May 22, 2011

The problem with fining Warne $50,000

Slapping such a hefty fine on someone for speaking his mind sets a precedent that may be tough to follow
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So what level of punishment does the BCCI envision for a serious cricketing crime? For instance, what would the use of performance-enhancing drugs or physical violence on the field bring in the way of punishment?

A mere life imprisonment perhaps? Or maybe a leisurely month-long inquisition at Abu Ghraib? Or if really drastic measures are called for, would they consider dusting off the guillotine? Seriously, a US$ 50,000 fine for Shane Warne speaking his mind does seem a bit on the high side. When I heard the severity of the sentence, I thought it was a Monty Python sketch in the making.

There's no doubt Warne can pay the fine, so the problem is not with him having to part with 50 grand; although he'd probably prefer to drop it at the nearest casino, where he'd at least have a chance of a win. The dilemma for the officials will occur when a serious offence is committed in the future by a young player who is not highly paid. Because the IPL is a lot like India itself - there are the have-lots and the have-nots - it's difficult to mete out even-handed fines. When player contracts vary between $2 million and 20,000 a year, it's difficult for the commissioners to treat each offence equally. I guess this is where a stiff suspension rather than a fine comes in.

Nevertheless Warne's penalty seems harsh. Especially considering, except in rare cases, in any animated discussion on the game between a cricketer and an administrator, the player will be the closest to reality.

Sure, Warne could have kept his conversation with Mr Dixit private. That way it would have remained a matter for the two of them to resolve. However, my experience tells me that in these cases involving a high-profile player and a back-room boy, the latter likes to flex his muscles and have his 15 minutes of fame.

There's also the not-so-minor matter of Warne playing his final competitive match. The public was not going to be thrilled, never mind the Mumbai Indians, if Warne wasn't available to match wits with Sachin Tendulkar one last time. It could have ruined a potential monster gate. So the officials knew it would be a mistake to suspend Warne for his transgression; that left them with only one option, a fine.

They probably felt they had to be seen to be hard on Warne. Sporting officials have this distinct distaste for personal criticism from players, never mind a public haranguing.

The problem the BCCI has created is one of precedent. The next time a serious offence is committed - and trust me it'll happen - Warne's is the fine by which the punishment for the new violation will be judged.

A devil's advocate might say Warne's steep fine will deter potential future offenders. That's not the way it works. In the heat of the moment something is said or done, and in the aftermath, no matter how much the offender wishes he could do it differently, the act has been committed. If the death penalty doesn't deter potential murderers, I don't like the chances of a steep fine making a highly competitive cricketer think twice before he speaks or acts.

Therein may lie the saving grace for the officials. It's usually only highly competitive players who get themselves into such a state that something offensive is said in the heat of the moment. And it's usually the same players who attain the lofty salary status.

Take Gautam Gambhir, for example. He's shown himself to be vulnerable to the odd bout of anger, but as the highest-paid player in this year's IPL, he'll be able to afford a steep fine if he transgresses.

Heaven knows there are a number of players in the IPL who are not worth the lucrative contracts they signed and they should have to return some of their "earnings" at the end of the season. However, Warne is not one of those players and in his case the punishment didn't fit the crime.

Former Australia captain Ian Chappell is now a cricket commentator and columnist

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • bigwonder on May 25, 2011, 19:49 GMT

    @Biggus, I don't think you read the article carefully, @Satabdwi is talking about the '15 minute fame' for the other guy in this episode (a.k.a Dixit). Either way, Ian's fame is not in question here, but his logic of excessive fine or precedence is definitely is.

  • vimal.pranay on May 25, 2011, 18:43 GMT

    Mr. Chappell with all due respect I wud lyk 2 say that no body is interested in what u say....plz help out your players that wud be better for ur country's team. And in context to warne's fine......i wud say it was a well deserved one......no one is bigger than the game.......you can't make furious comments abt curators like that......and btw.......same pitch saw the collapse of MI for a meagre 87.....whr was Mr. Warne to complain abt the pitch den??

  • Biggus on May 24, 2011, 19:34 GMT

    @Satabdwi Sinha-Chappell's had a bit more than "15 minutes of fame" mate. He had a long and successful test career-somewhat more than "15 minutes". Not the right analogy! Been watching too much 'Indian Idol' have we?

  • maddy20 on May 24, 2011, 18:46 GMT

    Warne had not just spoke his mind out. It seems he abused Dixit after the match with RCB. When you are paid obscene amounts of money to play 20-20 cricket, the least you can do is maintain discipline. Chappell and his like should come out of the illusion that Aussies still rule World Cricket.

  • Strafer on May 24, 2011, 14:02 GMT

    And all this talk of Warne somehow being a unique bad guy in wanting a certain type of pitch is nonsense. Pitch preferencing has been going on in every country around the world for years. Groundskeepers in each country are so expereinced at it now that the captains mostly don't need to even ask!

  • Strafer on May 24, 2011, 13:59 GMT

    I think the crux of the article is true, the fine seems too heavy. What they have set here is a precedent. It will be interesting to see what the next fine is and for what.

