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April 2, 2013

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The ODI batting giants: part 2

Anantha Narayanan
Viv Richards is head-and-shoulders above the rest of the batsmen in several of the parameters analysed, confirming his top position among all ODI batsmen  © Getty Images
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This is part two of the article on ODI Batting giants. The first part covered the standard measures. In this article I will be looking at certain special performance measures. Despite the requests by several readers, I have retained the same fifteen batsmen, in order to be consistent. However I am open to select a subset of these two articles, say 8-9 tables, and do the analysis for all ODI batsmen. This will depend on the readers' comments.

Though I could not satisfy all requests, a couple of tables were added to the few planned based on the the comments received. Since I already had seven tables planned I could not take in all requests. Also, where there were two suggestions on a single measure, say the Index, I have opted for the simpler one.

1. Impact Innings / High Scoring Index / MOM
InningsImpactInns% ImpactInnsInns-TopScored% TopScoresInns-Second TSTS PointsTS IndexMOMsMOM Frequency
Richards 167 5130.5% 5432.3% 25116.80.70 31 5.39
J Miandad 218 5022.9% 5525.2% 39122.20.56 1911.47
Crowe 141 3222.7% 4531.9% 17 85.50.61 18 7.83
M Waugh 236 4117.4% 5021.2% 40112.30.48 2210.73
Tendulkar 45210122.3%12928.5% 68282.30.62 60 7.53
Jayasuriya 433 6314.5% 8419.4% 55189.10.44 46 9.41
Lara 289 5820.1% 7024.2% 51157.40.54 30 9.63
Inzamam 350 7020.0% 6017.1% 79157.90.45 2315.22
Flower 208 4019.2% 5124.5% 37109.80.53 1020.80
Bevan 196 4321.9% 4623.5% 30 90.00.46 1216.33
Ponting 365 4913.4% 6417.5% 73152.70.42 3211.41
Kallis 307 5818.9% 7825.4% 47160.10.52 32 9.59
Gilchrist 279 5118.3% 5419.4% 35114.90.41 28 9.96
Pietersen 121 2621.5% 3226.4% 12 57.80.48 1012.10
Dhoni 196 4422.4% 3115.8% 35 74.30.38 1810.89

I am sure readers could justifiably comment that a 110 had no impact on the match while a 21 at No.7 had greater impact. I concede that. A context-driven innings ratings work, on the anvil, would bring out all such nuances. However here we are looking at players' careers at a macro level. Hence I have developed logical, easy-to-understand definitions to determine impact innings by the batsmen. The rules are given below. The idea is that it is easier for the top-order batsmen to score more runs, score a higher percentage of team runs but will score at lower rates, more often than not. The late-order batsmen are unlikely to accumulate runs and score higher percentage of team runs but are likely to score at a much faster rate. It is certain that some tweaks of the following numbers could be suggested. However these are based on common sense and are applied across all batsmen. My advice to readers is not to split hairs on these numbers and concentrate on the broad picture.

Definition of Impact innings

BatPos 1-3:
Runs scored 100 or more OR
Runs scored 50 or more and % of Team Runs 33% or more OR
Runs scored 50 or more and Relative Scoring Rate 125 or more.
BatPos 4-6:
Runs scored 75 or more OR
Runs scored 40 or more and % of Team Runs 25% or more OR
Runs scored 40 or more and Relative Scoring Rate 137.5 or more.
BatPos 7-11:
Runs scored 50 or more OR
Runs scored 25 or more and % of Team Runs 20% or more OR
Runs scored 25 or more and Relative Scoring Rate 150 or more.
Relative scoring rate = Individual SR / Team SR.

Richards leads the table with an impressive tally of 30.5% in the impact innings measure. That is just under one-in-three. He is way ahead of the next best, in this case, Miandad with 22.9% and Martin Crowe, with 22.7%. All three played their cricket before the 1990s. Dhoni and Tendulkar follow next. Jayasuriya's uncertain career moves are reflected in his 14.1% value. And I am sure most of these would have been in the second third of his career.

