March 6, 2008

USA

Varadarajan poses a serious challenge

Martin Williamson

The USACA elections take place on March 29, and Gladtone Dainty and his incumbents face a tough battle against an organised group headed by Ram Varadarajan.

While Dainty has been so low key as to be invisible - much the same could be said of USACA under his leadership - Varadarajan, who was born in India and emigrated to the USA in 1982, has been on a media offensive as well as launching a slick website outlining his vision.

"The response to the announcement of our team and the ideas and energy we bring has been fantastic," Varadarajan said. "I am getting e-mails and calls from interested people all around the world telling me that US cricket needs new management and initiatives to take it to the next level. There is widespread support for our team and people are asking how they can help make change happen. We appreciate and are humbled by the outpouring of support.

"It pains me that USACA has not been able to bring corporate commitment to cricket, the world's second most popular sport. The last few years have seen a significant increase in the monies spent globally on cricket by corporate sponsors and commercial organisers. The new USACA will find a symbiotic way to match the support of corporate sponsors and professional cricket organizations with the grass roots development needs in America. My team and I are well suited for this task and are committed to its success."

John Aaron, who is standing for the post of USACA secretary, targets the readmission of the USA to the international fold as a priority. "For too long now our children and adult players have been unable to play and develop their cricket in the international arena due to the ICC's suspension of the current administration. It is critically important for our team to be elected. We have harnessed the energy and chemistry needed to affect change in US cricket. We will strive to allow our players the opportunity to represent their country against the best in the world, and also create opportunities for the flow of capital needed to develop the sport in the very large US market."

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Martin Williamson is executive editor of ESPNcricinfo and managing editor of ESPN Digital Media in Europe, the Middle East and Africa

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Posted by Gangster Rap on (March 6, 2008, 14:09 GMT)

Very well said, Mr. Varadarajan. It's about time we all look into this issue which is keeping our nation from taking part in world tournaments. I'm very disappointed to learn that our U-19 national team was unable to participate in ICC U-19 World Cup 2008 in Malaysia just because a few officials like Dainty were not able to govern the cricket body properly. We didn't even see an official "apology" or "letter of disappointment" on the USACA website as a courtesy to all American cricketers and followers. Dainty has been in USACA for years and he hasn't done anything in order to help USA cricket. I used to be an USA U-19 national/regional player, however, this current unorganized board filled with fools and politics compelled me to focus on everything else but cricket. Having said everything, I urge all the voters to please vote for a person (or team) who has a long-term vision in mind for the betterment of cricket in this country and its players.

I'm out! Peace!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Martin Williamson
Executive editor Martin Williamson joined the Wisden website in its planning stages in 2001 after failing to make his millions in the internet boom when managing editor of Sportal. Before that he was in charge of Sky Sports Online and helped launch and run Sky News Online. With a preference for all things old (except his wife and children), he has recently confounded colleagues by displaying an uncharacteristic fondness for Twenty20 cricket. His enthusiasm for the game is sadly not matched by his ability, but he remains convinced that he might be a late developer and perseveres in the hope of an England call-up with his middle-order batting and non-spinning offbreaks. He is now managing editor of ESPN EMEA Digital Group as well as his Cricinfo responsibilities.

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