March 16, 2012

The man who beat the machine

For his two decades in the game, Tendulkar has kept the fame monster, every big sportsman's nemesis, at bay
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Even after the shouting has subsided and the whirling dust of celebration given way to the stillness of normalcy again, Sachin Tendulkar's numbers will still speak eloquently and loudly. A hundred international hundreds is an unreal number. It is more than a four-minute mile or a perfect ten or a clutch of Grand Slam titles in tennis or golf majors.

As Tendulkar's final step towards the Hundredth extended across series and continents and lasted days and months, the record was deemed to be artificially created and farcically obsessed over. The quest went from being considered an enormous feat to a petty pursuit. Whatever else it may be, Tendulkar's numbers will never go away, no matter what we think of them. Or even that the 100th came against an opposition far from formidable, in a tournament never lauded, in an unfashionable town and, with a final wicked twist, a game that was lost.

The context of Tendulkar's 100th century will be remembered today, tomorrow, even at the end of his career. Debating societies will exhaust themselves over its significance, particularly what transpired between 99 and 100. But the memory of Tendulkar's labours over the last 12 months will not outlast the hundreds. The numbers will neither be repeated nor surpassed. A hundred hundreds are the stuff of sporting eternity; this is our generation's 99.94.

For an entire year it actually seemed destined to become the 99.94 - a final Bradmanesque flourish of imperfection. In less than three months, between December 2010 and March 2011, Tendulkar had scored four centuries in 12 innings. His march towards the 100th was, we believed, destined. A hundred centuries was a landmark waiting to be reached. Except, of course, like every cricketer will tell you, nothing is merely written, because everything is accounted for. The game sought its dues and Tendulkar paid with with heavy interest. Between Nagpur and Mirpur, he has clanked through various gears to find the form to take him past three figures. From free-flowing to fastidious, from studiousness to abandon, from the purity of shot to anxiety of thought. He came close, went adrift and over and over again.

Tendulkar's failure to get across that ever-receding line had actually begun to shrink the hundred in its import. In the period, he took surprising decisions that have still not been clearly explained: he first missed out on a Test series for the first time in his career for reasons other than injury, and he chose to return to the ODI game after the World Cup, first in Australia and then, to everyone's surprise, in the Asia Cup.

Along with Tendulkar's trials, there was mayhem in India's Test cricket, the team went through two tours from hell. The eight Test defeats were larger than the absence of a Tendulkar hundred. Eight-zero reflects a worrisome future for Indian cricket which is not going away soon. The completion of 100 centuries still stand though for Tendulkar's appetite, drive and sheer cussedness as a competitor over two decades - and the combination of those qualities will be gone from Indian cricket sooner rather than later.

What unsettles some is that Tendulkar's 100th had to arrive in ODI cricket. Mirpur was not pretty, it did not round off a great script, it did not reflect the nobility of the longer version of the game, or indeed, the purity of Tendulkar's own game at its best. India didn't even win. But there it was. Slammed down our throats like a shot of country liquor. Gulp that down, boys.

Yet, it was in the short form cricket that Tendulkar became the boy-man to walk out for India and it was with 50-over feats that he first grew in the public eye. His identity as team-mate and prodigy, colleague and hero in Test cricket, will remain his most enduring. But one-day cricket has always been bread and butter. Tendulkar has often said that opening the innings in ODIs helped bring a greater range of shots into his Test game. So what if Mirpur was not poetry or fine dining? Right now, bread and butter will do just fine.

The 100 international hundreds are an essential part of the reason why Tendulkar has continued to survive in the game; this desire to put his game into repeated examination, has remained front and centre in his life, over and above everything else - the pop-icon status, the cult, the insane fans, the media circus, the protesting body, the clock, the scorn. The fact that the 100 hundreds even exist is because he wanted questions asked of himself and he found ways to answer them. A few minutes after Mirpur had happened, Sanjay Manjrekar tweeted to say that attention should not be so much on the 100th hundred, "but how he got his 100 hundreds."

For a large demographic looking for clarity in a churning world, Tendulkar represents an idea that will always wrestle with contemporary circumstance: the athlete as a clean, fair, respectful and successful competitor. It is so old-fashioned a notion that it gets called boring

Today Tendulkar is seen on billboards, on television, in magazines and newspapers, saying this, offering that, standing for something else - a corporation, clothing, a bank. This constant presence can dim an athlete's aura and annoy his public. But magically, not Tendulkar's. In the world of advertising and marketing, they may think of him as The Brand, but he is yet to be been consumed by it. The Brand is not yet a brand. Unlike what Andre Agassi - a Tendulkar contemporary at one stage - became for a while. Or like David Beckham is now. Or Tiger Woods used to be. Or MS Dhoni has tipped over into. As India and Indian cricket have changed during the course of his career, Tendulkar mysteriously has not.

In his two-decade-long odyssey, his main opponents, you would imagine, were bowlers, pitches, the opposition. He was, however, also involved in another contest, running on a parallel track for the same length of time. Tendulkar versus the Machine.

It was Sports Illustrated writer Gary Smith who first described the Machine in 1997, as he tried to argue the (now tragic) claim of Tiger Woods' father: that his son was not just a golfer but humanity's Chosen One. Smith didn't believe the idea, because, he said, in the contest against the Machine, with its "chewing mechanism of fame", the athlete could never win.

Circa 1997, Woods was what Tendulkar still is, and these were Smith's words:

"The machine will win, because it too is destiny, five billion destinies leaning against one... it will wear the young man down, cloud his judgement, steal his sweetness... The machine will win because it has no mind. It flattens even as it lifts, trivialises even as it exalts, spreads a man so wide and thin that he becomes margarine..."

In just over a decade Smith's fears for Woods came true. The Machine today is a recognisable, seductive, dangerous thing. It is fuelled by success, fame, money, celebrity, the image industry, all of which have seeped into the Tendulkar career, alongside the startling inevitability of his progress. Every series, every game, every season, every year, every achievement, Tendulkar goes up against his external adversaries and also the Machine. That he has stayed ahead of the Machine so far is as much of an achievement as 100 centuries and thousands of runs. That he has not turned into margarine is a miracle.

In an interview Tendulkar spoke of a moment early in his career, about what had happened to him just after he pulled on the India cap and t-shirt: "You start thinking that, oh, I'm somebody special." An unnamed friend then sent him a message. "Just tell Sachin that I've noticed he is probably starting to think differently. The sooner he realises that, the better it is."

Tendulkar said, "And I sat back and I realised that, yes it was true..." It is not the most profound piece of wisdom, it was probably a mate, saying, "Hey, don't act like a punk, yaar." But it came at the right time. For the particularly gifted and successful athlete, the penny often drops all too late.

Tendulkar's survival in a brutal business - Indian cricket, which first skyrocketed to financial highs before achieving consistent sporting success - has extended beyond his being a conventional "role model", defined and lauded by "good" public deeds. For a large demographic looking for clarity in a churning world, Tendulkar represents an idea that will always wrestle with contemporary circumstance: the athlete as a clean, fair, respectful and successful competitor. It is so old-fashioned a notion that it gets called boring.

Being so boring is actually hard work. For a man who hates losing, it cannot be said Tendulkar has no ego. (All the great ones have large egos.) For a man who loves cars, it cannot be said he does not appreciate wealth. (Who does not?) What probably overrides both these powerful intoxicants, along with the advice from his friend, is a central belief that keeps Tendulkar a step ahead of the Machine, that convinces him to keep his own publicity at bay.

He is not merely a student of cricket but, in fact, a devotee. Tendulkar never throws his bat, ever. There is a clue there. He understands what he would be without that bat. If he leaves the dressing room like a snarling competitor (telling Virender Sehwag before they went out to bat together against Pakistan in the 2003 World Cup, "I'm going to get these guys") he returns with humility. Every dismissal is a reminder of his flaws, his weaknesses.

His former India coach John Wright says that after he is out, there are never wild displays of emotion. The aggressor and accumulator becomes a reflective batsman in the dressing room who sits down to debrief himself. It is why, Wright said, Tendulkar "knows where to go with his mind and his technique".

Those around him say he forgets nothing about his time in cricket, about others who shared the field with him, what happened, what was said to him. Be it in his neighbourhood as a schoolboy, or in his first club game, or during a match played before thousands, when a nation held its breath. It is why he goes to meet his now-ailing coach before every tour, how he stays true to his gift. It is how he dodges the Machine.

Twenty years on, what is easiest to understand about Tendulkar is his cricket. How it all falls into place: the eye reads the length of the ball, the mind decides to pick a stroke, the feet follow that instant of shot selection, the arms and torso choreograph towards the moment of impact.

It is the man who has evaded the Machine who is the mystery. People say it is his background, his family, his deep moorings, but the Machine has always seen it all before and still won. Maybe it is because Tendulkar actually comes from another time, when he played a different sport to the one he now explores. He comes not only from a time that is now just memory, his familiar surroundings as a growing boy have now turned into another place. When all else fails, it is there, that time, that space that he can return to in his mind: what did he want to do as a 14-year-old? Bat. Score runs. How many? A hundred. When? Every time. The 100 India hundreds are not the only ones that define his career; he also has 38 first-class hundreds. And the schools cricket scores, and the pick-up matches he could play, and the tours he went on when he was 13 or 14 or 15.

When Tendulkar first broke through, he was a very shy teenager, a prodigy who didn't like being treated as one, who hated attention and barely spoke to strangers. Who disliked being photographed outside his area of work. Who had police constables standing outside the examination hall where he took his class XII exams. He could have folded up, he could have fled, but he has looked the Machine in the eye and stood his ground. It means now, on the field, the crowd bears down on him, surrounds him, demands of him. There is not a public space in India that he can walk free in; his holidays in Mussoorie for the last few years now have begun and ended with a short press conference.

It is the Machine, always at his side, purring, growling, always trying to win. He will have to keep it at bay for the rest of his life, but for the moment, with the fortress of a hundred international hundreds around him, Sachin Tendulkar is winning.

Sharda Ugra is senior editor at ESPNcricinfo

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • POSTED BY sachin86 on | March 19, 2012, 21:44 GMT

    Comparing the average,hundreds conversion sachin is better than all his peers.It's a myth that sachin accumulated these stats over time playing many matches.True to an extent but if you see his average and hundreds conversion he is still better than ponting or kallis who are behind him with less number of matches.On top of that the more the matches you play your average tends to go down..but sachin has been consistent with average above 55 for most of his career which is the sign of a genius... If ponting and kallis ever play as many matches as sachin they would never beat his record just going by their present average and i'm not even considering the longevity factor where one's average decreases the more you play particularly at the twilight of one's career...

  • POSTED BY sachin86 on | March 19, 2012, 21:27 GMT

    @BillyCC

    Bradman played 37 out of his 52 tests against ENG.He played either in england or australia.Bowlers he faced were no where to be seen in any all-time list of great bowlers. It's ludicrous that you are comparing someone who just played 80 innings with 99.94 average to the one who played 764 innings(both tests and ODIs combined) with 49.06 average in two different formats playing at 100s of grounds across the world in varied conditions spanning over two decades facing different bowlers with a billion people expectations who castigate him at the drop of a hat.Sir,he is the greatest ever.

  • POSTED BY BillyCC on | March 19, 2012, 20:40 GMT

    @jay57870, how about the numbers 100 vs 56? That's the difference between Bradman's average and Tendulkar's average. How about the numbers 56 vs 57? That's Tendulkar's average versus Kallis' average. And finally, how about 100 vs 60? That's Bradman's average versus the next highest average. Hope you are registering this now and yes, it is mind-boggling. @Gaurav Banodha, completely agree with you. It is the conversion rate that always matters in cricket, not the quantity. The quantity will always come as more and more matches are played.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 19:44 GMT

    @Sharda Ugra i used to hear all time that women have very less cricket brain but very good at to find the fault hence you proved it. i request you to leave yourAC press room and go to the field and play some cricket then you will understand what sachin is doing for last 23 years.