For the Innings Top score analysis I have adopted an intriguing method. For this I only consider the innings in which the batsman either top-scored or was the second-best score. Let us define these as PR, HS1 and HS2, where PR is the player runs and the other two represent the top two scores. It is easier to represent this in a formulaic fashion. If PR equal to HS1, then add PR/HS2 (will be above 1.00) to the TS points value, otherwise, add PR/HS1 (will be below 1.00). Finally divide this by the total number of innings played to arrive at the TS-Index. Higher TS-Index values indicate higher players performances at around the top of team scores.

First the % of innings the batsman top-scored. Richards (how often do we see him at the top in these performance based measures) with 32.3% of his innings being top scores. Martin Crowe follows close with 31.9% and then there is some daylight and Tendulkar at 28.5%. As expected, Dhoni, batting at the late order positions, has top scored only 15.8%. Richards is also in the top position of the TS-Index table, with a value 0.70. Tendulkar is next with 0.62 and Martin Crowe follows with 0.61. The way this index value is structured, it is not easy to even finish with 0.50.

Now comes the often subjective but important measure of MOM awards received. For sheer number of awards, Tendulkar, having played over 450 innings, leads with 60 awards. However the performance measure for this is the MOM-frequency which is Innings per MOM award. Who leads? Who leads? None other than Richards, with a very low figure of 5.39 inns per MOM. The next best is Tendulkar, requiring 7.5 innings per MOM and then, Martin Crowe, with a MOM every 7.83 innings. Incidentally Amla's TS-Index is 0.77 and he wins a MOM every 6.5 innings.

These are all performance-based analyses and it is amazing that Richards leads in each and every one of these.

2. World Cup SF-F Champions Trophy Finals / Significant / Early matches
WC - F&SF, CT - FSignificant matchesEarly matches
BatsmanInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/R
Richards 6 303 40050.50 75.8 0 0 0 0.00 0.0 15 710 80447.33 88.3
J Miandad 4 185 27146.25 68.3 3 68 12822.67 53.1 23 830 116936.09 71.0
Crowe 1 91 8391.00109.6 1 43 6243.00 69.4 19 746 90939.26 82.1
M Waugh 4 49 7312.25 67.1 6 383 44363.83 86.5 14 653 78546.64 83.2
Tendulkar 7 331 42847.29 77.3 22 800 98036.36 81.6 29 1588 171454.76 92.6
Jayasuriya 7 165 19723.57 83.8 23 874 94138.00 92.9 27 662 79624.52 83.2
Lara 4 72 10018.00 72.0 16 592 69237.00 85.5 30 1026 123934.20 82.8
Inzamam 3 117 10639.00110.4 13 191 34814.69 54.9 20 472 64023.60 73.8
Flower 0 0 0 0.00 0.0 10 354 50935.40 69.5 23 726 99331.57 73.1
Bevan 4 170 26142.50 65.1 10 300 44330.00 67.7 8 150 25718.75 58.4
Ponting 10 308 36530.80 84.4 26 1341 164451.58 81.6 24 687 94628.62 72.6
Kallis 3 95 15231.67 62.5 23 1000 130243.48 76.8 23 706 93230.70 75.8
Gilchrist 7 305 26143.57116.9 22 674 69230.64 97.4 15 488 56132.53 87.0
Pietersen 0 0 0 0.00 0.0 7 383 47254.71 81.1 9 310 34334.44 90.4
Dhoni 2 116 12158.00 95.9 4 10 21 2.50 47.6 9 233 30125.89 77.4

This is a very important table to measure how the batsmen contributed in important tournaments. I have been quite tough in fixing the qualification criteria. I have only considered the 10 Word Cups and 6 Champions Trophy tournaments. There may be other 6/7-team tournaments. But only true World level tournaments make the cut.

I have looked at the performances in three categories. The first consists of the really important tournament-winning matches: World Cup Finals, Semi-Finals and Champions Trophy Finals. The second category consists of the significant later stage matches: Super-Six matches, Quarter-Finals and Champions Trophy Semi-Finals. The third category consists of all other matches in these tournaments.

