World Cup 1983: 25 years on June 25, 2008

The year everything changed

The win that transformed Indian cricket sending it on an upswing that lasts to this day
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The catch that changed cricket: Kapil is mobbed by happy spectators after the dismissal of Richards in the final © PA Photos

Nineteen hundred and eighty-three might have been just another unmemorable year for India. The monsoons were good and the Congress government, in the time-tested manner, took credit for it. There was communal violence in Punjab and Assam. The former would lead to the assassination of Indira Gandhi, who was prime minister then. She was head of the Non Aligned Movement and host of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meet - talking shops invested with great prestige in a country whose influence in world politics was negligible. The year was unmemorable, but for one event that changed sport, changed cricket, and changed the way middle-class Indians saw themselves.

In the half-century since India had made their Test debut - on June 25, 1932, on the same date and at the same venue where they would lift the World Cup in 1983 - the maharajahs and the nawabs had gone, to be replaced by college-educated Brahmins, the backbone of the middle class. But already the next phase was beginning to reveal itself. The inspirational captain of the World Cup-winning team, Kapil Dev, was neither college-educated nor Brahmin. A generation or so later, Mahatma Gandhi's India, the one that lives in the villages, would push into the background Nehru's India of the cities, and international players would emerge from Najafgarh, Rae Bareilly, Bharuch, Palarivattom, Aligarh, Jalandhar and Ranchi.

Before the World Cup, India had played only 40 one-day internationals in the decade or so that the format had been around. "We didn't take the game seriously," said India's first ODI captain, Ajit Wadekar, "We had no idea of field placings or tactics." India refused to see the shorter game as a legitimate version of cricket. Brijesh Patel, top scorer in India's debut match against England at Leeds in 1974 said later, "I thought this was the future." But his colleagues behaved as if one-day cricket was a pimple on the face of real cricket, one that would disappear quickly.

This attitude was exemplified by India's best batsman, Sunil Gavaskar. In the 1975 World Cup (60 overs a side), after England had made 334 for 4, he batted through the innings to remain not out on 36. Had he been dropped from the team then, or had he voluntarily pulled out, India's approach in the early years might have been different. His attitude affected the team, the officials, the media. Supporting the one-day game was seen as a sell-out.

Yet, ironically, it was Gavaskar who played the most significant innings in the pre-1983 era; one that was to fill the team with self-belief, and lead to India's most important victory before the World Cup.

In the previous season, the Indian selectors had made one of those inspired moves for which they were criticised at the time but which shone like a beacon of common sense in hindsight. They named Kapil Dev captain of the one-day side. Under Kapil, India beat Sri Lanka 3-0, and lost to Pakistan 1-3, but the nucleus of a team took shape. It was a team built on the dual skills of the allrounder, and a team that understood the importance of the medium-pacer. In the 1970s, spinners like Bishan Bedi and Srinivas Venkatraghavan had focused on claiming wickets; now the medium-pacers borrowed from England's strategy and concentrated on keeping the runs down. In those two series Kapil was assisted by Madan Lal, Mohinder Amarnath, Balwinder Sandhu, Roger Binny and Sandip Patil. It was the attack that won them the World Cup.

 
 
Colour TV had come to India the previous year with the Asian Games in Delhi. Suddenly it all came together - television and live telecast from distant fields, an audience hungry for action, a significant victory, and the awareness of the marketing possibilities - and the first steps towards India's domination of world cricket were taken
 

On March 29, with the World Cup 72 days away, India beat twice champions West Indies in Berbice, Guyana. Gavaskar made his first 50 in 52 balls before falling for 90. Kapil Dev made 72 off 38 balls and India 282 for 5 in 47 overs. Madan Lal dismissed Viv Richards for 64, and Ravi Shastri had three wickets as the West Indies finished with 255 to lose by 27 runs. But the statistics of that win were not as important as the impact it had on a team that thought the essence of one-day cricket was simply to turn up and go through the motions.

