Samir Chopra October 6, 2010

Mixed feelings: A fan's lament

So near and yet so far
43

So near and yet so far. What a crushing disappointment to flirt with a long-held dream, only to have it cruelly denied. I speak not of Australia's failure to win the Mohali test, nor of Ricky Ponting's inability to win a test in India as captain. I speak, rather of my failure to watch India win a test by one wicket. I've dreamed and dreamed of a day when I would be watching a finish like this go down to the wire (don't ask why I would want to condemn myself to such painful suspense), and last night, I was cruelly denied by a combination of factors. Yes, I know this is a self-indulgent post, but please, indulge me, for I have hopes that my story will resonate with some.

So, as Monday night drew close to midnight on the east coast of the US, I faced a crucial decision. In terms of fandom and the competing calls made on one's time, this was about as critical as it gets. Should I stay up late and watch the match through to the end, or should I just wait for the highlights? Tuesday is a bad day at work for me. My first class meets at 9:30 in the morning, and my third at 6:30 in the evening. The time in-between involves meetings and an hour-long subway commute from Brooklyn to Manhattan. The telecast was scheduled to begin precisely at midnight, and there was little chance I would be able to pull off my usual "rise-at-5AM-to-watch-the-post-tea session" trick for games played in India. The game would be over, one way or the other, by then.

But I'm not a spring chicken any more, and all-nighters don't come easily - not that they ever did. And the thought of teaching Buddhism on only two hours of sleep filled me with something akin to the unease the young Siddartha might have felt on first being confronted by the sight of infirmity. On the other hand, I did know of an office on campus that I could sneak into for a quick nap during the afternoon. Should I risk it? Stay up till 5, grab two hours of sleep, fuel up on a couple of Americanos and then after powering through the Four Noble Truths, and then Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion at 11, hit the couch for a power nap?

Yes, why not? Tendulkar was still there, Laxman would bat for sure, hope sprang eternal and all that. Perhaps an Indian test win would sustain body and soul through a sleepless day.

So, I bit the bullet, grabbed my laptop, and moved to the kitchen to try and find a bootleg video stream. And that's where my troubles began. For one little detail that I have left out thus far, one considerably complicating detail, was that my live cricket provider had inexplicably failed to secure the rights for this series, and had thus relegated me to feeding off the scraps of illicit video streams, pockmarked with commercials, and marred by poor video quality. I had dealt with these irritations with some equanimity in my early morning sessions, fuelled as I was by six hours of sleep, and some coffee.

But the midnight hours are very different; the body doesn't hold up so well late at night. To make things worse, the network gremlins decided to come to roost in my home. For the nerdy amongst us, my wireless router has persistent DNS problems. Thus, not only was I dealing with a low quality feed, I was dealing with one that was intermittent at best. For two hours, as India moved from 55-4 to 156-8 at lunch, I dealt with it as best as I could, reloading pages, restarting browsers, and restraining myself from slitting my wrists with a butter knife.

But at two in the morning, I gave up. I was tired, I was sleepy, I was worn out. I would not be able to make it through the lunch interval. And the thought of dealing with a full day's teaching on very little sleep, even if supplemented with a short nap, suddenly took on a terrifying hue. Reluctantly, like a boxer agreeing to let his seconds throw in the white towel, I put the machine to sleep and slunk away to bed. My dreams tormented me: I saw green-capped men hugging each other, roaring triumphantly at empty stands, and handing out quick handshakes to crestfallen men with blue caps.

In the morning, I awoke, staggered into the kitchen, and gingerly touched the space bar on the sleeping machine, dreading the result, whatever it was. If Australia had won, a test was a lost. If India had won, I had missed out on watching a close win.

As the result sprang into view, my disappointment that a golden opportunity had been lost, possibly never to be repeated, was tinged with sweet relief. A sportsman that has always commanded my admiration had come through yet again, and in the grander scheme of things, if I had to make a choice, I would always have picked the second option above. So, thank you, Test cricket, for reminding me all over again, why you are the supreme game, bar none.

Please could we have another game like this? But in a better time-zone for me?

Samir Chopra lives in Brooklyn and teaches Philosophy at the City University of New York. He tweets here

Comments have now been closed for this article

  • Happy on April 3, 2012, 6:49 GMT

    Cricket makes a clear distinction beeetwn a tie and a draw, which are two different possible results of a game.A tie is the identical result that occurs when each team has scored the same number of runs after their allotted innings. This is very rare in Test cricket and has happened only twice in its long history, but they are slightly more commonplace in limited-overs matches.A draw is the inconclusive result that occurs when the allotted playing time for the game expires without the teams having completed their innings. This is relatively common, occurring in 20-30% of Test matches. Limited-overs matches cannot be drawn, although they can end with a no result if abandoned because of weather or other factors.Hope you can understand this.

