England v India, 4th npower Test, The Oval, 5th day

Dhoni calm as India veer off course

Unlike in his previous four years as India captain, MS Dhoni's now-famous clinical detachment has been unable to produce a turnaround for his team

Sharda Ugra at The Oval

August 22, 2011

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Rahul Dravid receives the Pataudi Trophy from Mansur Ali Khan Pataudi, England v India, 3rd Test, The Oval, 5th day, August 13, 2007
File photo: Tiger Pataudi was a happy man after the 2007 series between these sides in England, but things were different this time © Getty Images
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India's last word at the end of a Test series in which they made very few statements was MS Dhoni trying to be heard during his media conference in a committee room at The Oval. As the ICC Test mace was presented to England outside, the PA system played loud celebratory music - Jerusalem, Land of Hope & Glory and more such stirring stuff - while Dhoni answered his questions. In his line of vision was a television showing live pictures of England's players receiving medals and trophies, jumping up and down on stage, their lap of honour. It must have hurt. It better have. Dhoni, not given to many shows of emotion, unsurprisingly, looked neither crushed, nor dejected. He looked as he has always looked as India captain: quite together.

A short while before he spoke to the press, Dhoni had passed a man during the presentation who appeared to have taken the defeat personally: Tiger Pataudi, the first India captain to have won a Test series overseas. Four years ago, Pataudi sat on the steps outside the old dressing rooms at The Oval, with the Indian team, including Dhoni, gathered around him. In a photograph from that day, like everyone else, Pataudi is beaming, sharing the frame with a brand new shining trophy named after his family, for which India and England will forever tussle in Tests. The Pataudi trophy now belongs to England after a 4-0 rout of clinical execution. On the stage, with the game lost well before tea, Pataudi could not even force a manful smile as the Indians walked past him to collect their medals.

Unlike in Dhoni's previous four years as India captain which began, coincidentally, after that 2007 win, a now-famous clinical detachment has been unable to produce a turnaround from his men. India could not bat out the 30-odd more overs that would have saved the final Test and left them with a scrap of at least something from the series, rather than another thumping defeat.

All that India gained from this series were lessons in what not to do in the future. Dhoni talked about what is going to be a perpetual headache over the next few years: grooming the next generation and among them, building a pool of young bowlers. "It's important to not lose bowlers, especially when you are not in the subcontinent, because manoeuvring three specialist bowlers becomes very difficult, and using part-timers, who are usually spinners," he said. "I think it will be very important to groom a few bowlers or [to] have the bench strength. If we keep playing with the same bowlers and don't give exposure to some of the youngsters, we may be forced at some point of time to straightaway bring them in to play Test cricket, which can be tough on them. So I think you need to plan it a bit and hopefully utilise the time in between in the best possible manner."

The defeat to England aside, India, Dhoni said, were going through a "grooming" period. Their challenge would be handling public expectations of victories, based around performances from their most experienced, along with giving a new generation the opportunity to break into the international game. Dhoni said the younger players coming through were of two kinds - those who immediately started "scoring from the first game they play and they are superstars in their own way" and others who took their time.

"It's not like you are always entitled to get those kind of players, which means you will have to start grooming youngsters so that they are able to play in different conditions and different scenarios once there is pressure on them. We need to groom as many youngsters as possible, try to give them confidence by not shuffling them too much. It will all be about giving confidence to the coming generation so that they are at their best when thrown at the top level."

The burning IPL questions

  • A centrepiece of the instant postmortem of India's 4-0 defeat to England has been the involvement of most of the Indian team in the lucrative six-week IPL tournament that followed the ODI team's World Cup victory and preceded the tour of England.

    MS Dhoni was asked two specific questions about it: one, whether new coach Duncan Fletcher should be empowered to control how much key players took part in the IPL, particularly before major series. "Let's see and hope for the best, you know, who gets empowered and who gets the power," Dhoni said. "Hopefully we won't miss players, you know, if you all feel it's because of the IPL." It was then pointed out to Dhoni that, since 2009, there had been three straight dips in India's performances in major events immediately following the IPL: the two World T20s and now the Test series in England. Asked directly whether the IPL was good for Indian cricket, Dhoni appeared amused. "Well, this was not just after the IPL, you know, so let's not bring everything out of cricket and put it on IPL."