When Kapil Dev led against West Indies in India's opening match of the 1983 World Cup, bookmakers' odds on India were 66-1. But this was a different team psychologically. It was a team that was confident under a 24-year-old captain who was almost un-Indian in his self-assurance. Seven of the players in the final were in their twenties. There had been no conscious call to youth, but just over a year after that win, India's youngest prime minister, Rajiv Gandhi, took office. This was a new awakening, a reappraisal of long-held beliefs.

Only two people believed India could beat the odds. Former Australian captain Kim Hughes, who thought India were "dark horses", and the late Sunder Rajan, who writing in the Times of India predicted an Indian win. Neither had much to go by. India had lost a match at the previous World Cup to Sri Lanka, then not yet a Test-playing country, and their only victory had been against East Africa.

Now they brought to fruition the theory prevailing at the time: pack the team with allrounders, rely on the batsmen getting the runs, and then leave it to the bowlers to be restrictive rather than attacking.

The story of the 1983 World Cup is part of our collective consciousness. India began with a win, against West Indies, so clearly Berbice was no fluke. Kapil Dev's incredible 175 helped overcome Zimbabwe after India were 17 for 5 at one stage. That was the turning point of the tournament. India had lost to West Indies and Australia before that; now they sailed through without another defeat, beating Australia and England before meeting West Indies for the third time, now in the final.

While the team was creating upsets in England, the fans back home were transfixed in their drawing rooms, before shop windows, in offices, clubs and anywhere a television could be accommodated. Colour TV had come to India the previous year with the Asian Games in Delhi. Suddenly it all came together - television and live telecast from distant fields, an audience hungry for action, a significant victory, and the awareness of the marketing possibilities - and the first steps towards India's domination of world cricket were taken. Among those who had tuned in was future India captain Rahul Dravid, then ten years old. "I remember watching that final in Bangalore," he recalled. "That win inspired a lot of young kids to take to the game."

The pictures have been played over and over on television channels and in our minds. Krishnamachari Srikkanth square-driving Andy Roberts for four; Srikkanth taking a single running backwards in sheer exuberance; Balwinder Sandhu clean-bowling Gordon Greenidge, who had let the ball go; Kapil Dev running to catch Viv Richards over his shoulder after Richards had threatened to take the game away; Mohinder Amarnath bowling his friendly medium pace and then shyly walking up to receive his Man of the Match award; Kapil Dev handing over the World Cup to Amarnath; a bunch of unknowns, fans from India, grinning stupidly on the Indian balcony.



India kept the momentum of the World Cup going for a good while, winning the World Championship of Cricket in Australia in 1985 © Getty Images

From no-hopers to world champions is a huge leap, and led by Kapil Dev, India took it almost casually. Soon they won the Asia Cup in Sharjah and the World Championship of Cricket in Australia. But that was only the immediate fallout. Just as the players made that huge leap, so too did the fans (and the BCCI). One-day cricket went from being dog's dinner to emperor's feast. There's nothing like an international victory to ease the path towards acceptance. History was merely repeating itself with the win in the World Twenty20 last year.

India's one-day history can be divided into three phases. From their debut till the Berbice match in 1983 was a period of adjustment psychologically and physically. India relied on the established Test players to "play their normal game" and hoped for the best.

The second phase, from Berbice till the end of the Hero Cup tournament in 1993, was the Kapil Dev era. Kapil pulled India out of their lethargy, showed what was possible, and inspired the World Cup victory. India played the best teams on equal terms.

The third phase, the Sachin Tendulkar era, began the following year with two important developments. Tendulkar opened the batting for the first time, in New Zealand, and later made his first century, in Sri Lanka, in his 79th match.

But 1983 was the turning point. Soon the World Cup moved out of England. Within a decade England and Australia lost their veto power, and after the second World Cup in the subcontinent, Jagmohan Dalmiya became the president of the ICC.

When, having made 33 in 28 balls Viv Richards lofted Madan Lal in that 1983 final, the cricket world stood still. Kapil Dev took the most significant catch in India's history. From that moment, the world rearranged itself so India would emerge as the game's superpower. Cricket would never be the same again.