  • POSTED BY chaitu14 on | March 19, 2012, 19:07 GMT

    hi ramesh somanathan. in the series u mentioned where sachin and other seniors failed..what was it with the juniors..who performed well?? except kohli no other player..bowler nor the batsmen performed well. then why is that we have to blame seniors. and comparing with australia (and ricky).. that is just a team became great because of the great players once whelmed the team.. once those players retired.. ricky ponting is just a n ordinary player i feel is technically sound but uncapable of winning games on his own when there is fear that theres no one else to play except him. but sachin played with that thought in mind for almost a decade.. i still remember me tuning off television once sachin got out..but for ricky..he playd all kinds of strokes with ease coz he was not worried coz there were even better strokemakers after him to savee the team.that makes sachin great

  • POSTED BY soumyas on | March 19, 2012, 18:16 GMT

    @VickyN, spot on... i remember similar disgraceful article by S.Ugra when we lost all the tests in Australia, some journalists like ugra think themselves as too smart. On that article i put a comment saying S.Ugra doesn't deserve to write anything when india bak on winning. they should realize they are not even 0.001% compared to gr8s like Sachin Tendulkar. What u write on cricket legends doesn't change anything in the minds of cricket fans, rather its your image which is going to get spoiled. remember it SHARDA UGRA....

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 17:34 GMT

    One thing i l ike about tedulker is that he is a greAat sportsman..........he isn,t aggressive and short tempered like other indian players .eg. kohli, yuvraj , gambhir.....great achievement by a cool player..........

  • POSTED BY amitgarg78 on | March 19, 2012, 15:49 GMT

    @rockyanindianfan, Did you know that 33 of his 49 ODI centuries are in victory? Nobody else has even scored that many, let alone in wins! Story of his life is to score runs and then see the team blow it. This is a team sport and all members of the team are expected to do their part!

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 15:06 GMT

    jay57850 why is it that people like you compare only the amount of runs scored and not number of matches played? imagine what if bradman or ponting played as many matches as sachin has? ?????? please dont say that people like ponting , lara etc would lose passion and hunger for runs if they were to play for such long period. i appreciate sachin's appetite for runs but not ready to accept that other greats didnt have it in them. it really is a poor argument when sachin is compared with other greats.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 14:39 GMT

    Tendulkar is a batting genius and has most records to his name. He has to score his runs( obviously) against better bowling line-ups (mostly). When playing away, it is mostly tough batting conditions or at least alien batting conditions. India is known for batting greats , not so much for bowling. The batting greats from opposition thus have it that much more easier. When they play in India, on pitches which are flat, they can not have more easy than that , right? The point is , regardless of conditions which are same to both the teams everywhere it is played, just like the rules, only Tendulkar scored 200 in a ODI for the first time, and only he scored 100 100S In international cricket. Yes, it is really to sad to notice how we treat our sporting heroes. We go berserk saying that one billion people and not one medal in Olympics. When someone produces a world record, after having a extra-ordinary career by any stretch of imagination, we call for his head ! Great Indian hypocrisy !!!

  • POSTED BY sachin86 on | March 19, 2012, 21:44 GMT

    Comparing the average,hundreds conversion sachin is better than all his peers.It's a myth that sachin accumulated these stats over time playing many matches.True to an extent but if you see his average and hundreds conversion he is still better than ponting or kallis who are behind him with less number of matches.On top of that the more the matches you play your average tends to go down..but sachin has been consistent with average above 55 for most of his career which is the sign of a genius... If ponting and kallis ever play as many matches as sachin they would never beat his record just going by their present average and i'm not even considering the longevity factor where one's average decreases the more you play particularly at the twilight of one's career...

  • POSTED BY sachin86 on | March 19, 2012, 21:27 GMT

    @BillyCC

    Bradman played 37 out of his 52 tests against ENG.He played either in england or australia.Bowlers he faced were no where to be seen in any all-time list of great bowlers. It's ludicrous that you are comparing someone who just played 80 innings with 99.94 average to the one who played 764 innings(both tests and ODIs combined) with 49.06 average in two different formats playing at 100s of grounds across the world in varied conditions spanning over two decades facing different bowlers with a billion people expectations who castigate him at the drop of a hat.Sir,he is the greatest ever.

  • POSTED BY BillyCC on | March 19, 2012, 20:40 GMT

    @jay57870, how about the numbers 100 vs 56? That's the difference between Bradman's average and Tendulkar's average. How about the numbers 56 vs 57? That's Tendulkar's average versus Kallis' average. And finally, how about 100 vs 60? That's Bradman's average versus the next highest average. Hope you are registering this now and yes, it is mind-boggling. @Gaurav Banodha, completely agree with you. It is the conversion rate that always matters in cricket, not the quantity. The quantity will always come as more and more matches are played.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 19:44 GMT

    @Sharda Ugra i used to hear all time that women have very less cricket brain but very good at to find the fault hence you proved it. i request you to leave yourAC press room and go to the field and play some cricket then you will understand what sachin is doing for last 23 years.

  • POSTED BY chaitu14 on | March 19, 2012, 19:07 GMT

    hi ramesh somanathan. in the series u mentioned where sachin and other seniors failed..what was it with the juniors..who performed well?? except kohli no other player..bowler nor the batsmen performed well. then why is that we have to blame seniors. and comparing with australia (and ricky).. that is just a team became great because of the great players once whelmed the team.. once those players retired.. ricky ponting is just a n ordinary player i feel is technically sound but uncapable of winning games on his own when there is fear that theres no one else to play except him. but sachin played with that thought in mind for almost a decade.. i still remember me tuning off television once sachin got out..but for ricky..he playd all kinds of strokes with ease coz he was not worried coz there were even better strokemakers after him to savee the team.that makes sachin great

  • POSTED BY soumyas on | March 19, 2012, 18:16 GMT

    @VickyN, spot on... i remember similar disgraceful article by S.Ugra when we lost all the tests in Australia, some journalists like ugra think themselves as too smart. On that article i put a comment saying S.Ugra doesn't deserve to write anything when india bak on winning. they should realize they are not even 0.001% compared to gr8s like Sachin Tendulkar. What u write on cricket legends doesn't change anything in the minds of cricket fans, rather its your image which is going to get spoiled. remember it SHARDA UGRA....

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 17:34 GMT

    One thing i l ike about tedulker is that he is a greAat sportsman..........he isn,t aggressive and short tempered like other indian players .eg. kohli, yuvraj , gambhir.....great achievement by a cool player..........

  • POSTED BY amitgarg78 on | March 19, 2012, 15:49 GMT

    @rockyanindianfan, Did you know that 33 of his 49 ODI centuries are in victory? Nobody else has even scored that many, let alone in wins! Story of his life is to score runs and then see the team blow it. This is a team sport and all members of the team are expected to do their part!

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 15:06 GMT

    jay57850 why is it that people like you compare only the amount of runs scored and not number of matches played? imagine what if bradman or ponting played as many matches as sachin has? ?????? please dont say that people like ponting , lara etc would lose passion and hunger for runs if they were to play for such long period. i appreciate sachin's appetite for runs but not ready to accept that other greats didnt have it in them. it really is a poor argument when sachin is compared with other greats.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 14:39 GMT

    Tendulkar is a batting genius and has most records to his name. He has to score his runs( obviously) against better bowling line-ups (mostly). When playing away, it is mostly tough batting conditions or at least alien batting conditions. India is known for batting greats , not so much for bowling. The batting greats from opposition thus have it that much more easier. When they play in India, on pitches which are flat, they can not have more easy than that , right? The point is , regardless of conditions which are same to both the teams everywhere it is played, just like the rules, only Tendulkar scored 200 in a ODI for the first time, and only he scored 100 100S In international cricket. Yes, it is really to sad to notice how we treat our sporting heroes. We go berserk saying that one billion people and not one medal in Olympics. When someone produces a world record, after having a extra-ordinary career by any stretch of imagination, we call for his head ! Great Indian hypocrisy !!!

  • POSTED BY VickyN on | March 19, 2012, 12:58 GMT

    @Sharda Ugra: Should I remind comments on Tendulkar in your article "The same old selection cop-out"? I know you are in a business to sell but please be true to yourself. You were out with a knife for Tendulkar a week back and now here you are simply wowed by his perseverance and tenacity. The greatness of Tendulkar is his love and belief in the game beyond lime hogging criticism by some "experts". He is a genuine man with humble yet keen sense of affairs of the game - he will fair goodbye with elegance and style. Never forget RESPECT! (Cricinfo not sure if this will be published but I hope you will respect fairness of this forum)

  • POSTED BY jay57870 on | March 19, 2012, 12:56 GMT

    Every cricket-lover knows the numbers 6,996 & 29: Those are the great Don's stats for total runs & centuries in Tests. Does anybody recognize the numbers 6,992 & 29? Probably not. Well, that's the gap between Sachin's achievement & the next closest (or farthest) guy Ricky Ponting in their international careers todate. You do the math: Sachin's 33,896 & 100 vs Ricky's 26,904 & 71. Does it register now? It's mind-boggling: Tendulkar is so far ahead of the next guy - it equals what Bradman achieved in his entire Test career! Sachin's is the "most dominant" performance of all, notwithstanding the singular 99.94! He's done it over 22 years (6 more than the next four: Ponting, Kallis, Dravid & Lara). That's Staying Power: played through injury, pain, fatigue & slumps; faced adversity & crises; and, yes, the constant scrutiny of media & public; even security threats. The man is the Ultimate Cricketer: he's done it with humanity, dignity & integrity. That's why he stands at the top alone!!!

  • POSTED BY BillyCC on | March 19, 2012, 10:29 GMT

    @TheOnlyEmperor, agree with all your comments except for the comment regarding Bradman's knocks as being inspiring in his era only to the Aussies and the English. Bradman's career transcended cricketing generations to the extent that Tendulkar was thrilled to have met him back in the 1990s. Now that is inspiration at its best. In this way, Bradman's record is not meaningless but the most meaningful of all. And he averaged 100 whilst the next best is 60.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 9:34 GMT

    What a difference between India and Australia in the way we treat our great players. While Australians are close to reality, we Indians refuse to recognize the decline of batting skills of our past heroes. After Ricky Ponting's repeated failures in the ODIS' ( though he did very well in test matches), they dropped him. But we do not see the decline of our past Greats Dravid, VVS and Tendulkar Only Dravid decided to retire but Sachin just managed a century against lowly Bangladesh after his failures in England and Australia. Bravo, the whole country go berserk in describing him as the greatest after his Bangladesh century. Tendulkar will never retire seeing such adulation many of which are exaggerations. Recognize the emergence of new heroes, Kohli,Rohit, Pujara and Badrinath who are denied entries because of the hold of seniors like Tendulkar, VVS. Only Dravid saw it fit to retire, while others are still clinging on to past glories.

  • POSTED BY SouthPaw on | March 19, 2012, 8:24 GMT

    Sharda Ugra: You try very hard to fit the metaphor to the man, but unfortunately you fail. SRT is human, and those who know him closely know that he is fallible, but luckily for him, he has escaped media attention of these "little transgressions" thanks to his stature in the Indian society. So, the machine has won here too, except, it doesn't matter! Even if Sachin lost to the machine, he is still great and the darling of the Indian cricketing public.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 6:40 GMT

    The man who beat the machine . . . Sachin Tendulkar

  • POSTED BY TheOnlyEmperor on | March 19, 2012, 5:53 GMT

    What impresses me most about SRT's performance is his consistency over 22 years, 600+ games across several countries and over 58 grounds. It's not just the 100 centuries when the next best is at 71, but also the fact that he had 28 scores in the 90s when the next best is at 14. He definitely tried his best to excel. After all, as he himself put it, every batsman when he steps on the pitch to bat would love to score a century and that's what he tried to do every time he played. The many centuries AND the nineties are a hallmark to Sachin's greatness, when all the other cricketers seem plain and ordinary in international cricket's 135 year odd history.

  • POSTED BY TheOnlyEmperor on | March 19, 2012, 5:00 GMT

    When the team takes a hammering from various opposition, it's hard to rise over the low feeling in the dressing room and excel. That's what Sachin did when he started his campaign of excellence in the 1990s. It is Sachin's doggedness to battling opposition that have endeared to him to the country, in a way that's 10 times more than the impact Kapil, Saurav, Dravid, Dhoni, Kumble or Kohli could ever dream of achieving. Bradman's knocks were inspiring in his era to the Aussies and English. They were the only 2 countries that played any competitive cricket then, which is why Bradman's records become meaningless when compared to Sachin's. Ricky, Richards, Sobers and Kallis have been part of winning teams, teams already with great players. Lara was special in that regard, but not close to Sachin. Let's not forget, it took 2900+ODIs and nearly 40 years for any cricketer to score 200 and that man was Sachin! Priceless!

