April 11, 2010

The IPL: where young players get noticed

Playing with international stars, and triumphing against them, will help cricketers like Rohit Sharma and David Warner make strong cases for being given runs in their national sides
46

On a warm night in Nagpur, the IPL was seen in all its glory. Forget talk about obscene amounts of money, disregard for a moment the scantily clad cheerleaders, overlook the fawning celebrities and concentrate on the game: a tension-filled, competitive cricket match. Here was Shane Warne bowling at his wily best.

He spun the ball and a web around nervous, fidgety batsmen. This eventually led to a wicket, and amid the celebration Warne implored his team-mates to believe, to imagine that a glorious, much-needed victory was at hand.

When he wasn't dispensing devious deliveries, Warne was wracking his brain and waving his arms. He moved fieldsmen from outposts into threatening positions; he ignored the physical danger to his team-mates in order to further intimidate nervous opponents. He employed fielding positions that sent a message to both sides that we, the Royals, can win this game.

It was vintage Warne on all counts. His bowling was threatening and his captaincy was imaginative with a touch of genius. If a genius does oscillate between brilliance and madness, Warne was one minute Picasso, the next van Gogh. But mostly he was a leader who had the support of his players and the attention of his opponents. In the end his aggressive plotting prevailed, while the brave and resourceful Rohit Sharma's efforts fell just short. The Rajasthan Royals beat the Deccan Chargers by a whisker. But the result was only a minor detail, if not for the protagonists then at least for the game.

Here for all to see, the baying crowd at the stadium and the vast television audience, was Twenty20 cricket in its best light. A cricket contest of infinite skill and strategy, not one relegated by the flashy dancers and flouncing celebrities to sideshow status. This is a crucial point. For all the hype about being a billion-dollar industry, attracting Bollywood stars and rampant egos, the IPL does a lot of good for cricket - for both the game and the individuals who play it.

At a time when some international captains are content to allow opposing batsmen to score easy runs without putting their wicket at risk, thereby allowing the middle overs of ODIs to become more pedestrian than a jaywalker, Warne offered a viable alternative to these timid tactics.

And here was Rohit, a young Indian batsman of abundant skill, displaying the complementary nerve that is required to succeed at the highest level. The question is not whether Rohit has the skill to make it as a batsman in all forms of the game but whether the selectors will ignore his talents for so long that his best years will be past when he's finally chosen.

Having survived and prospered against Warne's devastating spell and taunting tactics will do wonders for Rohit's confidence. Hopefully it will also convince the selectors that he is a batsman for all seasons, not just the silly one.

For all the hype about being a billion-dollar industry, attracting Bollywood stars and rampant egos, the IPL does a lot of good for cricket - for both the game and the individuals who play it

This was a classic example of how the IPL's multicultural format, which puts Indian and international cricketers in the same arena, can benefit the game worldwide. In this case it was a former Australian player helping, albeit inadvertently, the cause of a talented young Indian cricketer.

In another example of the IPL's benefits, the young Australian tearaway David Warner seems to be benefitting from a close association with the Indian maestro of mayhem, Virender Sehwag. To witness close up and have the opportunity to talk to Sehwag about his modus operandi is an extraordinary piece of good fortune for Warner.

Like Rohit, Warner is in danger of being typecast. In his case as a hitter rather than what he really is: a batsman with explosive power. If Warner learns anything from Sehwag that helps him convince the first-class selectors back home that he should be playing all forms of the game as an ultra-aggressive opener, it will benefit him and Australian cricket.

Warner has already scored an IPL century under the watchful eye of Sehwag, and hopefully this won't go unnoticed in Australia. What also shouldn't be overlooked is that despite its occasional crass excesses, the IPL does offer much that benefits the game of cricket.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is now a cricket commentator and columnist

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • vineetkarthi on April 13, 2010, 4:48 GMT

    Is this "actually" an article by Ian Chappell. Surprised but quite thrilled too. Excellent. Hits the nail on the head.

  • mrshree420 on April 13, 2010, 3:47 GMT

    youngster will learn only how to play in t20 format. I do not see any young player who have not played test cricket yet can develop the techniques that is required to play test cricket. Sure they will be noticed but to me they are in danger of killing their potential carrier out side the t20 world. Bottom line is test cricket brings the quality out of a player, not the bang bang type of cricket

  • tfjones1978 on April 13, 2010, 2:24 GMT

    T20 will be good for cricket if it aims at new cricket markets. IPL should be called DPL (Domestic Premier League) and be played in a different country every 3 months over a 4 year rotation. In addition to India & South Africa (last year), countries could include America, China, Canada and other G20 economic countries. This would increase attention to the game whilst increasing revenue for domestic boards without overdoing the brand of the IPL. Additionally there should be an addition to the rule that players can only play IF they make themselves available to their country unless they are over 35 years of age. This would ensure that players dont retire early to play in the IPL like some players are currently doing.