Suresh Menon is a writer based in Bangalore

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • DineshIyer on June 25, 2008, 21:34 GMT

    We won the WC 25 yrs ago and that was a great achievement that must be remembered. Somehow the celebrations to me seem to be going overboard. With the amount of fan-following and money that is invested in Indian cricket, we have been complete under-achievers since that point. Look at Brazil in soccer, they have fan-following and they have made it to the finals 3 out of 4 cups and won 2 of them! The victory in the 1983 WC was supposed to lead to great things. But all it has led to the BCCI becoming power and money crazy!

  • kompai on June 25, 2008, 20:27 GMT

    Until 1983, Only West Indies, Australia and England use to make it to the finals. It is the 1983 world cup that put the 'Can do' attitude in Asians. Since then IND, PAK, SL have won world cups and each one of them have made it to the finals more than once. More than 50% of the finalist came from these teams. England has never won a world cup for that matter. should they be shameful?(They found cricket, correct me if I am wrong). As long as we give a good fight and keep the entertainment value high, I would continue to watch and follow India's cricket. We certainly had shameful world cups like the last one where we didn't qualify for the super six and was a poor show on entertainment as well. I hope that changes.

  • vsssarma on June 25, 2008, 19:23 GMT

    Kapil Dev inspired the team with his personal performances. He played 8 matches, batted 8 innings, 3 times not out, scored 303 runs; bowled 504 balls, conceded 245 runs to take 12 wickets, and then took 7 catches. He was certainly the man of the tournament and was ahead of the second best i.e. Vivian Richards.

    What did we do to Kapil Dev now ?

  • ajaym_believer on June 25, 2008, 19:06 GMT

    I was 16 when I went out to sea in 1972. I sailed with many natinalities which are traditionally known for their seafaring traditions, the English, Scandinavians, Germans etc. Based on my personal experiences, at a young age I realised that we are equal to anybody in the world where ability is concerned. What we fell short was in self belief that we can be world beaters. That day in 1983 watching the events unfold on a B&W tv in Delhi, I felt like a world beater. How much impact it had on how India perceived to be where she is now is open to arguement. But Mr. Kalyan, rejoice in significant victories in the past for they lay a foundation for future achievement. I will rejoice in future victories but 1983 will always be significant. It was then we raised our hand and said, we can do it too.

  • Gaadi on June 25, 2008, 16:12 GMT

    Summer of 1983 !!!! Nostalgic memories certainly....Especially so once you start associating such events with your childhood days....

    Kapil's Devils certainly changed the way India looked at & played cricket. And for those critics, we will keep talking about 1983 till another ODI team brings us another World Cup. Yes, Dhoni's team was equally brilliant when they won the T20 world cup but you are always charmed by what comes first. Surely 1983 world cup has a certain place in Indian people's minds....It is a shame that the 1975 hockey world cup win did not create the same effect on hockey and on the Indian Hockey Federation.

  • KishoreSharma on June 25, 2008, 14:36 GMT

    A somewhat contrived article. I am not sure why the author had to bring caste into it and where it fits into the picture. There were a number of prominent Indian cricketers and captains before Kapil who were not Brahmins - Bedi, Pataudi, Merchant etc. To make out as though Kapil not being a Brahmin was a significant transition is plainly false.

  • insightfulcricketer on June 25, 2008, 14:32 GMT

    I think in this hullabaloo of '83 cricket win we are missing a point. While truly great that win was, I think the turning point of Indian cricket was the winter of '80-81. When India beat a full strength Australian team at Melbourne and managed wins in World Series Cup against Australia and New Zealand. I compare that to starting to turn a battleship going full blast (read Indian cricket mindset). The '81 team showed it was possible to play the "modern" cricket and excel in it. Sportstar magazine had some fabulous pictures and DD was showing 1 hour capsule after the evening news. In the meantime the Indian team played Eng in England,Pak in Pak and West Indies in WI hardening their game further. By the time '83 World Cup came about the battleship had turned around and I think that ,Jimmy's fabulous form with the bat and '83 win made the game more mainstream . But make no mistake '83 and '85 wins truly captured imagination of awaam. I for one rejoiced like hell as only a 15 year could!