  • POSTED BY TheOnlyEmperor on | March 19, 2012, 4:42 GMT

    It's only the petty that can argue with SRT's greatness and that he's the best ever. He's scored all of this in diverse grounds and opposition, playing so many matches over 22 years, coming in as a child prodigy and not getting burnt out, bearing the expectations of a billion plus people, fighting to excel, staying humble, staying free of controversy, being a great brand ambassador to the game, being successful in various formats, adapting his technique when required to combat body injury or batting circumstance, lifting an entire team's batting standards and self belief of an entire nation with little sport tradition - these are the things that set him apart. He's the first man in cricket to do a lot of things. Others have and will achieve what he's done and say it's no big deal, but it's always a big deal to be the first and even Bradman recognised that in SRT. India lost the match because of poor bowling and not 'cos of SRT. People who think otherwise, DON'T KNOW cricket. Period.

  • POSTED BY on | March 19, 2012, 3:06 GMT

    I remember reading in The Hindu News paper roughly in 96- 97 where a statistician from some University (I apologies i cant remember his name or the article date, but i remember the stats, this is no plagiarism...okay;) )had analyzed that Tendulkar would finish with 85 centuries in all forms of the game to gather (it was only Test and ODI in 86.97). I thought the statistician was unrealistic 50-60 was more realistic.....Tendulkar has proved beyond 85........

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 23:30 GMT

    Run Machine. Will take forever to replicate this feat

  • POSTED BY BillyCC on | March 18, 2012, 20:22 GMT

    @sachin86, I agree with your assessment that this is an amazing feat but disagree with your other conclusion. In fact, I think Tendulkar has actually dropped a couple of places in the all-time greatest batsman list simply because of the way he got to this 100 centuries. It has taken him a long time, and in the process, he performed very poorly in England and Australia at a time when he was in the form of his life (thinking back to the 2009/10 seasons). So the process of him getting this final century has cost him being the undisputed second greatest batsman of all time. Bradman remains a clear number 1 and I would say there are now others who you could argue can be number 2.

  • POSTED BY jay57870 on | March 18, 2012, 16:57 GMT

    Much as Sachin likes to push the pedal to the metal & burn rubber, he's transformed himself with time into yet another type of scoring machine: Hybrid. Top-performance & Fuel-efficiency. He still has enough gas in the tank. It's been a long ride with a lot of wear & tear. The journey continues though. He knows how to preserve his energy & not burn it off prematurely. He knows how to change gears to handle the speed-bumps. Or when to go into overdrive & up the ante. But it's not just about horsepower or mileage. Even car guys are emotional. People love Sachin for his cricket. Like a great car, his batting evokes emotions. There's an element of humanity that transcends scoring machines & all else. Like Sachin said matter-of-factly yesterday: "I am human and I have emotions"! As Viv points out: it's "the little things that make him both human and exceptional". Yes, he's the Ultimate Cricketer! In a great tribute to Sachin on his 100th, Viv declares: "Sachin stands alone at the summit"!!!

  • POSTED BY jay57870 on | March 18, 2012, 16:47 GMT

    Yes Sharda - He's not a machine. But Sachin is the Ultimate Scoring Machine. Yes, he's a serious car guy. Like the bimmer, he gives "sheer pleasure" to all cricket-lovers. He can go anywhere & just about do anything. Vroom. Vroom. He loves racing. He's taken his favourite driving machine, a Ferrari, on the expressway (like a dragway), firing on all cylinders & pushing it to its limits - like a revved-up batting machine. He's kicked tyres & appeared in car ads, clearly "outbranding" the machine on display. How? Quality. Reliability. Durability. Sachin's QRD is best-in-class. But machines have a life cycle. They're prone to breakdowns and (worse) accidents. A crash & the car is disabled or totaled. An injury in cricket can be damaging too: Especially "an elbow injury and corrective surgery could be akin to a professional death knell," says Viv Richards re: Sachin's injuries. The way he "overcame those setbacks and played at the highest level with unmatched distinction is special"! (TBC)

  • POSTED BY sachin86 on | March 18, 2012, 16:27 GMT

    Such an amazing feat!He stands well and above his peers and predecessors.Sachin now climbed a step above bradman with this feat.Sachin is surely the greatest batsman of all-time.His career is the epitome of human excellence.The fact that everyone talks about even his smallest of the small failures to a larger extent shows that it's deeply ingrained in our brains that he is invincible and immortal.Even Bradman couldn't have fared this well if he was in sachin's shoes.34000 runs,100 100s in a 23 year long career with a billion people pressure is a super-human achievement and nothing short of a landmark achievement in human history.

    Bradman's average maybe be beaten if at all there will come a player who will have a short dynamic career like bradman but sachin's 100 100s can not be beaten or emulated in this cosmic cycle.

  • POSTED BY prashant1 on | March 18, 2012, 14:52 GMT

    GOD ....is back !!! wooo hooo !!! Many many more runs and Hundreds to flow from his golden willow...and also would love to see the naysayers cringe EVEN MORE after 23 years !! Ha..Ha!!! love it!!!

  • POSTED BY NALINWIJ on | March 18, 2012, 14:01 GMT

    There are 3 records in cricket that will never be broken as this game has reached a saturation point with the advent of t20 cricket. BRADMAN'S AVERAGE [99.94] MUALI'S 800 WICKETS and SACHIN'S INTERNATIONAL CENTURIES.

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 12:23 GMT

    Title of your piece is somewhat contrary to what Tendulkar was doing for last one year. A statistical belief of 100 International centuries is the sign of a mechanical society. Where Architects are adamant on building big booming stands rather than green and beautiful mounds of grass (New Adelaide Oval is the example), where art is measured by the auctions and prices. In such a society figures such as big money, and statistical data overpowers many rationale and discretionary things. Media and power establishments become the biggest proponents of such a make belief. Its not a surprise that for past one year Media is the biggest player in mounting pressure on Tendulkar for his ton. sachin tendulkar with all due respect to his genius, easily got affected and started tinkering with his game. he may well have defeated the machine for twenty one years for his career, but certainly not for last one year. he was beaten by machine and methods of Modern day efforts of garnering power,Revnue

  • POSTED BY davidgtgc on | March 18, 2012, 11:39 GMT

    Everybody blames Sachin's Strike rate on the last match. Actually it was not because of his problem, it was the Indian bowlers who throw away the match. Indian bowlers were worst than the Bangalasesh Bowlers and that's why were unable to defend of 290, which was against Bangladesh. Then who is the reason? Sachin............? No, it was because of Bowlers as well as the Captain. Indian bowling department is nothing...they are below average...even school children can defeat...that is the condition.. So try to focus in improving the bowling standards. Especially India msut have good bowling pitch which supports pace bowlers. Anyway Congrats to Sachin!

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 11:03 GMT

    What ever the world say.............sachin is the best batsman ever .......given the fact that if sachin was an Australian they would say he is the greatest ! we all know what's the issue ! same matter with murali.........If he was an Aussie they won't criticize him over his action !

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 10:19 GMT

    Great achievement from a great batsman, no doubt. Sachin will be remembered by cricketing world for another 100 years; there is no doubt about that either. However, after his 97th, 98th or 99th, we knew the 100th would come one day. So, no surprise there. Whether it is up there with Bradman's 99.94 is irrelevant too. The niggling thoughts I find hard to put away though are (a) whether India lost some games in his individual record's pursuit, (b) would India not have been a better cricket team today, if we had blooded and nurtured a lot more cricketers (other than Raina and Kohli) over last two years if he were to call it a day at that time and lastlly (c) would we have not won the World Cup is Sachin wasn't in the team?

  • POSTED BY cricket_wins on | March 18, 2012, 9:56 GMT

    Tendulkar is not above the game or the country. Criticizing him doesn't require knowledge of the game or a track record that is 'worthy' of criticizing him. In a democracy, we have the right to criticize anyone who represents the country. I don't have the right to abuse anyone, but criticism, yes. Especially if that person represent my country. With this context, I say that his pursuit of 'playing cricket because I am still hungry for runs' is a selfish pursuit. Will a valuable slot in the Indian XI be left to satisfy personal hunger of one player? Especially if the player is not available for all matches? He is not god. He is merely a cricket player with good talent and a good track record, so that's that. But all good things have to come to an end. And the selectors have to be firm and strong like Australia to say "Thanks Steve Waugh, you are out". They gotta say "Thanks Sachin, you are a legend, but you're out".

  • POSTED BY MostCulturedAussieSirLesPatterson on | March 18, 2012, 9:33 GMT

    All you guys who are knocking Sachin - just remember that he will forever remain in the record books as a great sportsman who was well respected and admired by his peers and fellow cricketers, both for his skill and his conduct, not least of all by Sri Don Bradman and Sir Garry Sobers. His achievements will shine on forever; whereas your comments will receive a passing glance, if that - nobody will remember your names. When you achieve something and become somebody whose opinions are noteworthy, please come back!

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 9:10 GMT

    sachin said in press conference after scoring 100th 100 that he would continue playing odis as long as he is enjoying the game. somebody please tell him that cricket is not his family business. selectors are there to decide who will play and for how long.

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 8:04 GMT

    very well written.. all those who hate him (apparently some guys gets their bread and butter with that) or criticize him, they somewhere in their heart feel lucky to be born in the era of such a prolific cricketer. Best that Cricket can ever see. Salute to you Sachin 10dulkar

  • POSTED BY brittop on | March 18, 2012, 7:47 GMT

    @Dravid_Gravitas: Why do you dislike Tendulkar so much?

  • POSTED BY screamingeagle on | March 18, 2012, 6:26 GMT

    Bradman played only against England who were in awe of him. Ponting played with the luxury of a great team behind him. Lara got his big ones but he was not really consistent, so on and so forth. Point is Sachin played the game like a gentleman, gave it respect and did the best he could. Thats all I can say to the guys who keep trying to bring him down throwing all sorts of funny theories around. Take a leaf out of the Masters book and try to behave with dignity and not like the jealous pups you come across as.

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 5:54 GMT

    real. no 1 can undrstnd his contrbution who hasnt accept their parents sacrifcs...........

  • POSTED BY Cric_Tic on | March 18, 2012, 4:57 GMT

    The so called milestone is not important to anyone..rather like to see 60 ball 50 by Yuvraj or Azharuddin or Robin Singh or a bowler.. even if it was for a hard fought losing match..!!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 4:54 GMT

    pathetic really pathetic... His creepy batting is the only thing which caused india's loss.. any other opinions...?? hanged around for his personal milestone and resulted in a humiliating loss for team india... wasted too much deliveries in search of century resulted in a below par score...Let's wait and watch what he can do for taking india to finals and to take The Asia Cup... Can he do it..?? I bet he can't... Over the years sachin is the most selfish indian batsman i ever seen..,

  • POSTED BY PeterDrucker on | March 18, 2012, 4:42 GMT

    Most important: When Sachin scores India lose the match (in most cases).

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 4:03 GMT

    Take a bow Sir...!! We are lucky to have born in this era to see you play...

  • POSTED BY Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on | March 18, 2012, 3:08 GMT

    People need to stop this nonsense of one billion people and pressure. If you have it in you, you'll feed off it - look at Flintoff, KP, Viv Richards, Greenidge, Gayle, Becker, Afridi, Imran, Miandad, Akram, Dravid, VVS, Ponting, Kapil, Kallis, Usain Bolt - high intensity performers - they feed-off the intensity and energy of the crowd and the intensity of the match. What about playing with pin-drop silence as the backdrop at the home of cricket, The Lords' and Wimbledon where everybody's eyes are set on you? Proper Sportsmen relish all of that. So, stop the nonsense of Sachin or Dravid or VVS or anybody to have taken the pressure of a billion people. You will feel the pressure only when you are not confident from within. Not the otherway around. Just because we are afraid of a huge crowd doesn't mean sportsmen are like us.

  • POSTED BY Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on | March 18, 2012, 2:37 GMT

    @awebuser, take a bow! End of story. Can't agree more. @Major_Hammad, very well said. Agree with you too.