  • on May 24, 2011, 12:58 GMT

    At least I don't know what actually happened there. Whether Warne said too much, or Mr. Dixit overreacted. I do not agree with Mr. Chapell's comment of "15 minutes of fame". There was an article by Mr. Dixit on Cric info about Warne being a flawed genius. One thing is for sure, Warne is a one of the greatest cricketers of modern day cricket. Mr Dixit's timing of writing that articles tells us that he was indeed offended by what Warne had said. I agree, End does not justify the means and hence Mr. Dixit mentioning that Warne is a dictator etc is atleast worth checking out. Warne has brought victory to RR when nobody even gave them a chance. The fact remains that RR played away matches and won! And they won the finals too. All this because Warne was doctoring pitches is preposterous. I haven't seen any player saying that Warne doesn't listen to suggestions, but who knows. Only time will tell.

  • on May 24, 2011, 12:57 GMT

    People like Ian Chappell wait for every single moment to criticize BCCI at every step.

    Thats all.

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 20:59 GMT

    @Mohammed Aseem, on what basis are you indicating that Warne made a formal comment? If your definition of abuse relates to formal comment, then we have serious difference of opinion. Truth is, Warne wanted a grand finale for his last IPL - which he did not get and wanted to blame someone - guess who is always the guinea-pigs for Australian Players? I am amazed that Ian even bothered to defend Warne by suggesting that BCCI is setting a bad precedence, in fact they would be setting bad precedence if they let Warne go scotch-free - just like many of his fellow-team mates have in the past under ICC.

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 20:51 GMT

    @Nival Chamara Kolambage, You are still not getting the point. Its not about defending BCCI (and whats wrong with that - Ian is defending his country men, even when they are wrong), its about correct punishment and I strongly believe Warne was given appropriate if not severe punishment. Also, please use correct English its not "dat" its "that"

  • bigwonder on May 25, 2011, 19:49 GMT

    @Biggus, I don't think you read the article carefully, @Satabdwi is talking about the '15 minute fame' for the other guy in this episode (a.k.a Dixit). Either way, Ian's fame is not in question here, but his logic of excessive fine or precedence is definitely is.

  • vimal.pranay on May 25, 2011, 18:43 GMT

    Mr. Chappell with all due respect I wud lyk 2 say that no body is interested in what u say....plz help out your players that wud be better for ur country's team. And in context to warne's fine......i wud say it was a well deserved one......no one is bigger than the game.......you can't make furious comments abt curators like that......and btw.......same pitch saw the collapse of MI for a meagre 87.....whr was Mr. Warne to complain abt the pitch den??

  • Biggus on May 24, 2011, 19:34 GMT

    @Satabdwi Sinha-Chappell's had a bit more than "15 minutes of fame" mate. He had a long and successful test career-somewhat more than "15 minutes". Not the right analogy! Been watching too much 'Indian Idol' have we?

  • maddy20 on May 24, 2011, 18:46 GMT

    Warne had not just spoke his mind out. It seems he abused Dixit after the match with RCB. When you are paid obscene amounts of money to play 20-20 cricket, the least you can do is maintain discipline. Chappell and his like should come out of the illusion that Aussies still rule World Cricket.

  • Strafer on May 24, 2011, 14:02 GMT

    And all this talk of Warne somehow being a unique bad guy in wanting a certain type of pitch is nonsense. Pitch preferencing has been going on in every country around the world for years. Groundskeepers in each country are so expereinced at it now that the captains mostly don't need to even ask!

  • Strafer on May 24, 2011, 13:59 GMT

    I think the crux of the article is true, the fine seems too heavy. What they have set here is a precedent. It will be interesting to see what the next fine is and for what.

  • on May 24, 2011, 12:58 GMT

    At least I don't know what actually happened there. Whether Warne said too much, or Mr. Dixit overreacted. I do not agree with Mr. Chapell's comment of "15 minutes of fame". There was an article by Mr. Dixit on Cric info about Warne being a flawed genius. One thing is for sure, Warne is a one of the greatest cricketers of modern day cricket. Mr Dixit's timing of writing that articles tells us that he was indeed offended by what Warne had said. I agree, End does not justify the means and hence Mr. Dixit mentioning that Warne is a dictator etc is atleast worth checking out. Warne has brought victory to RR when nobody even gave them a chance. The fact remains that RR played away matches and won! And they won the finals too. All this because Warne was doctoring pitches is preposterous. I haven't seen any player saying that Warne doesn't listen to suggestions, but who knows. Only time will tell.

  • on May 24, 2011, 12:57 GMT

    People like Ian Chappell wait for every single moment to criticize BCCI at every step.

    Thats all.

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 20:59 GMT

    @Mohammed Aseem, on what basis are you indicating that Warne made a formal comment? If your definition of abuse relates to formal comment, then we have serious difference of opinion. Truth is, Warne wanted a grand finale for his last IPL - which he did not get and wanted to blame someone - guess who is always the guinea-pigs for Australian Players? I am amazed that Ian even bothered to defend Warne by suggesting that BCCI is setting a bad precedence, in fact they would be setting bad precedence if they let Warne go scotch-free - just like many of his fellow-team mates have in the past under ICC.