  • insightfulcricketer on June 25, 2008, 14:31 GMT

    I think in this hullabaloo of '83 cricket win we are missing a point. While truly great that win was, I think the turning point of Indian cricket was the winter of '80-81. When India beat a full strength Australian team at Melbourne and managed wins in World Series Cup against Australia and New Zealand. I compare that to starting to turn a battleship going full blast (read Indian cricket mindset). The '81 team showed it was possible to play the "modern" cricket and excel in it. Sportstar magazine had some fabulous pictures and DD was showing 1 hour capsule after the evening news. In the meantime the Indian team played Eng in England,Pak in Pak and West Indies in WI hardening their game further. By the time '83 World Cup came about the battleship had turned around and I think that ,Jimmy's fabulous form with the bat and '83 win made the game more mainstream . But make no mistake '83 and '85 wins truly captured imagination of awaam. I for one rejoiced like hell as only a 15 year could!

  • RedRascal on June 25, 2008, 14:23 GMT

    The reason it is beng discussed is that it had been the only achievment by Indian sport at a world level for the last 25 years, and the reason that it did not cause the same impact in Pakistan ( after 92) is that even in 75, 79 and 83 World cups Pakistan team made the semi finals, they were not the 66-1 odds and no hopers coming and winning the finals in 1992, their track record in the game was good, a likely comparison would be if Bangladesh wins the world cup with their current track record, that was how India's record in the one day world was in 1983, they had won 1 match in two world cups before 1983 ! Those who did not exist at the time of the win do not understand the importance and the impact of the occaision.

  • ToTellUTheTruth on June 25, 2008, 14:13 GMT

    How old are you anyway Kalyan? May be you are too young to have not witnessed the significance of this victory. It has transformed an entire nation. Cricket really really took off after this victory. My heart still flutters remembering those grainy pictures on the B&W TV I watched the games. I very clearly remember my aunt running into the pooja room and praying her heart out (at 4:00 AM in the morning or so) for Indian victory. I still remember the whole family going to the Hanuman temple the day of the win and offering 101 coconuts, as we believed that God did help our team. This was one single event that united the country like never before, at least for a brief while. I never played cricket before that day. But after that the only thing I knew was run in from 25 paces and throw the ball as hard as I could. How many people got inspired by that win and how many gems of players came out just because of this single victory? God only knows. Nostalgia, you call it. As well it is.

  • DineshIyer on June 25, 2008, 21:34 GMT

    We won the WC 25 yrs ago and that was a great achievement that must be remembered. Somehow the celebrations to me seem to be going overboard. With the amount of fan-following and money that is invested in Indian cricket, we have been complete under-achievers since that point. Look at Brazil in soccer, they have fan-following and they have made it to the finals 3 out of 4 cups and won 2 of them! The victory in the 1983 WC was supposed to lead to great things. But all it has led to the BCCI becoming power and money crazy!

  • kompai on June 25, 2008, 20:27 GMT

    Until 1983, Only West Indies, Australia and England use to make it to the finals. It is the 1983 world cup that put the 'Can do' attitude in Asians. Since then IND, PAK, SL have won world cups and each one of them have made it to the finals more than once. More than 50% of the finalist came from these teams. England has never won a world cup for that matter. should they be shameful?(They found cricket, correct me if I am wrong). As long as we give a good fight and keep the entertainment value high, I would continue to watch and follow India's cricket. We certainly had shameful world cups like the last one where we didn't qualify for the super six and was a poor show on entertainment as well. I hope that changes.

  • vsssarma on June 25, 2008, 19:23 GMT

    Kapil Dev inspired the team with his personal performances. He played 8 matches, batted 8 innings, 3 times not out, scored 303 runs; bowled 504 balls, conceded 245 runs to take 12 wickets, and then took 7 catches. He was certainly the man of the tournament and was ahead of the second best i.e. Vivian Richards.

    What did we do to Kapil Dev now ?

  • ajaym_believer on June 25, 2008, 19:06 GMT

    I was 16 when I went out to sea in 1972. I sailed with many natinalities which are traditionally known for their seafaring traditions, the English, Scandinavians, Germans etc. Based on my personal experiences, at a young age I realised that we are equal to anybody in the world where ability is concerned. What we fell short was in self belief that we can be world beaters. That day in 1983 watching the events unfold on a B&W tv in Delhi, I felt like a world beater. How much impact it had on how India perceived to be where she is now is open to arguement. But Mr. Kalyan, rejoice in significant victories in the past for they lay a foundation for future achievement. I will rejoice in future victories but 1983 will always be significant. It was then we raised our hand and said, we can do it too.

