and i love him for that. There have been great batsmen before him and there will be quite a few after him but they way he has kept himself grounded, he has setup an example for every cricketer and sporstman and i love him for that. Back in Pakistan we often hold his humbleness as an example for people in all spheres of life and this is something that no one before or after him has been able to or will be able to emulate and that is what sets him apart from others.

  • Saravanan on January 4, 2013, 8:53 GMT

    Sachin is always the hero.

  • praveen on January 4, 2013, 8:51 GMT

    True buddy, I hate him for the same reason, he was my inspiration from my childhood, kept large posters of him in my room, adored him alot, and nw after his retirement dont feel like watching it, I still kept asking in recent series , "What's sachin's score..." I miss him, I hate him...

  • Dhinakaran on January 4, 2013, 8:47 GMT

    Azhagaaa sonninga... Yaaru petha pulloiyo... Like he said everyone in my home likes sachin and they stop doing other works when he is playing.. just to watch his enthusiasm. I hope sachin will let me to watch test cricket for another 2 years and I stopped watching ODI's.

  • Vchint on January 4, 2013, 8:37 GMT

    Very well woven Mr. Suman Kumar. And the focus piece is the best one and I must confess that the same happens with me too. Thanks for the nice write-up.

    On a lighter note to the first line in your write-up: Tendulkar's mother's name is RAJINI. Hence the acheivements.

    ;-)

  • Praveen on January 4, 2013, 8:33 GMT

    Agree with every word mentioned in this article. I had a lump in my throat when I heard the news " Sachin retires ODI's". thatz because I love him a lot but I guess its the right decision. I dont want petty bowlers like Siddle, Anderson, Panesar getting his wicket.

  • Aditya on January 4, 2013, 8:30 GMT

    you too much in "Awe"

  • R.Neil Rashan on January 4, 2013, 8:23 GMT

    You're absolutely right about each & every aspect of SRT sir. Had I got the power of making any1 person as immortal I would have made Mother Terasa as one & after seeing my favourite Kapil, Dravid, retired I wouldn't have a 2nd thought but after SRT announced his retirement from odi's my mind certainly wavers towards SRT as an immortal person. Thank the Lord Almighty I don't have that power nor any of us. But look at our Indian team just being thrashed by the weaker England & Pakistan side. I hate to see us losing to Pakistan & Australia along with Sri Lanka & Bangladesh since I hate the above 4 countries.

  • Prav on January 4, 2013, 8:20 GMT

    Nallla sonneenga suman.. Sachin is like our rajni who is known and loved by all ages

  • sajan deepani on January 4, 2013, 8:11 GMT

    The man who live for cricket has been retired peacefully & may god bless him in his future endeavour

  • Ali Khan on January 4, 2013, 8:09 GMT

    No doubt, Tendulkar was among the top best batsman in the cricket world and has its own unmatchable class. I solute him for his versatile Batting skills.

  • Karthik. K on January 4, 2013, 8:04 GMT

    It's very unfortunate and sad that he (or he was forced to) announce his ODI retirement without playing his last match that too in India. BCCI and the Selectors might allowed and honoured him to play his last ODI, he truly deserved that and i personally still believe he can still play ODI's till 2013. BCCI is to be blamed to hanle a living legend like this.

  • John Sunder on January 4, 2013, 7:58 GMT

    Fantastic. A billion people feel the same. Thanks

  • waqas on January 4, 2013, 7:53 GMT

    i dont have any words to explain about my feeling. He is such a great man we never forget the single ball which he played.

  • Shehzad on January 4, 2013, 7:51 GMT

    Great ODI career. Long test career.

  • rajesh on January 4, 2013, 7:51 GMT

    Great one about the master.. hope you could have added some more

  • b.durga prasada rao on January 4, 2013, 7:43 GMT

    Tendulkar is on his own.A phenomenon.A genious,a Cricketing God!His love & devotion to the game is unparalleled.A half-fit Tendulkar is better than most members of the present Indian team.I am happy for Tendulkar that he has almost unloaded the tons of burdonsome expectations of millions of his fans all over the World.Others could expect to fail but not HIM.I WISH him a happy retirement from one day cricket.I know cricket will not be the same again without him.

  • Chetan Paradkar on January 4, 2013, 7:41 GMT

    Oh!.. wish I could write something like that... however, that's how exactly I feel!!!

    I hate him like I love him!!!! I love the game coz Tendulkar was in it!!!! I would be wrong if I said I never thought of him to be leaving Cricket...but honestly I was never sure how cricket would be after He's retired..

    It's sad times for Indian Cricket!!!

  • Johnny129 on January 4, 2013, 7:41 GMT

    Like the article. SRT is a living legend! Often blamed for weak 'Team' India's short-falls - I suppose he is partly to blame for India's ODI WC performance? And also to blame for India's performance in the current ODI series? Shame on all SRT haters (if you're indeed Indian). Well, at least, now I can safely put my money on Pakistan (or any other half decent team for that matter), just like I did in the first two ODI and feel safe in the thought that there is no SRT to disturb the balance !!! ;)

  • Kishore KR on January 4, 2013, 7:32 GMT

    Purely an emotional piece. So, can empathize with the writer's feelings.

    But on a serious and clinical note, it indeed is high time Tendulkar hung up his boots - in all forms of Cricket. The great Gary Sobers had to do it when at age of 38 in 1974, his form dipped to less than what might be considered commensurate with his genius. A lot of persons did lament the fact of not being able to see him on a cricket field. But he went. Such is life!

  • Balaji on January 4, 2013, 7:29 GMT

    A country starved of heroes will definitely live off a lie. This is true with Sachin too. Sachin Tendulkar is nothing but a follow thru from Sunil Gavaskar who was a talented batsman but a poor captain and a record monger. Past stats do not compensate for present performances.

  • Amit on January 4, 2013, 7:28 GMT

    Great Artice Sir, You echo the thoughts of entire generation of cricket fans like us, who have grown up watching HIM play. Watching Sachin Bat was the essence of watchin Indian Matches in the 90s. Scoreboard never mattered as long as Sachin was batting.

    He taught a whole generation that Indians are no pushover, & we can be equally good or THE BEST as rest of the world.

    What a Player, What a MAN.

  • subbarao on January 4, 2013, 7:21 GMT

    Almost every Indian comments & laments like this. His exit is certainly a National loss, which is fast reflected by the recent deterioration of standards. Afraid, whether ever, ever can we see the high standards set by the little master along with the other two.

  • Dinesh Bhagavath on January 4, 2013, 7:18 GMT

    Typical article by an archetypal Indian-we indians would prefer Sachin score a hundred and India lose rather than Sachin not scoring and India winning.The idol worship continues.

    Have a nice weekend Mr Suman Kumar.

    Regards Dinesh Bhagavath

  • Shyam Talluri on January 4, 2013, 7:13 GMT

    Tendulkar should retire from tests asap. He is becoming a laughing stock. His mode of dismissals in the recent test series are apalling. His feet movement are slow and he is unable to differentiate between the ball that spins and that goes straight with the arm. No body now cares to read about Tendulkars greatness and what he has done in the past. I am a great fan of him but I want hime to retire now before people start saying he only scored against Bangladesh and Zimbabwe and on ded wickets. People only are interested in what once does now nobody cares about what one has done in the past.