  • rohit1709 on April 12, 2010, 23:08 GMT

    "The question is not whether Rohit has the skill to make it as a batsman in all forms of the game but whether the selectors will ignore his talents for so long that his best years will be past when he's finally chosen. " Really??? How many chances does he have to be given? He has the potential to go the Sachin Tendulkar way or the Kambli way... He has to choose.... Wisely.

  • venkatesh018 on April 12, 2010, 11:11 GMT

    A game of infinite skill and strategy? T20? Where a bowler does not need to really strain his body and mind to dismiss any batsmen, just alone restrict the runs by bowling stupid slower balls and overpitched balls as close to the wide line on the off side. Really after all these years of cricket watching what is this crap chappelly?

  • apyboutit on April 12, 2010, 10:42 GMT

    I disagree Ian. IPL is just entertainment. That's it. It is neither "crass", nor a threat to cricket, nor a disgrace to it, nor the beginning of any end. It is just like a wedding party with a lot of talented artists. IPL may teach a young'un the tactics of winning. But definitely not the tactics of batting et bowling. It is sad that Rohit is praised for "gritting it out" against Warne, for the "whole 8 balls"! He has done more worthy things this IPL that suggest his efforts towards graduation than that "inning". His performance is still less than Suman, Vijay, the Ojhas', P Chawla, A. Mishra, Lumb, Junjun, Jakati, Voges, Vinay, et al. when put in context. Anyway, Rohit has in deed been selected in all forms of the game, in all away tours over the past two yrs. He has not even clicked in the domestic season over the past 2 yrs. BTW, Warner hasn't got anything other than the 100* to show either. Selectors note. AND ... it was Gr8 to watch the Sachin-Warne duel again!

  • RaghuramanR on April 12, 2010, 10:20 GMT

    Ian has been trying to back/prop up IPL with his comments but cant see why he is doing it. We have players like Sachin, Kumble, Warne, Gilchrist etc doing well in IPL, but what is the point? Where are the so called 'youngsters', which IPL is supposed to throw up in dozens? If one 'young promise' shows up in one IPL and hopefully if he is from India, that is such a poor returns for this 'money spinner'. I dont understand the point in Sachin or Ganguly making 50s, Kumble or Warne showing their skill with the ball and the rest of the team being spectators stading inside the cricket ground.

  • Sandyjosh on April 12, 2010, 10:14 GMT

    Ian Chappell is an old Aussie cocky. He also knows what he is talking about. And that for sure is cricket, my friends. His three generations have only done cricket. His comments on the Indian Popular League obsession is extremly forthright and on the dotted thinking. Cricket, when first played was only about a bat and a ball. The rest of the things related to its tradition, technique, rules and strategies have developed later. To me, T-20 cricket has brought back the nuances of the great game to what it actually started with - a bat and a ball. Its taken a full circle. Whether you like it or hate it, its still cricket. I agree, cricket of any form will strive and give enjoyment. People who bicker on the format must look at the development of the history of the game. Changes do not end the biggeining, they only add to the biggening. The changed great game still cherishes us all. Cricket lovers like Ian Chappell only add to the mystirical history and golden glory of the great game.

  • theGod-Sach on April 12, 2010, 9:09 GMT

    Ian Chappel is not writing about Sachin's innings. This is totally expected. He is never behind though when it comes to criticising him. God bless him!! (I mean Sachin)

  • dada.... on April 12, 2010, 6:17 GMT

    I am really surprised that Ian Chapell would write such an article. I have been a very keen observer of cricket for the past 17 years. According to me T-20 has been a disaster for cricket. It has destroyed the techniques of young cricketers. Young cricketers have lost the patience that is the most important virtue of the game. Playing well for a short period of time like in a T-20 does not make one a great cricketer. the ultimate test for a cricketer is proving his mettle in a test or a 50 over game. all great cricketers to have played the game have great records in the test arena. IPL has added fuel to an already raging fire. It has given importance to club over country. IPL has brought those people into the game who nothing about cricket. How many owners of the franchisees really know anything about cricket.? it is really sad to see my wonderful game cricket to be reduced to this level. I hope sanity will prevail and ICC bans IPL and regulates the amount of T-20 being played.

  • vineetkarthi on April 13, 2010, 4:48 GMT

    Is this "actually" an article by Ian Chappell. Surprised but quite thrilled too. Excellent. Hits the nail on the head.

  • mrshree420 on April 13, 2010, 3:47 GMT

    youngster will learn only how to play in t20 format. I do not see any young player who have not played test cricket yet can develop the techniques that is required to play test cricket. Sure they will be noticed but to me they are in danger of killing their potential carrier out side the t20 world. Bottom line is test cricket brings the quality out of a player, not the bang bang type of cricket

  • tfjones1978 on April 13, 2010, 2:24 GMT

    T20 will be good for cricket if it aims at new cricket markets. IPL should be called DPL (Domestic Premier League) and be played in a different country every 3 months over a 4 year rotation. In addition to India & South Africa (last year), countries could include America, China, Canada and other G20 economic countries. This would increase attention to the game whilst increasing revenue for domestic boards without overdoing the brand of the IPL. Additionally there should be an addition to the rule that players can only play IF they make themselves available to their country unless they are over 35 years of age. This would ensure that players dont retire early to play in the IPL like some players are currently doing.