  • Anonymous on October 15, 2010, 8:46 GMT

    hahahahah nice one.

    I also had a tormenting dream of green jersy men celebrating and shaking hands with blues

    3 balls 1 run required to win, I turned te TV off and went to bed

    in the morning, news paper front page had pictures of sehwag celebrating

    match was tied and india won on bowlouts :)

  • Retaish on October 8, 2010, 17:41 GMT

    HI Samir, It gladdens my heart to know how people from around the world love my beloved cricket and take pains to see it,on the 5th day i had a guest from abroad,i had to meet him in hotel,when i left home 6 wickets had fallen down ,by the time i reached the hotel i checked on internetscore read 124 for 8 ,i was so disappointed. after talking to my friend for more than hour ,we had to go for lunch,i thought let me check on cricinfo by how many runs india have lost,to my glee ,headline was laxman haldf century keeps india in hunt and on the corner of the screen score read 198 for 8 ,i immediately told my guest to put on the tv and no way i was going to go for lunch at that time.it was nerve racking stuff after that,wen last two runs were scored ,i shouted in happiness,i became very emotional and told my guest its one of the best days in my life,and the guest, would you beleive was an AUSSIE,to his credit he was very sporting.lers hope buddy bangalore provides same kind of drama.

  • Raj Datta on October 8, 2010, 17:01 GMT

    This was a strange match for me. Every time I surfed over to Cricinfo, India lost a wicket or dropped a catch. I mean EVERY time. I must have caused at least 12 Indian wickets to fall :-P

    Including that of Sachin, on the 5th day at 2 am my time (or it seemed that late anyway)... I hurriedly closed that Firefox tab, and got some work done, browsed idly on every news site, careful not to read any cricket related news. I couldn't bring myself to go back till the match was safely over .. (I thought) .. only to see that Johnson had hurled one down leg. Only just .. if I had clicked on Cricinfo 45 seconds earlier, I have no doubt ol' Mitch would have pinned Ojha in his crease with an yorker on leg, and India would have tied with Australia a 2nd time.

  • Chandra on October 8, 2010, 16:13 GMT

    Almost lost my job watching my favorite batsman an fellow Hyderabadi...as i spent the night watching the match....BTW I am in US time.....but i am craving for a repeat of Mohali...QUALITY cricket, be it T20 / ODI / TEST is always great to watch but only TEST Cricket has the ability to produce quality cricket...again depends on what Quality Cricket means to you....

  • Rajiv Naik on October 8, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    For anyone who's read all the comments above, this is bound to feel repetitive, but considering that the Senior Counsel who was arguing for the other side in an arbitration kept everybody including the Arbitrator, a retired Supreme Court judge, waiting to watch the end, was worth the experience! I of course have renewed respect for him for i dutifully followed him outside the room to watch it on a tv screen in the dining area of the gymkhana we were at! When Ojha scored those winning runs it was all i could do to keep from jumping around in joy! What a match and what a man, VVS.

  • Aditya on October 8, 2010, 15:19 GMT

    Gr8 to see that there are so mant lovers of true cricket and that too across the globe.

  • ravi kumar on October 8, 2010, 9:35 GMT

    Samir, you wanted this story to resonate with some and see how many you found... and let me tell u there are lot more of them who have read this and felt resonated but just didn't find enough time to type it in so many words...but it's amazing what a match like this does to cricket lovers all over the world...I saw quite a few youngsters (the T20 brigade) who loved this match as much as I loved it..what a great advertisement for test cricket...and Samir love your articles ...keep them coming... Cheers Ravi Kumar

  • Kunal Talgeri on October 8, 2010, 6:15 GMT

    Hey Samir, a nice and nerdy perspective. :-) Just to re-live one of the wonderful finishing moments for you, I live in Bangalore, and got a call to rush to a TV-screen when 6 runs were needed with 1 wicket in hand. The tension was heightening, and everybody was prone to errors: Laxman's runner, non-striker Ojha, the umpires, commentators--and even the Aussies! When Ojha erred in taking a single, Laxman scolded him in such an animated manner that everybody in our TV room (in office) was in splits. It relieved the tension somewhat, and we watched VVS complete another lovely memory against the Aussies. As long as he plays Test cricket, I am sure we can continue to have more Mohalis. :-) After all, the Indian team has held their nerve against the Aussies since his Sydney innings of 2000. Whatta player!