  • Ramana on January 4, 2013, 7:12 GMT

    Yes that's true ...And I hate him for all joy full days given by him to us

  • bhagyaraju on January 4, 2013, 6:59 GMT

    Sachin Tendulkar is the man who take even failures with a smile, even millions people criticize him that not playing well. Right now who the hell is playing well than the truth is some people are jealous of his success & achievements what ever it is he is my Hero no matter what others thing. He is a Humble sportive & awesome human being.

  • Addi on January 4, 2013, 6:57 GMT

    What a lovely article, brought tears in my eyes --- a Proud Pakistani fan of Sachin Tendulkar.

  • umasankar on January 4, 2013, 6:54 GMT

    beautiful and emotional one i will cherish the moments he gave us in our life like scoring hundreds in aus, saf,eng.

  • yash vijaivargiya on January 4, 2013, 6:48 GMT

    awesomely and truely said!!!... how can a man redefine longevity like him?? ... this implies that he's not human , but GOD!! Cricket miss him like hell!! I miss him!!

  • Talha Ali on January 4, 2013, 6:48 GMT

    WOW!! One of the best articles I have ever read on cricinfo. I am a Pakistani and only a regular fan of Sachin (I have always liked Dravid better) but the article, so dramatically poignant,brought tears to my eyes. Kudos!

  • ImpartialObserver on January 4, 2013, 6:42 GMT

    Wonderful article about The Great Man, Suman. In fact, I guess most of us (his fans) want him to quit only because we can't see him failing repeatedly. Even today, I feel it would have been the BEST thing to happen if he had quit immediately after the World Cup 2011. He would have been immortalized. First of all there would have been that wonderful blemish of his 99 international 100s. People would have said he is not for records. And given the fact that India lost miserably after that, he would have become absolutely immortal since we would all have missed him and lamented about it. However, we're always wiser in hindsight and things don't always pan out as perfectly as one would want.

  • SATHEESH on January 4, 2013, 6:35 GMT

    Excellent narration of a truly dedicated sports person our country has every produced

  • Ravi on January 4, 2013, 6:31 GMT

    A very fine tribute to a very very special person. I am proud to say that i lived in Sachin Era, I still can live those moments, those long hours i spent before TV imitating his stance, shots and discussing endlessly with friends how special his straight drive is. He is the very reason for an entire generation of cricket frenzy in this country and he will forever live in our memories as the greatest sportsperson India has ever produced.

  • Mayank on January 4, 2013, 6:31 GMT

    Most of us who were clamoring for Tendulkar's retirement took only one series to start understanding his importance to Indian Batting lineup. In the last few years he was not flashy and flamboyant as his earlier days, however still provided the solidity around which young stars like Yuvraj and Kohli relied on. Now that he is gone from one day framework Indian Batting unit is looking more fragile than ever before. Even the almost debutant opening ball pair of Pakistan is thrashing India. SO lets hail Tendulkar, his humbleness and most of all his contribution in making Indian Cricket as world champion.

  • Mrigank Devam on January 4, 2013, 6:15 GMT

    Brilliant! Sums up almost everyone's emotion who has held a cricket bat in hand by watching Sachin play

  • Madhusudhan on January 4, 2013, 6:07 GMT

    Yes "It will be, forever, poorer without him. I hate him for that" the proof is already there we lost hands down to our arch rivals. Plz come Back Sachin

  • Sajid on January 4, 2013, 5:49 GMT

    Very deep and emotional article, very well written. I really think he should have played for more 1 or 2 years, and it really wasn't a good idea to drop him from Indian squad against Pakistan series, he has always played well against Pakistan and there were chances that he was going to get back his form in this series. At least this legend should get an ODI for his farewell match.

  • Vasudevan T on January 4, 2013, 5:39 GMT

    Whatever media say Sachin is Genius and the best batsman Cricket world has ever seen. Except Kohli, we have seen only some nuts in the middle order. We are paying the price for it. So called young talents biting the dust match after match. Sachin surely could have played one more year easily. Still I remember the 1998 Sharjah Final between India and Australia. I was watching it in the stadium. It was full and I was sitting on the floor which is very close to the boundry fence. Damien Fleming was standing on the long on fence. The final was held on April 24th which is the birthday for both Sachin and Fleming. I shouted at Fleming " Your birthday Gift" Sachin's century. Fleming was helpless/clueless and nodding his head because Sachin's murderous innings. I got my "birth's worth" watching one of the great innings by the little genius/master.

  • Akshay Shingote on January 4, 2013, 5:34 GMT

    To say about Tendulkar in just one line,it is this: No matter whichever country or player you support,you just cannot hate Sachin Tendulkar..!!!

  • RAVI KIRAN on January 4, 2013, 5:29 GMT

    Some how the world has this uncanny habit of throwing out great players... Mohinder Amarnath, Michael Vaughn, Sanath Jayasuriya, Krish Srikkanth, Sourav Ganguly, Michael Bevan, Mark Taylor, Ricky Ponting and now Sachin Tendulkar... oh, this world...

  • VijayK on January 4, 2013, 5:21 GMT

    We need Tendulkar back to Indian team

  • Balaji on January 4, 2013, 5:16 GMT

    Wow! wonderfully written. I share a lot of the author's thoughts. I am sure many more of that generation feel the same things about Tendulkar.

  • Pradeep on January 4, 2013, 5:08 GMT

    Well written article. Yes Sachin Tendulkar in India is known to even those who do not follow cricket.

  • Srikanth on January 4, 2013, 5:04 GMT

    Suman, it is a beautiful piece of article...u just reflected my thoughts and I am sure it is not just me alone...may be millions...kudos!

  • Amit Wadhwa on January 4, 2013, 5:03 GMT

    There will never be a day when whole nation says that we did not miss god..He is such a legend that he will be missed everytime when India plays. God - Please dont announce retirement from "TEST CRICKET" sitting at home, Whole world has grown up watching you play and let this whole world show how much love and respect everyone has for "the only living god"

  • Pratit on January 4, 2013, 4:56 GMT

    All good things must come to an end.

  • Ashok Nigam on January 4, 2013, 4:55 GMT

    How nicely you narrated about SACHIN by four Generations. How focused he is in all the fields and what a temprament he got. Whenever we watch or liste cricket in the coming years we always remember SACHIN's not only as a player his gentleness, clamness, dedication and we salute him for his greatness.

  • Anonymous on January 4, 2013, 4:52 GMT

    very good article. I became emotional while reading.

  • Umer on January 4, 2013, 4:37 GMT

    Waooohh .... Reminded me his greatness in the format which he ensured will be remembered by his greatness.

  • anand on January 4, 2013, 4:33 GMT

    true. without sachin it is no cricket. I watch the game just for him. Hopefully, he will continue to play Test till he drops dead

  • Arslan Javed on January 4, 2013, 4:33 GMT

    Dear Suman Kumar: i hate you for writing such a nice article for someone Genius like Tendulkar. Its a great tribute to little master. May Allah bless him with same success he choose after cricket.He has been a treat to watch and been loved by all cricket lovers around the world.

  • dhana on January 4, 2013, 4:27 GMT

    Yeah. in test cricket, he is one of the greatest batsmen. but in odi, he is the one and only greatest batsman. odi is his very own format.