  • rohit1709 on April 12, 2010, 23:08 GMT

    "The question is not whether Rohit has the skill to make it as a batsman in all forms of the game but whether the selectors will ignore his talents for so long that his best years will be past when he's finally chosen. " Really??? How many chances does he have to be given? He has the potential to go the Sachin Tendulkar way or the Kambli way... He has to choose.... Wisely.

  • venkatesh018 on April 12, 2010, 11:11 GMT

    A game of infinite skill and strategy? T20? Where a bowler does not need to really strain his body and mind to dismiss any batsmen, just alone restrict the runs by bowling stupid slower balls and overpitched balls as close to the wide line on the off side. Really after all these years of cricket watching what is this crap chappelly?

  • apyboutit on April 12, 2010, 10:42 GMT

    I disagree Ian. IPL is just entertainment. That's it. It is neither "crass", nor a threat to cricket, nor a disgrace to it, nor the beginning of any end. It is just like a wedding party with a lot of talented artists. IPL may teach a young'un the tactics of winning. But definitely not the tactics of batting et bowling. It is sad that Rohit is praised for "gritting it out" against Warne, for the "whole 8 balls"! He has done more worthy things this IPL that suggest his efforts towards graduation than that "inning". His performance is still less than Suman, Vijay, the Ojhas', P Chawla, A. Mishra, Lumb, Junjun, Jakati, Voges, Vinay, et al. when put in context. Anyway, Rohit has in deed been selected in all forms of the game, in all away tours over the past two yrs. He has not even clicked in the domestic season over the past 2 yrs. BTW, Warner hasn't got anything other than the 100* to show either. Selectors note. AND ... it was Gr8 to watch the Sachin-Warne duel again!

  • RaghuramanR on April 12, 2010, 10:20 GMT

    Ian has been trying to back/prop up IPL with his comments but cant see why he is doing it. We have players like Sachin, Kumble, Warne, Gilchrist etc doing well in IPL, but what is the point? Where are the so called 'youngsters', which IPL is supposed to throw up in dozens? If one 'young promise' shows up in one IPL and hopefully if he is from India, that is such a poor returns for this 'money spinner'. I dont understand the point in Sachin or Ganguly making 50s, Kumble or Warne showing their skill with the ball and the rest of the team being spectators stading inside the cricket ground.

  • Sandyjosh on April 12, 2010, 10:14 GMT

    Ian Chappell is an old Aussie cocky. He also knows what he is talking about. And that for sure is cricket, my friends. His three generations have only done cricket. His comments on the Indian Popular League obsession is extremly forthright and on the dotted thinking. Cricket, when first played was only about a bat and a ball. The rest of the things related to its tradition, technique, rules and strategies have developed later. To me, T-20 cricket has brought back the nuances of the great game to what it actually started with - a bat and a ball. Its taken a full circle. Whether you like it or hate it, its still cricket. I agree, cricket of any form will strive and give enjoyment. People who bicker on the format must look at the development of the history of the game. Changes do not end the biggeining, they only add to the biggening. The changed great game still cherishes us all. Cricket lovers like Ian Chappell only add to the mystirical history and golden glory of the great game.

  • theGod-Sach on April 12, 2010, 9:09 GMT

    Ian Chappel is not writing about Sachin's innings. This is totally expected. He is never behind though when it comes to criticising him. God bless him!! (I mean Sachin)

  • dada.... on April 12, 2010, 6:17 GMT

    I am really surprised that Ian Chapell would write such an article. I have been a very keen observer of cricket for the past 17 years. According to me T-20 has been a disaster for cricket. It has destroyed the techniques of young cricketers. Young cricketers have lost the patience that is the most important virtue of the game. Playing well for a short period of time like in a T-20 does not make one a great cricketer. the ultimate test for a cricketer is proving his mettle in a test or a 50 over game. all great cricketers to have played the game have great records in the test arena. IPL has added fuel to an already raging fire. It has given importance to club over country. IPL has brought those people into the game who nothing about cricket. How many owners of the franchisees really know anything about cricket.? it is really sad to see my wonderful game cricket to be reduced to this level. I hope sanity will prevail and ICC bans IPL and regulates the amount of T-20 being played.

  • knowledge_eater on April 12, 2010, 5:05 GMT

    To be honest, I just thought it can work in reverse too. If you want to get call from IPL auction, you have to perform very good cricket in your respective country as well. No-one is going to call you for an auction if you don't play responsible cricket for your country. So, if you want to play IPL, then perform well in ODI, perform well in Test, show your technique while you play your domestic games. I just saw Mitch Marsh the kid who just won under 19 wc and he got call from Deccan, what was that ? It was because he was captain of under 19 champion. See all the cricket around world have to do, is to take advantage of stage. There was last line spot on from IC's last article. I will try to say in my word. If you hate IPL or Indians, they are going to stay away from you, and take full throttle advantage of your hatred and make millions out of it. Love or hate you have to decide, IPL will not stop, take advantage. Use it or Loose it.