  • Bapi Raju Nanduri on October 7, 2010, 21:02 GMT

    Hi Samir, Had a feeling that it was gonna be a close finish by the end 4th day but I shud say that being in India has not helped either.. The reason the power outage that happened across some parts of India had to happen exactly when the match was happening... And as any cricket lover I had to use my cellphone to log into cricinfo and keep refreshing the scorecard evry 30 seconds or so to know wat happened and jus as the match was reaching a thrilling climax the inevitable happened, the server crashed and I was left looking at a score which read India 205/9 still requires 11 runs for victory.. Ishant got out and I didn't know how.. Tried refreshing it but still the same score, got nervous and tensed, called up friends frantically in the end only to c the current come back on after another 30 mins and Ravi Shastri giving away the MOM the award to Zak... I'd like to appeal to the teams to give us another Test match which goes like this and I promise this time I'll watch it at a Pub..;)

  • Happy on April 3, 2012, 6:49 GMT

    Cricket makes a clear distinction beeetwn a tie and a draw, which are two different possible results of a game.A tie is the identical result that occurs when each team has scored the same number of runs after their allotted innings. This is very rare in Test cricket and has happened only twice in its long history, but they are slightly more commonplace in limited-overs matches.A draw is the inconclusive result that occurs when the allotted playing time for the game expires without the teams having completed their innings. This is relatively common, occurring in 20-30% of Test matches. Limited-overs matches cannot be drawn, although they can end with a no result if abandoned because of weather or other factors.Hope you can understand this.

  • Anonymous on October 15, 2010, 8:46 GMT

    hahahahah nice one.

    I also had a tormenting dream of green jersy men celebrating and shaking hands with blues

    3 balls 1 run required to win, I turned te TV off and went to bed

    in the morning, news paper front page had pictures of sehwag celebrating

    match was tied and india won on bowlouts :)

  • Retaish on October 8, 2010, 17:41 GMT

    HI Samir, It gladdens my heart to know how people from around the world love my beloved cricket and take pains to see it,on the 5th day i had a guest from abroad,i had to meet him in hotel,when i left home 6 wickets had fallen down ,by the time i reached the hotel i checked on internetscore read 124 for 8 ,i was so disappointed. after talking to my friend for more than hour ,we had to go for lunch,i thought let me check on cricinfo by how many runs india have lost,to my glee ,headline was laxman haldf century keeps india in hunt and on the corner of the screen score read 198 for 8 ,i immediately told my guest to put on the tv and no way i was going to go for lunch at that time.it was nerve racking stuff after that,wen last two runs were scored ,i shouted in happiness,i became very emotional and told my guest its one of the best days in my life,and the guest, would you beleive was an AUSSIE,to his credit he was very sporting.lers hope buddy bangalore provides same kind of drama.

  • Raj Datta on October 8, 2010, 17:01 GMT

    This was a strange match for me. Every time I surfed over to Cricinfo, India lost a wicket or dropped a catch. I mean EVERY time. I must have caused at least 12 Indian wickets to fall :-P

    Including that of Sachin, on the 5th day at 2 am my time (or it seemed that late anyway)... I hurriedly closed that Firefox tab, and got some work done, browsed idly on every news site, careful not to read any cricket related news. I couldn't bring myself to go back till the match was safely over .. (I thought) .. only to see that Johnson had hurled one down leg. Only just .. if I had clicked on Cricinfo 45 seconds earlier, I have no doubt ol' Mitch would have pinned Ojha in his crease with an yorker on leg, and India would have tied with Australia a 2nd time.

  • Chandra on October 8, 2010, 16:13 GMT

    Almost lost my job watching my favorite batsman an fellow Hyderabadi...as i spent the night watching the match....BTW I am in US time.....but i am craving for a repeat of Mohali...QUALITY cricket, be it T20 / ODI / TEST is always great to watch but only TEST Cricket has the ability to produce quality cricket...again depends on what Quality Cricket means to you....

  • Rajiv Naik on October 8, 2010, 16:12 GMT

    For anyone who's read all the comments above, this is bound to feel repetitive, but considering that the Senior Counsel who was arguing for the other side in an arbitration kept everybody including the Arbitrator, a retired Supreme Court judge, waiting to watch the end, was worth the experience! I of course have renewed respect for him for i dutifully followed him outside the room to watch it on a tv screen in the dining area of the gymkhana we were at! When Ojha scored those winning runs it was all i could do to keep from jumping around in joy! What a match and what a man, VVS.

