Full Name

Peter Moores

Born

December 18, 1962, Macclesfield, Cheshire

Age

58y 180d

Nicknames

Billy

Batting Style

Right hand bat

Fielding Position

Wicketkeeper

Height

6ft

Education

The King's School, Macclesfield

relations

(son),

(brother)

Other

Coach

TEAMS

The man who won a second chance. Five years after he was sacked as England coach, Peter Moores won another opportunity to make a success of the role when he was reappointed in April 2014. It was reward not just for his success at domestic level - Moores oversaw Lancashire's first outright Championship success in 77 years in 2011 - but for his dignified silence following his sacking at the end of 2008.

Results rarely went Moores' way during his first spell as coach. While he laid some of the foundations for England's later success - he recalled Graeme Swann and Matt Prior, installed James Anderson and Stuart Broad as the new ball pairing and appointed Andy Flower as his right hand man - the team lost their first home series in six years in 2007 (to India), before suffering defeat in Sri Lanka in the winter and then to South Africa in England in 2008.

But it was Moores' relationship with Kevin Pietersen, installed as England captain in August 2008, that proved his undoing. Pietersen felt Moores was not up to the job and, though Pietersen was sacked for his role in the attempted mutiny, the damage to Moores' reputation was such that his position was also untenable.

Within a month, he was appointed as Lancashire's coach and, despite a modest-looking squad, he went a long way towards salvaging his reputation with that Championship success in 2011. While relegation followed the next year, Lancashire bounced back up and, by early 2014 when Flower stepped down from the England job following an Ashes whitewash in January 2014, Moores, with reputation restored, was an obvious candidate for the job. He beat Ashley Giles, formerly England's limited-overs coach and the presumed successor to Flower, to the role.

Moores had enjoyed an earlier career as a hard-working wicketkeeper for Sussex, for whom he made over 500 dismissals. He first honed his playing skills as a member of the MCC groundstaff and, although he joined Worcestershire in 1982, his opportunities were limited by the ever-present David Humphries. He moved to Hove in 1985, initially as understudy to Ian Gould, and won his cap four years later. He was elected captain in 1997 after a winter of upheaval at Sussex, becoming player-coach in 1998. He retired midway through that season to concentrate on coaching and quickly established a reputation in that field.

Under his direction, Sussex won the second division of the Championship in 2001, and then main title itself in 2003, Sussex's first Championship title in their 164-year history. His ever-growing coaching skills were recognised by the ECB who appointed him as coach on the England A tour in 2000-01, and in 2005 he was appointed as Rod Marsh's successor as director of the ECB's academy. He quickly made a name for himself in the role, and it was not a surprise when he succeeded Duncan Fletcher as the England coach in April 2007 following, just as in 2014, an Ashes whitewash.


ESPNcricinfo staff

Career Averages

Batting & Fielding
FormatMatInnsNORunsHSAve100s50sCtSt
FC23134543735118524.3473150244
List A24519346260389*17.700822532
Bowling
FormatMatBallsRunsWktsBBIBBMAveEconSR4w5w10w
FC23118160---5.33-000
List A245000-----000

Debut/Last Matches - Player

FC Matches
Span
1983 - 1998
List A Matches
Span
1983 - 1998

Videos



Photos


Peter Moores has signed a two-year contract extension as Nottinghamshire head coach
Moeen Ali and Peter Moores talk during a rain delay
Drinking to success: Peter Moores enjoys Nottinghamshire's success alongside Andy Pick
Peter Moores with his son Tom ahead of a Nottinghamshire match
Peter Moores, named as Nottinghamshire head coach, takes the pre-match warm-up
Peter Moores helps the players warm up