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 20:51 GMT

    @Nival Chamara Kolambage, You are still not getting the point. Its not about defending BCCI (and whats wrong with that - Ian is defending his country men, even when they are wrong), its about correct punishment and I strongly believe Warne was given appropriate if not severe punishment. Also, please use correct English its not "dat" its "that"

  • arunNY on May 23, 2011, 20:18 GMT

    @ Nival: mate it seems that you didnt understand the whole scenario. No player is above the game and what Warne tried was to modify the condition of the pitch; if he is a true champion then he should be able to perform on all pitches. Have you seen Tendulkar calling a curator and asking him to take off the grass from pitch. He might have been suspended for few matches but fortunately the following match was his last one. BCCI took the harsh step also when they banned Jadeja for the whole IPL. So in short no player is above the game of cricket.....

  • on May 23, 2011, 19:00 GMT

    wow!..i see a lot of BCCI defenders here..sad dat we cant be a bit more openminded...well its an aussie dat feels da most for an aussie..so why not he speaks out?..actually what warne did was speaking out his mind. fining him with such an amount is to say like..hey, dis is our country, our ipl, our territory, we are the bosses m u are jst guests...!

  • RGee on May 23, 2011, 17:40 GMT

    oh shut up IAN, just because Shane Warne has a potty mouth doesn't mean you can potty mouth anyone you want. I think Shane should have been kicked out of RR!!!

  • on May 23, 2011, 17:06 GMT

    it was a formal comment with a laugh by warne but critics made it an issue, instead thanking a great captain who brought blistering players for india for winning the world cup... Hope there are no people in bcci involved in playing mind games.. Anyways good luck warne for future.

  • trublue on May 23, 2011, 14:45 GMT

    Hate to say it Ian, but its just very hypocritical aussie mentality. I can think of countless times aussie players misbehaved and got away with it and indians being fined and punished. I am not condoning indian's behavior nor am i condoning Warne's. You guys need to chin up when things are down.

  • Angad11 on May 23, 2011, 13:55 GMT

    why does harsha call ian chapell as chapelli ?

  • on May 23, 2011, 12:51 GMT

    Mr Chappell, what is your view point when a certain Mr Ganguly was dropped because he had a clash of opinions with your brother? Which way did your sympathy lean? Warne was fined 50k because he was the captain and behaved in the most boorish manner. I think he should have been banned from IPL.

  • jay57870 on May 23, 2011, 12:05 GMT

    (Contd) BCCI on balance has actually done a good job of managing crime & punishment matters, especially in IPL. Crucial cases: A "high-profile" player - Yes, Harbhajan Singh - given a 1-year ban, as also a young gun - Yes, Ravindra Jadeja of RR. The offenses: Slapping (HS) and violating contract terms (RJ). A Big Case: Lalit Modi was fired! Another case: Gambhir (Yes, again) reprimanded for calling his (Yes) RR opponents "ordinary"; and RR people were upset! Yet, when Shane publicly "abuses" an RCA official - a far more serious offence - Ian complains the fine is too hefty for "speaking his mind"? Upshot: As a superstar/leader, Shane should be held to a higher standard of conduct. Importantly, notice be served to CA & ICC to toughen discipline standards. Enough is enough: No more wrist slaps and free passes for "highly competitive players." It's a long list. The real problem is in your own backyard, Ian: Get your act together! Impose tougher penalties on wayward Aussie players!

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 11:46 GMT

    @Mark Checkley, Test Cricket is increasingly becoming a dying breed. Even ODI had to be changed (remember when there were 60 overs in ODI and no powerplay?). The only constant thing about Cricket is the change. ICC has to walk a the thin line of not loosing viewers (or increasing them) by just focusing on Test Vs. giving too much focus to T20 that it may cannibalize Test Cricket. Either way, T20 is here to stay, be it in IPL or other league.

  • jay57870 on May 23, 2011, 11:44 GMT

    (Contd) Anil Kumble made similar comments about these incidents: "The Australians always seem to get away. Whatever their transgressions ... invariably it is their opponents who end up paying a price." (Benn was banned for 2 ODIs, while the Aussies were fined only a small portion of match fees). The reality: Instigators are not punished enough. He further cited the 2008 Delhi Test where Gautam Gambhir (Yes, Ian) was given a 1-Test ban for "elbowing" Shane Watson. He had verbal spats earlier with Watson and Simon Katich; also Katich was later seen "obstructing" Gambhir. The provoking Aussies got away free. Another curious coincidence: The same umpires (match:Chris Broad) and (field: Billy Bowden) were present in both Indian & Australian controversies. Now, both Taylor and Kumble have credible credentials as former captains and officials. Their views need to be seriously heeded. And, believe it or not, something is being done about it in India. Give credit where it's due. (TBC)

  • jay57870 on May 23, 2011, 11:36 GMT

    It's not surprising anymore to see Ian Chapell viewing the world upside down from Down Under. His topsy-turvy, one-sided worldview of cricketing crime & punishment is laughable: The notion that "Warne's steep fine will (not) deter potential future offenders" is ridiculous. Does Ian seriously think that penal laws are ineffective - because the "death penalty doesn't deter potential murderers"- and thus won't deter so-called "highly competitive players" either? Really? Thankfully wiser people in the know don't buy into such perverse logic. For example, Mark Taylor admonished Ricky Ponting and his team for the ugly incidents (involving Brad Haddin, Mitchell Johnson & Sulieman Benn) in the 2009 Australia-West Indies Tests. Mark warned: "Australians could be a bit more proactive in trying to nip these things in the bud, rather than letting things escalate." Also Ricky could take a bigger role by "think(ing) a bit from the opposition's point of view - not just your own." Wise words. (TBC)

  • Funmac on May 23, 2011, 9:56 GMT

    Ian, there is big difference between speaking ones mind and accusing and abusing someone. The fine was for the later.