  • Aditya on October 8, 2010, 15:19 GMT

    Gr8 to see that there are so mant lovers of true cricket and that too across the globe.

  • ravi kumar on October 8, 2010, 9:35 GMT

    Samir, you wanted this story to resonate with some and see how many you found... and let me tell u there are lot more of them who have read this and felt resonated but just didn't find enough time to type it in so many words...but it's amazing what a match like this does to cricket lovers all over the world...I saw quite a few youngsters (the T20 brigade) who loved this match as much as I loved it..what a great advertisement for test cricket...and Samir love your articles ...keep them coming... Cheers Ravi Kumar

  • Kunal Talgeri on October 8, 2010, 6:15 GMT

    Hey Samir, a nice and nerdy perspective. :-) Just to re-live one of the wonderful finishing moments for you, I live in Bangalore, and got a call to rush to a TV-screen when 6 runs were needed with 1 wicket in hand. The tension was heightening, and everybody was prone to errors: Laxman's runner, non-striker Ojha, the umpires, commentators--and even the Aussies! When Ojha erred in taking a single, Laxman scolded him in such an animated manner that everybody in our TV room (in office) was in splits. It relieved the tension somewhat, and we watched VVS complete another lovely memory against the Aussies. As long as he plays Test cricket, I am sure we can continue to have more Mohalis. :-) After all, the Indian team has held their nerve against the Aussies since his Sydney innings of 2000. Whatta player!

  • Bapi Raju Nanduri on October 7, 2010, 21:02 GMT

    Hi Samir, Had a feeling that it was gonna be a close finish by the end 4th day but I shud say that being in India has not helped either.. The reason the power outage that happened across some parts of India had to happen exactly when the match was happening... And as any cricket lover I had to use my cellphone to log into cricinfo and keep refreshing the scorecard evry 30 seconds or so to know wat happened and jus as the match was reaching a thrilling climax the inevitable happened, the server crashed and I was left looking at a score which read India 205/9 still requires 11 runs for victory.. Ishant got out and I didn't know how.. Tried refreshing it but still the same score, got nervous and tensed, called up friends frantically in the end only to c the current come back on after another 30 mins and Ravi Shastri giving away the MOM the award to Zak... I'd like to appeal to the teams to give us another Test match which goes like this and I promise this time I'll watch it at a Pub..;)

  • Nityanand Naik on October 7, 2010, 18:57 GMT

    I had not gone to office that day just to make sure that i do not miss the 5th day's play.When the 8th wkt fell, i switched off the TV thinking that if i stop watching the TV, india would recover. And that is exactly what it happened. I was reading the commentary in cricinfo.But i was crestfallen when ishant finally got out.I got disappointed and frustrated and decided to switch on the TV since i knew that the match was lost already.But since ojha survived the very first ball, i thought some miracle would happen.For every delivery from there on, i heard only the commentary from the TV and didnt watch it. I watched it only when india had finally won the match. I seriously do not recommend such matches for weak-hearted people. I almost got a heart attack during the last 10 minutes :)

  • Saurabh on October 7, 2010, 18:40 GMT

    Well written article. Sums up the dilemma very nicely.

    I had to make a similar choice but stayed up and did I feel elated at the result or what? Definitely one of the best Test wins by India in recent times. And we have been fortunate to have the opportunity to savor and choose from a fairly long list in the past few years.

  • Abhishek on October 7, 2010, 16:00 GMT

    you talked abt. time zones....... being in India only I missed the most interesting part of the test match..... can you believe it!!! all the "credit" goes to my friends who convinced me that its Aussies who are going to do the celebrations..... But I would like to say that it was one of the greatest fight backs and also that Indian cricketers are great..... I think many of the fans would have taken it for granted that India is going to lose this test and would have switched off the TV, but India is India. you can never tell when they would bounce back on you.... be it be any form of cricket.... the test, the ODIs or the T-20's..... team India rocks....

  • abhishek rajan on October 7, 2010, 14:01 GMT

    well... its gud 2 see..so many people across the world...defying the time zones...taking out their time 4m bsy schedule...4 one of the most enthralling match of cricket..i shud mention..test cricket..particularly..coz dis match realy establishes its supremacy over othr formats.Many of u missed the match...i realy feel sory 4 dat...i also managed somehw 2 watch the match...n caught last moments of the game..wich was high on adrenaline.meanwhile dnt regret..celebrate the match..hop we wud watch mor test matches lyk dat in near future....!!!!!!