  • vinay kumar on January 4, 2013, 4:27 GMT

    it is wonderful to read this. tendulkar should have played at least ten more years. let him score or not score but he be part of the indian cricket team. it is hard to imagine team without him. he is such a wonderful and valuable player india ever had. never before and never again will we have such a wonderful player.

  • Jawahar on January 4, 2013, 4:26 GMT

    Very well-written. I am also from Tamilnadu, India. So I can feel the complete essence of this article. I am a big fan of Sachin. As you told, when I feel lazy or tired of doing something, I think of Sachin and try to push that work as soon as possible. Really I felt low (lowest) when I heard about Sachin's retirement. Tears in my eyes, when I think ODI's without Sachin. For me, Cricket is not cricket without Sachin. Love you Sachin and thank you so much for the excellent articlet!

  • Satish Tomer on January 4, 2013, 4:17 GMT

    "Sachin" a name beating in my heart since my childhood as my iconic hero who pace my life not only by cricket field but by the tremendus placement of his day to day behaviour and his positive attitude. I love all HIS betting moments and most inportant when He left Captency own his own. I can understand his decision to leave us in lurch and dark abt ending his great one day cariear. God bless u SACHIN. Satish Tomer, India

  • Rakesh on January 4, 2013, 4:14 GMT

    Well written,He is definitely an inspiration to aim higher in any field.

  • VK on January 4, 2013, 4:05 GMT

    Same feeling :-( No joy in watching a cricket match without Sachin.

  • Bhaskar on January 4, 2013, 3:59 GMT

    He could have quit Testmatches in which he dint show good. But not to ODI's. I think he did well in all ODI's till date. I am still surprised, why he had quit ODI's than Testmatch!?

  • VinodkumarGB on January 4, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    Wonderful article :) Yes, sachin has become a synonym for Cricket in india. It is easy for 100crore to comment on one man sitting infront of TV and doing nothing but.. the same man carried the burden of those 100 crore cries, hopes, appeals, requests, criticism every single time and then delivered back the Joy, the happiness, the satisfaction, the pleasure for over 20 years!! What else could we call him.......... other than GOD!! Wish you all the best Sachin, may the God bless you with all the joy of this world! Miss you!!

  • UB on January 4, 2013, 3:55 GMT

    A beautiful tribute to one of the greatest Batsmen ever to have graced a Cricket field. Couldn't agree more!!!

  • Mahesh on January 4, 2013, 3:53 GMT

    A good article Suman...I am one of the many who have similar feelings of Tendulkar, as yours...(the above mentioned instances -- Perth,Sharjah & Sydney are still fresh in my eyes)...Fans like us will find it still tougher to digest, when he calls it quits from test cricket ...

  • Sandeep on January 4, 2013, 3:51 GMT

    Nice article. I liked the Chittoor touch, I am from the same town and wonder if we know the same Arun.

  • Mohit on January 4, 2013, 3:47 GMT

    Lovely Article.. Caught the mindset of many people... You can love him or hate him but you seriously cannot ignore hime..

  • Prasad on January 4, 2013, 3:44 GMT

    A different tribute to the legend. Superb!!!

  • Ashok on January 4, 2013, 3:34 GMT

    This is the problem with Indian fans. As much as we enjoyed Sachin, we need to keep watching for future 'Sachins' in India. Consistent teams like Australia do not boast of a single player's performance. The team comes first. Indian cricket can flourish only when we stop creating superstars and start enjoying the team's performance.

  • biswas on January 4, 2013, 3:34 GMT

    now critics will search for a new scape goat which was sachin for them since last 20 years, whenever our team failed we use to criticise sachin only, though always its a team game that he never play under pressure give chance to youngstar etc etc, and we never noticed that its due to his presence that other players perform b coz they knew if they will get fail thr will b cry for sachins head only so they used to play fearless cric but as sachin is no more now media critic and the team india is in search for another scape goat so that they can continue the way they used to play, perhaps the new one will be MSD who knows, we miss u sachin

  • Srini on January 4, 2013, 3:16 GMT

    Excellent Piece! I used to lunch watching his exploits against Shoaib Akhthar in the 2003 WC. I used to drive 30 minutes + 30 minutes home to watch this every day...much to the ire of my boss. But don't regret it even a minute... Great man is gone - now we see the hollowness in Indian cricket - His greatness will haunt us for days to come - I adoot anticipate another even close to him in the near future...... Now take it easy Sachin! You have given us great moments in the middle of schemers,money pedallers and match throwers. Thankyou So much!!!

  • Atmjeet on January 4, 2013, 3:14 GMT

    Wow Man impressed. You almost wrote things that millions of people feel at the moments. Kudos for that.

  • Nikhil on January 4, 2013, 3:04 GMT

    I am very lucky I have born when sachin is playing. I feel like watching sachin's old matches rather watching cricket live. I too hate him :( ...

    Great man, Great Batsman and Great Article :)

  • Hari on January 4, 2013, 2:45 GMT

    Suman, I Loved the way you expressed your Love towards Sachin. Hopefully Sachin gains some form and treats us in coming test matches.

  • Amit Parekh on January 4, 2013, 2:43 GMT

    Thanks Suman. You have exactly reflected my thoughts and feelings for Sachin. I was watching Ind play Pakistan. Two key factors were missing from the match - Sachin and intensity.

  • Biju Joseph on January 4, 2013, 2:42 GMT

    Tendlya is an icon and he will be a role model for many, many generations to come both for his on-field and off-field life style. His records speak for themselves and they will remain un-conquered forever. We, Indians all over the world are proud of our Little Master's Achievements. Cricket lovers everywhere will surely miss his ODI exploits. Hope he continues to plunder more runs against all nations in the Test arena! Hail, Hail Sachin Tendulkar!

  • Chaitanya R. on January 4, 2013, 2:33 GMT

    Seriously, enough of these Tendulkar tributes already! These guest posts have a "me too" vibe about them, and they are getting very tiring. He's only retired from ODIs, and who knows how long he intends to carry on in Tests. If you must publish these, save it for when he finally retires from all cricket.

  • natnastak on January 4, 2013, 2:10 GMT

    good read.R.I.P. One Day Cricket.

  • Sooryanarayanan.P on January 4, 2013, 2:00 GMT

    This article expresses whateven I felt and keep feeling about Tendulkar's Cricket and the man he was in indian jersey. This article is inspiring and qualifies to be published in any leading daily newspaper or book. Keep writing. Thanks

  • Mr X on January 4, 2013, 1:57 GMT

    Sachin,

    I remember you charging down the wicket and launching bowlers through the covers in ODI cricket...Yes...you have now retired from that format...I have seen the way you have recently got out in test cricket and I tell you one thing...you should be schooling these bowlers...I know you're the oldest man to still be playing cricket currently...but mate...DO NOT RETIRE...not yet anyway...You can and will dominate once more...forget your age, forget what others say...go out on your own terms...I wanna see you play into your mid 40s and defy logic, history and science...Sachin once you are gone...cricket is DEAD...Lara, S Waugh, YOU, Saqlain, Warne, Younis, Akram, Donald...you're the LAST legend left since I watched cricket back in 1996...Don't go...FIGHT...