  • Shunya on April 12, 2010, 4:31 GMT

    "occasional crass excesses" is to put it lightly. in fact, there are so many visible rough edges that need to be polished as the league advances. modi and co. would do well to take every criticism/suggestion that come its way as an opportunity to develop the league into a better and refined product. gauging the league solely on its overall market valuation vis-a-vis other major sports leagues around the world would be incorrect. the right index for the success or failure of a league should also give weightage to pitch quality, spectator comfort, level of commentary, TV viewing experience, quality of the games, etc. hope the next edition of IPL will at address at least some of the issues that are constantly being flagged by media and pundits alike-- the overwhelming no. of ads that threaten to put cricket in the back burner, being one.

  • on April 12, 2010, 3:19 GMT

    Rohit is just there because of skill, he's too much inconsistent and had a bad domestic season than anyone, personally there are about 5 batsmen in domestic circuit who are better than him and consistent.Everybody is hoping he will succeed because of his pure skills but i guess its time for him to perform for India or else the other players are at loss because of his repeated selections to national team.But purely personal opinion!

  • Alexk400 on April 12, 2010, 2:46 GMT

    T20 is not sloggerfest if grounds are big and same size. I believe that best slogger is best technical player. Because consistency can come only if you have good technical skill. That is get close to ball. Create enough force / Speed by punching..you can't punch the ball by swishing...you need to get close to the ball first.

    T20 you really need BAT speed. That means you have to be fit and strong. By playing T20 , TEST Domain will be changed. TEST will get interesting because of T20. T20 makes athletes with technical skill and mental strength to be successful.

    Before all the money went to Cricket boards , now the pie is shared somewhat. So also commentators get paid more. IPL is great boon for cricket players. Anyone complain about IPL is just a sour grape. IPL makes every country to match it , then we have great cricket entertainment that is short and sweet and whole world will start playing. T20 is far better than snoozefest BASEBALL.

    IPL need quality in some areas.

  • BillyCC on April 12, 2010, 1:32 GMT

    Good article by Ian about the merits of bringing superstars into the same team as younger players. However, for these younger players to step up, they have to perform well in the first-class format as well. And T20 is not a good breeding ground for the first-class format because it's rarely a contest between quality batting and quality bowling. In T20, either the batsmen dominate or get out. Maidens are unacceptable for the batting team and maidens without wickets suit the bowling team just fine.

  • on April 11, 2010, 23:27 GMT

    Iam surprised to see this kind of article from Ian Chappell. Few days back I read an article from Ian Chappell criticizing IPL and now he says that it would benefit the WORLD CRICKET. Anyway, financially and exposure wise yes, Indian domestic players are getting benefited by IPL, but its denting the technique of some of the young cricketers. But again this is only 3rd IPL event and the game something still new and its still in the first phase and evolving with single match. If the scores and averages are taken into account, players who play the game with conventional technique are making good runs then flashy players who are investing new shots for this shorter format. Sachin, Kallis, Sangakara and Mahela play with conventional technique and they are highly successful, eventually youngsters will take note and follow the same. Its just my guess and it can go any where from here...as I said before, the game is still evolving in this shorter format.

  • Zahidsaltin on April 11, 2010, 20:01 GMT

    prospects of "hit out or get out" can be viewed differently. People get worried about talent going in waste due to Twenty20 formate but I think it will give birth to a new type of talent where batsmen will learn to score of even those deliveries which they normally left or blocked. New type of shots will be invented and time will come when TEST MATCHES WILL BE PLAYED OVER 3 DAYS with very few resulting in draws. Batsmen will be pushed to play faster even in tests and ODIs as that's going to be the marketing strategy to inhance the x factor on their Twenty20 price calculator. To get the best pay in IPL, EPL, APL or what ever, a bigger fan following will only be for those who play like Gayle and Afridi and with time these type of players will learn to score big.

  • knowledge_eater on April 11, 2010, 19:46 GMT

    I am not sure about getting noticed, but I am sure about becoming Ripe sooner than expected. More than 50,000 thousands people around the globe (where 30000 is lone Indian) but nevertheless they stare you,they record your performance, they analyze you, they have spent money on you, and they want you to perform. If you want to give final touch for young players to be ready to face the real world, you have to put them in Hot place. Despite all the heat around you, and you perform and show top class performance, they get reward. Rohit have showed every kind of shots he can play, he doesn't play fluke shots. I am glad that Ian Chappell, Harsha Bhogle,Sanjay Manjrekar, and Aakash Chopra are so far coming out with interviews and hidden positive points from IPL, let the others many journalist complain of Marketing errors.I just hope that Good international players don't become sandwich in between IPL and rest of the Boards, otherwise it will big loss for country more than player himself

  • Alexk400 on April 11, 2010, 16:18 GMT

    About Indian Franchise players need to be drafted separately from normal draft. Reason is commercial. If a team think they can make money better or win better with particluar indian player they should allow them to buy. Some part of that money should go to IPL , so IPL can encourage that. Also it allow other teams to get sachin, dhoni or sehwag. Indian crowd has to identify a team with indian players. So if a player want to move to another team , if the payout is good enough , IPL should allow.