  • Gaadi on June 25, 2008, 16:12 GMT

    Summer of 1983 !!!! Nostalgic memories certainly....Especially so once you start associating such events with your childhood days....

    Kapil's Devils certainly changed the way India looked at & played cricket. And for those critics, we will keep talking about 1983 till another ODI team brings us another World Cup. Yes, Dhoni's team was equally brilliant when they won the T20 world cup but you are always charmed by what comes first. Surely 1983 world cup has a certain place in Indian people's minds....It is a shame that the 1975 hockey world cup win did not create the same effect on hockey and on the Indian Hockey Federation.

  • KishoreSharma on June 25, 2008, 14:36 GMT

    A somewhat contrived article. I am not sure why the author had to bring caste into it and where it fits into the picture. There were a number of prominent Indian cricketers and captains before Kapil who were not Brahmins - Bedi, Pataudi, Merchant etc. To make out as though Kapil not being a Brahmin was a significant transition is plainly false.

  • insightfulcricketer on June 25, 2008, 14:32 GMT

    I think in this hullabaloo of '83 cricket win we are missing a point. While truly great that win was, I think the turning point of Indian cricket was the winter of '80-81. When India beat a full strength Australian team at Melbourne and managed wins in World Series Cup against Australia and New Zealand. I compare that to starting to turn a battleship going full blast (read Indian cricket mindset). The '81 team showed it was possible to play the "modern" cricket and excel in it. Sportstar magazine had some fabulous pictures and DD was showing 1 hour capsule after the evening news. In the meantime the Indian team played Eng in England,Pak in Pak and West Indies in WI hardening their game further. By the time '83 World Cup came about the battleship had turned around and I think that ,Jimmy's fabulous form with the bat and '83 win made the game more mainstream . But make no mistake '83 and '85 wins truly captured imagination of awaam. I for one rejoiced like hell as only a 15 year could!

  • insightfulcricketer on June 25, 2008, 14:31 GMT

    I think in this hullabaloo of '83 cricket win we are missing a point. While truly great that win was, I think the turning point of Indian cricket was the winter of '80-81. When India beat a full strength Australian team at Melbourne and managed wins in World Series Cup against Australia and New Zealand. I compare that to starting to turn a battleship going full blast (read Indian cricket mindset). The '81 team showed it was possible to play the "modern" cricket and excel in it. Sportstar magazine had some fabulous pictures and DD was showing 1 hour capsule after the evening news. In the meantime the Indian team played Eng in England,Pak in Pak and West Indies in WI hardening their game further. By the time '83 World Cup came about the battleship had turned around and I think that ,Jimmy's fabulous form with the bat and '83 win made the game more mainstream . But make no mistake '83 and '85 wins truly captured imagination of awaam. I for one rejoiced like hell as only a 15 year could!

  • RedRascal on June 25, 2008, 14:23 GMT

    The reason it is beng discussed is that it had been the only achievment by Indian sport at a world level for the last 25 years, and the reason that it did not cause the same impact in Pakistan ( after 92) is that even in 75, 79 and 83 World cups Pakistan team made the semi finals, they were not the 66-1 odds and no hopers coming and winning the finals in 1992, their track record in the game was good, a likely comparison would be if Bangladesh wins the world cup with their current track record, that was how India's record in the one day world was in 1983, they had won 1 match in two world cups before 1983 ! Those who did not exist at the time of the win do not understand the importance and the impact of the occaision.