  • Rahul on January 4, 2013, 1:57 GMT

    You, like the rest, are still being emotional. You wanted him to quit because, he was suffering when India was failing badly. Now you regret, because they are failing miserably.

    I would really like someone, if not everyone, in the team to step up from these failures. The focus should be on rebuilding the team to live up to the great man's legacy, rather than lamenting over his retirement.

  • Mr X on January 4, 2013, 1:50 GMT

    Sachin,

    I always said from the time I started watching cricket (1996 world cup). Once Lara, Steve Waugh and Sachin go...it's the death of the game...you guys inspired, you guys performed miracles and you guys will go down as legends...I know you have only just retired from ODI cricket...but in all honesty I have no reason or inspiration to watch India bat now that you are gone. Yes India have Kohli, Yuvraj, Sehwag...but mate...now that you are gone it's a whole new ball game for the Indian team in ODI cricket...I remember one ODI final against Sri-Lanka...Sehwag came out blazing...you scored 120-140 patiently before getting out LBW to Mendis (after reverse sweeping him twice in that over for boundaries)...I loved that knock...I know you have played many other great knocks...but that was one I will always remember...and one other thing...whenever I read the scorecard and see you have been bowled...I always wanna see the ball that got through your defenses...

  • Ashwanth on January 4, 2013, 1:50 GMT

    Good job,suman.

  • Joseph on January 4, 2013, 1:45 GMT

    I hate you for bringing a tear and a rainbow in my eyes...

  • sahil suman on January 4, 2013, 1:41 GMT

    Thanxxxxx a lot 4 sharing this........I feel truly blessed everytym I get 2 see or watch or read about the genious...Yes, he was, he is & he will remain "THE GENIOUS" 4ever...

  • Raju shah on January 4, 2013, 0:32 GMT

    When India as a nation used to run at 4.5 runs per over (5% growth rate), this guy had the audacity to score at 5.2 runs per over (86 strike rate)and showed that Indians can be high achievers in any chosen sphere of life, I hate him for that. How could he challenge the feudal system?

  • Khwaja Arsalan on January 4, 2013, 0:07 GMT

    Like you love him in bracket

  • neer on January 3, 2013, 23:56 GMT

    I wud love him.more if he'd decided to play atleast pak series n show his talent of playin these new kids...n end his his career on a " another high note ", still can't think of watchin indian playinn without him..

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 23:39 GMT

    A few afternoons ago, my three-year-old little girl paused while pedalling her tricycle, glanced at the TV and said: “Sachin!” I was shocked. He was socking all throughout his career with greatest up and low, lower..... But still he is one who will be admired by all the generation before or after him !!!

  • Rajat on January 3, 2013, 23:38 GMT

    Good one. Enjoyed reading that.

  • Vinod on January 3, 2013, 23:07 GMT

    Your writing on having loved by many generations is really nice gesture. But I have to disagree with you on the timing of his retirement. I knew his reflections are slowed down but what people don't understand is that he still fits in out best 11. We will definitely regret for pushing him out of odi side. That's been showing now with a loss in the hands of Pakistan and I sincerely hope it doesn't repeat against Eng.

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 23:06 GMT

    good to read all the good things about someone we loved so much... great work Suman...

  • Niel Palit on January 3, 2013, 22:57 GMT

    What an excellent piece man!! Well written. He is not a human indeed.

  • suresh on January 3, 2013, 22:38 GMT

    Dude I understand you agony and Pain, coz I am going through same phase, cricket is never CRICKET with out him, but lucky he retired otherwise Dhoni would have blamed him for Pakistan series loss....

  • Anilk on January 3, 2013, 21:56 GMT

    This is the problem with us Indians, Suman! We are invincible in our ability to make gods and then destryoing them. This infatuation has cost bright students a spot in a higher class/institute; cost the Nation years as employees stayed glued to radio/TV sets instead of working; dwarfed the prospects of bright aspirants as there was no opening to aspire for a National berth. Why cannot we see the sportsmen as just humans? Unlike Sachin, Kallis has a higher average and more wickets, he is not worshipped in SA; Ponting shouldered captaincy, won innumerable matches and scored truckloads; he is not worshipped in Aus; same with Lara. Why are us Indians so infatuated, obsessed? Post 2007, some Ranchi men wanted to erect a temple for Dhoni; maybe there are some for Sachin somewhere. What madness is this? He was a great sportsman. That's it. Move on. We have great scientists, thinkers, and huge many slum-dwellers too. Spare a thought for them as well.

  • Kapil Gulechha on January 3, 2013, 21:41 GMT

    Amazing & straight from heart.....loved it :)

  • Rajesh Rathore on January 3, 2013, 21:41 GMT

    How can he be so humble and down to earth...I hate him for that.

  • Khan on January 3, 2013, 21:22 GMT

    We are all humans and humans have expiry date. India was lucky to have a extra ordinary talent like him and they capitalised many games on his genius. His reflexes are not there any more. He will fail few more times in tests and give it up. If I will be him, I will be looking forward for my next career. He is still in his late 30's and probably have alot of family depending on him. Good wishes for Tendulkar from me.

  • Vasu Reddy on January 3, 2013, 21:20 GMT

    All good things come to an end, and then we remember them forever. Sachin is not just great, but was surrounded by other greats such as Rahul, Anil, Dada, Virender and many seniors. Ture greatness typically is well surrounded by other greats, and will be remembered for a long time.

  • Salman on January 3, 2013, 21:14 GMT

    For every day, there is a night; and for every night, there is a day. :)

  • satyendra sharma on January 3, 2013, 21:13 GMT

    by reading this i feel that i have written it.thanks

  • Maddy on January 3, 2013, 21:01 GMT

    I guess the article though well written, but what India need to realise is that Tendulkar as an individual batsman was great but not as a team player, as he never played India out of a situation like Dhoni does. Lastly India needs to wakeup and smell the air so to speak and look towards the future rather than make old hogs play the role of young stallions trying to achieve glory. Coming from a Pakistani fan who recognises the need for change in Indian cricket for the sake of competitive cricket otherwise India will fall back into the dark ages where they were praying for a win against Pakistan.

  • V. Ramsamooj Gosine on January 3, 2013, 20:45 GMT

    Sachin Tendulkar will remain in the hearts of millions of people one of the greatest batsmen of all times. Truly a lot of us have been taught to measure success by certification. Here too in the Caribbeab it is just as bad. But men have talent and only if you explore that talent, could you produce something memorable and orignial. it is wise that all of us look at Tendulkar as a man who followed his dreams and became world class. If we don't look at it this way, we are limiting our potential. Hats off to Sachin. You have done your duty, sir.

  • Shanmuga on January 3, 2013, 20:42 GMT

    nice post. love the way the post has been presented!! great work!! Missing Little Master already in ODI's. hopefully India will recover.

  • Venkatesh on January 3, 2013, 20:13 GMT

    Shortly full India is going to ask for SACHIN

  • venkatesh on January 3, 2013, 20:07 GMT

    Bring back SACHIN

  • Prasad on January 3, 2013, 20:03 GMT

    He was a gem in the making from the very provenance. The fantastic part of his career is his humility and temperment which got him the reverence and left an indelible impression in the hearts of billions, apart from the artistry with the bat. "He is a diamond and diamonds are forever". Cricket never was as exciting nor will be, without his presence. Miss you Sachin :(

  • Faisal Ahmed on January 3, 2013, 19:53 GMT

    Cricket won't be the same game without Tendulkar...