    England captain Andrew Strauss was asked whether his team had benefitted from the fact that most of its players did not take part in the IPL due to its clash with the English season. "You can never hold it against a player for wanting to play in the IPL for financial reason or for improving their game or whatever," he said. "But in some ways, we have been less affected by it than other sides. And as an England team, looking at it purely from an England perspective, there have been some benefits in us being less involved, but as I said you can understand players want to be involved in that tournament."

    As long as this result rankles India, this debate too will rage.

In this series the only "youngsters" to come through were Amit Mishra, ironically with the bat, and Praveen Kumar, for his all-round feistiness. "Definitely we have the talent," Dhoni said, "if you see the players who have been performing for us who have been part of the Test side. Of course they have not been very consistent. We have somebody like a Suresh Raina, we know how talented Rohit Sharma is, Cheteshwar Pujara did decently well in South Africa, Abhinav (Mukund) did a good job in the last two series. I think we have got the talent that is needed, they need to be given the exposure and confidence. I feel that it is not always the technique... technique is important, but it's also the confidence level. If the confidence level is high, people stop talking about the technique because you are scoring runs."

On a pitch that England captain Andrew Strauss called a "little more subcontinental" compared to those for the first three Tests, India produced an almost 1990s-style post-Tendulkar collapse. Seven wickets fell for 21 runs. Seven was also the top score from the last five wickets. It came, not from three of India's top seven batsmen who were part of the crash that followed the Mishra-Tendulkar century partnership, but Ishant Sharma. Ishant's call for a review after being given out caught bat-pad, was perhaps the strongest gesture of defiance in India's nausea-inducing last hour of the Test series.

Dhoni said later that the loss of quick wickets just before the second new ball had led to the slide, after what had begun as India's best day of the tour. "It sets like a panic in the dressing room if you lose wickets in quick succession. We should have been able to stop that but we were not able to, which was the main reason why the game ended so quickly." Dhoni said, "the batting department should have performed a bit better."

Injuries, particularly to key players like Zaheer Khan and Virender Sehwag, have been cited as one of the reasons for India's failure in England. When asked whether the team should find a way to ensure that its best players are at their fittest for the most important series, Dhoni's answer appeared to indicate that external expectation often dictated how the Indians went about their business. "The expectation level is too high - (it is) one thing that doesn't allow the kind of... I wouldn't say experimentation ... but the kind of procedure that needs to involve the youngsters. When we play any side, we are expected to win and the pressure comes on the same players who have been playing for the past few years. It takes a toll on them, everyone wants to play as many games as possible. How can you say this series is important and that is not, but you don't want to miss players in key series?"

Until this result, Dhoni had not lost a series as captain. When he was asked whether his enthusiasm for the job as leader had begun to dip at any time during the series, he said, "I don't believe in surrendering. This job was given to me when I didn't really expect it and I'm not a person that believes in surrendering. I'm giving it my best shot and that's what it's all about."

For all his success, courage and risk-taking ability, a World Cup-winning captain has, within four months, become part of India's most monumental series surrender in the last decade. It must hurt. It had better. Even if he didn't show it.

Sharda Ugra is senior editor at ESPNcricinfo

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© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.

Posted by Wismay on (August 25, 2011, 12:25 GMT)

@Madhu Vamshi Rahul Dravid was never dropped from Test matches! He has played continuously and missed tests because of not being well. Once having fever and another time when he got hit on his jaw and it had a crack. But yes he was dropped from ODIs but it was more like children neglecting parents once they grow up as they can manage themselves. Young guys were playing well and Dravid was neglected for ODIs.