  • Mohammad Asad on October 7, 2010, 13:57 GMT

    Mohammad Asad from USA....

    Nice article !!! appreciate your emotion ....... What a match !!! Wow ....That's why cricket is so lucrative .... I do not have words to express ... This is the best test I have ever seen !!! O my God !!!!!! By the way, I am Bangladeshi and a cricket lover ...

  • Ska on October 7, 2010, 13:56 GMT

    My story - Woke up in London abt 30mins b4 lunch. Quickly loaded the cricinfo page on my iphone and quite frankly was shocked & sunk to see 8 wickets down. I lay in bed watching the score until just a few mins to lunch; then nervously got out of bed and carried my phone into the restroom. It was still lunch when I got out & was careful to keep it hidden from the Mrs. Had breakfast, quickly slipped out of the house to the station, hopped on to the train for my 8 minute travel and walked to my office - all this with my mind and both the eyes completely focussed on the live updates from cricinfo. Mindful of losing the network if I used the elevator, took the stairs but still lost the page at 200/8 (read every ball's commentary until then). Finally got to the desk but cricinfo wouldn't load even on my laptop. By this time I was quietly confident of an Indian victory and opened TOI only to find Ishant out. My heart sank. I never thought I'd say this but Rediff was the savior. What a rush!

  • Sudheer on October 7, 2010, 13:21 GMT

    Thas was emotional..and these kinda matches bring the emotions out of any cricket lover for sure..My badluck that i had to go to office and depend on cricinfo..I was able to look at the scores till 50 to get ..after that I stopped watching because of the tension and pressure and went for lunch..but their people started telling the scores and got to know Ishant was out..that's it..I started talking to anyone only when my friend messaged me that we won..That feeling was awesome..

  • Mandeep Singh on October 7, 2010, 10:46 GMT

    similar situation- i work in Vietnam and was in m factory then, cricinfo dissapeared and i was on call with my India office trying to know the scores!, once India won, i shouted yeahh....and made such a loud noise that all people were starting at me , no clue about what i was so happy about at 3 PM in all the office pressure!! but really nice to enjoy this win and hope for repeat games probably on a day when i watch it and milk it to perfection!!

  • Sujee Selva on October 7, 2010, 7:59 GMT

    Ah Samir.. I understand.. I am in Thailand and no coverage what so ever, and Thai Govt too blocks all the illegal streams.. :( so sad that I missed the match but so GLAD that India won it.. I too want a rematch..

  • rajeev kulkarni on October 7, 2010, 3:57 GMT

    Hmmmm. I, too, missed the last winning moments. Damn it. Not only did my live streaming stop working, cricinfo and other online score sites also refused to help. Very very frustrating. I completely understand your wanting to have a rematch sometime again in a better timezone. I had watched everything but the last few seconds of the game.

  • VivaVizag on October 7, 2010, 3:20 GMT

    Samir,

    I woke up to a similar dream at 4 AM EST and gingerly refreshed Cricinfo.com, had to rub my eyes twice to realize that miracles do happen with Team India!

    And kids, here is my formula for mooching reliable live cricket streaming: try www.AllCric.com with Firefox as the browser (IE sucks and not at all recommended).

  • Sivaram on October 7, 2010, 3:13 GMT

    Great piece! This test revoked memories of the historic 2001 series involving the same opponents and some of the main cast. We watched the finish together as students, first when Ganguly switched ends for Harbhajan in Kolkata and he soon trapped McGrath lbw to even the series. And then Sameer Dighe and Harbhajan scoring the winning runs in Chennai to win the series. Great moments that will forever be in the memory (and now on Youtube) - they can create everlasting fans.

  • Anonymous on October 7, 2010, 0:33 GMT

    Your DNS problems are likely caused by your service provider.

    Switch to OpenDNS or Google's DNS servers, and your problems may go away. Even if they don't go away completely, your browsing should get a lot faster...

  • Lokesh on October 7, 2010, 0:25 GMT

    I didnt watch the live stream till the end but i really dont regret it as i feel i contributed to the win as well :). I am on central time in Mexico and watched it live till bhajji got out. After that i stopped the stream and followed cricinfo. Till lunch time(1am here) Ishant-VVS had added 38 runs together so i thought i would continue after lunch as well. We all tend to become superstitious in such situations, so was I, i made sure nothing changed while they played. i just didnt turned on the stream entire time, followed the score on cricinfo, continued listening to Kishore Kumar playlist(which i started when ishant came in), continued to keep laptop on charging even when it was 100% charged and MORE THAN ANYTHING controlled my loo for 1.5 hrs :). When it came down to 6 runs i felt i shud turn on the live stream but again controlled my emotions.