  • ToTellUTheTruth on June 25, 2008, 14:13 GMT

    How old are you anyway Kalyan? May be you are too young to have not witnessed the significance of this victory. It has transformed an entire nation. Cricket really really took off after this victory. My heart still flutters remembering those grainy pictures on the B&W TV I watched the games. I very clearly remember my aunt running into the pooja room and praying her heart out (at 4:00 AM in the morning or so) for Indian victory. I still remember the whole family going to the Hanuman temple the day of the win and offering 101 coconuts, as we believed that God did help our team. This was one single event that united the country like never before, at least for a brief while. I never played cricket before that day. But after that the only thing I knew was run in from 25 paces and throw the ball as hard as I could. How many people got inspired by that win and how many gems of players came out just because of this single victory? God only knows. Nostalgia, you call it. As well it is.

  • lord_v on June 25, 2008, 13:05 GMT

    We need to give the due to the cricketers for the win. This win did transform indian cricket and popularized it to every corner of India which has a TV set. I was an 8 year old that time and in small town India , cricket was not the first sport. We would play anything else like kho-kho , kabbadi and obviously football since none of them required elaborate equipments. After that win (and even the drubbing by WI not withstanding) , cricket did become the de-facto game to be played. Cricket used to be everywhere. From classroom to alleys ,with strange fielding and batting restrictions. I guess the result is now to be seen. Small town boys are making big into cricket and it is no longer a bastion of bombay , bangalore or calcutta. Apart from the sporting legends in defining the era there was one additional factor which we should not forget. That of brodcasting. The telecast by Channel 9 with 8 cameras was breathtaking. Kudos to star/espn in the 90s.

  • yv100 on June 25, 2008, 12:16 GMT

    As for Kalyan's statement, I dont think its a shameful fact that India has won the world cup just once. Its a game and the best team wins it, you also have to remember that British invented cricket and they have never won it even once. There is no shame in losing a game against better opponent but there is glory is winning.

    Yogi

  • yv100 on June 25, 2008, 12:12 GMT

    And this is the way they treat Kapil Dev now because he doesnt get involved in dirty politics of politicians and administrators who have never made any significant contribution to indian cricket. I'm not a fan of ICL but have always been a fan of Kapil because of his contributions to the game. I think everyone deserves a fair chance to play cricket, its a gentleman's game and it should be played in that spirit. This goes for the australian team too.

    Yogi

  • ssk3 on June 25, 2008, 11:36 GMT

    Mrs. Gandhi was killed in Oct 1984. Rajiv became PM after that. Mrs G was alive when India won the world cup in 1983!

  • joshgpic on June 25, 2008, 10:31 GMT

    Yes, I can never forget that day rather night, past the midnight hour when my all time favourite cricketer the most courageous and ever smiling "Jimmy" Amarnath bowled India into the records and my shout of ectasy & joy woke up the owner of the house in Bangalore, where 10 engineering college students watched every ball with nervous tension, we were in near desperation when Dujon and Marshall built up a partnership, but then Mohinder had Dujon bowled and Marshall caught by Gavaskar before finally getting Holding LBW, for which he deservedly won the man of the match. But all credit to Kirmani and Sandhu for the last wicket partnership of 21 runs. Sandhu's Magical ball to Greenidge and the out of the world running catch by Kapil. I wish our team all the best and hope we don't have to wait another 25 years to win a Cricket world cup. I wish to sign of with comment of Ramchandran Guha "had Greenidge not left that ball alone, hockey would still be our National game. JOSHGPIC, BAHRAIN

  • SatyajitM on June 25, 2008, 10:24 GMT

    1983 was a new dawn and the heroes deserve the accolades they are getting, more so since we have given the T20 winning team a maddening welcome. Indian's love a bit of exagerration so lets not try to pretend we don't just for this moment. But lets also not forget that this dawn was basically for ODI cricket. In test cricket a similar thing was done in 1971 (against WI and Eng) and by 1980 was a reasonably good test team who could hold their own against most other teams. To the nayseryers who say why should we celebrate the 25 years while Aus do not celebrate so many wins, my friends two reasons, first it was a new beginning, second exactly what you say: India never won it again. India's T20 win was good but not in the same league. So, lets not brag about things we are going to do in future. Lets first beat the top teams continuosly for two/three years in all forms of the game and then claim we are the superpowers in cricket.