  • A disciple on January 3, 2013, 19:45 GMT

    I've grown up looking at him. Imitating him is how I learnt Cricket. Watching him play is how I believed in the existence of a Super power in humans. His character is how I understood the synonym of Will power. His failures were my disappointments too and his achievements, my ecstatic moments. He was not Sachin when he was playing, for me he was magic. Passion personified. The only Utopian cricketer I've known thus far and I doubt that would ever change. A man that seldom spoke but often retaliated his critics with the bat. In this day and age of "Be aggressive or be forgotten", he was the one man that showed the true meaning of aggression, proving to everyone that talk is cheap and making a statement means letting your records talk for you. Sachin, I don't care what all the haters have to say, but you made me a believer. You are the one, and the only one that ever was and will ever be, the one greater than the game. Thank you for all those years of sacrifices and pure Magic.

  • nareshgb1 on January 3, 2013, 19:38 GMT

    the only guy who scored 241 off a bonafide test attack while being out of form and not playing one of his most productive shots on the off side. Not just that, he went on to get 495 runs without getting dismissed over those two test matches - and ALL THE WHILE being out of form (well, Panditji (a.k.a. Chappeli) said he was not any more in form AFTER that 241 as he was BEFORE IT so I guess he WAS out of form all the way :)

    so there you are. Sach WAS life.

  • Gururajan Rao on January 3, 2013, 19:33 GMT

    I think Tendulkar has erred in making his ODI retirement call as opposed to Test cricket. I think he was pressured from the outside due to bad judgment from the likes of Sandip Patil, Srikanth and Srinivasan. They should have declined his retirement call and provided support. I strongly suspect that Tendulkar would have made a strong comeback with a century against Pakistan. I think it is not too late for the selectors to ask him to lead what is essentially an India A team with the likes of Pujara, etc. in the last match against Pakistan. What is there to be lost? The current India Sr. team lacks the 2012 WC dedication like Gavaskar stated. Tendulkar can essentially groom the current India A team (Jr.WC champs)for the 2015 W.Cup.His very presence in the middle can inspire them to reach greater heights! If the selectors have any grit, they should attempt this approach. When Tendulkar is fit enough to play in Ranji matches, why not India ODIs? Tendulkar, please reconsider your decision.

  • Arunesh on January 3, 2013, 19:27 GMT

    Since i don't find a word to laud Sachin and writer, only i could only thank them. Now days i write most of words starting with 'S' as Sachin before correcting them...

  • Keith on January 3, 2013, 19:18 GMT

    A very well written tribute to the Little Master. Your article speaks what millions of Sachin fans have on their mind.

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 19:16 GMT

    Superb ... You're speaking what is in the minds of millions of people. He is indeed unique and raised the benchmark of excellence so high that we can't believe it when he struggles these days. But he has earned his stripes and no amount of keyboard warriors or Sachin haters can change my opinion on him. He is indeed a gentleman tailor-made for the Gentleman's game ie: Cricket. Hats off for inspiring generations, you champion.

  • Prithu on January 3, 2013, 19:15 GMT

    This is a really good piece. You've described every Indian out there, phenomenal

  • Dhasuruthe on January 3, 2013, 19:11 GMT

    I felt like reading my mind. Similar incidents had happened in my life too. But, one of the rare articles which I could relate to myself. Thanks Suman Kumar.

  • Dr.K.Chandrasekharan on January 3, 2013, 19:09 GMT

    SACHA. INDiAN.....Sachin, a. True Indian who is. The Lord of the Runs. To day is the saddest day for Indian cricket,l, being ripped open by Pakistan. Team .and showed the absence of. Sachin ! We have lost him and very much so in the game.The absence of Sachin itself would have pepped the morale of Pakistan players and enhanced their performance. India will not forget this tragedy for a long time to come.

  • Rock on January 3, 2013, 19:03 GMT

    Tht's a good one sir..the last paragraph felt as if you were writing my thoughts in one of your articles.I am one of the generations that love him!!!

  • Rock on January 3, 2013, 19:02 GMT

    Tht's a good one sir..the last paragraph felt as if you were writing my thoughts in one of your articles.I am one of the generations that love him!!!

  • abhijit on January 3, 2013, 18:58 GMT

    I love sachin tendulkar. But happy with his retirement. He has been the shield of the team be it win or loss. He was taking blame for centuries in losing cause or failed captaincy when no one from the team performed. Just because of his greatness in cricketing skills he survived BCCI politicians else he would have landed outside team long back. I wish he had Dhoni's shrewd politician like skills to survive by performing on rare but right occasion.

  • zamon zeb on January 3, 2013, 18:36 GMT

    hmmmm.......... a story of every fan of him, but i cant hate him, yess i am VERY ANGRY with him, how can he do this to me, to us, i know he is the better judge, i am ready to accept his decision BUT again... i would feel less pain by giving him a last match salute, i wont be that restless by wiping my tears on his final inning i wish to hear thousands of claps for MY HERO my great SACHIN, BUT....

    is there anybody in the board in whole cricket fraternity, who can ask him to come down for last time ONE TIME for millions of his fans...??????????????

  • Ram R on January 3, 2013, 18:30 GMT

    Wow! Well written my friend. I am one of those lucky ones who have been following SRT from the time he was only known in the Mumbai schools. Now, I look back to these 25 odd years and I can say that I prayed for SRT more than I prayed for myself! And I hate you for that!

  • Kiran on January 3, 2013, 18:29 GMT

    Superb.... We all hated him for that. Today why am I am not feeling dat bad even after loosing a series to Pak. May be, I lost interest in ODIs :)

  • Wasim Ahmed on January 3, 2013, 18:28 GMT

    I'm a proud Pakistani but when it comes to Cricket I can't help loving 'Master Sachin Blaster'

    Great Player!

    Will be missed!

  • Khasrul Kabir on January 3, 2013, 18:27 GMT

    May be it is the over adulation which robbed us couple of more years of cricket from him. He faught all his life the adulation with a smile, only for a second maybe, because half of the second he was thinking about the practice next day, the swing he has to focus on, the exercise type so that he can achieve the swing.

    Is it over, really? with 8 batsman getting out below 20, in T20, one day, is it really over. India can surely produce batsman, but they would have a tendency to defend, defend on the field, defend off the field. But India needs batsman who can straight drive a yorker to boundary, a buzzing whirling dangerous leg spin to a majestic SIX!, defend the wickets like it is his life he is defending, and then smile....Sachine, is it really over?

  • Sandeep on January 3, 2013, 18:24 GMT

    Nice, cute article! Great Job, Suman

  • Sachwaslife on January 3, 2013, 18:18 GMT

    i am already missing him...

  • priyankar pandey on January 3, 2013, 18:17 GMT

    brilliant article.we all miss sachin big time

  • Manohar Dondlapally on January 3, 2013, 18:15 GMT

    I still hate him because I personally believe he quit ODI career very early.

  • Tomy Sebastian on January 3, 2013, 18:07 GMT

    It was the pressure from the media that forced him out. He would have come back gloriously like it happened so many times. But you should again hate him for leaving at this time. What a decision not to be part of this wrecked Indian team. I love him for that!!!!!