In the first category, Tendulkar, Ponting, Gilchrist and Richards have exceeded 300 runs. This is reflected in their teams' successes. The average does not mean much. Hence only RpI is shown. More important than that is the total number of runs scored. Look at Gilchrist's strike rate in these matches, exceeding 115. Tendulkar has scored 331 runs, at a much lower strike rate.

Ponting leads in the significant matches category, with over 1300 runs. Kallis comes in next with exactly 1000 runs, outlining his importance to South Africa in these key matches. There is nothing for Richards since these matches were non-existent during the first 3/4 World Cups. Tendulkar is the run-away leader in the third category, with nearly 1600 runs, at an excellent strike rate. Lara follows next with just over 1000 runs and Miandad has also done well considering that he played only in World Cups.

It should be noted that all these three classifications are mutually exclusive. Tendulkar has scored a staggering 2700+ runs in these important world level tournaments. He missed the first four editions of the World Cup.

3. Career Summary (Revised Index) incorporating Batting position analysis
BatsmanInnsNOsRunsBallsAvgeS/RRpIIndexBatPosAvgeBest BPBBP InnsBBP RunsBBP RpI
Richards 16724 6721 745147.000.9020.1928.163.964 81 337341.64
J Miandad 21841 73811101441.700.6700.1704.754.074160 567835.49
Crowe 14119 4704 647638.560.7260.1734.853.214 53 189935.83
M Waugh 23620 85001105339.350.7690.1614.872.271141 572940.63
Tendulkar 45241184262136744.830.8620.1806.951.8313401531045.03
Jayasuriya 43318134301472332.360.9120.1434.211.5313831274033.26
Lara 28932104061308640.490.7950.1715.523.303106 444741.95
Inzamam 35053117391581239.530.7420.1524.464.174147 517535.20
Flower 20816 6785 909735.340.7460.1564.123.554 82 286834.98
Bevan 19667 6914 932053.600.7420.1505.975.326 87 300634.55
Ponting 36539137031704642.030.8040.1575.303.1033301266138.37
Kallis 30753114991575645.270.7300.1655.443.423196 776039.59
Gilchrist 27911 9619 992235.890.9690.1465.091.391259 920035.52
Pietersen 12116 4369 503641.610.8680.1575.673.764 67 235235.10
Dhoni 19656 7259 822851.850.8820.1506.875.456 82 251230.63

This is a revision of the ODI Batting Index. I have adopted Deepak's suggestion and got a revised Index value. His suggestion that the Index could be "Average x Strike Rate x Share of team runs" has a lot going for it. The top order batsmen who could lose on average because of decreased number of not-outs are likely to score a higher % of team runs. The compensation may not be complete but at least there would be a partial compensation. The "share of team runs" is also a dimension-less value. Richards scored 19.2% of his team runs, Tendulkar, 18% and Jayasuriya, 14.3%. The average seems to be around 16%. It should be understood that this analysis is valid only across the entire career since only then does the % of team runs have meaning.

What do we have here? This clearly shows how far ahead Viv Richards is. His revised Index value is 8.16 and is nearly 15% ahead of Tendulkar, the second-best. Dhoni is next, a very high average of 51 contributing to this position. Quite a number of batsmen are in the sub-5 level indicating how tough it is to get a high value in this revised index. Just out of interest, Amla (57.81/0.922/0.21) hits the ceiling with a stupendous Index value of 11.2. de Villiers has an imposing 7.8 and Kohli, an equally good 7.4.

The average batting position is self-explanatory. The only additional information needed is that both openers are assigned 1 as the batting position. Thus the batsmen who spent the better part of their careers opening the batting, such as Gilchrist, Jayasuriya and Tendulkar have Avge Batpos values below 2.0. The lower the value, the more often the batsman has opened. The best batting position numbers are based on runs scored. There could be other positions in which the batsmen could have averaged more. There is no surprise. Tendulkar, Jayasuriya, Mark Waugh and Gilchrist have excelled in the opening positions. Dhoni and Bevan in position number 6. And the others in the middle-order positions (3/4/5).