  • ahmadonly on June 25, 2008, 8:53 GMT

    For me its really Celebration time as I have also celebrated my 25th Birthday in the year and past month , so whenever I used to see 1983 it boosted me and from my heart wishes all the cricket lover to congratulates the historic winning world cup movement. Thanks

  • nikeil on June 25, 2008, 8:49 GMT

    its a shame that you guys are still stuck in the past glories......... its demoralizing that we haven't won the world cup for 25 years..... and you guys are still happy.... its woeful

  • guptavipulv on June 25, 2008, 8:44 GMT

    Thats the whole point Mr Kalyan that Mr. Suresh Menon is trying to make through this article. The journey of India becoming a superpower in cricket started in Berbice 1983 which gave them the confidence to achieve what nobody thought was possible i.e. winning the World Cup.Just consider the background of this triumph. Indian Cricket was in turmoil, a new young captain had been appointed of a very youthful team, the team was rumored to be faction ridden etc. etc. Suddenly a new strategy was evolved of filling the team with all rounders and medium pacers more importance was given to fitness and fielding and lo- behold even the mighty Windies were toppled thrice within a span of 90 days. Indian Cricket is what it is because of that win and no amount of credit would be enough for the chief architects of that win!!

  • dskrish on June 25, 2008, 8:41 GMT

    It is still a mystery on how we keep on talking on how the World Cup win changed the face of Indian cricket .Why has it not transformed Pakistan ????

  • HiyerNHiyer on June 25, 2008, 7:51 GMT

    with due regards and respect, the era of 1983-1987 was one which saw cricket become a religion in India. Those days it was more of pride that the cricketers played for and this era is responsible for BCCI and Indian cricket becoming the financial powerhouse that it is today. It also marked the advent of change of dominance in world cricket from the Aus / Eng camp to the Indian subcontinent. What this win has done for the Ind /Pak /SL cricket, not too many wins can

  • Sampdoria on June 25, 2008, 7:39 GMT

    Silver? Whats next - 3 decade celebration? Whats our problem is dwelling on the past glories may it be history, science or culture.

    I think its time to get past these nostalgic things and concentrate in an organized manner on todays' cricket. I am in no way belittling such a big achievement but over-glorifying it doesn't make sense. It just increases apathy that this is all India achieved on a sporting stage in 30 years.

    It's also going to be some sort of technique for veterans to get some piece of the BCCI pie and accolades.

  • madhan17 on June 25, 2008, 6:18 GMT

    in the comment of kalyan and also sain its shame to celebrate the past glories its not correct, we should celebrate the past glories to respect the players who played in the glories of 1983 champions

  • Ajay42 on June 25, 2008, 6:06 GMT

    With due respect to kalyanb, whatever "modern" Indian cricket does will not come close to the magic of 1983. I was seventeen then, in Mangalore, without television...it was the dulcet tones of Brian Johnston, Don Mosey and Christopher Martin Jenkins that guided me through that incredible evening.One must realize how unheralded the side was and how much against the odds the victory came. It was a singular day in a singular summer and the next four years were probably the consistently best period of India's one day history, till the loss in the semi finals of the Reliance world cup in 1987.

  • KapilBari on June 25, 2008, 5:57 GMT

    I don't agree with you Kalyan.

    That was a start to something new for Indian cricket, celebrating or glorifying the moment is not at all shameful.

  • Arbaz on June 25, 2008, 5:42 GMT

    Kalyan, the point is its where it all started , even if India wins it a few more times i doubt it will have the same effect as the 83' win had.It not only launched the BCCI atop the financial ladder but also the pride of a billion Indians.From curry muncher jokes to the point where the pommies among others are considering pre-mature retirement to come and play in India.It is certainly worth glorifying IMO.

  • madhan17 on June 25, 2008, 5:41 GMT

    when will India win there second world cup that is so important to us so we should keep trying to win the second so we could make a good team like 1983 champions who brought the 2nd cup to India

  • alsa on June 25, 2008, 5:35 GMT

    I was about to write this and I see that kalyan has already mentioned it. BCCI does not understand that it is a shame celebrating a win that happened 25 years ago. With all the world cups they have, I wonder how the Australians will feel about the celebrations we are having. It is a shame that India hasn't won any world cup for the last 25 years. Its not like Independence (celebrating 61 years). With the kind of money BCCI has now, it should have world class players (who play as a team and win). The infrastructure is still pathetic. BCCI has once again proved that they are a bunch of shameless fellows.