    Kind of find the best out of NBA,NFL and MLB systems.

    Also i like MLB scouting concept. Because that way team will look for talent not doing favour to some BCCI bigwigs. Also IPL winner and IPL runner up money should be 10:1.

    That makes winning is everything.

  • ElGerrardo on April 11, 2010, 16:13 GMT

    apart from just being in the same room as warne, tendulkar, kallis etc, i wouldn't have thought being good at twenty20 would make the first class/ national selectors sit up and take notice. Twenty20 isn't cricket, it's a hit and a giggle. David Warner is a joke. they did try him at ODI level and he failed miserably. can't say i've seen much of sharma but i believe he failed at ODI level as well. Being good at twenty20 is about as useful as turning up to gun fight with a knife. at least we don't have to endure this ipl nonsense much longer and once the fake world cup rubbish is outta the way we can get back to real cricket. Thankfully the ECB started their county season earlier, so there's some real cricket on.

  • on April 11, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    Kudos on a very good article once again Mr Chappell. I was a skeptic of the IPL in its first season but I have warmed up towards it. Thanks to Mr Modi for providing coverage to a global audience at a very minimal cost. I realised the very same thing about the IPL that you have mentioned - it is a very good platform, not just for international players to cement/enhance their reputation but also for the younger, talented players to get noticed. By playing alongside the stars, they learn a lot. The format pits team-mates against each other, provides for a good contest and is therefore a good spectacle. What Warne has done for Royals is there to be seen. Their achievement in the absence of any major indigenous stars is more commendable than other teams. Trivial matters such as cheerleaders and money aside, it has done wonders for the game. If cricket is to make a headway globally, T20 is the format to do so. It captures people's attention in a way that the traditional formats don't.

  • Alexk400 on April 11, 2010, 16:11 GMT

    Ok my points for improve IPL cricket.

    1. Pitches should be like bangalore with true bounce and bigger boundary. If small guys hits boundary , game will lose its attractiveness. We really want stars to hit Sixers not nobodys. All boundary in all ground has to have same size to make it consistent.

    2. Definitely 5 international players. I see most teams lack lower middle order strength (lack of indian hitters) and top heavy and lose badly. Only RC has strongest batting line up.

    3. TRADES!. I want to see trade between teams before playoff start. Guys like Vignesh sitting in bench and can be used in many other teams. In that way teams will stop playing players just to give favor to ex cricketers like rohan gavaskar annirrudth srikkanth gets to play for some favor than talent.

    4. Need award for commentators to improve their quality. Also product placement is too much. how many times they want to see that stupid mrf blimp.

    5 Player ranking before draft. (exclude indian mvp)

  • wanderer1 on April 11, 2010, 15:21 GMT

    Name me ONE cricketer that has flourished because of the IPL and became a world class player through the IPL? Not a single cricketer can I think ofhas made himself a truly great international player through the IPL system. T20 will dilute and hinder the development of technique of players, take a look at the upcoming crop of Indian players, they're all technically lacking, constantly going for the big shot and getting out. Once again Ian Chappell swings and misses. But it's OK because I'm sure some of that IPL money will filter down to him in a short while.

  • dcrowle on April 11, 2010, 13:53 GMT

    IPL is strange. The players worth most are famous marquee test players (even old decrepid ones). Once they retire again who will watch no names from nowhere play cricket? Yet IPL and T20 is going to, apparently, kill test cricket. Could be killing the goose that layed the golden egg...

  • on April 11, 2010, 13:37 GMT

    This is an excellent article and should be made mandatory reading for a number of Cricinfo writers and columnists who have gone on so much about the commercial aspects and bling of the IPL, that the griping itself was beginning to look llike the most obscene thing around! The success of players like Warne, Tendulkar, Kallis, Vaas and other "senior cricketers" has shown how important the "first principles" of cricket - talent, skill, adaptability - remain even in T20. And, for once, it is a relief to see someone who is willing to talk about this instead of banging on about the same old tired themes that most of Cricinfo's writers regurgitate about the IPL.

  • popcorn on April 11, 2010, 13:34 GMT

    I am surprised that Ian Chappell, an eminent cricketer has also succumbed to the Sloggers Park form of the game. He has forgotten to mention what Shane Warne said - "for Twenty20 to be a contest between bat and ball,not a batsman's game raining sixes and fours, boundaries need to be longer - LIKE THE NAGPUR STADIUM.". If Ian Chappell advocates the Twenty20 "hit out or get out" technique,God help cricket.

  • shirazu on April 11, 2010, 13:16 GMT

    Ian is a numbers guy, so it's surprising that he ignores Rohit Sharma's dismal ODI performance for India (avg 26 at SR of 72). Now it's probably just negative variance and he's a better player than that, but this is India, there are many, many strong middle order players around that can't get a game. Rohit is the typical Indian player who can demolish the military medium pacers and spinners on flat tracks, but struggles against real competition. Who could blame him though, since these are all he faces on the domestic circuit.