  • prabhjeet on January 3, 2013, 18:04 GMT

    Exactly the same feeling I associate with watching Tendulkar for so many years. We have grown up watching him, admiring him, getting sad when he failed, jumping with joy at his success. But feels really sad when he has almost been pushed out of the team by the so-called leader of the young brigade, at a time when we needed him most for guiding the youngsters.

    The craze of taking a leave from office to watch his batting is not there anymore since all that is left is the game of the mortals. There will always be only one , the GOD of cricket.

    Will miss you Sachin, always...

  • Prakash Passanha on January 3, 2013, 17:53 GMT

    This one touched!

  • Satish Madhu on January 3, 2013, 17:47 GMT

    Hey Sachin,

    You really broke our dream, no matter how well you have performed all these years, you just did not get a deserved fairwell at the end. We wanted you to bid adieu from the stage where we started to recongnize you as a god of cricket. we really hate u... Please come back for the last time.. we want to see you moving out of the center stage not from the behind.. Please come back for the last time.. we want to fill our eyes with a standing aviation. Please come back.

  • Arun Kumar K on January 3, 2013, 17:44 GMT

    Nice read. Wonderful article. A man who transcended generation and a man who made atleast a few million of us to follow cricket. Humble, great and wonderful human being. Even i chided him for not retiring and suffering against Swann and Panesar. A Tendulkar at his pomp would have tonked each one of them. Following today's match i missed the great man more than ever. How many rescue acts he would have scripted. If at all the genius was still around in his blue todays match could have been a cakewalk. Living in the great mans memories........

  • Bhau on January 3, 2013, 17:43 GMT

    I hate him for not giving a chance for his fans to see him enter the field for the last time, his fans deserved the farewell.

  • praveen on January 3, 2013, 17:42 GMT

    u r really great!!! sir

  • azeem hafiz on January 3, 2013, 17:40 GMT

    nice heading

  • Ramesh on January 3, 2013, 17:35 GMT

    Small and crisp. Sums up the feeling of every Sachin fan. Made a very good read.

  • Arnav on January 3, 2013, 17:28 GMT

    I bet all those vying for his head in tests too, would weep on the day he leaves the purest form of cricket. The title is so apt. Love you Like I hate you

  • Devendra on January 3, 2013, 17:23 GMT

    We expect him to succeed every time he goes in there...in this lies his greatness!

  • Jijil on January 3, 2013, 17:23 GMT

    Wow!! Amazing..:) Sharing this :)

  • Srinivasulu on January 3, 2013, 17:19 GMT

    it is very nice....the decision of retirement in ODI is shocking news for every one...we miss tendulkar in his own format

  • Praveen Phadke on January 3, 2013, 17:17 GMT

    Your post was a great tribute to the Master! I happen to follow him right.from the moment he made his international debut. we always knew that india had a chance of winning, when he was at the crease! and this thought came over and over again while watching the last 2 one day matches against pakistan! We miss u Sachin! Forever!

  • arul on January 3, 2013, 17:05 GMT

    Nice Humble story. Liked the way it was put

  • Satish on January 3, 2013, 17:05 GMT

    Wonderfully written. My own experience when under stress at work has been to tell myself - "Do this you idiot! Don't even dare compare this pressure to what Tendulkar faces every time he goes out to bat"!

    I have said this on many cricket forums - outsiders will never understand what he means to a struggling, growing India of the 90s. My only senseless fear is that Tendulkar came in 1989 and India started rising in 1991. His career is now winding down and looking at our nation and our society I really hope India is not winding up!

  • chezhian on January 3, 2013, 17:01 GMT

    very nice article suman...I use to get up at 4am when India toured NZ and watch him play with my uncles during my school days ended up getting beatings from my father for this maniac.Even that may turn into ectasy when sachin scores a good score....

    Comically, we usually discuss in schools that, sachins strike rate is better than our parents today, on calculating the beatings tat we got.Those days if SRT gets out, thats it.Indian innings is over.We switch off and start our routines.

    But, i too had the same feeling that, a guy who tormented warnies,waquars,shoaibs,Mcgrath type of legends shouldnt fell to panesars and andersons. But, he should have played one last tournament and should have given a colourful owation in the ground while he leaves.

    Hm.... ODI's - RIP.

  • Rakesh on January 3, 2013, 16:58 GMT

    Mr Suman- I just read your article at 10:30 PM before going to bed. What a way to end your day. Wonderfully drafted article with a touch of emotional attack for god followers. Loved it...definately took me in those days when I only used to switch on TV to watch this god play.

  • Upatel on January 3, 2013, 16:56 GMT

    Good one. I like it!

  • sahil on January 3, 2013, 16:52 GMT

    Well written article. For those who have seen today's Ind-Pak 2nd ODI at Edens : the Inbian batting was looking for someone to give direction, someone to hold one end, an anchor ; but 'HE' wasn't there. Dear Sachin, ODI cricket will not be the same again.

  • pratik on January 3, 2013, 16:42 GMT

    Well written Suman, but can't do anything, well it seems like one dayers are not the same as it used to be, by his sheer presence!!!!

  • Vishwa on January 3, 2013, 16:41 GMT

    Awesome Mr. Suman. Article looks like a mirror image of my inner feelings about 10dulkar. I greatly adore, respect and love his style and attitude on field. BIG BOWS to the CRICKET GOD

  • Anik Khan on January 3, 2013, 16:37 GMT

    Badly missing Sachin.

  • Syed Muhammad Faisal on January 3, 2013, 16:36 GMT

    Yes i know that Tendulkar is a world class player, but as he declared his retirement due to ignorance of Indian Cricket Board. He did not deserve such retirement as compared to his class.

  • Pranab on January 3, 2013, 16:31 GMT

    Awesome....we all miss you Sachin. The day Indian cricket will understand you importance in current Indian Team till then we will be the minnows in the world cricketing history.

    BCCI wake up!!

    Hats off to you Sachin Sir.

  • Sudheer on January 3, 2013, 16:30 GMT

    I completely agree with what Suman is mentioning ,Sachin's sheer presence in crease made billion people to think India can win the match even when India chases a mammoth total & people always kept their finger's crossed as soon as he gets out even when India just 15 runs with 4 wickets in hand....When he bats people feel that its a batting paradise,as soon as he gets out it suddenly turns nightmare for batsmen.... Was it because he is a genius or Really God doesn't want too see him ideal in the dressing room .....Some argue Sachin's gets out in pressure situations but the fact is pressure starts only when he is out, as long as he is batting there is never pressure on us coz he is between us & pressure.. I doubt if there was even one occasion where he carried on bat & India loose the match while chasing, if he stays not out it was certain that India won the match.... I can write much more but can I phrase each & every single achievement of his? Every one knows the answer .....

  • Senthil Nathan R on January 3, 2013, 16:26 GMT

    Great to see another facet of Sachin.

    My biggest worry is, my son cannot see how Sachin plays cricket.

    The most annoying thing with the computer is, whenever I type the word "Sachin" that idiot box suggests that the word is wrong. I've added the word Sachin in my dictionary...have you?

