England v Sri Lanka, 1st ODI, The Oval

Goodbye, Sanath

Plays of the Day from the first one-day international between England and Sri Lanka at The Oval

Andrew McGlashan at The Oval

June 28, 2011

Comments: 43 | Text size: A | A

Sanath Jayasuriya fell for just 2 in his 445th and final ODI appearance, England v Sri Lanka, 1st ODI, The Oval, June 28 2011
Sanath Jayasuriya picked up a wicket but failed with the bat in his final international match © Getty Images
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Tickle of the day
All eyes were on Alastair Cook as the match began because Sri Lanka's decision to field first meant he had an early chance to prove that his game can adapt to one-day cricket. Much of the build-up had been dominated by talk over his strike-rate, but that wasn't a problem today as he clocked in at 166.6. Sadly for Cook, however, the innings only spanned three balls. He was off the mark straight away with a nudge off his hip, then clipped a boundary through midwicket before feathering Lasith Malinga down the leg side where Kumar Sangakkara held a fine catch. It didn't prove anything.

Long hop of the day
Kevin Pietersen, who survived a mighty close run-out appeal on 5 by the width of a missing TV frame, avoided falling to 41-year-old Sanath Jayasuriya for the second time in two innings but still departed in less-than-glorious-manner to a spinner. Jeevan Mendis, a part-time legspinner, was thrown the ball for the 17th over. His first delivery, perhaps an attempted googly, came out as a long hop and Pietersen's eyes lit up. He rocked forward, then back to pull through midwicket and couldn't believe it when he picked out Tillakaratne Dilshan at midwicket. Pietersen, though, had batted with confidence and aggression which promises many more runs this summer.

Farewell of the day
So that is that. At least we presume it is. Matches 445, runs 13,430, 28 hundreds, 323 wickets. They aren't bad numbers for Sanath Jayasuriya. His final innings didn't add many runs to his tally as he cracked a signature square cut to backward point where Eoin Morgan held a stinging catch. How England's 1998 vintage must have wished he'd done the same. "There are no fairytales in sport," Steve Waugh once said and given Jayasuriya's time away from the top level a farewell innings of note was always a long shot. But the bowling has held up better and his 323rd ODI wicket came when he trapped Ian Bell lbw trying to sweep. He said this would be his final game. It will be, won't it?

Innings of the day
Eoin Morgan again added the dazzle to England's innings but it's well known what he's capable off in coloured clothes. For a longer-term significance it was Craig Kieswetter's 61 off 56 balls that was most impressive, not least because he had to stop after seven overs and wait three hours to resume needing to play a different innings than he may have initially planned. However, he never rushed or tried to be overly aggressive, instead picking his strong areas straight down the ground, and didn't actually move over a run-a-ball until reaching fifty with a towering six off Suraj Randiv. Although his downfall was ugly it was an innings that should set him up well for the series.

Fluke of the day
Some wickets come from hours of planning and perfect execution from the bowler. Some are just plain lucky. James Anderson's first-over scalping of a fit-again Tillakaratne Dilshan falls into the latter category, for all that Cook did well to have a deep square-leg and not a long leg. Anderson speared a good length delivery towards Dilshan's pads which he extravagantly flicked upwards and even on a gloomy evening Tim Bresnan had time to run in and snaffle the catch. It was such a tame way to go after missing the last two weeks of the tour that you'd have preferred him to be caught playing the Dilscoop.

Catch(es) of the day
Anderson was everywhere at the start of Sri Lanka's run chase. If he wasn't taking wickets he was plucking catches and, on one occasion, did both together. His reflex caught-and-bowled to remove Kumar Sangakkara was a wonderful effort for a fast bowler following through from his delivery and he made it look easy. A short while later Anderson then showed what an outstanding all-round fielder he is - one of the best in the world - as he flung himself horizontally to his right at midwicket to hold Angelo Mathews' pull and give Jade Dernbach his first ODI wicket.

Andrew McGlashan is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo

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Posted by khiladisher on (June 30, 2011, 12:55 GMT)

SRI LANKAN FANS TALK ABOUT RAIN,WEATHER ,NOTHING ABOUT CRICKET OR THEIR LACK OF TALENT AND ABILITY.A CRICKET PLAYERS TALENT AND SKILL IS MEASURED BY HIS ABILITY TO PLAY OUTSIDE HIS CONDITIONS. MAHELAS AVG AT HOME IS 64 AND AWAY IS 41 A DIFFERNECE OF ABOUT 23 .JAYASURYA BATTING AVG IS 35 AWAY FROMHOME AND COMING TO SANGA,WHO IS CALLED THE BEST LANKAN BATSMAN AFTER ARVINDA HAS A AWAY AVG OF 48,BUT FALLS SHORT OF THE GREATNESS MARK OF 50. THE RECORD OF THE BEST SRILANKAN BATSMAN ARAVINDA AWAY IS VERY POOR BY HIS HIGH STANDARDS -ONLY 36 I REST MY CLASS OF SRI LANKAN PERFORMANCES AWAY FROM HOME.SO DOES 41,35,48,36 SHOW GREATNESS OR A POOR RECORD?