4. Middle-order runs (3 and 4)
Batsman3/4 Inns3/4 NOs3/4 Runs3/4 Balls3/4 Avge3/4 S/R3/4 RpI3/4 Index
Richards 13221 5791 648452.17 89.343.939.2
J Miandad 17835 6409 957244.82 67.036.024.1
Crowe 11115 3671 499538.24 73.533.124.3
M Waugh 54 4 1786 240035.72 74.433.124.6
Tendulkar 71 9 2151 285634.69 75.330.322.8
Jayasuriya 12 1 252 32622.91 77.321.016.2
Lara 19018 6963 852040.48 81.736.630.0
Inzamam 20828 7208 979240.04 73.634.725.5
Flower 108 7 3775 483237.38 78.135.027.3
Bevan 5616 2359 338958.98 69.642.129.3
Ponting 34734133071655342.51 80.438.330.8
Kallis 27047104141417646.70 73.538.628.3
Gilchrist 1 0 29 4429.00 65.929.019.1
Pietersen 96 8 3131 373635.58 83.832.627.3
Dhoni 34 9 1903 187676.12101.456.056.8

This is again based on a request from a few readers. They asked me to do a table for runs made in positions 3 and 4 also. This would round up the batting analysis since I have already covered opening, 5 and 6 positions. It is obvious that 3 and 4 are the key positions usually occupied by the best batsmen: Richards, Tendulkar, Ponting, Lara et al. I decided to combine the 3 & 4 into a single analysis.

Look at Richards. An average of 52 when he bats in these pivotal positions, at a strike rate of 89 leads to an Index value of 39. He is far ahead, to the tune of 30%, of the next best significant players, Ponting and Lara, clocking in at just above 30. Ponting, however, has scored millions of runs at these key positions. Dhoni's numbers are high, but too few innings have been played.

5. Team share of runs/balls
BatsmanRunsTeamRuns% RunsBallsTeamBalls% BallsRatio
Richards 6721 3491619.2% 7451 4633816.1%124.4%
J Miandad 7381 4338417.0%11014 5917718.6% 89.6%
Crowe 4704 2713717.3% 6476 3804517.0%102.2%
M Waugh 8500 5285716.1%11053 6575516.8% 94.8%
Tendulkar 1842610247218.0%2136712197217.5%103.2%
Jayasuriya 13430 9410914.3%1472311556512.7%114.0%
Lara 10406 6067717.1%13086 7744316.9%101.8%
Inzamam 11739 7720115.2%15812 9709716.3% 92.2%
Flower 6785 4345515.6% 9097 5805015.7% 99.6%
Bevan 6914 4606115.0% 9320 5545916.8% 87.4%
Ponting 13703 8736115.7%17046 9954317.1% 90.0%
Kallis 11499 6989916.5%15756 8342218.9% 84.6%
Gilchrist 9619 6573314.6% 9922 7426413.4%111.2%
Pietersen 4369 2781815.7% 5036 3281915.3%102.8%
Dhoni 7259 4830815.0% 8228 5377615.3% 97.9%

This is a straight-forward % of player numbers out of total team numbers. More important than the numbers are the ratios between the two numbers. This gives a clear idea of the % of out-performance for each player. Richards out-performed his team mates by 24%. Jayasuriya, by 14% and Gilchrist, by 11%. Kallis and Bevan are at the other end of the table. It should be noted that for want of complete data on when the batsman was dismissed, this analysis is based on the total team score. Hence please apply some caveats when using this.

6. First & Second Innings
First InningsSecond Innings
BatsmanInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RRpI % First-to-Second
Richards 80 3711 389346.39 95.3 87 3010 355934.60 84.6134.1
J Miandad 127 4340 646134.17 67.2 91 3041 455233.42 66.8102.3
Crowe 75 2422 334532.29 72.4 66 2282 313034.58 72.9 93.4
M Waugh 130 5181 657339.85 78.8106 3319 448131.31 74.1127.3
Tendulkar 220 97061150744.12 84.3232 8720 986137.59 88.4117.4
Jayasuriya 223 7688 856834.48 89.7210 5742 615627.34 93.3126.1
Lara 132 4981 613237.73 81.2157 5425 695334.55 78.0109.2
Inzamam 199 6943 923134.89 75.2151 4796 658231.76 72.9109.8
Flower 110 3825 502734.77 76.1 98 2960 407130.20 72.7115.1
Bevan 115 4032 504735.06 79.9 81 2882 427235.58 67.5 98.5
Ponting 212 86291040740.70 82.9153 5074 664033.16 76.4122.7
Kallis 152 5981 809439.35 73.9155 5518 766235.60 72.0110.5
Gilchrist 149 4830 517232.42 93.4130 4789 475136.84100.8 88.0
Pietersen 60 2370 274039.50 86.5 61 1999 229532.77 87.1120.5
Dhoni 101 4104 438440.63 93.6 95 3155 384433.21 82.1122.4