  • POSTED BY Sal76 on | March 18, 2012, 2:28 GMT

    To all of Tendulkar's critics, here's something from Geoff Boycott that is spot on. "http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/multimedia/507179.html"

  • POSTED BY RockyAnIndianFan on | March 18, 2012, 1:37 GMT

    Sachin is a Great batsman and would have won more matches for India if he had played for the team rather than his personal milestone. There is no denying to fact that many of his hundreds have been on loosing side. He has never played on tense pressure games except 98 against Pakistan in one of worldcup. I never liked his attitude.

  • POSTED BY on | March 18, 2012, 1:32 GMT

    Not many will see this feat repeated in their life time. It is shame so little tribute has come from outside if any indication how much politics has taken out of sports. Congrats. to wonderful Tundelkar grown from a flower child to a truly gentleman cricketer.

  • POSTED BY Swingit on | March 18, 2012, 0:22 GMT

    @BillyCC you are so right! I keep trying to tell all these folks that 100 100s aint all that at all! How many cricketer do we have who HAVE scored 100 100s in first class cricket? Trust me many of the 100s that Tendulkar scored were against teams way way inferior to first class teams that the Don, Richards or any number of players scored in 1st class cricket. I mean u think ANY of the cureent batsmen in the world today could have easily scored a century against Barbados or Jamaica first class teams of the 80s that had bowlers who could demolish any batting line up in the world? Or Sommerset with Garner Boycott et al? Oh when English county cricket was the hunting ground for pacemen around the world (ask anyone who faced Wayne Daniel in county cricket). My point is Sachin has stats that point to his excellence but 100 100 is not one of them. And stop with the expectation of Billions so often quoted. Many would die for the support of massive Indian crowds, see how Gale thrives on it!

  • POSTED BY AjaySridharan on | March 17, 2012, 23:24 GMT

    Got to say, despite it not been up there, this is by far one of the better articles by Shardha Ugra. Still no where near the sheer poetic quality that oozes out of a Peter Roebuck article.

  • POSTED BY josh2david on | March 17, 2012, 23:07 GMT

    stats is nothing if you want to find out how many times a dog run around in the ground while play is on, you could find it, please look at the quality of the match, i just want to point out no body denies AB Devillers is a match winner,we need match winners not the historian!

  • POSTED BY BillyCC on | March 17, 2012, 22:43 GMT

    @T-rex, I would change your statement to say all stats are meaningless EXCEPT for the 99.94. The batting average is the most meaningful of all stats. Sachin's feat has been emulated many times over, by Bradman and others in first class cricket. The fact that these are international matches is testimony to the Indian Test cricket and ODI selection panel.

  • POSTED BY barani_m1975 on | March 17, 2012, 22:09 GMT

    i hate this selfish sachin to the core. he is not playing for the team. plays for his personal record to earn millions. Even indians do not bother about team result. shame on Sachin and India.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 21:59 GMT

    Congratulations Sachin, Congratulations Team India and Congratulations to billions of cricket fans who witnessed such a great moment in cricket history!!! I am looking forward to enjoy as much as cricket you can play for India and make us all proud!!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 21:23 GMT

    @Anshuman Kumar Any century by any batsman representing any team against any bowling attack on any ground and any kind of wicket is special! And here this guy (or GOD?) has 100 International Centuries and still you dismiss Him as a mediocre batsman who luckily could play more matches, that too for Himself and you go on to say that He got all of those on dead wickets against weaker bowling attacks! Now I basically can't understand why, dear o dear why, if you hate Him to this extent, do you move to a post related to Him and then rant on and on about how mediocre He is! Just makes no bloody sense, neither your post nor your behavior in this regard! Sir, forget about Him and His selflessness or selfishness... Playing for more than 2 decades and scoring 33k+ runs with 100 tons with a burden of a billion is in itself a miracle! And if it was so damn easy, we would have had so many SACHINS! Anshuman Sir, take a break, a good break, and try reinventing life... Take care!

  • POSTED BY ManishDDeshmukh on | March 17, 2012, 20:55 GMT

    Sachin is a great living Legend, God of Cricket ! Hats off to him for his achievement !

  • POSTED BY ManishDDeshmukh on | March 17, 2012, 20:48 GMT

    Yes, i don't mind whether the Team wins or loses, but Sachin is a real Master Blaster and a great living Legend in this decade i can say who reaches the milestone of 100 centuries in his career till now and may reach to many more in future !!! Hats off to him !!! Very difficult to play for 23 years maintaining health, family and all including criticisms...He is a God gift person & himself is a God of Cricket !

    I wish him all the best for his future life !

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 20:47 GMT

    " All these records are meaningless compared to 99.94. Yet, that too will be broken. All this conceit for just a good batsman who played a lot, for himself on dead wickets."

    that record is no record..son..statistics ..is nt ur cup of tea..

    do check which test cricketer has best average n dont qualify it with "number of matches played" u vl get a name AG Ganteaume...average 112 :D

    Bradman is second best

    so dont u ever try to bring in statistics alone to prove someone great..

    like if u say wt if bradman played so n so matches..

    wt if ganteaume played 52 test..52 hundreds???

    if u cant appreciate quality..take a hike

  • POSTED BY josh2david on | March 17, 2012, 20:46 GMT

    Its interesting that Sachin said in press conference he feels like lost 50 kg after he scored 100th hundred after 13 months of battle, but what happened to india after long time a memorable defeat against a weakest opponent. Are we care about the country ? or individual record? obviously his 100th centuary is the second slowest centuary in ODI.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 20:15 GMT

    Must read article how he overcame the machine

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 19:59 GMT

    What Say...........................................................

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 19:59 GMT

    100>99.4 At last Sachin surpassed Bradman......Now he's not the 'Modern Bradman' but Don was 'Ancient Sachin'!!!!

  • POSTED BY Sreerang on | March 17, 2012, 19:57 GMT

    Richards, Waugh, Warne, Imran, Gavaskar, Peterson, Hayden, and a host of other past and present cricketers say that Sachin is great or Greatest, but a few of our esteemed commentators here apparently understand cricket better than these above mentioned individuals!

  • POSTED BY T_Rex on | March 17, 2012, 19:36 GMT

    @awebuser The difference between 71 and 100 is one Bradman. If Bradman could not imagine playing 862 innings, I fail to see how it is Sachin's fault .Yes all statistics are meaningless which include 99.94 (with all due respect) Sachin's feat is a celebration of something which has never been done before and would take a lifetime to emulate. Your incoherent rant about it is just a reflection of your confused state of mind.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 19:31 GMT

    hi pl read article than comment

  • POSTED BY porshatom on | March 17, 2012, 19:26 GMT

    Please do not confuse criticism with hate. For example, I criticize my own daughter when appropriate, it does not mean i hate her. I criticize her for her own benefit so that she may become a better person. In the same way people should take criticism of Tendulkar with an open mind. Did Tendulkars slow 100 vs Bangladesh cause India to lose ? No, it merely contributed. Many factors caused India to lose that game, including Bangladeshs excellent performance. Tendulkers batting records almost exclusively revolve around his longevity in the game which is fine but it does not make him better than Bradman, Richards, JESUS or BHUDDA, nor does it make him a GOD. Surely if God played cricket he would win more often than lose? Surely God would inspire his team to win more often? Dare I say if Shewag or Yuvraj scored a ton yesterday India would have won ? Cricket is a team sport where the emphasis should be on the team winning and not on individual records. Peace.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 19:23 GMT

    awebuser - Averages are not everything. Someone making 10 hundreds in 100 innings has an average of 10. The point is EVEN AFTER 862 innings Sachin's numbers are better than that number 2 which in itself speaks volumes. And I betcha the #2 does not know what it means to be expected to do well EVERY SINGLE TIME by a billion people. Nowhere near.

  • POSTED BY rahuja on | March 17, 2012, 19:11 GMT

    No one can guarantee a win for their team just by scoring a hundred. For those talking about win %s, please try and digest the sentence below

    This is just based on tests - When Ricky scores a century - australia's chances of a win improve by 8.6% When Sachin scores a century - india's chances of a win improve by 17%

    Clearly with Australia's awesome win/loss Ricky would have had a tough task to bump up the # more.. but these stats are hopefully a reminder for folks who try to look at win %ages in 100s, that it is an incomplete statistics without looking at how much was the player pulling up his team's performance.

    btw - here is the explanation behind the #s (all data from statsguru) Overall in Ricky's career Australia won 65% times, but with his century 71% Overall in India's career India won 33% times, but with his century 39%

  • POSTED BY Swingit on | March 17, 2012, 18:38 GMT

    @awebuser after your piece nothing else needs be said you have put it all in perspective. I always thought that 100th 100 was the most ridiculous of all SRT records, if I were he I would have retired on 99 hundreds and not encourage this nonsensical pursuit of what is indeed a farcical record.

  • POSTED BY chikku_ on | March 17, 2012, 18:36 GMT

    Well Said Sharda. Happy to see a positive muse from you. Now can we all leave it to Sachin to decide when he has to retire. This man is hungry for more. Let him be.Sit back and enjoy!!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 18:17 GMT

    Gents - ST's ability stay in the crease has nothing to do with win/loose ratio by India. He started every inning like any other cricketer thus carried on and on many a times than any other over an over again for world of cricket is itself is a tremendous tallent. When billions waiting this milestone as a human being he too feels it. nothing absolutely wrong with it as we all fails everyday in everything as no one is perfect. you are a wonderful gift to cricket and that should be admired by all. A Sri Lankan fan

  • POSTED BY Sal76 on | March 17, 2012, 18:10 GMT

    "Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds" - Albert Einstein. "Enough said!" - Sal D.

  • POSTED BY Sal76 on | March 17, 2012, 18:05 GMT

    I just have 1 thing to say to Tendulkar's critics - Individual 100's DO require individual performance. Winning matches requires "TEAMS". The fact that India lost suggests poor TEAM performance. It is NOT a reflection of how Tendulkar played. Even if he had scored fast and say India had scored 325 ish, these comments would have still been there picking on something else. I have read such comments over and over and over again by Tendulkar haters and I have never said ANYTHING about it. But I want to say this, a 100, AT ANY LEVEL, whether it be club cricket, county or international, is a FEAT in itself. A 100 100's is a legacy. Are you truly qualified to criticize a man that has created a LEGACY? Short answer - NO! Can you dig that punk?

  • POSTED BY Patrick_ on | March 17, 2012, 18:05 GMT

    Good article, well written. Cannot think of the day Tendulkar retires.

  • POSTED BY kurups on | March 17, 2012, 17:54 GMT

    people who rubbish tendulkar's achievement in terms of winning matches are not well informed. U got to give it to sachin for his longevity and milestones he has achieved which by no means is an easy one! India's win % has always been less even with the fearsome four, mainly because of the lack in bowling strength..and almost every time a Tendulkar had to face a bowling far superior to what he would have had at the nets which makes his 100's even special! As a cricket fan lets celebrate his 100 100's ..not the 100th 100!! and unlike a Sehwag or Gilchrist, its not unusual to see everyone else try to get to their personal milestone..simply because mentally that helps them to be a better player and serve the team better.

  • POSTED BY porshatom on | March 17, 2012, 17:26 GMT

    Congratulations Tendulkar , The Suffering is to continue for India. Out of his 49 ODI 100's for INDIA, only 33 resulted in wins ( a very low percentage even when compared to other Indian batsmen). What is even more shocking is that out of those 33 wins, 4 were against Kenya, 4 vs Zimbabwe, 5 vs New Zealand, 3 vs West Indies & 1 vs Namibia. So more than half the ODI wins were against bottom ranked or non test playing teams (teams India were likely to beat regardless). Indian fans find this impressive ? :P

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 17:11 GMT

    india lost the match because of weak bowling....indian bowlers bowled more than 20 full tosses..... how the indian bowlers bowled in slog overs... very shameful.... still u people r blaming cricket god..... in every country, there is respect for legend players....mike gating played till his 40. so please leave the decision to the master.....

  • POSTED BY Major_Hammad on | March 17, 2012, 17:08 GMT

    Congrates to Tendulkar on personal Milestone/Record but always Remember My 6 Points: 1: Tendulkar scored 100th Hundred after struggle of 1+ year. 2: He scored 100th Hundred after 33 International Innings. 3: His 100th Hundred was his 2nd lowest strike rate in ODI Hundred by him. 4: He finally did it on Asian/subcontinent pitches, after failed to do it in England, Austrailia long tours. 5: He did it against weak team ( Anyhow at End of Day Stronger team than India) Bangladesh. 6: And India Lost the Match due to his slow Batting as he played maiden over (34th over) but at opposite scene Shakib made 18 runs in 37th over.