    With that said though I like the article. But I think the league would be even better if they opened up another slot or two per game for the international players. With the two extra teams there are now going to be 70 domestic players holding starting places. And they will need backups, so probably 100 in all. Are there 100 cricketers in India worth paying to see or sponsor?

  • BarackBush on April 11, 2010, 13:06 GMT

    I am waiting for the article from Shakspere. Probably the next one will be about the batting faults of Kallis,tendulkar,gayle...

  • aniket_tyagi on April 11, 2010, 12:35 GMT

    Well Ian, Warner 'learning' something from Sehwag. LOL. Sehwag is a crazy thing on planet. He has got some mental deficiency that he cannot remember the previous ball bowled to him or anyone. His magnificent eye makes him more destructive contemporary batsman. But Sehwag comes with a warning. 'Don't try this at home'. p.s- I am not disparaging DW. Big fan. But Sehwag came here by 'not learning' (read- from purists). They used to not to play him in Najafgarh initially. They did not have budget for buying as many balls as he was going to hit out of park. Keep DW uncluttered. Sehwag is uncluttered.

  • Sanks555 on April 11, 2010, 11:31 GMT

    There are 27 Ranji teams in India. If some one really wants to see Indian talent, one can follow Indian domestic matches closely. It is a pity most matches are not telecast.

    For a century, high-profile county teams had some of the best International players playing for them. I believe Viv Richards scored more runs playing for English counties than he did for West Indies. I don't see how the exposure to best foreign talent helped English cricket who are currently struggling to have 11 Englishmen in their 15-member squad.

    And I see why an IPL was needed. A domestic T20 cricket, with the traditional associations as the participants and with the rights to contract foreign players, would have been much better. A match between Mumbai and Delhi Ranji teams in much better than one between Mumbai Indians and Delhi Daredevils and has much richer history.

  • santhosh8866 on April 11, 2010, 9:27 GMT

    Ian is my one of the best commentators of cricket. I totally agree that Rohit has talent but he is hitting the self destruct button at the threshold of victory. Warner will learn from Sehwag because by nature he is very aggressive and he should retain that mindset no matter whats the situation. People hail you when you play your natural game and score hundred and conversely you will be in the line of fire when you under perform. So my advice is to stick to your natural game. I hate IPL commentary just because of the commercialization of the commentary. I think IPL will remove that feature from next version.Other than that sit back n enjoy the cricket. Its been quality cricket from IPL this year.

  • bulla on April 11, 2010, 9:05 GMT

    I think the money is an important part of the IPL, for the first time, the players are getting a cut of all the money that flows around in cricket - and has been flowing in other forms of the game as well, just that administrators have been loath to pass it on to those who were generating these sums. The greatest good that the IPL does is by allowing cricketers to focus solely on sport to generate a living - the days of player revolts over pay may well be past us if events like the IPL make it possible for even those players who are fortunate enough to get into national squads to make handsome sums of money. And had this happened a decade ago, maybe farces like the Brian Lara led West Indies team's refusal to tour South Africa till their pay is sorted out would have been avoided just as Shane Bond now need not worry about how to raise 3 kids on a cop's pay.

  • Alexk400 on April 11, 2010, 8:15 GMT

    Hmm NO!. Rohit sharma has talent. But he had brain lapses. He needs to play like Dravid and sehwag not try to be sehwag all the time.

    Warner definitely benefit with sehwag the other end. Warner has this competitveness and he wants to score more than sehwag , it also make his confidence little higher if he can match sehwag.

    Sehwag has his own method to madness. He scores 3 successive ball and save energy for another assault. Warner should gather energy but by taking singles with dabs and nurdles for next attack. I believe run should be scored of every ball. Not 4s and Sixers. That is what warner has to learn. Take singles of every ball (dhoni). That will make him australia's sehwag.

    I like IPL except the nauseating ADs and ugly product promotion by commentators..MRF blimp is ony ugly blimp ever seen with my eye.

    I also think 5 foreign players in team instead of 4 to give some more quality. Teams still select indian players by favour not by talent.

  • Quazar on April 11, 2010, 8:14 GMT

    Good to see an article acknowledging that the IPL ain't evil-incarnate! That was indeed a terrific game. But while Warne, the captain, was fantastic that night Warne, the bowler, was good, not sensational...it was more a case of the Deccan lower order batting like headless chickens! To me, Sid Trivedi was the MoM...taking 2 wickets in the final over (as well as effecting a run out) and conceding only 3 runs (when just 6 were needed) was simply sensational!

  • on April 11, 2010, 7:40 GMT

    I respect Ian Chappel's immense cricketing wisdom.I had got totally fed up with the crassness of the IPL.Maybe I should now see just the cricketing skill and ignore teh rest?Mr.Chappelli, you are weakening my resolve...