    Kudos to VVS and Ishant I feel proud for my contributions becos of their efforts. GREAT game of cricket.

  • Sandip on October 7, 2010, 0:22 GMT

    Folks, I got all the action seamlessly off a website called TVN Sports for a really small fee ($10 for the whole series including ODIs). I think my investment more than paid off just with the first test. Totally recommend this service before the second test, especially if it is half as exciting as this one.

  • Benny on October 6, 2010, 22:43 GMT

    Haha...i live on the east coast too, and i had to stay up late anyway, with the reason of studying for USMLE....but there was no way i was gonna give the match a miss...when bhajji got out, i told myself, that if another wicket fell, i was gonna get back to studying...i was watching the match, alternating between two illicit streams, and listening to commentary on test match sofa...and the last few minutes of the match forced me to sit in one spot, without moving! ultimately, i had to stay awake till about 4am, but i am glad that i was able to see it through to the conclusion..and trust me, the win makes it rewarding!!

  • Anonymous on October 6, 2010, 22:32 GMT

    Hi Samir,

    I stay in the West Coast (LA), and was highly priviledged to watch this match. It was around 11:00 PM, when the team left for Lunch. I was reluctant to let lose my sleep as I had a early morning call. I was up until 11:30 and ready to go to bed, but the craze we have for Cricket, does not mind watching Cricket rather than a early morning call.

    I did not move my place (superstition) when the target came below 50, and could not control my excitement when the final run was scored, i was jumping like a jack. I woke up till 2:00 AM till the presentation got over and the match was worth the sleep that I lost.

  • Sharatchandra Bhargav on October 6, 2010, 19:04 GMT

    Hi Samir,

    Excellently written piece. I am in Arizona, and Cricinfo basically gave up when there were 6 runs to win. I kept going to google, trying to see if I could get the latest update and ultimately it was google that told me of the result. So all the savoring of all the related articles in cricinfo had to happen in the morning.

    Anyway, I am glad I stayed up till 2 a.m or whatever, though it still made for a very bad work day. In future, if it is a game against Australia and it is on the line and VVS is playing or yet to come, I think we should make a rule to watch it come hell or high weather. :)

  • Anurag on October 6, 2010, 18:57 GMT

    Hi Sameer,

    I was in the same situation as you were. Next day I had a morning class at 9:30 (as a student). Initially I planned that if India had lost less than 2 wickets till lunch, I'll watch the full match. As the match unfolds in the 1st hour of lunch session, I was about to go to bed at 1 am (India lost 4 wickets). Then somehow I planned to watch till lunch (till 2am). But I saw a ray of hope in VVS.

    Then I decided to watch the full match....AND BOY !! what a decision that was....watched till 4:30 am alone....and for next 30 mins called friends in India to get their reactions and went to bed at 5am.

  • Test_is_best on October 6, 2010, 18:44 GMT

    Hey Samir, I live in east coast too. I don't watch match that late and rely on watching highlights. I felt like watching match on 5th day as It was interestingly poised but when I started watching it, Tendulkar just got out. My gf told me that match was over but i had some gut feeling that Laxman was gonna win this match for us. Soon Dhoni departed and then Harbhajan. Now, I had to almost argued with my GF to watch this match as acc. to her we were already lost. I watched some balls which Ishant faced and I knew that he was not gonna lost his wicket just like that. I told to my GF that VVS was gonna make 75 and Ishant 35(I just had gut feeling). She mocked me and then went to sleep. I kept on watching and with each delivery, my confidence went up. Actually, I am always nervous watching close matches but somehow I had no nervousness this time, as I believed so much on VVS. I saw sthng I'll never forget. My predictions was also very close. Now, I believe sthng call sixth sense.

  • CricKandy on October 6, 2010, 18:30 GMT

    Dude. You chickened out :) You did not deserve it because you did not invest much into it. You will enjoy the wins immensely if you sit through all the losses and watch each game till the last ball. Esp the ones where India loses very badly.

  • Nitin Sonkusale on October 6, 2010, 18:08 GMT

    We watched the end moments of the match in our computer lab waiting for an interview and nail biting moments buffering in the video stream. Was a nice ending to the match :)

  • Patrick Clarke on October 6, 2010, 16:57 GMT

    I had to have a shower and get ready for work when India needed about 20 to win but within minutes was drawn back to the TV when Sharma was out and stood there naked with water dripping everywhere and watched the innings to its conclusion. Fortunately, no one else was in to see me!