  • Charindra on May 23, 2011, 9:36 GMT

    Ian Chappell really needs to get a life and stop obsessing over Warne. Warne was really good, but let's get over it shall we. He's gone now. In a few years some other leggie will come, and may even turn out to be better than him, in the sense that he may be able to take wickets without intimidating umpires or verbally abusing batsmen. Then we'll have a lot of guilt-less fun.

  • Kavum on May 23, 2011, 9:18 GMT

    Yer bites the 'and that feeds yer and yer gets yer Pedigree Chum taken away. Its never too late to teach an old dog new tricks (or lessons).

  • on May 23, 2011, 9:07 GMT

    Those who describe the IPL as "unreal" are dead right. This whole form of "Cricket" (not in the least new; Club Cricketers have played 20 overs games for a bit of fun on a Summer evening since the year dot) is so devoid of the finer points of cricketing tactics and strategy as to be, of itself, "unreal". It's like 7-a-side Rugby, an interesting and exciting specacle for an end-of-season party, so long as not taken too seriously. But as an exercise in true cricketing expertise it leaves almost everything to be desired. The vast sums of money being poured into this game are a mistaken attempt by commercvial interests who do not understand cricket as a game to capitalise on a percveived market. That market is a temporary thing - already people are getting bored, and realising that TEST MATCH CRICKET, particularly in the context of some of the excellent matches and series of recent years, is the form which has lasting value. Quality will rise to the top, given time.

  • on May 23, 2011, 8:21 GMT

    I agree with Ian... $50,000 fine? let's call a spade a spade, the BCCI is just looking to get some extra pocket money. They already make a lot of money off of these tournaments.

  • Bytheway on May 23, 2011, 7:53 GMT

    When Sachin speaks, the earth (pitch) moves.

  • rickywanting on May 23, 2011, 6:19 GMT

    Ian Chappell, you should have realised by now that everything concerned with the IPL is exaggerated and unreal... There's no need to devote a full column to a triviality such as the fines in the IPL. Aren't the salaries of the players unreal? Should not fees for Test matches, which are a thousand times tougher, be much more than in the IPL? What justifies such contrast in fees for playing for your country and playing for a domestic club? Thus, just as the fees are unreal, the fines are unreal and exaggerated. For instance, Sachin Tendulkar was fined $20,000 when Mumbai was slow in their bowling over rate against Kochi... And they were slow by one fricking over. So, the fine on Warne is perfectly in accord with the IPL's overblown sense of proportion.

  • macdaddy on May 23, 2011, 4:40 GMT

    @ krishna darooka You want warne to be a consultant? Consultant for what? On how to publicly insult officials and humiliate yourself? IPL is running properly and is being managed well. If it wernt then it would not have been listed on forbes.com as the world's HOTTEST sports league.

    As for chappel, the problem with australians is that they always come to the rescue of their own, even if they are wrong. When was the last time an aussie was supporting the truth rather than the fellow countrymen. Ponting is the most arrogant and unprofessional cricketer going around. He questions the decision of on field umpires even after being reviewed by the third umpire, furthermore he instructs umpires upon making decision for giving out (seen in the contorversial sydney test). Moreover, sledging was invented by aussies, so when they sledge its just part of the game. But when they are on the receiving end of it, they go crying like little babies to their board (also seen in the sydney test)

  • harshalb on May 23, 2011, 4:05 GMT

    It is an arbitrary amount and disproportionate with the offense. Warne should go to court and teach BCCI a lesson.

  • ScriptWriter on May 23, 2011, 3:30 GMT

    Harbhajan was fine $200,000 and banned for the rest of the season. This meant he lost whatever earnings the matches would have brought him plus he had to pay the fine. BCCI is being fair.

    The fine is not for speaking out his mind. The fine is for calling a board official names. That is not cricket, is it?

  • bigwonder on May 23, 2011, 2:59 GMT

    @Rahul Bhandari, You are arguing using assumptions - which can go either way. If Shewag had said this then would BCCI would have done this. If you focus on facts and things that have occurred in the past, this is the right thing to do. You do not want to go softy on this. You can't let players come into IPL and verbally assault an official. They are not only getting paid highly but they are also expected to behave professionally. How do you think this incident is different from Pointing throwing stuff in the dressing room after getting out. Its all part of frustration that these experienced players are supposed to control. What kind of example is Warne setting for young RR players? You are indirectly supporting that Warne's behavior is correct and that if young players behave like this they should not expect any repercussion if they display similar behavior when playing abroad.