This analysis looks at the performances of batsmen while batting first or second. Nothing is gained by looking across batsmen. It is necessary to look within batsman. Richards, Mark Waugh, Jayasuriya, Ponting et al have performed better setting up the target than while chasing. Gilchrist, Martin Crowe, Bevan, Miandad et al have done better while chasing. I leave it to the readers to draw their own conclusions. Richards has the biggest positive difference and Gilchrist, the highest negative difference.

7. Home / Neutral / Away analysis
Home matchesNeutral locationsAway matches
BatsmanInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/R
Richards 26 805 89230.96 90.2 59 1995 234133.81 85.2 82 3921 425347.82 92.2
J Miandad 60 1976 260532.93 75.9 82 2832 427734.54 66.2 76 2573 413133.86 62.3
Crowe 56 1884 261733.64 72.0 32 1179 162636.84 72.5 53 1641 223130.96 73.6
M Waugh 113 3827 510033.87 75.0 43 1614 205937.53 78.4 80 3059 389838.24 78.5
Tendulkar 160 6976 789543.60 88.4146 6385 727843.73 87.7146 5065 619534.69 81.8
Jayasuriya 124 3880 435731.29 89.1162 5463 594433.72 91.9147 4087 442227.80 92.4
Lara 85 3225 409037.94 78.9111 3969 483035.76 82.2 93 3212 416734.54 77.1
Inzamam 64 2674 330641.78 80.9159 5133 695532.28 73.8127 3932 555130.96 70.8
Flower 57 1887 245733.11 76.8 76 2544 349133.47 72.9 75 2354 314831.39 74.8
Bevan 80 2849 395835.61 72.0 45 1577 212635.04 74.2 71 2488 323135.04 77.0
Ponting 150 5406 681436.04 79.3 86 3208 405137.30 79.2129 5089 618639.45 82.3
Kallis 131 5102 679438.95 75.1 75 2689 383635.85 70.1101 3708 512636.71 72.3
Gilchrist 110 3960 401036.00 98.8 62 2017 213432.53 94.5107 3642 377934.04 96.4
Pietersen 41 1130 131927.56 85.7 17 816 99648.00 81.9 63 2423 272038.46 89.1
Dhoni 75 3010 330240.13 91.2 38 1232 136132.42 90.5 83 3017 356536.35 84.6

This is a location-based analysis. The matches are split into Home, Away and Neutral locations since many matches are played in neutral locations and many World Cups have two outside teams playing. It is interesting to note that most batsmen play more outside their home location. Tendulkar was the best performer at home, closely followed by Inzamam and Dhoni. Pietersen, albeit in very few innings, was masterful in neutral locations, followed by Tendulkar, in nearly 150 innings. Richards was the king in outside locations. Ponting was also quite good. Look at the magnificent strike rates of Gilchrist everywhere, Jayasuriya on neutral and away grounds and Richards in outside locations.