  • Ramesh on January 3, 2013, 16:19 GMT

    Sachin Great Man! Still more to come from this so called talented young Indian team and they will feel the absence of Tendulkar lot. For Sachin haters look at his contribution in 2003 WC and the latest World Cup win, I can highlight lot of his memorable innings. I have lost watching one day matches, for me without Tendulkar it's boring to watch. It took me 23 years to stop watching One day matches.. Long live Sachin

  • ganesh on January 3, 2013, 16:16 GMT

    This article is much better than many of Cricinfo specialist's. Suman Well done you captured the real Tendulkar passion the country had for 24 long years. Well wrote man

  • John Sathish on January 3, 2013, 16:15 GMT

    Really an impressing article by Suman Kumar

  • vikrant on January 3, 2013, 16:15 GMT

    how can i miss to pay the tribute to THE LIVING LEGEND of cricket.

    How many times has HE given the goosebumps/thrills/respect to my generation. I am greatful for having watched players like Sachin, Dravid, Kumble, Laxman & Ganguly. But today is specially for SACHIN. What not has he done for the country ? I dont want to ask that... a Bow with respect to him ~ for what he has given to India.

    Love you always Sachin... will miss your services in shorter format. Looking ahead to watch you play test cricket.

    p.s. i missed going through the emotional moments of watching you play the last ODI before announcing retirement. Will mourn that lifelong... Hatts off SIR SACHIN

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 16:14 GMT

    Guys like Sachin are just like gems who are made at 500000 degree celsius .. He was the reason why Indian cricket became famous ..He made all of india glued to tv , radio , internet. His actions always determined fate of team india. And now look where we are , all alone in middle of nowhere . No wonder you can see decreasing popularity among the viewers.

  • ANNU on January 3, 2013, 16:14 GMT

    Now you write articles in his praise….. It really hurts to even imagine cricket team without him. At least he should have been kept in the dressing room to motivate and influence others. It was most depressing day when heard about his retirement. And see the result, humiliated defeat from arch rivals. Only positive that I have taken from the situation is that I will not be wasting time watching full game, like Tendu I have other priorities in life that come first. Glued to TV to even see Bangladesh vs. Kenya series didn’t sees any of Pak/ Ind matches. My 30 years love affair with the game is broken the very day he retired. Thanks this news came last year and New Year is not spoiled.

  • mohammad amir on January 3, 2013, 16:13 GMT

    A master,he made batting look easy.the best i have seen in 40 years.Simply the best!

  • Dhumal Vishal on January 3, 2013, 16:13 GMT

    We are really poor in one day cricket without him... Salute to GR8 man..plz come back for us...

  • ram kumar bongarala on January 3, 2013, 16:12 GMT

    I missed the spirit of the country and the spirit of the game in the current India cricket team..To me and to all he is ever Tendulkar....and ever the only god exists in the history of cricket!!!

  • Raghu on January 3, 2013, 16:10 GMT

    Good one Suman..as usual bringing in humor while conveying your message...I really liked the last paragraph..when Sachin started failing with his bat consistently in the last few quarters, I just used to scream 'why can't he retire'...it is primarily because we don't want him to fail and don't want him to retire at a low!

  • Muhammad Waqar Jilani on January 3, 2013, 16:10 GMT

    One of the greatest of all time, no wait a minute. THE greatest of all time. This is coming from a hardcore Pakistani supporter. A gentlemen in and out of the field. Examples of his straight bat batting will be talked about for generations to come. The little master, will be missed surely..

  • Raaj on January 3, 2013, 16:09 GMT

    Absolutely right.. There are thousands and millions of people will agree with the same.. we are all hate him like we love him..

  • Vishal on January 3, 2013, 16:08 GMT

    Amazing article!! every media person who criticized should read this and weep!! if he played against pakistan we might have lost but it wouldn't be humiliating! his presence alone gives others security. He is the God of cricket till the end of time!

  • samsung1 on January 3, 2013, 16:06 GMT

    what you said quite early in the article sumarises tendulkars career quite well.

    "India lost that match by a massive margin of 300 runs. But that innings, one of the greatest that I have ever seen, was some sort of a magical preamble."

    Sadly his critics and his fans notice he performs most regular when there is no pressure. There are exceptions to the rule. But the rule is ,Little or no pressure , Tendulkar cashes in on some runs. Pressure on , india facing possible defeat....tendulkar fails.

    Rahul Dravid - Different story all together. He is the king. COuntless times , he performed BETTER when team was under pressure. That for me is the mark of a TRULY GREAT sportsman.

  • Umashankar on January 3, 2013, 16:04 GMT

    A brilliant article! Each and every one of us born and raised during the reign of Sachin The Great Tendulkar has suffered loss of interest in cricket. I felt when Sampres left and when Schumacher left. But Sachin is in a different league altogether. Close to home, closer to heart, Cricket will never be the same without Sachin!

  • Asim on January 3, 2013, 16:04 GMT

    Very well written! I am a Pakistani and I am an ardent admirer of the little master and I literally grew up watching him since his debut when I was a school boy. I am quite excited to imagine when I will be telling my kids that I watched this man playing. To sum it up, whenever the history of cricket will be written, historians will categorize it with Pre-Tendulkar and Post Tendulkar ages.

  • Dhairya on January 3, 2013, 15:55 GMT

    I grew up, by watching him. I consider myself lucky that i have seen him playing. Such a phenomenal player.

  • Muddasar on January 3, 2013, 15:54 GMT

    Nice article. I am a big fan of sachin and very sad that he has quit ODI's Just in india nor just in pakistan he has fans in the whole world . We can never have such a gentle and genious crickter

  • Deepak on January 3, 2013, 15:52 GMT

    great artical, my grany and granpa are his fans, my mom and my dad also me my bro also and now my nefue is also his fan. 4 generations, Mom never ask for sop opera dad never ask for news chanal when he is playing and i feel sad fo my future son that he will never have chance to se him.

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 15:52 GMT

    Enough man. Sachin belongs to the genre of Sunil Gavaskar and boring one up man ship. Nothing more. Mere past records are not the same as present performance. Sachin Tendulkar is a living proof. That's all.

  • K.Krishnakumar on January 3, 2013, 15:50 GMT

    That Tedulkar made an indelible impression in the minds of millions for the brilliace with his "bat-man" like batting cannot be better expressed than this brief missive of oxymoron....probably he should be playing in one - dayers too where he achived more than the collective achivements of the present team

  • Paul Francis X. Fernandes on January 3, 2013, 15:44 GMT

    Everytime the man failed to deliver, the spectators nimbled at him barring a few. They always wanted younger blood to be pumped into the side... The effect is in front of everyone... Tendulkar is not the only one... There were times when some spectators cried for the blood of the likes of Ganguly, Dravid and Lakshman... How wrong... I am sure at least one of them was forced out of the pack in the name of retirement... Untimely and illogical decisions taken in a haste...

  • Nobel on January 3, 2013, 15:43 GMT

    Very touching article! For my generation which grew up watching cricket of 90s, Sachin was the lone hope. The interest in watching a match ended with Sachin's wicket. Though Perth and Sharjah are what defines Sachin, I am thankful to him for giving me memories like the last over of Hero Cup semi final against SA which he bowled and then clean bowling Lara in the final. Every child dreamt of becoming another Sachin. Sportstar and Sportsworld magazines were bought if there was a cover photo or star poster of Sachin. The present generation addicted to fizzy cola and popcorn will never understand what value he brought to Cricket. If it was not for Sachin, Indian cricket wouldnt have reached this high and BCCI should be thankful that indirectly he contributed to their coffers. Love you Sachin... from the deepest corner of my heart.