  • POSTED BY muski on | March 17, 2012, 16:50 GMT

    Wow Sharda- Hope can we compare a clutch of grand slams in tennis to 100 international hundreds in cricket. We cant compare apples and oranges can we.Its takes 7 matches to win a grand slam. Even if we say half a grand slam is equivalent to one international hundred, it takes 50 grand slams and the man on top of it hasn't even got 20!!!!. So lets not compare that. The Aussies or the English may not like if we say that Bradman and Sachin are on the same pedestal. Given the rigours of the modern game, the fact that this guy has gone on for 23 years inspite of this tennis elbow, back problems et al and continued to perform to the aspiration of a billion Indians speak volumes of his ability and mental strength. For a change here I would say that his guy is bigger than the game- it may not be politically correct. But that is that he is. He may go soon but then he deeds will continue to loom over the game which he ruled like a king for 23 years.

  • POSTED BY awebuser on | March 17, 2012, 16:33 GMT

    These subcontinental writers with their grandiose, ornate, stilted drivel as if any subject of such conceit would be elevated to greatness and the writing itself to classic. Pathetic. Dime-a-dozen, these writers and the records they write about. Speaking of 100 centuries in 862 innings repeatedly in reference to a test average of 99.94 exposes these self-lovers' grasp of cricket. To put that in perspective, the next man has 71 in 641 or a century every 9.02 innings compared to this man's 8.62. The difference is marginal. There is absolutely no doubt that a good batsman playing 1,000 innings in this batting friendly era will score more than 100 centures. Could Bradman, with 80 innings, have imagined anyone playing 862 or 641? Nor can the current crop imagine playing 1,000. But people will play that many, and more. All these records are meaningless compared to 99.94. Yet, that too will be broken. All this conceit for just a good batsman who played a lot, for himself on dead wickets.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 16:29 GMT

    An article that has bravely done justice to the fact that, something as remarkable won't be witnessed ever anymore... Thanks Sharda for a fantastic piece of writing...

  • POSTED BY Crikt.Afg on | March 17, 2012, 16:19 GMT

    Im absolutely agreed with you Kenishah.... they r jealous all . . .

  • POSTED BY Crikt.Afg on | March 17, 2012, 16:16 GMT

    Yes. everybody is jealous of The Great Little Master Sachin Tendulkar ..... Those who say that Sachin made his 100th 100 against Bangladesh, please once you check that howmany of the remaining 99 have been made against your teams ? ? ? Come on check and tell me .... @ian_ghose: you see the records of him then you understand y..... @Bunty Jorwal: Dear if he makes hundreds and scores more runs that means he has made that for the team, if he hadn't made that 114 agains Banglades then subtract that 114 from a total of 289 and think that how easy Bangladesh could have got that target . . . may be B'Desh would have won that by ten wickets . . . I hope all those who are jealous can understand and talk the truth

  • POSTED BY inswing on | March 17, 2012, 16:10 GMT

    I don't have a problem with the record of international hundreds. It makes complete sense and is a logical category. There is a double standard in this regard. Mention the name Jack Hobbs, you will start hearing first class this and first class that. First class? Since when did it have any importance? This category was created for Jack Hobbs, because that's what he played the most. He played 30 matches every year against cream puff local opposition every year and made bazillion runs. Those runs should have no importance attached to them. First class has no relevance at the top level. _That's_ an artificial record, if there ever was one. International hundreds is a truly significant achievement, on the other hand. So stop with the hypocrisy y and give the man his due. And stop mentioning 'first class' anything.

  • POSTED BY Sarangarajan on | March 17, 2012, 16:05 GMT

    It is refreshing that the author Sharda Ugra has some thing nice to write about Indian cricket. We are so used to her using the terms" Funeral procession- "etc after the disastrous tour of Australia in describing Indian cricket . When the going is good, all Tom , Dick, Harry and now Sharda Ugra praise lavishly. When the going gets tough all these wise men and women become the "preachers- 'I know all about Experts'. There is no sense of balance in reporting and all these go with the public tide and yet call themselves as" experts".

  • POSTED BY Crikt.Afg on | March 17, 2012, 16:04 GMT

    My God !!!!!! Come on guysss be logical... how can you people blame The Master for losing the match when he has set a total of 290 for Bangladesh to win ? ? ? If the bowlers can not defend such a total then you can never ever blame Sachin for this.....If he scores runs but the teammates can not score and the bowlers can not defend then please think alittle , , , I hope you people understand . . . Why is every one JEALOUS of such a quality player ? I LOVE SACHIN LOVE HIM LOVE HIM LOVE HIM AND IM NOT JEALOUS THAT WE DO NOT HAVE SUCH A BIG PLAYER IN OUR TEAM... IM NOT JAELOUS. WELL DONE SACHIN....KEEP IT UP AND KEEP GOING.. BEST OF LUCK

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 16:04 GMT

    Brilliant stuff, again, Sharda. The trouble is that much of the "large demographic looking for clarity in a churning world" principally seeks to judge rather than understand, to teach rather than learn. And so we return to the facile polarities between Tendulkar-the-divine-champ and Tendulkar-the-mortal/villain-copout. The "machine" is not just outside: many, many of these comments (and their authors) are the "machine".

  • POSTED BY inswing on | March 17, 2012, 16:02 GMT

    The culture of individual landmarks and worship has it's roots in history. Simply put, India was not a good team in the past and hardly ever won. If you hung your hat on team performance, you would be disappointed most of the time. Although the team lost, occasional brilliant performances by individuals were always there. So we learned to pay attention to personal records and ignore the team and the results. Now, India not a bad team anymore, and has not been bad for over a decade. So it is now time to move past the hero worship culture and into a team success culture. We should be upset that Tendulkar made a century on a very flat track at a strike rate of only 77. As a direct result, India was 20 runs short and lost the game. A personal landmark cost the game. Should not be acceptable anymore.

  • POSTED BY nachiketajoshi on | March 17, 2012, 16:02 GMT

    Wonderful article, Sharda! It is not always easy but you did try to peel off a layer from an onion here :-) "this is our generation's 99.94" is a nice quotable quote!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 15:59 GMT

    Recent comment from Sachin says he is not playing for century or record. To achieve his 100 he is very nervous. Where India about to score 300+ and 300+ automatically put opposition team mental pressure. But everyone is just concern about century but not how they defeated from home team. We want team to win the match not individual performance. Rather he could have played individual game rather in team. I am happy to see Sachin century but disappointed 1000 times loosing India. :( ... Come on team play for country and forget about individual records.

  • POSTED BY I_know_cricket on | March 17, 2012, 15:57 GMT

    Another ill timed article... just to bump up readers! I am not even bothered to read...

  • POSTED BY blogossip on | March 17, 2012, 15:56 GMT

    Well whaits more important- india winning matches or tendulkar breaking records? sorry I disgaree that winning grand slams or breaking time barriers is easier than scoring 100 centuries. you cant win grand slams by beating mediocrites like bangladesh. period!

  • POSTED BY SRAMESH5 on | March 17, 2012, 15:54 GMT

    We Indians must be the most sentimental people in the world. In today's Times of India, the achievement of Tendulkar's 100th international 100 occupied huge space covering front, back and sports pages while the actual match result was covered in two columns. Disgraceful, if you are a sports lover. No matter whatever be the status or achievement of an individual, the game is greater than the individual. After all, what is all the noise about 100th ton. The one day game and a test match are two different ball games altogether. It is absurd to club 51 hundreds of test match cricket and 49 centuries of ODI's and say it is a great record. Some describe Tendulkar as the Greatest ever. Comparisons are made with Don Bradman. It is a ridiculous comparison. Don's 29 centuries in 52 tests and Sachin's 51 100's in 188 tests shows, the Don in a different league. Had Don played 188 tests his tally would have been more than 100 test centuries. Don is incomparable. Sachin is too fragile a batsman.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 15:33 GMT

    I do think he wanted to get it no matter what this time, only because he must have thought anything above 270 should be good enough against Bangaladesh - he so over-estimated our bowlers! What is wrong in him thinking that this is the best chance to get the so-called monkey off his back without jeopardizing his team's chances! Yes, he might have scored faster, but seriously, is that the reason we lost? I do not think so.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 15:24 GMT

    There cannot be another Tendular - this much is sure - one will get to know only when he hangs his boots - for a man playing continously for 23 years with success with billions of people turning to the ground or opening their tv because the master is batting ! what treat he gave to the connoissuers of the game - one can feel the enormous opressure as the expectations were high everytiime he went out to bat - he had deliverd everywhere and he is a Kohinoor diamond. We salute the master !

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 15:21 GMT

    Agree, a true Cricket Devotee. But sorry Sharda, the length and repetitions in this article would make more sense if it were an exercise in irony explaining how he got his 100th 100 :)

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 15:11 GMT

    Sachin has scored 49 ODI Centuries out of which 33 matches India won, 14 India lost, 1 match was tie and 1 match had No Result. After seeing this how can you say that When Sachin scores 100 then India looses?.We should respect him for his Cool,Gentle,excellent & incredible human nature in CRICKET WORLD....So before Criticizes anybody think about it.Although who Criticizes SACHIN they don't know how to Play the game of CRICKET.

  • POSTED BY josh2david on | March 17, 2012, 15:00 GMT

    Tendulkar is god of cricket for indians and he achieved the milestone, as far I remember he is not a matchwinner,honestly India could have won the match if he could have scored quickly , he took 36 balls for last 20 runs of his centuary,he made sure his centuary after more than a year, only Dhoni managed to pul out a decent score by scoring 16 runs in last over.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 14:56 GMT

    A very beautiful and inspiring article. Loved it...

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 14:50 GMT

    An excellent article which cannot be better expressed .

  • POSTED BY tennis on | March 17, 2012, 14:48 GMT

    Pakistan easily defended 260 against Bangladesh. Our bowers can't defend 290 against them. So, stop blaming Sachin every time...enjoy him while he's around. And, if you have some free time read this to show his worth http://www.espncricinfo.com/asia-cup-2012/content/current/story/557551.html

    Anyway, playing for India is so difficult with fans like ian_ghose and kantipur that India is lucky to have him.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 14:00 GMT

    A great player (individual) indeed but not a team man.... its like" what i should do to achieve this goal?" instead of " what i should do that my team win"...

  • POSTED BY caught_knott_bowled_old on | March 17, 2012, 13:47 GMT

    SRT 100 hundreds. Ricky Ponting 100 Test Wins. Wonder if either of those records will ever be broken.. Wonder if Tendulkar would rather have the 100 test wins??

  • POSTED BY gandharibr on | March 17, 2012, 13:40 GMT

    @ian_ghose, @kantipur, a century of century happens once a century. But, matches with bangladesh are played very often. Hope now you guys understand why he gets the praise irrespective of the loss. Even if you discount the 100X100, don't you atleast aknowledge a century albeit from a batsman from loosing team?

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 13:38 GMT

    Great his done it, I wish hi the best in the future. Great player and guy, a pak fan.

  • POSTED BY Dravid_Pujara_Gravitas on | March 17, 2012, 13:24 GMT

    Ugra, in the whole thing, let's not lose perspective while churning out hyperbole. Coming in as an opener against not so formidable attack with field restrictions, powerplays etc on offer, he crawls to a century after eating up a major chunk of the deliveries. For people who are happy with India's win even though their idol doesn't score a century ala Dravid in Kingston 2006 or Dravid in Edgbaston with a jaw dropping 90+, this century is a painful reminder of our cringing obsession of personal landmarks, an obsession that is against the fundamental ethos of a team sport. Dravid scored a century at less than 80 strike-rate only once whereas Sachin has 5 such centuries, the latest of them being the match losing 100th 100. Had he scored at least a run a ball hundred, one can't complain. But eating nearly half the team's deliveries and scoring 114 is just the main reason we lost this match. Praising a slow and detrimental individual achievement in the wake of a lost match? Nothing new.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 13:08 GMT

    @Billydekid

    How do you know not a single former great feels Sachin is better than a Gavaskar or Viv ? Are you friends with them ? Even if they don't feel, it doesn't matter as people try to rate players from their era as best even if its not true. If you want true opnion, ask contemporary players especially the bowlers to know the greatness of this man

  • POSTED BY CricketFirstLove on | March 17, 2012, 12:57 GMT

    Congratulations. But enough is enough. Now please vacate the slot that we can train another boy for future. After the match for the first time I saw an old Tendulkar, so haggard and exhausted. EVen after your double hundred you didn't look so old at that moment. Sachin age is catching up on you. Great people go in style and at their peak. You have so many examples in front of you. Just remember BJon Borg for instance. In cricket Don still had some years with him but he left. Lara same. Neil Harvey and so many others. Give yourself and us a break. Lets remember the good old young alert Tendulkar not an old haggard one that gives rise to the suspicion that you are following your guru Gavaskar who only played for himself and records. We want better legacy from you. Rest assured your records are not likely to be even touched leave alone emulating it. Good luck in a happily retired life.