  • Saphalya on October 6, 2010, 15:14 GMT

    To every non cricket fan, watch this match, it will surely get a Golden Lion in the ad festivals of Cannes. O my God what a match !!! I was in office and following it through Cricinfo, cricbuzz and regular calls to dad.

  • Pras on October 6, 2010, 13:55 GMT

    Samir,

    Excellent article, I live in the east coast too and an avid test cricket fan like you. I did watch the nailbiting finish through the illicit video streams , what a game,what memories!!

  • Arun on October 6, 2010, 11:36 GMT

    Samir, I cannot just stop feeling the same. Living in the land of the pharoh where this sport is not known and therefore does not receive any followership except the few people from the sub-conti who live here...I do not know how I can make up for what I lost and for what I will be losing in future... Surely I must find a way out and ensure that I now follow the game more closely and get into the thick of action. All that I follow is cricinfo and the blogs good samaritans like you put up for lesser mortals like me to enjoy. Am sure it would have been like going through hell as one of the respondents mentioned... but in the end guess it is all worth it.

  • Anshuman Prakash on October 6, 2010, 11:22 GMT

    Hi Samir, I face a similar situation being at east coast. Though i have resigned now. Also BCCI making cricket viewing so Difficult and costly in US. I have Willow TV but no Indian cricket could be seen. Atleast I wld have recorded and watched it in the morning.

  • abhinav anil on October 6, 2010, 9:56 GMT

    sameer i can truly relate to ur sentiments,at least those that match with mine of being a die hard cricket fan.i have had to face similar constraints in my quest for uninterrupted viewing pleasure of my favourite sport,& have alsways found out a way ot two to overcome dem.dis article just refreshes old memories,n d inner spirit of a true blue indian cricket fan comes to mind.

  • Nagu on October 6, 2010, 8:44 GMT

    Mate! your blog reflects my feelings. I live in the other part of the world (Shanghai). It was national day week in china and i had five days off till yesterday. I was all set with my FTTH connection (it ranges upto 20Mbps). All was well in the morning session and i could see Sachin and even Laxman playing and i was was sitting with the fingers crossed after having lunch. My wife went for short nap and there was no disturbance at all. I saw was Laxman's cover drive off Hauritz. For a moment,it seemed like a perfect afternoon for a thrilling finale but that was the last ball i saw. The concept of perfect afternoon vanished and proved "Perfection can be found only in dictionaries and not in life". My 20 Mbps connection started crawling at 2 kbps. The streaming website was blocked time ang again after constant intervals (Internet policies in China). Even Cricinfo, Cricbuzz died in the last moments. I missed it despite having everything. I too want a rematch

  • venkat on October 6, 2010, 8:27 GMT

    Be thankful that you did not watch it. I switched the tv off for a little and then switched it on again. It was horrible. The entire routine started.The supersitions in between balls, the prayers, the chanting, all the irrationality that I so proudly dismiss during better times. But these were desperate times and required desperate measures.I would love to watch a neutral test match that goes this close, but god (if you exist) please, dont put me through this again.

  • Longmemory on October 6, 2010, 8:04 GMT

    Some of us in better time-zones had a different predicament. As India inched closer to the target, the tension had become so unbearable that it took everything to keep tabs via Cricinfo or Rediff.com (to whom I switched once the former crashed with about ten runs to go). Each time the page refreshed my heart was in my mouth and when Ishant fell, my hopes came crashing down as well. I was doing the equivalent of a little kid at a scary movie peeping at the screen through his fingers - unable to watch but equally unable keep his eyes off the screen either. None of the usual pieties - "its just a game yaar," "it doesn't matter now - both sides played great," "win or lose, cricket's the winner," - brought any relief at all. And when it ended, the relief was unbelievable. This test match reminded all of us why we love this game and why we can never stop caring about it.

  • Rohan Bhalerao on October 6, 2010, 7:58 GMT

    "My dreams tormented me: I saw green-capped men hugging each other, roaring triumphantly at empty stands, and handing out quick handshakes to crestfallen men with blue caps." This line was supremely hilarious. But at the same time, it's the reality of every true cricket fan's nightmares! Even i couldn't sleep prior to 5th day's play given the excitement ahead! Somehow in my dreams, i had a premonition that this was gonna be close on the 5th day. Anyways, it's a pleasure reading your articles always! Keep writing...