  • Abdullah on January 3, 2013, 15:41 GMT

    Bad Article for such a great player.

  • Anonymous on January 3, 2013, 15:39 GMT

    That's a great way of showing love.. I feel the same way but we don't have a option except to live with it.

    I hate him too coz there is no word in dictionary to how much we love them.

  • rao on January 3, 2013, 15:34 GMT

    I like it - great article

  • Arish on January 3, 2013, 15:33 GMT

    that is a affectionate one :-) ... i guess he had to leave ... just disappointed he didn't score a century and then retire .. i hope he does so for tests ..

  • Sandeep on January 3, 2013, 15:32 GMT

    Could not agree more. Sachin will sure be missed ! Sachin gave his 100% to cricket ... re wrote most of the batting records but the end was not what he would have anticipated, I still recall the last interview on a popular news channel where the anchor said everything except "Sachin its time you call it a quits". By his retirement he has silenced all but the style in which he did it is a slap on every face that could not stand by him in his dark days !

  • Amit on January 3, 2013, 15:31 GMT

    I only hate to see him struggling and of course, for quitting ODIs without warning. Wanted to see him bat for one last time.

  • Prabhat Prasannan on January 3, 2013, 15:27 GMT

    Great insight Suman Kumar!.... You are right - even I could'nt achive 0.5% of the focus the great man has. But with the end of each of your paragraphs, one painful thing which kept ringing at the back of my head - "The great guy is not play in colours anymore :-( ". There was and there will be none who played the game with such dignity, astuteness and humbleness. I hate him for that.....

  • Jay on January 3, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    Gr8 tribute to a gr8 Cricketer. I think, it was better than many experts' tributes.

    Gr8 job Suman Kumar! I hate him for that!

  • Saad Anwar on January 3, 2013, 15:21 GMT

    Respect from across the border. I have always mentioned to people that he (Sachin) is the face for this sport (cricket) just like Muhammad Ali to boxing, Tiger Woods to Golf, Pele for football. A true legend. A very exceptional and emotional piece of writing.

  • ram on January 3, 2013, 15:19 GMT

    good article... i stopped watching cricket from the moment Tendulkar retires.

  • Sakif Shahriar Pritom on January 3, 2013, 15:02 GMT

    I love tendulkar, he is the best :(

  • Khan Ather Aziz on January 3, 2013, 14:46 GMT

    wow what a great article just the fact that you made me share it on my facebook with all my friends should be enough of a compliment. thank you !

  • Ashwani Sharma on January 3, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    Should a referendum be held on his retirement from ODI, there would be massive majority desiring him to play at least a series or two and then retire so that spectators can get the opportunity of giving his a majestic farewell. BCCI honchos should have convinced him to play till the end of England one day series rather than meekly announcing there honoring little dynamo's highly thought out decision.Nevertheless, thanks a lot to this little master for entertaining all of us for well over 23 years in one day cricket.Wish him success in the remaining period of his test cricket which does not seem to be long one.

  • Harsh on January 3, 2013, 13:46 GMT

    Couldn't have echoed my feelings better, First the criticism that he should retire and once he retired the anguish and desire to see him in full flow one last time. Tendulkar has been the reality of our era, everything else changed but he's always been there except for his latest drought. Wish him lots and lots of runs and a happy retirement from tests, unlike in ODIs where he abruptly called it a day.

  • Vyasaraj N V on January 3, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    When I started watching this little fella,I felt finally I got a role model batsmen as my favorite.The innings he played against Australian and Pakistanis are exemplary. Some time I was questioning myself why I am attracted to this little giant batsmen, the answer was he not only cherished Indians he gave great joy to people who watched cricket with passion and zeal whether they are Indians are foreigners. I was thinking that he might play against Pakistanis and score that eluding 50th hundred in one dayers too, but he has his own plans and we have to respect his decision and allow to him enjoy the personal moments which he has missed with family members for past 23 years. I wish him all the success and peace throughout his life.

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  • Vyasaraj N V on January 3, 2013, 13:14 GMT

    When I started watching this little fella,I felt finally I got a role model batsmen as my favorite.The innings he played against Australian and Pakistanis are exemplary. Some time I was questioning myself why I am attracted to this little giant batsmen, the answer was he not only cherished Indians he gave great joy to people who watched cricket with passion and zeal whether they are Indians are foreigners. I was thinking that he might play against Pakistanis and score that eluding 50th hundred in one dayers too, but he has his own plans and we have to respect his decision and allow to him enjoy the personal moments which he has missed with family members for past 23 years. I wish him all the success and peace throughout his life.

  • Harsh on January 3, 2013, 13:46 GMT

    Couldn't have echoed my feelings better, First the criticism that he should retire and once he retired the anguish and desire to see him in full flow one last time. Tendulkar has been the reality of our era, everything else changed but he's always been there except for his latest drought. Wish him lots and lots of runs and a happy retirement from tests, unlike in ODIs where he abruptly called it a day.

  • Ashwani Sharma on January 3, 2013, 14:16 GMT

    Should a referendum be held on his retirement from ODI, there would be massive majority desiring him to play at least a series or two and then retire so that spectators can get the opportunity of giving his a majestic farewell. BCCI honchos should have convinced him to play till the end of England one day series rather than meekly announcing there honoring little dynamo's highly thought out decision.Nevertheless, thanks a lot to this little master for entertaining all of us for well over 23 years in one day cricket.Wish him success in the remaining period of his test cricket which does not seem to be long one.

  • Khan Ather Aziz on January 3, 2013, 14:46 GMT

    wow what a great article just the fact that you made me share it on my facebook with all my friends should be enough of a compliment. thank you !

  • Sakif Shahriar Pritom on January 3, 2013, 15:02 GMT

    I love tendulkar, he is the best :(

  • ram on January 3, 2013, 15:19 GMT

    good article... i stopped watching cricket from the moment Tendulkar retires.

  • Saad Anwar on January 3, 2013, 15:21 GMT

    Respect from across the border. I have always mentioned to people that he (Sachin) is the face for this sport (cricket) just like Muhammad Ali to boxing, Tiger Woods to Golf, Pele for football. A true legend. A very exceptional and emotional piece of writing.

  • Jay on January 3, 2013, 15:25 GMT

    Gr8 tribute to a gr8 Cricketer. I think, it was better than many experts' tributes.

    Gr8 job Suman Kumar! I hate him for that!

  • Prabhat Prasannan on January 3, 2013, 15:27 GMT

    Great insight Suman Kumar!.... You are right - even I could'nt achive 0.5% of the focus the great man has. But with the end of each of your paragraphs, one painful thing which kept ringing at the back of my head - "The great guy is not play in colours anymore :-( ". There was and there will be none who played the game with such dignity, astuteness and humbleness. I hate him for that.....

  • Amit on January 3, 2013, 15:31 GMT

    I only hate to see him struggling and of course, for quitting ODIs without warning. Wanted to see him bat for one last time.