Posted by chandau on (June 30, 2011, 12:49 GMT)

Hmm no offense peeps, but i think Sanath should have retied after the 2007 WC or at least 3 years ago. It is difficult to argue with mother nature as one approaches 40 and then passes it: the reflexes slow down, the eye sight weakens and though the body is fit the various processes on the field become labored. Had he gone 3 years ago the stats would have been better and also the feelings among people more gentle. Now that he is out who should come in ? I say bring Thirimanne in even if it is untill Tharanga is available for selection. People say Chandimal is better but how many runs has he scored in this tour??? And what kandambi is doing in the middle only those who sent him there know!! Poor guy is the copy of Broad as T20 skipper; out of depth despite the selection and then having to prove he is good to be there. They should have persisted with Samaraweera at least for one or 2 matches.

Posted by   on (June 30, 2011, 12:41 GMT)

Indian bowlers now can make a huge sigh of relief because another hard hitting batsman who tormented them many times had played his last game ... Sanath had played a big role in tsansforming Srilanka from a minnow team into a champion team in the mid 90s ... How can you forget that hurricane innings in 1996 World Cup Quarterfinals against England .. India had tasted the heat of his bat several times .. 189 at Sharjah,340 at Colombo are only few of themIndian bowlers now can make a huge sigh of relief because another hard hitting batsman who tormented them many times had played his last game ... Sanath had played a big role in tsansforming Srilanka from a minnow team into a champion team in the mid 90s ... How can you forget that hurricane innings in 1996 World Cup Quarterfinals against England .. India had tasted the heat of his bat several times .. 189 at Sharjah,340 at Colombo are only few of them

Posted by TDIL on (June 30, 2011, 10:07 GMT)

Hats off Sana wish u all the best in your future

Posted by AjayVijayan on (June 30, 2011, 10:00 GMT)

CricInfo Should have written some articles on Sanath Jayasurya with stats ..

Its a pity that a true Legend is not acknowledged in the deserving manner...

Please put up some articles on Sanath

Posted by anver777 on (June 30, 2011, 9:35 GMT)

Adios! Sanath.............u have contributed a lot for SL cricket & hope after the retirement u will be in touch with SLCB & share u'r experiences with them. Wishing u all success !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by   on (June 30, 2011, 8:13 GMT)

We ill never forgot ur iningz in pakistan u r true legend good bye santh! Best of luck to sl for upcoming matchs frm pakistan

Posted by khiladisher on (June 29, 2011, 20:22 GMT)

THANK GOD THE CIRCUS OR JOKE IS OVER-SANATH SHOULD NOT HAVE COME BACK AND MADE OF JOKE OF HIMSELF AND HIS COUNTRY.HAPPY RETIREMENT SANATH-WAITING FOR SANGA AND MAHELA TO RETIRE BEFORE THEY END UP LIKE SANATH.PERFORMANCES IN ENGLAND SUGGEST ITS TIME THEY PACK THE BAGS.

Posted by Mousum on (June 29, 2011, 18:28 GMT)

I'm from Bangladesh. But my fav team is Lanka as I grew fond of cricket watching Sanath in 96 w/c. For me, cricket will never be the same again.Will there ever be another lankan cricketer who will be known as the man who changed the face of the game?

Posted by Aussasinator on (June 29, 2011, 17:56 GMT)

He redefined the ODI game. Interest in ODIs had shot up tremendously after his style exploded.

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Andrew McGlashanClose
Andrew McGlashan Assistant Editor Andrew arrived at ESPNcricinfo via Manchester and Cape Town, after finding the assistant editor at a weak moment as he watched England's batting collapse in the Newlands Test. Andrew began his cricket writing as a freelance covering Lancashire during 2004 when they were relegated in the County Championship. In fact, they were top of the table when he began reporting on them but things went dramatically downhill. He likes to let people know that he is a supporter of county cricket, a fact his colleagues will testify to and bemoan in equal quantities.
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