  • POSTED BY Sam_SRT_Fan on | March 17, 2012, 12:54 GMT

    Your best article yet, Sharda. Respect & Love.

  • POSTED BY AbhijeetC on | March 17, 2012, 12:46 GMT

    whatever Sachin achieved.......a lot has been said against and for Sachin.....I just want to ask one Question? is Sachin desire to play 2015 WC? if Yes he should continue playing ODI. If not there is no point playing for records and blocking one spot for players like Rohit Shrama and Manoj Tiwari.....It is not that I am big fan of these players......but if we are not allowing these youngsters to fail then we are not looking to future...It is high time Sachin should retire from ODI and just concentrate on winning more Test matches.....till he retire eventually after 1/2 years..... He said it is selfish to retire when you are playing you best cricket...but it is also selfish to play on and block place of younger cricketer when there is nothing to achieve. At the moment, there is nothing to achieve in ODI cricket for Sachin, unless he wants to play in 2015 WC.

  • POSTED BY Meety on | March 17, 2012, 12:38 GMT

    @Biophysicist - I admire Sachin but I have to agree with you. He slowed down to get his 100th. He played out a maiden over against Mortaza in the 34th over. Now Mortaza is Bangladesh's best ever pacer, but he is not that good. I admire the way Sachin adjusted his game for tests, but this whole 100 100s, in a team sport is unsettling. I am also very surprised he did not retire from ODIs after the W/Cup. Now that Dravid has retired, & the probability that VVS is on the way out, India probably need him to hang around another year or two. I just wonder how he'll be remembered then? There are signs that the decision-making (his cornerstone), are fading. He'll be saved somewhat by playing exclusively in tests at home, but should he not tour afterwards, I think he'll have done India a disservice. IMO - Sachin had about 3 team goals (just over a year ago) 1) Win W/Cup (Tick), 2. Win test series in Saffaland (Cross), 3. Win test series in Oz (Cross). Can't see him changing the last 2 (atm)!!!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 12:37 GMT

    Since over two decades, every Indian, irrespective of own age, feels himself as Sachin's blood-line; 'Twin'! India plays along with Sachin when Sachin plays for India. Each minute on-field emotion of Sachin is carbon-copied (sometimes magnified) on the face of each Indians! In post independence of India, very few characters can match of this exceptional credible social unifier, who emotionally unites Billions of human mind with his simplest form of character; 'Play aggressively being humble to game'. It is not appropriate to place a debate whether Sachin is the best in the game or not, but if we think seriously on what makes Sachin to be the 'God Of Cricket', undoubtedly the unanimous answer would be..."He has the blessings from The God" !

  • POSTED BY Nair_saab on | March 17, 2012, 12:36 GMT

    love that.....lets wait for C. no. 101

  • POSTED BY Herath-UK on | March 17, 2012, 12:10 GMT

    Great record by him and credit should be given where it is due.On other hand,player like Jayasuriya never went for records;once he was on ther verge of breaking oneday record with over 180 runs against India but never minded it and continued to be aggressive and got (unnecessarily) out whereas a chap like Tendulkar would have slowed down yearning for the record.Weren't it Hayden & Waugh who point blankly told the truth about his sacrifice of team win for personal glory.Therefore do not forget there are a lot of unsung heroes who put the team first than personal records. Ranil Herath- Kent

  • POSTED BY STondulkar on | March 17, 2012, 12:02 GMT

    Noone can deny the fact that cricket wouldn't have been what it is for Indians had this guy not been there. Remember his early days and everyone wanted to play like him, be like him. Even the great Don didn't win every match for Australia 12 losses and 10 draws. Give the man his due. He has been an exceptional batsman and even greater persona as far as Indians are concerned and nobody can change that by writing an article or commenting on it. People still come to ground to watch him batting and that tells it all.

  • POSTED BY Sidd.K on | March 17, 2012, 11:51 GMT

    Great achievement. Great article. And too all those critics. We know it has only become fashionable to do so. A century against a weak team is the first thing the mindless critics say. what they forget is this is the 100th, the rest 99 doesn't count in their mind. Slowed down to score a century. yes, that is what INDIA wanted. what INDIA didnt want is for them to go concede the 290. Definitely the slowdown was not at the cost of the team. at the end of the first innings if u gave india 289 on any wicket against bangaladesh we will take it always. and that is what he thought. what he didnt expect was the bowling to be bashed like that. It is the same as making a new player debut against a weak team in a low profile tourn. The intention is not to have a weaklink in the team because it is a easier proposition, but to use the opportunity. Which is affordable. He used the situation to get his 100 slower but only to think that he can play freely in the upcoming imp fixtures with reduced wt

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 11:40 GMT

    It is not the Indian Media, it is the followers of the Religion of cricket who have realized that there is no human who has carried the responsibility of any particular sport for more than two decades and performed well, it has to be GOD himself! Anyone who thinks he has played for his personal interests should better go through his and team statistics of past 20 years before commenting. Believe me, you'll get tired reading all those stats but then you should not write stories unless you have read the book. No one here or in the country will buy your jealousy!

  • POSTED BY hagar009 on | March 17, 2012, 11:32 GMT

    Who are Match Winner's, Record says it all…. Tendulkar 51- Test 100's IND has won 20 Matches Ponting 41-Test 100's AUS has won 27 Matches Kallis 41-Test 100's SA has won 19 Matches Inzamam-ul-Haq 25-Test 100's Pak has won 17 Matches

  • POSTED BY schizad1 on | March 17, 2012, 11:28 GMT

    A beautifully written article and worthy praise for a legendary sportsman. People may argue if he is a selfish batsman or not, if he plays for himself or the team. But he is one of the best ambassadors of the game and a true role model for younger one's to look upto.

    BTW won't you say in going for 100 hundreds the "Machine" has won????. India could've easily made 30-40 more runs.

    But what can you say 10-15 years from now who will remember the Asia cup or loss to a minnow, 100 hundreds will be part of Folk lore.

  • POSTED BY suresh59 on | March 17, 2012, 11:22 GMT

    What good is century of centuries when your team had lost. Sachin would have consumed fair amount of overs to get his 100 because of which the team had lost. Only in India, too much of importance is given to individual performance.How many of his centuries would have fetched India a victory? I would rather see Sachin getting rapid 90 and see India win.

  • POSTED BY rajachandra on | March 17, 2012, 11:21 GMT

    It is like praising Dr. manmohan singh for his role as former Finance Minster now ! Tendulkar is as insipid and rudderless as Dr. Singh just holding on to his seat . He has no shame in holding on to his seat because of likes of Ms. sharda who like congress sycophants show their verbosity. Sachin says he is still enjoying his cricket but we are not enjoying his cricket. It is high time he hangs in his boot. Otherwise he may hang on like politicians till his son is ready to play for India and may blackmail for a swap!

  • POSTED BY praveen4honestremark on | March 17, 2012, 11:19 GMT

    Sachin took a wrong decision in his life, he could have taken tennis as his career than Cricket,Sachin would have excelled and would have brought laurels to Indian tennis even beating greats like Sampras.....because cricket is team game and it suits to players like Dravid not Sachin.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 11:16 GMT

    Thanks Bangladesh for exposing this man sachin so miserably. All match viewers still laughing for his hundred centuries against world's weakest bowling attack and result is same "India Lost the Match". What a god that helps always opposite teams. GILLY , Chappel and Shoaib were abosolutly right.

  • POSTED BY Kaze on | March 17, 2012, 11:16 GMT

    I don't like Tendulkar I personally think he is a selfish, over hyped player and is not in the same class as Lara, Ponting and Kallis, much less in the class of Gavaskar, Greg Chappel, Viv Richards, Bradman etc. However cricket is one sport where an individual cannot always single handedly determine the result. In football, tennis, golf and basketball you can do it single handedly but very hard in Cricket. So I find some of the criticisms leveled at him on the 114 being slow and what not and causing them to lose the match as being a bit ridiculous. It was a hundred against a mediocre opposition and it looked hilarious at least to me to see Sachin have to resort to earning his runs again Bangladesh when he seemed so mediocre against everyone else. But a hundred is a hundred and they lost because the Indian bowling is downright mediocre. That is no fault of Tendulkar.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:58 GMT

    Why are people are so bitter? ..Its a great mark to achieve and that someone from the subcontinent has achieved should be celebrated not condemned. So what if India lost the match.Give credit to the Bangla team for trying and not consumed by the hype. They have had nothing to hype about and will probably not even reach the finals in-spite of this win.The man is special and when we realise that its not physically possible now for anyone to endure the Hype, pressure,fans,media and physicality of sport for so long and still come on top.Who else will even go close I am not even sure. I am happy to let Sachin play and continue to break records because I know that it will be a long long time coming and IF there will also be another Indian player to even go close to his stature....

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:29 GMT

    Good Job Sharda Ugra. There are people always trying to find fault with greats, but the greats never find fault with the people they face on the ground or off the ground-Dost from Riyadh

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:24 GMT

    Great article shards and all those cticising him look at yourself what hv u achieved in life

  • POSTED BY shishir7 on | March 17, 2012, 10:21 GMT

    I still personally feel Tendulkar could have done better. I think it's the human tendency, you always want him to perform 200%.But only few succeed and fulfill your expection. He is among them.

    He is the only cricketer in the history of the cricket to have played for so long even in the odds. Even the greatest will agree with me.

    At this moment all the cricketers in the world (past & present) look very small in front of him. Sachin is a genius.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:19 GMT

    He is really The God of Cricket and upper then indian Cricket Because when anyone talking about cricket then comes a name of a Indian Sachin Tendulker.Without Tendulker we have not bigger achivement in cricket.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:16 GMT

    Our love is the thing which has kept sachin ahead of that machine...We are privileged sir to have seen your batting. Please carry on . Please take us into yet another world. You are simply amazing. You are my greatest inspiration.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:13 GMT

    every one blaming after he made a century India I'll loose the game leave it the last match coz his strike rate was not impressive how about our bowlers they cannot defend 290 what a shame

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:07 GMT

    Brilliant stuff about a true legend Sharda, you are the Harsha Bhogle of the text, great article, have downloaded for the posterity. coming to the cynics, think everyone braying for him is missing a point, cricket is not an individual sport but a team game aint"it ? what about at least a couple of them coming to the party, PEOPLE, ITS A CYNICAL WORLD FULL OF TOUGH COMPETITORS remember Jerry Maguire

  • POSTED BY harshthakor on | March 17, 2012, 10:03 GMT

    Tendulkar is the equivalent of a Jesus Christ or Muhammad to Cricket.His feat will probably never be equalled and he virtually defined the modern cricketing age.Sadly a majority of his epochs or landmarks came in losing causes.Infact when Indian cricket reached it's zenith in 2004 and in 2010-11,the wins were more the result of Rahul Dravid,V.V.S.Laxman and Virendra Sehwag.In his peak in from 1996-7-2002,Tendulkar literally played the role of the lone crusader and had no support as later stars got like Rahul Dravid from 2002-2006 .

    However it is sad that the little man reached this Everest with Indian cricket at it's lowest ebb.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 10:00 GMT

    Few people says that Sachin is play for records ,let me ask them why he should not, these records are pride of India......So every player should play for Records. carry on sir ............

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 9:54 GMT

    Ask Tendulkar which he would rather do - win a Test match or score a century. I guarantee on every occasion he would prefer to win the match. That is why I prefer the Australian (and West Indies of the 80s) approach. The team has to be greater than the individual. Unfortunately the Indian media has built Tendulkar up to be a god when hi merely human.