Posted by mybesteleven on (August 25, 2011, 4:33 GMT)

It had been pointed out by Dhoni that the players are overworked and they are playing continuously. While answering to the question regarding IPL he said, "don't bring everything out of cricket and put it on IPL". If he feels the players are overworked why don't they boycott the IPL? Everyone is fit enough for playing IPL however when it comes to national side most of senior players injured and not fully fit. IPL ruined the classic format of the Cricket World.

Posted by kesasam on (August 25, 2011, 0:21 GMT)

@@@@Sehwagologist@@@@ he is gone crazy...he is repeating the same paragraph on and on. Hope he hasnt sallow something that couldnt digest....Hope u enjoying the indian summer....Good luck and all the best Team England...Sri Lankan fan

Posted by zico123 on (August 24, 2011, 15:10 GMT)

Dhoni should take break from IPL and CL, atleast he should give up captaincy and wicket keeping in IPL and CL

Posted by zico123 on (August 24, 2011, 15:09 GMT)

There ought to be superior remuneration or compensation for Test cricketers compared to IPL or CL, if India wants to produce great young test players, otherwise all we would get is good young T20 players

Posted by zico123 on (August 24, 2011, 15:09 GMT)

india lost badly beause of injury and fatigue inflicted by IPL, which caused most of our players to skip WI tour and so come Eng tour we were under prepared, it is too much cricket which is affecting quality. get rid of IPL and CL, india would go back on top again. our big 3 is stil lthe best. if BCCI gives so much money and importance to IPL india would never produce great young test players, all we would get is good young T20 players

Posted by zico123 on (August 24, 2011, 15:09 GMT)

that is not fair to call for heads of our big 3, india lost so badly not because poor performance from big 3, dravid scored 3 hundreds and sachin scored 90, india lost badly because the younger lot failed likes of Raina, Gambhir, Abhinav, Sehwag, Dhoni etc, our big 3 is still the best, none of the younger players are good enough to replace them, no young player have grabbed no.6 spot yet, how can they grab no.3, 4, 5!! eventually 3,4,5 should go to Kohli, Rohit and Pujara, but first let one of them grab no.6 firmly, what longer run for younger players we are talking about, Raina already got a long run and he failed terribly, he is not a test cricketer for god sake, nor is Yuvraj.

Posted by Raj12345 on (August 24, 2011, 13:48 GMT)

Dear Friends, it is not IPL. It is mentality of few cricketers. Their mind set totally different and they don't want give chance any new player. Even they don't have skill, they want to represent Indian in all formats. Simple example. RG should be playing test ahead of Raina, Kohli. Both Raina & Kohli is far from test. But what is happening, friendship is working out. Raina is been selected over and over. He don't have skill, why the hell we have to select him. Never select Raina, Kohli for test. Take another example, Badri failed in 3 ODIs, so many opposition from fans and saying he is unfit, IPL bully, flat track bully. No wcan you say some word about both Kohli ( failed in 3 tests) and Raina ( failed in more than 8 tests). Learn that don't hurt anyone without knowing basics. It is not badri, I am afraid that the same thing will happen to Rahanae & Puraja in future. Mark my words, they will not be allowed to play for India if RG, Raina, Kohli, Yuvi & Dhoni play.

Posted by   on (August 24, 2011, 9:50 GMT)

@Shan156-Absltly agree with you.He has never played in the pivotal no.3 position...never in his long "never ending" career!! We also know how he abhors getting pushed out form his favorite no.1 or no.2 position in ODIs.Which actually gives me the feeling that he is uncomfortable and definitely smart(maybe selfish) enough to demand ( either verbally or not) that he plays in his favorite position only...irrespective of the match situation.

Posted by   on (August 24, 2011, 7:34 GMT)

Letz not be so critical about Dhoni. I am not a Dhoni fan but he has lead the team through crisis. After 2007 World Cup, he lead the team well. This loss will definitely open the eyes of our selectors and the team. I will blame IPL for this loss. All the players suffered injuries during IPL. BCCI should instruct there key contracted players to skip IPL next year and even the champions league.

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