  • on May 23, 2011, 0:45 GMT

    I think the fine should be converted into 50000 rupees from 50000dollars to save face for such heavy fine or fine the same amount to the judges who fined so heavily for such small crime

    If people cannot manage IPL properly than close it down permanently

    Other suggestion is to appoint Warne as a cosultant

  • DKan on May 23, 2011, 0:34 GMT

    @AsherCA Harbhajan was banned for almost entire season (10 games I think) for the Sreesanth incident. How is that penalty less than 50000$ fine?? And if a player isn't available for a game, they lose their salary on a pro-rata basis, so Bhajji lost a lot more than 50K.

  • Arthaurian on May 22, 2011, 21:13 GMT

    Lol Warney has just been taken for a ride by the BCCI HAaaaaahahahahahahaaaa

  • on May 22, 2011, 19:20 GMT

    I agrree with IAN on this one .. How do you determine whats the punishment for a given offence. Is three match ban more sever than 50000$. Its debatable depending on who the player is .

    I feel the system should be more transparent and not a knee jerk reaction because they need to prove that they are taking strong action. Is slapping a fellow player a bigger offence or speaking about something publicly.

    And I dont understand why people are commenting that since warne is australian he deserves this. The point is would BCCI have done the same thing had this been sehwag who is also very open in saying things. I am sure sehwag would have said similar things if that was his team. Would BBCI take the same action.

  • AsherCA on May 22, 2011, 19:15 GMT

    In terms of example & violence, the bigger crime in IPL was Harbhajan slapping Sree Santh. The penalty on Warne was higher than that on Bhajji. However, Warne has questioned BCCI's power to decide match results through pitch selection - how dare he ? The BCCI Secretary had sent a recommendation to RCA for a pitch that favored CSK to help CSK reach the knockout phase. RCA therefore had no option, but to follow "management orders" in both cases - pitch selection & then, penalty on Warne.

  • Vasi-Koosi on May 22, 2011, 19:10 GMT

    I agree with Ian Chappell. Instead of the fine being quoted as $50,000, it should have been equated to a prorata of 1 match fee... Then the precedence would be a lot different. Also, IPL could have handed a suspended sentence that could have a lot more meaning and fairness...

  • on May 22, 2011, 18:46 GMT

    The BCCI has never been in touch with reality- in fact, they refuse to return reality's calls most of the time.Just more proof.

  • bigwonder on May 22, 2011, 17:10 GMT

    I don't agree with Ian since there are have been plenty of examples from ICC with different standards while imposing fines. For example Broad was not handed any ban for deliberately throwing a ball at the batsmen, Pointing never got a ban for forcibly arguing with on-field umpires. BCCI is just following ICCs and making sure that arrogance is not acceptable no matter what country you play for.

  • on May 22, 2011, 16:51 GMT

    As always, very well said and pointed out by Ian Chappell. And believe me most of the Indians are also on the side of Warne. And if you ask me what makes me believe that the most of the Indians are on the side of Warne, let me tell you that I have read a lot of discussion & comments about Warne being fined & most of the Indians feel that its too severe & secondly why Mr. Dixit was not fined & reprimanded.

  • asterix.gaul on May 22, 2011, 16:29 GMT

    I think the BCCI wanted to send out a message that Aussies can't say things and get away scot-free, like it happens at ICC tournaments; this is a BCCI tournament. That said, Dixit should have been raked over coals for his statement on Warne's abilities as a captain. I'd like to know what disciplinary action has been taken against him by the BCCI and the RCA.

  • Truemans_Ghost on May 22, 2011, 16:16 GMT

    He deserves the fine for underestimating the self importance of Indian cricket officals.

  • jhakumar on May 22, 2011, 16:11 GMT

    I am not sure if Mr. Chappell got it right or anyone who is against this 50K fine. A fine is imposed to make you feel guilty of doing a wrongful act and the should make you think twice before repeating it. If an indian Ranji Player does the same, i am sure he wont be fined 50 K, but even if he is fined 5K, that will make him think many times before repeating this act. 50 K for warne or may be for Dhoni or Gambhir is equivalent to 5 K for a Ranji Player. If we go Chappell's way of dioing justice,these australian's will keep on repeating this again and again, just because they have enough money to pay for it. Mr. Chappell, i think you need to get you basic understanding of social living right. How do you pay your taxes ? equal to a street vendor ?

  • aaditya98june on May 22, 2011, 15:55 GMT

    Ian is wrong and right. Wrong in the sense of forgetting all those times when Indians have had the short end of the stick vis-vis the Australian ( remember Sydney Test-Steve Buckner or Ricky Ponting with his churlish behavior all his life) and right in the sense that in any fight between a player and an official, the player tends to suffer more. Frankly what is Mr. Dixit's role in Rajasthan Royals compared to Warne's. But then in any fight between the players and Accountants, latter will always win at least in Indian sport. It is a pity that a nobody like Mr. Dixit can take on and win against one of the all time greats like Warne.

  • pradeep_dealwis on May 22, 2011, 15:20 GMT

    About time Warne paid for something he said/did

  • avis1001 on May 22, 2011, 15:16 GMT

    IPL with $2M to $20K - depends on the best and worst teams.

