An ace of pace and a duke of yorker feature in our list of ODI bowling nominees. Click here for our ODI batting shortlist

Jhye Richardson
4 for 26 v India
first ODI, Sydney
In the space of three balls, Richardson changed the face of this game, dismissing Virat Kohli and Ambati Rayudu to reduce India to 3 for 4. He then kept Rohit Sharma and MS Dhoni on a leash, finishing with 6-2-15-2 after his first two spells. When he returned later in the innings, he got Dinesh Karthik to chop one onto his stumps and then had Ravindra Jadeja caught at deep backward point. India fell 35 short of the 289-run target.

Yuzvendra Chahal
6 for 42 v Australia
third ODI, Melbourne
Chahal equalled the record for the best ODI figures by a bowler in Australia, and unlike Ajit Agarkar's effort in 2004, this one came in a big win for India. Playing his first game of the tour, Chahal took two wickets right away. Shaun Marsh was stumped off a wide and Usman Khawaja caught and bowled off a leading edge. Later, Marcus Stoinis and Jhye Richardson were done in by the turn, Peter Handscomb by some skid off the surface, and Adam Zampa by the length when he came charging down the track.

Trent Boult
5 for 21 v India
fourth ODI, Hamilton
This was an exhibition of terrific swing bowling in helpful conditions: Boult got it to move back past Shikhar Dhawan's inside edge and had him lbw. He dipped one in front of Rohit Sharma and it swung back in, eliciting a caught and bowled. Nineteen-year-old Shubman Gill pushed at one without moving his feet and also offered a return catch. Kedar Jadhav could do little against a ball that swung in and trapped him plumb. Boult got his fifth ODI five-for when Hardik Pandya fell to a short ball. India were all out for 92 and New Zealand won by eight wickets.

Oshane Thomas
4 for 27 v Pakistan
World Cup, Nottingham
West Indies bowled Pakistan out for 105 in their opening World Cup game, and leading that display of fine bowling was 22-year-old fast bowler Thomas. Babar Azam had just been dropped when Thomas came into the attack, and he made sure it wasn't a costly miss, getting Azam to nick an outside edge to the keeper. He then had Shadab Khan lbw with a good-length delivery, Mohammad Hafeez caught off a bouncer, and Wahab Riaz bowled. Pakistan lasted fewer than 22 overs.

Mitchell Starc
5 for 46 v West Indies
World Cup, Nottingham
Australia had clawed their way to 288, which didn't look threatening enough against the big-hitting West Indian line-up. That was until Starc got rid of Chris Gayle for 21, having had two reviews overturned against the batsman earlier. Starc then came to Australia's rescue again when Andre Russell and later Carlos Brathwaite threatened to take the game away. In the process of getting his sixth five-for, Starc also became the fastest bowler in ODI history to reach 150 wickets.

Lasith Malinga
4 for 43 v England
World Cup, Leeds
Shortly before retiring from ODI cricket, Malinga turned in this classic performance on a wicket that got progressively slower. Defending 232, he trapped Jonny Bairstow lbw for a duck with the second ball of the innings, a trademark dipping yorker on leg stump. He got James Vince to nick a faster delivery and Joe Root to chase after a ball drifting down leg. But it was Jos Buttler's dismissal that had the Malinga of old written all over it: a fast and flat yorker angled towards leg and trapping the batsman plumb. Many players contributed to Sri Lanka's 20-run win, but Malinga's star shone brightest.

Mitchell Starc
4 for 43 v England
World Cup, Lord's
All of Australia's bowlers were on point in this game, but Starc was masterful, with his speed, swing and late-swerving yorkers. A sharp inswinger accounted for Joe Root and a surprise bouncer for Eoin Morgan, but the delivery that is still seared in the mind is the 145kph yorker that whooshed under Ben Stokes' bat on the way to the stumps. Stokes reacted by dropping his bat and kicking it away in annoyance.

Shaheen Afridi
6 for 35 v Bangladesh
World Cup, Lord's
To stay in the World Cup, Pakistan, after making 315, had to dismiss Bangladesh for 8. That didn't happen, of course, but Afridi gave them a memorable 92-run win against a side that had beaten them in the last four encounters between the two. He accounted for Tamim Iqbal and Liton Das with slower balls, Mahmudullah and Mustafizur Rahman with yorkers, and ended Shakib Al Hasan's glorious World Cup run with an extra-fast delivery. In the process, he overtook the other Afridi to pick up the best figures by a Pakistan bowler at a World Cup.

Matt Henry
3 for 37 v India
World Cup semi-final, Manchester
In a rain-interrupted match played over two days, New Zealand's 239 looked modest in the face of India's batting might. But 19 balls into the chase, the game turned: India were 5 for 3 with Henry accounting for Rohit Sharma and KL Rahul with balls that moved just enough to meet the outside edge on the way to the keeper. In the tenth over, Henry made it 24 for 4 with Dinesh Karthik's dismissal. Later in the innings, he kept MS Dhoni and an otherwise rampaging Ravindra Jadeja in check by not conceding more than five in any over.

Chris Woakes
3 for 20 v England
World Cup semi-final, Birmingham
Three overs into the semi-final, any thoughts England's players might have had about their 64-run defeat to Australia earlier in the tournament had been banished, because Aaron Finch and David Warner were back in the pavilion. One ball after Warner hit Woakes for a four over his head, Woakes responded by squaring him up with a nasty bouncer caught at second slip. And when he got Peter Handscomb to inside-edge a fuller delivery onto his stumps in the seventh over, the score read 14 for 3. Woakes, along with Jofra Archer, had ensured Australia couldn't set up a massive total, and England's batsmen did the rest.

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