8. Won / Lost matches
Won matchesLost matches
BatsmanInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RInnsRunsBallsRpIS/RRpI % Won-to-Lost
Richards 114 5129 563044.99 91.1 51 1501 183929.43 81.6152.9
J Miandad 107 3931 539836.74 72.8104 3389 536932.59 63.1112.7
Crowe 60 2694 341544.90 78.9 78 1938 298724.85 64.9180.7
M Waugh 146 6054 768341.47 78.8 85 2335 321927.47 72.5150.9
Tendulkar 231111571235848.30 90.3200 6585 824332.92 79.9146.7
Jayasuriya 228 8873 918938.92 96.6192 4044 496921.06 81.4184.8
Lara 134 6554 756548.91 86.6144 3557 502024.70 70.9198.0
Inzamam 191 7434 942738.92 78.9146 4118 605428.21 68.0138.0
Flower 57 2402 311642.14 77.1144 4252 582129.53 73.0142.7
Bevan 122 4504 595336.92 75.7 70 2276 316432.51 71.9113.5
Ponting 254107251300742.22 82.5 96 2658 360227.69 73.8152.5
Kallis 194 80121058241.30 75.7100 3162 463831.62 68.2130.6
Gilchrist 196 7657 770939.07 99.3 72 1767 195524.54 90.4159.2
Pietersen 51 1878 214636.82 87.5 64 2281 268335.64 85.0103.3
Dhoni 107 4578 469842.79 97.4 82 2333 315428.45 74.0150.4

Wins are achieved by teams. However this analysis completes the huge exercise. It is certain that the winning RpI values for all these batsmen would be much higher than the RpI in losing matches. The difference ranges from very little for Pietersen (3% difference) to very high for Lara (98% difference).

I have created 16 tables for these selected 15 batsmen. Many readers have suggested that other batsmen should have been considered. Ganguly has had quite a few votes. Hence I will select 8-9 tables out of these, based on readers' responses. I will then do the analysis across all batsmen, subject to a minimum number of innings or runs, and come out with an ordered set of tables. This will ensure that there is fair representation across all players and it would be a performance-centric article.

Any doubts in deciding on the best ODI batsman have been clearly dispelled. The leading position of Viv Richards in many of these tables indicates that he is, unarguably, the best ODI batsmen of all time. This is supported by the fact that there is considerable gap between Richards and the next batsman in many measures. All this was done when the rest of the world scored at around 70 and the target for most teams was 250. He also did not have any powerplays assisting him. Not just the "Master Blaster" but the "Master".

Any number of IPL matches, with coloured clothing, Bollywood stars, million-dollar players, imported cheerleaders and umpteen numbers of sixes cannot match those last 15 minutes at Eden Park, Auckland. Those dot balls were far more important than many a six hit. Who cares if Prior does not have an IPL contract? He can hold his head high. Panesar faces 5 balls, probably more important than many a wicket he has captured. Test Cricket lives, and how! And from next week onwards, the sublime to the big-brash-bash.

And my fervent prayers go to Jesse Ryder to get well soon. A great character with undeniable talent, with a special fascination for the Indian attack: all three of his hundreds were scored off the Indian bowlers.

Anantha Narayanan has written for ESPNcricinfo and CastrolCricket and worked with a number of companies on their cricket performance ratings-related systems

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Posted by   on (May 1, 2013, 15:31 GMT)

Hi maybe not the place to do it, but I Was wondering if you could look into it. I have looked through afridis records. He has scored more than 25 runs in an innings about 1/3 of the time, with a strike rate greater than 100. Considering when he comes in, scoring 25 runs at strike rates of 130 and upwards is more than useful. The fact that his strike rate is so high so much of the time would indicate that he is taking more risks, and his average would affect this. Adding to the problem is that he comes in many times when the team is already in a hole, sitting at maybe a 100 for 5 or 160 for 6, being expected to pull the team out of a hole. I think the fact that he has scored more than 25 runs an innings at a huge strike rate the way he plays, adding to the bad platform often given to him, adding the wickets he takes, and he must be one of the all time greats

Posted by Bonehead_maz on (April 17, 2013, 3:06 GMT)

Wonderful work Ananth ! I'm not a fan of any cricket that doesn't have draws, as I believe runs only skews the whole game..... Was VERY exiting in NZ :).
[[
Don't miss the next one on Test results which would give draws the exalted deserved place.
Ananth
: ]]

Nice to see Viv where he belongs !

I understand the parameters and that many great players miss this 15 (I'm with the Aravinda and Saeed Anwar supporters but delighted no Jones lol)) .