  • cricket2Monkey on June 25, 2008, 4:18 GMT

    With all due respects to the 1983 World cup winning team..

    I don't understand why we are glorifying a shameful fact that the biggest economy in World cricket has been able to win the world cup only one time, and that too 25 years ago.

    Our modern Indian cricket has come a long way, and will achieve greater things..we don't need to live in past glories.

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  • cricket2Monkey on June 25, 2008, 4:18 GMT

    With all due respects to the 1983 World cup winning team..

    I don't understand why we are glorifying a shameful fact that the biggest economy in World cricket has been able to win the world cup only one time, and that too 25 years ago.

    Our modern Indian cricket has come a long way, and will achieve greater things..we don't need to live in past glories.

  • alsa on June 25, 2008, 5:35 GMT

    I was about to write this and I see that kalyan has already mentioned it. BCCI does not understand that it is a shame celebrating a win that happened 25 years ago. With all the world cups they have, I wonder how the Australians will feel about the celebrations we are having. It is a shame that India hasn't won any world cup for the last 25 years. Its not like Independence (celebrating 61 years). With the kind of money BCCI has now, it should have world class players (who play as a team and win). The infrastructure is still pathetic. BCCI has once again proved that they are a bunch of shameless fellows.

  • madhan17 on June 25, 2008, 5:41 GMT

    when will India win there second world cup that is so important to us so we should keep trying to win the second so we could make a good team like 1983 champions who brought the 2nd cup to India

  • Arbaz on June 25, 2008, 5:42 GMT

    Kalyan, the point is its where it all started , even if India wins it a few more times i doubt it will have the same effect as the 83' win had.It not only launched the BCCI atop the financial ladder but also the pride of a billion Indians.From curry muncher jokes to the point where the pommies among others are considering pre-mature retirement to come and play in India.It is certainly worth glorifying IMO.

  • KapilBari on June 25, 2008, 5:57 GMT

    I don't agree with you Kalyan.

    That was a start to something new for Indian cricket, celebrating or glorifying the moment is not at all shameful.

  • Ajay42 on June 25, 2008, 6:06 GMT

    With due respect to kalyanb, whatever "modern" Indian cricket does will not come close to the magic of 1983. I was seventeen then, in Mangalore, without television...it was the dulcet tones of Brian Johnston, Don Mosey and Christopher Martin Jenkins that guided me through that incredible evening.One must realize how unheralded the side was and how much against the odds the victory came. It was a singular day in a singular summer and the next four years were probably the consistently best period of India's one day history, till the loss in the semi finals of the Reliance world cup in 1987.

  • madhan17 on June 25, 2008, 6:18 GMT

    in the comment of kalyan and also sain its shame to celebrate the past glories its not correct, we should celebrate the past glories to respect the players who played in the glories of 1983 champions

  • Sampdoria on June 25, 2008, 7:39 GMT

    Silver? Whats next - 3 decade celebration? Whats our problem is dwelling on the past glories may it be history, science or culture.

    I think its time to get past these nostalgic things and concentrate in an organized manner on todays' cricket. I am in no way belittling such a big achievement but over-glorifying it doesn't make sense. It just increases apathy that this is all India achieved on a sporting stage in 30 years.

    It's also going to be some sort of technique for veterans to get some piece of the BCCI pie and accolades.

  • HiyerNHiyer on June 25, 2008, 7:51 GMT

    with due regards and respect, the era of 1983-1987 was one which saw cricket become a religion in India. Those days it was more of pride that the cricketers played for and this era is responsible for BCCI and Indian cricket becoming the financial powerhouse that it is today. It also marked the advent of change of dominance in world cricket from the Aus / Eng camp to the Indian subcontinent. What this win has done for the Ind /Pak /SL cricket, not too many wins can

  • dskrish on June 25, 2008, 8:41 GMT

    It is still a mystery on how we keep on talking on how the World Cup win changed the face of Indian cricket .Why has it not transformed Pakistan ????