  • Great_Nate on April 11, 2010, 6:59 GMT

    Thanks Ian for a great article. I totally agree, but then you, as a commentator have been largely the instrument of my cricketing education! While I live in South Africa amongst the cricketing philistine who show great skill but little knowledge of the game, it is great to have the internet and ability to catch up on some real thinking about the game.

  • rko_rules on April 11, 2010, 6:35 GMT

    First of all, a big thanks to Shane Warne, the legend, who is actually helping a great deal, the Indian youngsters. Seriously, I m a great follower of Indian domestic cricket, apart from International which is ultimate. But we dont listen much about the names in rajasthan royals squad, I mean players like Sidharth trivedi, naman ojha, faiz fazal, and aditya dole, we dont get to listen about these players at all, on the other hand, other teams do have 2 or 3 big domestic stars, only Shane Warne can get the best out of these inexperienced low profile cricketers and taking the team forward to the semis with these players. That will help them and Indian cricket a great deal. And the game between rajasthan and deccan chargers was a great game and how Shane was encouraging his boys not to give up till the end, only A Legend like him can do that.

  • KhuMir on April 11, 2010, 6:12 GMT

    Of course the high batting scores aren't there because of how easy it is to score n India, what with the boundaries becoming smaller etc, but because of supposed talent eh? I bet I could score a couple of centuries in the IPL. Also, the only type of talent we're going to see emerging is Indian talent, teams are only going to have that much space for international players, and there are only 11 Indians for however many teams. So, obviously, there will be around, what, 10-12 Indian players found to have "talent". in the IPL, and the real talent from elsewhere won't be chosen because the owners will obviously bid for the best, with only 2-3 talented players from the rest of the world even looked at. No, sorry Ian, for a cricketer, your reasoning is weaker than mine is. And believe me, mine isn't the best

  • on April 11, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    mr.chappel has hit d nail ..on many points..though d IPL really turns out crass because of its over dose of commercialism but there are a 1000 moments where you really admire the skills of these talented individuals from india and abroad( point in case..warner and rohit...!!! ) Way to go IPL ..!!!!

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on April 11, 2010, 5:36 GMT

    Yea. No doubt that the things Chappel said is exactly why I like the IPL, it allows us to see several stars on 1 team..like a dream come through and as I said b-4, once the flaws and ridiculous advertisements get ironed out, it will be one of the best tourneys around. Personally, with the growth of the IPL, I would like to see the foreign restrictions lifted a bit as well, this will improve the quality and also ensure that only the best Indian youngsters play, maybe also there can be associate players getting a contract (Associate players should get a chance to get to play with some of the great players too!). If anything, they could even split the IPL into 2...1 for Indians only (maybe 1-2 guest players) and then the tourney with as many foreigners as they can afford. Ind has the demographics to support such tourneys, I think that they can work once the best interest of the game is considered. I think Warner and Rohit need to EARN a test spot though, not sneak it due to talent.

  • flashgordon214 on April 11, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    Thank you, Mr.Ian Chappell. I have been your fan since my younger days and by appreciating Rohit Sharma you have done a world of good for him. I can say he is bit unlucky and his shot selection may not be good at times, but his talent is never a question after having watched him in close quarters since his childhood. I wish the Indian selectors bring him in as a regular in the Test team. I wish him all the very best in the future.

  • melayaraja on April 11, 2010, 5:01 GMT

    I agree with Ian's first choice, Rohit. He has an all round game and can be a future super star in all 3 formats. He still needs to work on his shot selection and patience in order to step up for the Test format. David Warner on the other hand is a vey good option for 20-20,currently. I have not seen him muchon TV but from whatever I observed, I think that he is weak agiainst quality spin bowling. In his last 20-20 gmae he was seriously tested by medium pacer Dinda. He has a long way to go before he can talked alongside some other good players. His time with Sehwag, Dilshan, Gambhir, AB and Colingwood will be of great help to him.

  • RaghuramanR on April 11, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    // Forget talk about obscene amounts of money, disregard for a moment the scantily clad cheerleaders, overlook the fawning celebrities and concentrate on the game

    Easier said than done, isnt it? The medium IS BECOMING the message. If the IPL's objective is to throw up one odd cricketer with 'talent', then I dont think IPL is worth it. It is producing a bunch of mediocre players and yes, it is silly to expect people drafted into the national side based on their exploits in IPL. Rohit Sharma has been 'promising' for too long and has done nothing noteworthy in domestic or other competitions. The barrage of superlatives for every banal 'act' in an IPL match in the name of commentary is only leading people to view IPL with circumspect, to put it mildly. We have fielders saluting the crowd after taking a dolly of a catch :(

  • CRam on April 11, 2010, 4:20 GMT

    I wonder if it is a good time to look at TEST matches between franchises!

  • sekharbobba on April 11, 2010, 3:50 GMT

    very well said, Ian Chappell is always interesting to listen.