  • jay on October 6, 2010, 7:14 GMT

    gr8 piece. very emotional

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  • jay on October 6, 2010, 7:14 GMT

    gr8 piece. very emotional

  • Rohan Bhalerao on October 6, 2010, 7:58 GMT

    "My dreams tormented me: I saw green-capped men hugging each other, roaring triumphantly at empty stands, and handing out quick handshakes to crestfallen men with blue caps." This line was supremely hilarious. But at the same time, it's the reality of every true cricket fan's nightmares! Even i couldn't sleep prior to 5th day's play given the excitement ahead! Somehow in my dreams, i had a premonition that this was gonna be close on the 5th day. Anyways, it's a pleasure reading your articles always! Keep writing...

  • Longmemory on October 6, 2010, 8:04 GMT

    Some of us in better time-zones had a different predicament. As India inched closer to the target, the tension had become so unbearable that it took everything to keep tabs via Cricinfo or Rediff.com (to whom I switched once the former crashed with about ten runs to go). Each time the page refreshed my heart was in my mouth and when Ishant fell, my hopes came crashing down as well. I was doing the equivalent of a little kid at a scary movie peeping at the screen through his fingers - unable to watch but equally unable keep his eyes off the screen either. None of the usual pieties - "its just a game yaar," "it doesn't matter now - both sides played great," "win or lose, cricket's the winner," - brought any relief at all. And when it ended, the relief was unbelievable. This test match reminded all of us why we love this game and why we can never stop caring about it.

  • venkat on October 6, 2010, 8:27 GMT

    Be thankful that you did not watch it. I switched the tv off for a little and then switched it on again. It was horrible. The entire routine started.The supersitions in between balls, the prayers, the chanting, all the irrationality that I so proudly dismiss during better times. But these were desperate times and required desperate measures.I would love to watch a neutral test match that goes this close, but god (if you exist) please, dont put me through this again.

  • Nagu on October 6, 2010, 8:44 GMT

    Mate! your blog reflects my feelings. I live in the other part of the world (Shanghai). It was national day week in china and i had five days off till yesterday. I was all set with my FTTH connection (it ranges upto 20Mbps). All was well in the morning session and i could see Sachin and even Laxman playing and i was was sitting with the fingers crossed after having lunch. My wife went for short nap and there was no disturbance at all. I saw was Laxman's cover drive off Hauritz. For a moment,it seemed like a perfect afternoon for a thrilling finale but that was the last ball i saw. The concept of perfect afternoon vanished and proved "Perfection can be found only in dictionaries and not in life". My 20 Mbps connection started crawling at 2 kbps. The streaming website was blocked time ang again after constant intervals (Internet policies in China). Even Cricinfo, Cricbuzz died in the last moments. I missed it despite having everything. I too want a rematch

  • abhinav anil on October 6, 2010, 9:56 GMT

    sameer i can truly relate to ur sentiments,at least those that match with mine of being a die hard cricket fan.i have had to face similar constraints in my quest for uninterrupted viewing pleasure of my favourite sport,& have alsways found out a way ot two to overcome dem.dis article just refreshes old memories,n d inner spirit of a true blue indian cricket fan comes to mind.

  • Anshuman Prakash on October 6, 2010, 11:22 GMT

    Hi Samir, I face a similar situation being at east coast. Though i have resigned now. Also BCCI making cricket viewing so Difficult and costly in US. I have Willow TV but no Indian cricket could be seen. Atleast I wld have recorded and watched it in the morning.

  • Arun on October 6, 2010, 11:36 GMT

    Samir, I cannot just stop feeling the same. Living in the land of the pharoh where this sport is not known and therefore does not receive any followership except the few people from the sub-conti who live here...I do not know how I can make up for what I lost and for what I will be losing in future... Surely I must find a way out and ensure that I now follow the game more closely and get into the thick of action. All that I follow is cricinfo and the blogs good samaritans like you put up for lesser mortals like me to enjoy. Am sure it would have been like going through hell as one of the respondents mentioned... but in the end guess it is all worth it.

  • Pras on October 6, 2010, 13:55 GMT

    Samir,

    Excellent article, I live in the east coast too and an avid test cricket fan like you. I did watch the nailbiting finish through the illicit video streams , what a game,what memories!!

  • Saphalya on October 6, 2010, 15:14 GMT

    To every non cricket fan, watch this match, it will surely get a Golden Lion in the ad festivals of Cannes. O my God what a match !!! I was in office and following it through Cricinfo, cricbuzz and regular calls to dad.