  • POSTED BY kenishah on | March 17, 2012, 9:43 GMT

    finaly the biggest record has been brocken n im hounourd 2 be alive at this grand moment. people who tink he plays for himself r stupid. he only sets himself high standerds n he achieves them. u lot who tink he plays for records r jealous of him cos hes got the perfect life n all u wna do is complain

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 9:33 GMT

    Only cricketer whom I respect, I love, I admire and I will miss after his retirement.

  • POSTED BY Ramji_Amencherla on | March 17, 2012, 9:19 GMT

    What an article..beautiful words, sentences to describe a phenomena. Cricinfo is the best

  • POSTED BY brittop on | March 17, 2012, 9:11 GMT

    @icfa: and what exactly was it about those 47 hundreds that caused India not to win the match?

  • POSTED BY Hyderabadi_Nawab on | March 17, 2012, 9:01 GMT

    He truly is a legend but ODI retirement is way overdue - all this talk of who will replace him is hogwash as far as ODIs are concerned. Test matches are a different ball game, literally - may he continue as long as he wishes but hope all these meaningless 100s will cease to be a subject matter of discussion and we will be debating his runs made in Test matches and their relevance to the Indian team's effort to regain test match supremacy. Sachin, please retire from ODIs - let the Tiwaris, Rahanes, Murali Vijays, Rohit Sharmas and many more younger bucks take over this ODI circus while you show us your vintage run-making ability - which you still have much more to display doubtless - in Tests.

  • POSTED BY Billydekid on | March 17, 2012, 8:56 GMT

    Its funny, but not a single former great feels Sachin is even close to Sunil Gavaskar or Viv Richards. But thats unofficially. On record they sing another tune. BTW thanks Bangladesh, if not for you the 100 would have been a bridge too far.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 8:28 GMT

    A true selfish player...... batted for his hundred not for country...

  • POSTED BY kantipur on | March 17, 2012, 8:22 GMT

    Come on . India has lost the match. Only in india an individual becomes bigger than the game. Furthermore it was a selfish innings. How can you explain being on 80 runs in 102 balls and then taking 36 balls for next twenty when one should be accelerating with wickets in hand.

  • POSTED BY ian_ghose on | March 17, 2012, 8:21 GMT

    Why is this guy getting so much praise for losing a match to Bangladesh? LOSING A MATCH TO BANGLADESH for crying out loud!! Whats happening here? Something's seriously wrong here.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 8:21 GMT

    Many Many Congratulations to Sachin From me and From Whole World.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 8:14 GMT

    Truly a master blaster and many many congratulations to Sachin from my heart and Whole World.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 7:58 GMT

    Little Master : The Legend

  • POSTED BY GanJack on | March 17, 2012, 7:55 GMT

    A great article Sharda ! May I also say that you are one of the better cricket writers around these days especially after the unfortunate passing of Peter Roebuck. Your writing is so refreshing, given the drivel that gets written on cricket sites and newspapers of late. Continue the good work !

  • POSTED BY Deb_Rockstars on | March 17, 2012, 7:31 GMT

    Just for everyone's reference, Sachin isnt 39 yet, he will complete 38 on April 24th - next month. Also for those who think he is getting old - remember as recently as last year Sanath Jayasuriya played international T20 for SL at the age of 42, and he was a regular in the SL side till 40. Also recently Brad Hogg made a successful return to international T20 at the age of 40! if you look beyond cricket martina navratilova played (and won) grand slam doubles tennis till almost 50 years age!..so its not always about the age, its about the desire, the passion & enjoyment from the game, the competitive urge, the ability to keep mind & body up for the grind. As long as Sachin is feels he is loving doing what he is doing, its no one's business to suggest him to even consider retirement. And lifelong supporters of the master like myself are only too happy to see him stride out to the center!

  • POSTED BY 200ondebut on | March 17, 2012, 7:17 GMT

    The great thing about SRT is that he has managed to remain level headed, humble and dignified despite his immense achievements, fame and fortune. He is a beacon to all other sportsmen who too often become arrogant, aloof and materialistic despite never reaching these heights.

  • POSTED BY RandyOZ on | March 17, 2012, 7:11 GMT

    And yet they still lost to Bangladesh! Haha! Typical!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 7:10 GMT

    rightly said.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 7:00 GMT

    A TRUE TEAM PLAYER. UNFORTUNATELY PEOPLE SAY THAT HE PLAYS FOR RECORDS. ANYONE WHO HAS PLAYED A COMPETITIVE TEAM GAME WILL UNDERSTAND THAT HE HAS AND IS AND WILL PLAY FOR HIS TEAM. LET'S CELEBRATE THIS TRUE CHAMPION. IT HAPPENS ONLY IN INDIA THAT PEOPLE ALWAYS DOUB'T THE INTENTIONS OF CHAMPIONS.

  • POSTED BY suresh_bsr on | March 17, 2012, 6:47 GMT

    congratulation dear sachin, its amazing, keep it up

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 6:44 GMT

    these qualities probably make him the god of cricket...the achievements ofcourse bt its d simplicity which adds the spark of divinity to sachin's aura...

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 6:29 GMT

    I think Sharda Ugra should give it a break! One day she was calling for Tendulkar's head and now today, she is all words!!

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 6:15 GMT

    Sharada Ugra has come up with master piece befitting the occasion and I am glad to say she has excelled herself again. There are quite few memorable phrases which make you go 'Wow" like

    "the arms and torso choreograph towards the moment of impact" a and ' He understands what he would be without that bat. If he leaves the dressing room like a snarling competitor (telling Virender Sehwag before they went out to bat together against Pakistan in the 2003 World Cup, "I'm going to get these guys") he returns with humility" A stand out article which could do even a Harsha Bhogle proud.

  • POSTED BY Vindaliew on | March 17, 2012, 6:10 GMT

    It is his attitude which is a greater hallmark of his ability than any numbers. It is also that same attitude which makes me respect Rahul Dravid at that Number 2 spot. I hope the two of them stay up there until someone more worthy but equally as down-to-earth joins, separates or overtakes them. Ricky Ponting is not that man.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 6:10 GMT

    To those critics of Sachin, have you ever let him alone? - whenever he got out at the crucial time, he was blamed for india's loss - whenever he did not score, he was blamed for india's loss - whenever he scored and India lost, he was blamed for India's loss - whenever he broke milestones which are just stones on his path, he was blamed as selfish guy playing for records - whenever he made money (for a great player, money will come to him and he does not need to go after it), he was blamed as money minded

    Who cares? I am lucky to see a once in generation play. This is what I will tell my grand children. If tendulkar retired now, you know what will happen.......you all will 100% brand him saying that he played ONLY to get his 100th 100. Carrying the burden of 1 billion people's expectation that he should score a century everytime he goes out to bat for 23 years and taking all the above criticisms from you guys and yet performing and being humble on and off the field, only sachin can do

  • POSTED BY Nadeem1976 on | March 17, 2012, 6:08 GMT

    Great article about greatest cricketer ever. He played better than machine and achieved which no body can dream of. He is super hero in cricket. Genius and one of his kind only. Team win world cups for their country here team won the world cup for Tendulkar , he is larger than cricket sportsman and too good a person.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 6:02 GMT

    well we know wisdon couldnt find a single hundred by sachin that was worth mentioning in its list of best performances. the 100th 100 wasnt any exception either. india had 7 wickets in hand till 43rd over. but instead of looking for boundaries sachin was playing for his hundredth hundred. simply ridiculous. consumed a hug number of deliveries in that selfish knock which eventually cost india the match. we need to be discussing about his retirement from odis and not the 100th 100.

  • POSTED BY vasuki1957 on | March 17, 2012, 5:50 GMT

    Salute the Indian Cricket God....The only thing I want to say here is to those who are of this mindset that whenever he scores a ton, India loses. For all those you, the pathetic bowling against Bangladesh is an answer. All and every time sachin scores a ton the opposition really do chase it down because of our poor bowling....

  • POSTED BY Biophysicist on | March 17, 2012, 5:39 GMT

    Sharda, You are right when you said that "... Tendulkar's numbers will never go away, no matter what we think of them. Or even that the 100th came against an opposition far from formidable, in a tournament never lauded, in an unfashionable town and, with a final wicked twist, a game that was lost". None of the above will go away, neither the numbers, nor the fact that the opposition was Bangladesh, nor the fact that his 100th century came after a gap of 33 international innings, nor the fact that India lost the match (which may lead us to NOT qualify for the final), nor the fact that after scoring 80 runs off 102 deliveries (SR = 78.43), Tendulkar slowed down in order ensure he gets his 100th 100 and consumed 36 deliveries for the next 20 runs (SR = 55.55). It is a pity that some people play for records rather than for winning the match for the country. It was also noted in the Cricinfo report that this was Sachin's second slowest ODI century.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 5:30 GMT

    For all those that say India will loose the match if sachin scores a hundred

    In Test: 51 centuries, Lost-9, Draw-20, Won-22

    In ODI: 49 Centuries, Lost 14, Tied-1, No result-1, Won-33

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 5:01 GMT

    Two different things: graceful, and full of grace. Tendulkar is both the dream and the reality of cricket.

  • POSTED BY landl47 on | March 17, 2012, 4:59 GMT

    Tendulkar is a wonderfully gifted athlete and seems to be a very level-headed person as well. He is by no means unique; the most gifted and modest athlete I've ever seen was Wayne Gretzky, whose accomplishments in ice hockey dwarfed Tendulkar's in cricket. However, in the end the machine got Gretzky by luring him back into hockey as a coach. He was still the same person, but his achievements as a coach were very ordinary. Tendulkar, I would argue, has also lost to the machine. He has kept playing even when playing was to the detriment of his side in order to achieve personal goals. Like his contemporary Ricky Ponting, he has been unable to step back and say "My time is over." The seductive murmur of 'just one more game... just one more series... I'll get it next time' has carried him along. His 100th international hundred has been a sad anti-climax, coming in a game against a minor side which India lost. His stature would have been better served had he retired a year ago, on 99.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 4:58 GMT

    Very Good Article that articulates the other side of Sachin's statistics/records & the Psyche of the most revered sportsmen of our times.

  • POSTED BY crick_sucks on | March 17, 2012, 4:43 GMT

    Ayilaa!!!

    47 out of 100 centuries have not resulted in a Positive Result for India v Australia 9 v Bangladesh 2 v England 6 v Kenya v Namibia v New Zealand 3 v West Indies 3 v Zimbabwe 2 v Pakistan 5 v South Africa 8 v Sri Lanka 9

    53 v Australia 11 v Bangladesh 4 v England 3 v Kenya 4 v Namibia 1 v New Zealand 6 v West Indies 4 v Zimbabwe 6 v Pakistan 2 v South Africa 4 v Sri Lanka 8 Only 13 meaningful tons against good/decent opposition in Test cricket 24 out of 53 in win causes have been against lesser nations

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 4:19 GMT

    An Absolute beauty of an article.. to put it crudely, it had something for everyone (be it a Sachin fan or a critic)... but a beautiful blend.. right perspective.. nothing extravagant.. nothing unrealistic.. nothing which creates the aura of GOD.. but still shows the un-human-like effort put in by the great man.. Cheers!! lets just njoy the cricket while we can..

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 4:16 GMT

    You got it as good as Tendulkar gets his batting. A gr8 article Sharda in all these cacophony of views around this artificial statistical milestone he has crossed. Tendulkar's genius lies in his persistence, in his focused hard-working mind-set.That's his flaw also in a business of entertainment called Sports. He was never a spontaneous exhilarating genius, playing against situations, against numbers, going with the instinct only. He played with the situations, for the numbers and with all the preparations one can go through. He crafted a stardom for himself out of sheer hard-work. There lies the greatness and weakness of Tendulkar. Most of the times, modern cricket watcher - prefer a more Poetic Brian Lara or more classy Ponting over a predictable methodical knock of tendulkar. he is loved and cherished by billions of indians for the same reason. he is HOPE personified - if a very short stocky man can do it in sports a venture for strong men with simple hardwork and focus.