  • Ulio on April 11, 2010, 3:31 GMT

    Ian, IPL is a great idea to be honest and almost all of the games are great and the game between Deccans and Rajasthan was indeed a great one. What bothers is me that commentary is awful and few other if taken out can make it far more fun. Thanks

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • Ulio on April 11, 2010, 3:31 GMT

    Ian, IPL is a great idea to be honest and almost all of the games are great and the game between Deccans and Rajasthan was indeed a great one. What bothers is me that commentary is awful and few other if taken out can make it far more fun. Thanks

  • sekharbobba on April 11, 2010, 3:50 GMT

    very well said, Ian Chappell is always interesting to listen.

  • CRam on April 11, 2010, 4:20 GMT

    I wonder if it is a good time to look at TEST matches between franchises!

  • RaghuramanR on April 11, 2010, 4:52 GMT

    // Forget talk about obscene amounts of money, disregard for a moment the scantily clad cheerleaders, overlook the fawning celebrities and concentrate on the game

    Easier said than done, isnt it? The medium IS BECOMING the message. If the IPL's objective is to throw up one odd cricketer with 'talent', then I dont think IPL is worth it. It is producing a bunch of mediocre players and yes, it is silly to expect people drafted into the national side based on their exploits in IPL. Rohit Sharma has been 'promising' for too long and has done nothing noteworthy in domestic or other competitions. The barrage of superlatives for every banal 'act' in an IPL match in the name of commentary is only leading people to view IPL with circumspect, to put it mildly. We have fielders saluting the crowd after taking a dolly of a catch :(

  • melayaraja on April 11, 2010, 5:01 GMT

    I agree with Ian's first choice, Rohit. He has an all round game and can be a future super star in all 3 formats. He still needs to work on his shot selection and patience in order to step up for the Test format. David Warner on the other hand is a vey good option for 20-20,currently. I have not seen him muchon TV but from whatever I observed, I think that he is weak agiainst quality spin bowling. In his last 20-20 gmae he was seriously tested by medium pacer Dinda. He has a long way to go before he can talked alongside some other good players. His time with Sehwag, Dilshan, Gambhir, AB and Colingwood will be of great help to him.

  • flashgordon214 on April 11, 2010, 5:12 GMT

    Thank you, Mr.Ian Chappell. I have been your fan since my younger days and by appreciating Rohit Sharma you have done a world of good for him. I can say he is bit unlucky and his shot selection may not be good at times, but his talent is never a question after having watched him in close quarters since his childhood. I wish the Indian selectors bring him in as a regular in the Test team. I wish him all the very best in the future.

  • _NEUTRAL_Fan_ on April 11, 2010, 5:36 GMT

    Yea. No doubt that the things Chappel said is exactly why I like the IPL, it allows us to see several stars on 1 team..like a dream come through and as I said b-4, once the flaws and ridiculous advertisements get ironed out, it will be one of the best tourneys around. Personally, with the growth of the IPL, I would like to see the foreign restrictions lifted a bit as well, this will improve the quality and also ensure that only the best Indian youngsters play, maybe also there can be associate players getting a contract (Associate players should get a chance to get to play with some of the great players too!). If anything, they could even split the IPL into 2...1 for Indians only (maybe 1-2 guest players) and then the tourney with as many foreigners as they can afford. Ind has the demographics to support such tourneys, I think that they can work once the best interest of the game is considered. I think Warner and Rohit need to EARN a test spot though, not sneak it due to talent.

  • on April 11, 2010, 5:48 GMT

    mr.chappel has hit d nail ..on many points..though d IPL really turns out crass because of its over dose of commercialism but there are a 1000 moments where you really admire the skills of these talented individuals from india and abroad( point in case..warner and rohit...!!! ) Way to go IPL ..!!!!

  • KhuMir on April 11, 2010, 6:12 GMT

    Of course the high batting scores aren't there because of how easy it is to score n India, what with the boundaries becoming smaller etc, but because of supposed talent eh? I bet I could score a couple of centuries in the IPL. Also, the only type of talent we're going to see emerging is Indian talent, teams are only going to have that much space for international players, and there are only 11 Indians for however many teams. So, obviously, there will be around, what, 10-12 Indian players found to have "talent". in the IPL, and the real talent from elsewhere won't be chosen because the owners will obviously bid for the best, with only 2-3 talented players from the rest of the world even looked at. No, sorry Ian, for a cricketer, your reasoning is weaker than mine is. And believe me, mine isn't the best

  • rko_rules on April 11, 2010, 6:35 GMT

    First of all, a big thanks to Shane Warne, the legend, who is actually helping a great deal, the Indian youngsters. Seriously, I m a great follower of Indian domestic cricket, apart from International which is ultimate. But we dont listen much about the names in rajasthan royals squad, I mean players like Sidharth trivedi, naman ojha, faiz fazal, and aditya dole, we dont get to listen about these players at all, on the other hand, other teams do have 2 or 3 big domestic stars, only Shane Warne can get the best out of these inexperienced low profile cricketers and taking the team forward to the semis with these players. That will help them and Indian cricket a great deal. And the game between rajasthan and deccan chargers was a great game and how Shane was encouraging his boys not to give up till the end, only A Legend like him can do that.