I still shudder thinking of bowling to Lloyd in a 50 over match (downright scary to bowl at him without a helmet !).... thank goodness that better "bashers" like Weekes, Harvey, Pollock, Burge or the other Richards never played this game internationally.

To show how out of touch, my favourite 50 over cricketer, is Simon O'Donnell :)
[[
And a very brave one, to boot.
Ananth
: ]]

Cheers Murray

Posted by STNS on (April 13, 2013, 7:11 GMT)

Ananth i agree with most of the content in this blog. But it always seems that if you play with a genuine great in the side your performance gets no mention.

I am talking about Saurav & Yousuf. Just because they played with greats like Sachin & Inzi, they are not mentoned. In many aspects i believe both were better than Sachin & Inzi in ODI's. Th

Like i have always considered the 100's scored by Saurav to be more valuable than those by Sachin. Saurav's 100's has been in more difficult conditions & against high class bowling attacks. Sachin have scored 38 of his ODI 100's in asia, with just one in Aus. Out of his 4 in SAF 3 have been against Namibia, Zim & Kenya.

Similarly Yousuf has a far better record against the better bowling attacks of his era & in Aus & SAF compared to Inzi.

Posted by   on (April 13, 2013, 6:50 GMT)

@Ananth "Test Player contributions" What that exactly is? Is it to have all the contribution from a player in a match - batting/bowling/fielding/captaincy? If that's the case then its going to be a stiff exercise! especially the last two parameters.
[[
Batting/Bowling/Fielding. Fielding to the extent data is available. No Run outs but different weights for different types of fielder dismissals. Captaincy is a vague subjective matter. If a decision is successful, captain is great else he is a fool.
If Dhoni opens with Ashwin at cape Town and he captures 2 wickets during the first over, Dhoni is a genius. If Ashwin gets hit for 25 runs in 7 overs, Dhoni is certifiable.
Anyhow let us not jump the gun.
Ananth
: ]]

Posted by   on (April 12, 2013, 6:20 GMT)

@ Rohan1: Good responses!! I would say one more batsman who is thoroughly underrated is G. Smith of SAF. He has 5 centuries in successful run chases in tests. And those 100s werent scored against minnows. Some of them came against Aus @ Perth & in SAF (in a match which had 2 sub-100 scores - Ananth would still say those two are aberrations) which were tough conditions.

Of course, 100s while chasing in 4th innings is not the only tough condition that one gets to bat on (11/2 in 8 overs on day 1 facing fresh fast bowlers who have tasted blood is equally tough which SRT / BCL have come in to bat on zillion occasions). Having said that. Rohan1, I must admit that the last 2 comments of yours were very unbiased and objective.

All leading allrounders (Kapil / Imran / Botham) on their haydays had relatively low returns in ODIs (Kapil having the best records of them). One day matches have been more traditional than people have believed and one look at the list of batsmen shows why!

Posted by   on (April 12, 2013, 2:29 GMT)

Cont.. If none of Sachin's test innings found its way into top 100, forget about the general public a lot of ex-cricketers will be baking their breads on the pyre. But I do understand their problem. They have to say what people want to hear. In an interview Glenn said that he found sachin/Brian to be most difficult to bowl at. Now his record, in Tests, against Lara is well known, but nobody knows about Sachin. I did an analysis a few years back with available commentary. Lara avged 16 against McGrath with S/R less than 50, whereas Sachin avged 14 with S/R of less than 30 (scored 87 runs from ~300 balls - 6 times out). Now how in the hell he found them difficult to bowl at???

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anantha Narayanan
Anantha spent the first half of his four-decade working career with corporates like IBM, Shaw Wallace, NCR, Sime Darby and the Spinneys group in IT-related positions. In the second half, he has worked on cricket simulation, ratings, data mining, analysis and writing, amongst other things. He was the creator of the Wisden 100 lists, released in 2001. He has written for ESPNcricinfo and CastrolCricket, and worked extensively with Maruti Motors, Idea Cellular and Castrol on their performance ratings-related systems. He is an armchair connoisseur of most sports. His other passion is tennis, and he thinks Roger Federer is the greatest sportsman to have walked on earth.

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