  • mrr_nair on May 22, 2011, 15:13 GMT

    Why can't a person as senior as Ian, think that the fine is imposed for behaving unprofessionally in front of many budding cricketers? It is a bad precedence to shout at an official for not giving a pitch that match a team's style of play. It is like you rent a house and ask the house owner to paint the house as per your choice of colors.The fine is not high considering the seniority of Mr.Warne, he might have been upset by the team's performance and pitch not helping the cause as well. However a person regarded as mentor/guru by millions of people shouldn't have behaved the way he has done that day. IPL is all abt money, regardless whether it is franchisees, commentators, columnists, players, board(s), bookies, channels… however there is another purpose we cricket lovers look for, finding and nurturing young talent, who can fill in the great shoes, hanged in near future. Mr.Warne has mentored talents during his IPL stint, he should not spoil the spot by behaving irresponsibly

  • CricketpunditUSA on May 22, 2011, 15:11 GMT

    @Greg Of course, Sachin is better. Ask Branman to play a number of different formats against a number of oppositions and not to mention the quality of bowlers Sachin has faced. Time will tell the difference. Though it is ridiculous to compare two greats from different eras.

  • mogan707 on May 22, 2011, 15:04 GMT

    PLEASE AT LEAST POST THIS COMMENT.Reposting again.

    Nice point.It is not the point that Shane Warne has been fined US50,000 dollars.It is the point of flexing of BCCI's muscle power to humble a player of Shane Warne's quality.Sanjay Dixit and N srinivasan has misused the power they had.And in the coming months he would crush his opponents(lalit Modi etc) with the help of law.And whoever opposes him would face severe consequences.And by using his power,he would select team of Indian containing all players from the region of South Zone esp TamilNadu.Shame on N srinivasn.Shame on BCCI.

  • trackwhack on May 22, 2011, 13:55 GMT

    Greg O'Donnel.. Did you expect Sachin to answer otherwise irrespective of what he actually though. Sachins no Ponting you know. He does not walk around with a trumpet waiting to prop himself up. He does not need to. Keep telling yourself yourself you delusional aussies that someone who repeatedly played against the same team (pathetic too) over and over again to get an inflated average must be the greatest ever.

  • cryptq1 on May 22, 2011, 13:04 GMT

    @sathishkrish - I think you're missing the point of the article. Nowhere does Ian condone Warne's behaviour or maintains that he should not have been fined. He is purely stating that they have set a dangerous precedent. If another less well paid player commits the same offence will he be able to afford such a big fine? That's Ian's point.

  • Animesh_Mishra on May 22, 2011, 12:58 GMT

    Well said. I think its just intolerable to super-fine Warne and leave the official without even a warning. Such incidents can provide ground for future mishaps.

  • on May 22, 2011, 12:56 GMT

    Ian is still as good as it gets at 70 years of age and he has got a point. But it wont matter this time I tjink. Warne wants to carry on with IPL so he'll keep mummmm.

  • SibaMohanty on May 22, 2011, 12:47 GMT

    50 grand to Warne? And that Dikshit bullshited Sachin Tendulkar and Mumbai openly and got away. The BCCI did not see that? Or is it that Warne (read Rajasthan Royals) is paying because RCA is occupied by Congress?

    And yes, Harbhajan was not banned for a whole season. Just about three games. He had hit a fellow cricketer. Scoundrels work at BCCI, we all know that.

  • fazald on May 22, 2011, 12:31 GMT

    A $50,000 fine imposed on Shane Warne was too harsh a penalty by the BCCI considering it's not the sole authority incharge of international cricket.It creates a wrong precedent where other cricket playing countries are concerned that they could impose hefty fines on players as well for breach of discipline. The decision should have been made by the ICC.Apparently the ICC has no say in this matter as the BCCI dictates the terms nowadays.

  • on May 22, 2011, 12:25 GMT

    Australian supporting an Australian...there are tons of offences which Australians go unpunished....

    Remember Venkatesh Prasad being fined for pumping his fist after a dismissal and Ricky Pointing going scot-free for abusing J Srinath, when he went to apologize after a bouncer hit him.

    And the Sydney test...just scratch your brains....

  • ponic on May 22, 2011, 12:20 GMT

    Mr. Ian, I disagree with your view. Most aussy cricketers is of the view that they could do whaterver they want and get away without any action. If the same had happened between an Australian administrator and Indian cricketer, then it is absolutely correct and no issues at all. But an Indian does the same, then aussies cannot accept it. This is the same thing happened on field, when Indians sledge Australian cricketers, then it is racism and not following the spirit of the game. On the other hand Australian cricketers could sledge anyone and it is called as "tough way of playing cricket". What rubbish is this. Warne is a legend in cricket, there is no doubt, but it doesn't mean that he should not be penalized for wrong doings. Mr Ian why didn't you comment when Harbajan Singh was penalized by IPL governing body? Most of your views are proved to be wrong. When Sachin had a bad run, Mr. Ian's advice was Sachin should stop playing cricket at all, we all know what happened since then!

  • Mina_Anand on May 22, 2011, 12:18 GMT

    Typical Chappellsim. Anything to excuse a fellow countryman. And typical of most Indians, blindly following an Aussie !