  • POSTED BY Nilesh_T on | March 17, 2012, 4:15 GMT

    Thanks Sharda, a brilliant piece in simpler language comes as a breath of fresh air as compared to some of your earlier articles where one required a copy of Oxford dictionary at hand. Anyway,you have truly brought out facets of this national treasure of India, also known as Sachin Tendulkar which most of us may not be aware of,example that he meets his earlier coach before every tour as a mark of respect. Neither prose nor poetry can do justice to his accomplishments who despite all the name,fame & wealth has remained a humble down to earth human being - whether on the cricket field, or in personal life, doing product endorsements, or playing a role model to millions of his supporters round the world. Th best of best would have cracked long ago under the sort of pressure and expectations he is under when he walks out to bat. The sheer awe and respect he commands from his opponents is unparalled. The day this Bharat Ratna retires, a generation of followers will stop watching cricket

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 3:06 GMT

    *A to Z Qualities that every person to be learned from Sachin:

    A: Admiration, Adulation, Attention B: Belief, Brave C: Charity, Commitment D: Dedication, Devotion, Durable E: Encouragement, Endeavor F: Fearless G: Gratitude H: Humanity, Humble, Honest I: Intensity, Innovation J: Jive K: Kind L: Loyal M: Motivational, Master N: New ideas O: Overhaul P: Perfection Q: Quality R: Respect S: Steady, Silent T: Temperament, Technique U: Undertakings V: Volatile W: Wonderful X: X-treme Y: Youthful Z: Zero Gravity (Down to Earth)

  • POSTED BY mansman on | March 17, 2012, 2:51 GMT

    Thanks Sharda. You reminded me why I adore the little master. Indeed it's not the act of scoring, but the qualities that the man possesses that has made him what he is today. Qualties, that are worth emulating. Source of inspiration in any walk of life, a living example that success comes when actions are congruent with the values and the principles that the man upholds.

  • POSTED BY Cool_Jeeves on | March 17, 2012, 2:46 GMT

    Great batsman. Sad it had to hapen like this.

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 1:51 GMT

    Brilliant article, Sharda! You go much deeper into the subtleties and nuances of elite sport - and a few trite cliches are disposed of along the way as well. Thank you for an excellent read. Sachin's continuing passion for the game and his ability to maintain an elite level of fitness/form/athleticism for 22 years are his greatest achievements. The centuries are simply a consequence of this - would he be any less valuable as a batsman if he had scored a hundred 90s or 80s or even 50s? Of course not.

  • POSTED BY KiwiRocker- on | March 17, 2012, 1:19 GMT

    It disappoints me to see that a great player is not getting credit he deserves. I am tired of reading praises of impostor Tendulkar.World knows that Tendulkar only plays for records.A recent example was how he left tail enders high and dry during first test against SA and conveniently saved himself as a NOT OUT.World's greatest cricketer EVER has been J. Kallis.Lets compare Tendulkar's batting with Kallis.In tests Kallis has average of 57.50 runs compared to Tendulkar's 56.90.Clearly Kallis is a better batsman.Lets do not forget Kallis has also scored bulk of his runs on bouncy SA tracks instead of Tendulkar's worthless runs in Indian dustbowls. Kallis has won more matches for SA than Tendulkar and his other team mates combined. Here is the real stat: Kallis also has 270 wickets in test matches and 166 catches. Is there any other cricketer including Bradman, Sobers, Imran Khan ever compare with J.Kallis? Please make up you mind as numbers tell the story.Kallis=Complete Cricketer Ever

  • POSTED BY on | March 17, 2012, 0:06 GMT

    this is one of the best articles on Him, thanks Sharda

  • POSTED BY TamilIndian on | March 16, 2012, 22:45 GMT

    Great piece - Really enjoyed it as a person who grew up watching Sachin. Still cannot think of Indian cricket without him - It will be a huge void for me personally when he decides to hang his boots!

  • POSTED BY Nutts on | March 16, 2012, 22:18 GMT

    Your best piece so far Sharda. But again, you wrote it about The God

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 21:49 GMT

    That was perfect, point to point..... Great Article Ugra...

  • POSTED BY sidharth_madhav on | March 16, 2012, 21:37 GMT

    Incredible..no more words to describe The Man.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 20:47 GMT

    Way too long! Lost interest half way through. Am glad the 100 is done and over with.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 20:23 GMT

    An absolutely brilliant piece of writing Sharda. Gives perspective that bridges the extreme hoopla and sheer dismissiveness...

  • POSTED BY Al_Bundy1 on | March 16, 2012, 20:21 GMT

    The machine has already won. That's why he has a Texas sized ego. That's why he ate up so many balls to score a meaningless century - which ultimately contributed to India's defeat at the hands of Bangladesh.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 20:19 GMT

    It requires tremendous humility and discipline to remain at the top for 20+ years. He has been a man of unreal numbers. Still fit, eager, hungry ... Keep it going little master :) I was feeling the nostalgia of how I was drawn into watching this great game by the beauty that HIS batting depicts. The feeling is still the same after 20 prime years of my life. A lot of you who have shared your golden years watching the GOD will reckon that we have been really lucky or the luckiest :)

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 20:02 GMT

    very interesting and thoughtful article, the new generation of indian players (rohit, yuvraj, raina etc) are a product and creation of this machine, after Tendulkar retires ( which i think will happen sooner then we all expected) Indian cricket wont have players like him, the twitter generation stands no chance agianst the The Machine.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 19:38 GMT

    All the superlatives aside Cricket is a team game and Sachin's hundred cost the team the game....How about Sirji just retiring and moving on????

  • POSTED BY Hurricane08 on | March 16, 2012, 19:28 GMT

    The key difference between Indian cricketers and the rest is that the rest call it quits when their bodies stop co-operating and the team just about begins to suffer at their cost. Indian cricketers however set a milestone for themselves and the fans allow them to stretch themselves to get it. Sunil Gavaskar had 10,000 runs, Kapil Dev - 500 wkts and now Sachin 100 100s. I won't be surprised if we see Sachin in World Cup 2019 and the fans still loving his presence. The Indian fan really needs to get to team results.

  • POSTED BY AndyZaltzmannsHair on | March 16, 2012, 19:28 GMT

    The machine will win because like there is no spoon maaaan. It is futile to fight out against it Neo. All emotions achievements are mere figments of imagination created by humans trying to justify their place in the world. But Tendulkar is different he is the chosen one. Except Bangladesh beat India.... so nothing I just wrote really makes any sense and really this whole post is just a parody of the Matrix series.... so yeah.

  • POSTED BY Sports4Youth on | March 16, 2012, 19:11 GMT

    Sakib and Rahim will remember this match more, as they won the match in which Sachin got his 100th. Now this has been 3 times in a row for tendulkar in ODI's. Out of his last 3 centuries India have lost 2 games and tied one (SA). i dont know how to put it. But atleast now he must hang his boots.

  • POSTED BY niraj13 on | March 16, 2012, 19:05 GMT

    Nice article, but a little strange coming from the same writer who mentioned a few days ago that "The Sachin Tendulkar situation is not just an elephant in the roomanymore, but the whole zoo" :). The author probably forgot about everything she has written here, when the master was going through a rare slump, which was still nothing compared to his extraordinary string of consitency over the years. It's strange what one innings can do in cricket. It can make the worst of critics into staunch supporters and devotees. Cricket really is a cruel sport. A few failures gives an opportunity to every Tom, Dick and Harry to humiliate the greatest of players. Anyways, congratulations to SRT for his 100th ton.

  • POSTED BY ashlatchem on | March 16, 2012, 18:51 GMT

    Absolutely fantastic article! Brilliantly written and a great read.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 18:48 GMT

    RELIEVED .... HAPPY .... WISH MANY MANY MANY ENCORES IN THE NEAR FUTURE .......... VIBHAV

  • POSTED BY Shahed.Akhtar on | March 16, 2012, 18:35 GMT

    A very finely composed piece Sharda. However, I cannot agree to any 'machine' comparison for Sachin just the same way as I cannot agree that a Michael Jordan or a John McEnroe can be a machine. There have been times that Sachin has looked out of sorts - which is what makes his feat amazing. In a land where superlatives are churned out like the paddy crop that grows there, let's just marvel at the man - an incredible talent.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 18:28 GMT

    India's proudest jewel....

  • POSTED BY harshthakor on | March 16, 2012, 18:14 GMT

    Sadly Tendulkar acheived this mammoth feat when Indian cricket was at it's lowest ebb or zenith.Significantly,it did not even win the match for India.It would have been very different if he had made his 100th ton in England or Australia.

    However let us bow down to this giant who has acheived a landmark that will probably never be equalled in the history of the game.Sachin has defined the game like a prophet sent to the earth to play cricket.Even the greats like Sobers,or Hobbs or Viv Richards would not have emulated this had they played in the modern era nor even Bradman.Sadly Sachin's hundreds have championed many a losing cause.At their best Lara and Viv Richards have been greater match-winners but remember Sachin bore more pressure than any great batsman.

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  • POSTED BY harshthakor on | March 16, 2012, 18:14 GMT

    Sadly Tendulkar acheived this mammoth feat when Indian cricket was at it's lowest ebb or zenith.Significantly,it did not even win the match for India.It would have been very different if he had made his 100th ton in England or Australia.

    However let us bow down to this giant who has acheived a landmark that will probably never be equalled in the history of the game.Sachin has defined the game like a prophet sent to the earth to play cricket.Even the greats like Sobers,or Hobbs or Viv Richards would not have emulated this had they played in the modern era nor even Bradman.Sadly Sachin's hundreds have championed many a losing cause.At their best Lara and Viv Richards have been greater match-winners but remember Sachin bore more pressure than any great batsman.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 18:28 GMT

    India's proudest jewel....

  • POSTED BY Shahed.Akhtar on | March 16, 2012, 18:35 GMT

    A very finely composed piece Sharda. However, I cannot agree to any 'machine' comparison for Sachin just the same way as I cannot agree that a Michael Jordan or a John McEnroe can be a machine. There have been times that Sachin has looked out of sorts - which is what makes his feat amazing. In a land where superlatives are churned out like the paddy crop that grows there, let's just marvel at the man - an incredible talent.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 18:48 GMT

    RELIEVED .... HAPPY .... WISH MANY MANY MANY ENCORES IN THE NEAR FUTURE .......... VIBHAV

  • POSTED BY ashlatchem on | March 16, 2012, 18:51 GMT

    Absolutely fantastic article! Brilliantly written and a great read.

  • POSTED BY niraj13 on | March 16, 2012, 19:05 GMT

    Nice article, but a little strange coming from the same writer who mentioned a few days ago that "The Sachin Tendulkar situation is not just an elephant in the roomanymore, but the whole zoo" :). The author probably forgot about everything she has written here, when the master was going through a rare slump, which was still nothing compared to his extraordinary string of consitency over the years. It's strange what one innings can do in cricket. It can make the worst of critics into staunch supporters and devotees. Cricket really is a cruel sport. A few failures gives an opportunity to every Tom, Dick and Harry to humiliate the greatest of players. Anyways, congratulations to SRT for his 100th ton.

  • POSTED BY Sports4Youth on | March 16, 2012, 19:11 GMT

    Sakib and Rahim will remember this match more, as they won the match in which Sachin got his 100th. Now this has been 3 times in a row for tendulkar in ODI's. Out of his last 3 centuries India have lost 2 games and tied one (SA). i dont know how to put it. But atleast now he must hang his boots.

  • POSTED BY AndyZaltzmannsHair on | March 16, 2012, 19:28 GMT

    The machine will win because like there is no spoon maaaan. It is futile to fight out against it Neo. All emotions achievements are mere figments of imagination created by humans trying to justify their place in the world. But Tendulkar is different he is the chosen one. Except Bangladesh beat India.... so nothing I just wrote really makes any sense and really this whole post is just a parody of the Matrix series.... so yeah.

  • POSTED BY Hurricane08 on | March 16, 2012, 19:28 GMT

    The key difference between Indian cricketers and the rest is that the rest call it quits when their bodies stop co-operating and the team just about begins to suffer at their cost. Indian cricketers however set a milestone for themselves and the fans allow them to stretch themselves to get it. Sunil Gavaskar had 10,000 runs, Kapil Dev - 500 wkts and now Sachin 100 100s. I won't be surprised if we see Sachin in World Cup 2019 and the fans still loving his presence. The Indian fan really needs to get to team results.

  • POSTED BY on | March 16, 2012, 19:38 GMT

    All the superlatives aside Cricket is a team game and Sachin's hundred cost the team the game....How about Sirji just retiring and moving on????