  • on May 22, 2011, 10:16 GMT

    Bismoy, ask Sachin if he thinks he is better than Bradman. You should already know the answer, all serious cricket fans do.

  • on May 22, 2011, 10:16 GMT

    Only one sentence is un-baised and that is "highly competitive cricketer think twice before he speaks or acts." this true for everyone. But Warne never did.

  • CRam on May 22, 2011, 10:02 GMT

    Well, interesting to find out if the fine would still have been 50,000$ if the official were to be found guilty in the same case! I do think the entire process should be seen as fair and equitable.

  • bonaku on May 22, 2011, 9:27 GMT

    Can someone tell us the complete story behind this episode ? I know it will be hard, as they might have to pay big fines like warnie... hope some one has courage. I dont want to judge until I listen to both sides.

  • on May 22, 2011, 8:15 GMT

    Inshallah if rajistan will not win cup then Bangalore or kolkata are my Favorites..

  • bismoy on May 22, 2011, 8:01 GMT

    Agree if warne was dropped we would have been deprived to see world greatest Leg Spinner(Warne) vs World greatest batman of all time(SIR Sachin).

    Thank you warne.....We enjoyed you rivalry with sachin and Lara in test/odi...That was time when cricket was at his very best....

  • cric_fanatics on May 22, 2011, 7:21 GMT

    BRILLIANT article....you have spoken the absolute truth..... moreover home team should have the right to prepare a pitch which better suits their strength than the oppositions...

  • on May 22, 2011, 6:57 GMT

    This will be forgotten....

  • Dashgar on May 22, 2011, 5:52 GMT

    Well said Chappelli, as usual. As someone wrote on another thread this fine is actually more than the prize money for second place in the Intercontinental cup. If they want to fine the rich more and the poor less they should have fined him a % of his contract. That said Warne probably doesn't have the biggest contract out there so that's probably why they just slapped the flat 50 grand on him.

  • sathishkrish on May 22, 2011, 5:49 GMT

    So typical from Ian Chappel, highlighting the penalty part and not getting into what Warne had done. Aussies do these things on and off the cricket field and get away with it most of the times. This is domestic cricket league in India and here rules are set by the BCCI. Not only Warne, every player needs to follow it.

  • Rahul_78 on May 22, 2011, 4:57 GMT

    I have great respect for Ian but I would like to remind him that Harbhajan an established player has been suspended for a whole season of IPL and Manish pandey was suspended for 4 games which allocates to 25% of the matches for the season for his team for his offense. In warne's case he already has announced his retirement from IPL so what purpose it was going to server to ban him for 4 or 5 matches like pandey when he wont be available for the next season to complete the ban handed out to him. Hence a heavy fine was only the option. Mr.Dixit is no saint himself and has cases filled against him in Rajasthan court but Warne himself is the captain and mentor of RR team and didnt exactly setup a great example by abusing another person on the ground in presence of many. Cant really argue with the punishment handed out to warnie.

  • on May 22, 2011, 4:56 GMT

    fining indians and australians these days are the source of regular EXTRA income for icc now a days.

  • dumolo on May 22, 2011, 4:41 GMT

    There was nothing more to this than Dixit grandstanding on the back of Warnie's profile. Total non-issue as RR will pay the $50k - just shut the bar an hour early and do without the girls for one night and they'll save $50k

  • m_kamb on May 22, 2011, 4:34 GMT

    ROBIN UTHUPA,YUSUF PATHAN,PIYUSH CHAWALA,IRFAN PATHAN AND MANY MORE , ARE ALL

    MONEY FOR OLD ROPE

  • on May 22, 2011, 4:28 GMT

    I guess when you're an established journalist like Ian Chappell , you can get away with faux pas such as starting a paragraph with a question.

  • abhi_cricinfo on May 22, 2011, 4:27 GMT

    $50000 is fined for captain whose team mess-up with over-rate as well and if the same team is found guilty due to slow over-rate the captain is banned for 2 matches or so. SRT himself was fined for over-rate . You cannot ban a player for mistake he has done first time . Ian Chappell should know this . ICC also do this thing . I did't got article.

  • vparisa on May 22, 2011, 4:18 GMT

    It just does not make sense. Shane Warne did not deserve that. What about fining Dixit for his outburst against Mumbai Indians? Can Administrators get away with anything?

  • on May 22, 2011, 3:55 GMT

    I have a great respect for Ian Chappel's writings because he is one of the very few great analysists of the game. However I am afraid to say in the instant case he is taking a partial attitude towards Shane Warne. I remember Ian Chappel proudly boast in tv broadcasts that Australian curators are extremelyy independent and would give a fitting reply if any captain tried to influence them for doctoring a wicket. Now when an Indian Admnistrator has done the same thing it should be accepted by the Australians. Unfortunately the Australian way of creating a scene is by first shouting and when it does not work aplogise. International cricketers(even retired ones) who are being paid huge sums of money for participation in the IPL have been taught a lesson by Mr Dikshit that you have to be careful in your choice of words in India. They should remember that this is India and not Australia and such type of talk can never be tolerated.

  • BreakingNews on May 22, 2011, 3:49 GMT

    As usual Ian taking side and trying to justify his autralian country man. IPL in the 1st season also penalised and banned Harbhajan for his misdeeds.

    Its difficult to understand what Ian wanted the IPL administrators to do. There is no criticism for Warne act but entire article written with the focus on IPL and its administrators.

    Why Warne committing a crime should be seen thru diffirently. Australian in the past have done (the mistake) that and left Mark Waugh and Warne with small match fine.

  • NumberXI on May 22, 2011, 3:46 GMT

    Shane Warne's fine was a case of officialese (and bureaucracy) "triumphing" over cricketers. The fine seemed more a case of a somewhat self-important official - and a very senior bureaucrat in the State Govt of Rajasthan - getting his own back for being spoken rudely to. It was probably a compromise solution, aimed at giving Warne a match to have a last hurrah. Whatever it may have been, there is no telling what damage it will eventually do to the IPL - one can only hope its effects will not be long-lasting.

  • chait83 on May 22, 2011, 3:12 GMT

    "Speaking out your mind" is a masquerade to abusive behavior. There are means and ways of "Speaking out your mind". You need to call upon a formal conference/meeting and structure your thoughts into well formulated agenda and then "Speak your mind". We are not talking of backyard cricket here, it's played at such a professional level. Warnie is aware of that. You can't take your brawl to public, you need to settle it within the administration only.

  • on May 22, 2011, 3:07 GMT

    couldn't agree more... it was a very egoistic decision by bcci..

  • CameoKing on May 22, 2011, 3:04 GMT

    I'm with you Mr Chappell. 50k is bizarre for what Warne did. BCCI should watch Spiderman: "With great power, comes great responsibility"

  • VipulPatki on May 22, 2011, 2:57 GMT

    BCCI is a bully. Punishing someone for calling dirt dirt.

  • No featured comments at the moment.

  • VipulPatki on May 22, 2011, 2:57 GMT

    BCCI is a bully. Punishing someone for calling dirt dirt.

  • CameoKing on May 22, 2011, 3:04 GMT

    I'm with you Mr Chappell. 50k is bizarre for what Warne did. BCCI should watch Spiderman: "With great power, comes great responsibility"

  • on May 22, 2011, 3:07 GMT

    couldn't agree more... it was a very egoistic decision by bcci..

  • chait83 on May 22, 2011, 3:12 GMT

    "Speaking out your mind" is a masquerade to abusive behavior. There are means and ways of "Speaking out your mind". You need to call upon a formal conference/meeting and structure your thoughts into well formulated agenda and then "Speak your mind". We are not talking of backyard cricket here, it's played at such a professional level. Warnie is aware of that. You can't take your brawl to public, you need to settle it within the administration only.

  • NumberXI on May 22, 2011, 3:46 GMT

    Shane Warne's fine was a case of officialese (and bureaucracy) "triumphing" over cricketers. The fine seemed more a case of a somewhat self-important official - and a very senior bureaucrat in the State Govt of Rajasthan - getting his own back for being spoken rudely to. It was probably a compromise solution, aimed at giving Warne a match to have a last hurrah. Whatever it may have been, there is no telling what damage it will eventually do to the IPL - one can only hope its effects will not be long-lasting.

  • BreakingNews on May 22, 2011, 3:49 GMT

    As usual Ian taking side and trying to justify his autralian country man. IPL in the 1st season also penalised and banned Harbhajan for his misdeeds.

    Its difficult to understand what Ian wanted the IPL administrators to do. There is no criticism for Warne act but entire article written with the focus on IPL and its administrators.

    Why Warne committing a crime should be seen thru diffirently. Australian in the past have done (the mistake) that and left Mark Waugh and Warne with small match fine.

  • on May 22, 2011, 3:55 GMT

    I have a great respect for Ian Chappel's writings because he is one of the very few great analysists of the game. However I am afraid to say in the instant case he is taking a partial attitude towards Shane Warne. I remember Ian Chappel proudly boast in tv broadcasts that Australian curators are extremelyy independent and would give a fitting reply if any captain tried to influence them for doctoring a wicket. Now when an Indian Admnistrator has done the same thing it should be accepted by the Australians. Unfortunately the Australian way of creating a scene is by first shouting and when it does not work aplogise. International cricketers(even retired ones) who are being paid huge sums of money for participation in the IPL have been taught a lesson by Mr Dikshit that you have to be careful in your choice of words in India. They should remember that this is India and not Australia and such type of talk can never be tolerated.

  • vparisa on May 22, 2011, 4:18 GMT

    It just does not make sense. Shane Warne did not deserve that. What about fining Dixit for his outburst against Mumbai Indians? Can Administrators get away with anything?

  • abhi_cricinfo on May 22, 2011, 4:27 GMT

    $50000 is fined for captain whose team mess-up with over-rate as well and if the same team is found guilty due to slow over-rate the captain is banned for 2 matches or so. SRT himself was fined for over-rate . You cannot ban a player for mistake he has done first time . Ian Chappell should know this . ICC also do this thing . I did't got article.

  • on May 22, 2011, 4:28 GMT

    I guess when you're an established journalist like Ian Chappell , you can get away with faux pas such as starting a paragraph with a question.